"history" blog posts

Humanising Historians: Deana HeathDeana holding a book on Colonial Terror

Humanising Historians: Deana Heath

In this month's Humanising Historians blog, we journey back and forth across the Atlantic, landing in Liverpool where Professor Deana Heath discusses what led to her decision to focus on Indian and Colonial History. Along the way we encounter old sci-fi movies, cakes and outrageous hats.

Posted on: 13 February 2024

The First Noël Coin of Constantine from Sirmium

The First Noël

Dr. Robin Whelan who teaches on HIST260: Are You Not Entertained? Games and Festivals in the Christian Roman Empire, discusses the mysteries surrounding the origin of Christmas in this blog post.

Posted on: 4 December 2023

Humanising Historians: Stephen KennyStephen Kenny and MA International Slavery Students – Kwame Amoah-Boateng, Taylar Charles, Emma-Leigh McCabe and Aisha Taylor Duran met with Professor Stephen Berry (Gregory Professor of the Civil War Era, Department of History, University of Georgia)standing in a line smiling and facing the camera

Humanising Historians: Stephen Kenny

In this month's Humanising Historians blog, Stephen Kenny discusses his academic life, including his remarkable journey from the United States to Liverpool. Stephen also discusses his personal history, passion for history and social justice, literary interests, and even some of his favourite hobbies.

Posted on: 9 October 2023

What to Read, Watch and Listen to This Black History Month!A collage of two book covers and a screenshot of an audiobook

What to Read, Watch and Listen to This Black History Month!

The theme of this year’s Black History Month is ‘Saluting Our Sisters,’ the celebration and showcase of Black women. I’m going to share how to celebrate Black history this October – by reading, watching and listening!

Posted on: 3 October 2023

Humanising Historians: Jessica White Jessica White with her bike posing next to a lake

Humanising Historians: Jessica White

In this month's Humanising Historians blog, Jessica White discusses how her love for History grew, alongside her passions for all things cycling, travelling and which reality TV show she is really enjoying at the moment!

Posted on: 10 September 2023

Environmental Humanities in Central Asia: Book launch A man stands in the middle of a field in Central Asia

Environmental Humanities in Central Asia: Book launch

'Environmental Humanities in Central Asia' brings together essays in environmental history, sociology, comparative literature, geography, and anthropology, to illustrate how humans have related to other organisms and landscape features in four broadly defined ways. Dr Beatrice Penati discusses the book more in this blog!

Posted on: 6 September 2023

Congratulations to the Classes of 2020, 2021 and 2022!History staff and PhD students at summer graduation 2022

Congratulations to the Classes of 2020, 2021 and 2022!

This summer we draw the final curtain on what has been the most turbulent and demanding period in the life of university departments up and down the country. In History at Liverpool, not only have we seen our wonderfully resilient class of 2022 graduate in person in the sumptuous surroundings of Hope Street’s Philharmonic Hall, but we have also welcomed back to campus – at long last! – well over 300 students from the classes of 2020 and 2021. These students were denied their own in-person graduation ceremonies due to lockdown restrictions, and it was a tremendous privilege – and not a little emotional – to see them again in person.

Posted on: 1 August 2022

REF 2021: Making a Difference - The Impact of our ResearchIllustration of a dog

REF 2021: Making a Difference - The Impact of our Research

The History Department takes great pride in the work we do to ensure that our research has a real relevance and impact outside of academia. 100% of our research was classified as 4* and 3* for impact in REF2021 and this impact score is testament to our commitment to publicly-engaged research.

Posted on: 28 June 2022

REF 2021: History Publications

REF 2021: History Publications

It’s been a busy few years for publications for Liverpool Historians. We submitted 81 outputs to the REF, ranging from single authored monographs and articles to co-edited collections and scholarly editions of translated works. Our REF outputs represent only a fraction of the diverse work that we publish for a wide range of audiences.

Posted on: 23 June 2022

REF 2021: History’s Research Environment

REF 2021: History’s Research Environment

We had a 24% increase in 4* research across our outputs, impact, and environment since the last REF. Over the coming month we’ll be celebrating our achievements during the 2013-2020 REF Cycle and talking about what’s next for History at Liverpool in a series of blog posts. This post talks about our research environment and funding successes.

Posted on: 19 May 2022

Decolonising Bluecoat: A Collaborative Project the Bluecoat building in Liverpool

Decolonising Bluecoat: A Collaborative Project

PhD researcher Michelle Girvan tells us about her work with the Bluecoat, Liverpool's oldest inner-city building, to investigate the building's complex connections with global trade, slavery and empire.

Posted on: 16 March 2022

Mapping Fascism Across EuropeA group of members of the SF in Gipuzkoa rendering the Roman salute

Mapping Fascism Across Europe

Image credit: Pascual Marín, A group of members of the SF in Gipuzkoa rendering the Roman salute (1937). Kutxa Fototeka, Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Posted on: 9 March 2022

Semester 1 Summaries: Bethan Asher Crosby beach banner image

Semester 1 Summaries: Bethan Asher

The first semester of my second year studying history at Liverpool has been a blast. Having lived in student accommodation at the on-campus Crown Place Halls of Residence last year, I was worried that living slightly further out of the city would be difficult. Quite the opposite- living in a house with five of my friends has been so much fun. Living in halls last year was exciting and a great way to make new friends with people doing a broad range of courses and all from different places. The university made such an effort to make halls feel like home with weekly activities to do with flatmates and events in the social areas. There are so many options here in terms of accommodation and the best thing is that most of them are pretty good value!

Posted on: 16 December 2021

Professor Charles Forsdick reflects on the importance of decolonising the curriculumDecolonising the Curriculum.

Professor Charles Forsdick reflects on the importance of decolonising the curriculum

As part of BHM Professor Charles Forsdick reflects on the importance of decolonising the curriculum within the University of Liverpool’s relaunched MA in International Slavery.

Posted on: 22 October 2021

‘Bath 250: A Virtual Conference to Mark the 250th Anniversary of the New Assembly Rooms At Bath’

‘Bath 250: A Virtual Conference to Mark the 250th Anniversary of the New Assembly Rooms At Bath’

On 30th September 1771, the Upper Rooms in Bath opened their doors for the first time. Two hundred and fifty years later, the Bath 250 conference welcomed scholars from across the globe to celebrate this momentous occasion.

Posted on: 13 October 2021

‘News you’re not supposed to know’: Uncovering the birth of Liverpool Free Press 1971-77Image of newspaper clippings.

‘News you’re not supposed to know’: Uncovering the birth of Liverpool Free Press 1971-77

This little newspaper, run on a shoestring and staffed by part-timers in a tiny office, was responsible for investigating and breaking the news of a huge corruption scandal that ended with three prison terms for local councillors and business leaders.

Posted on: 10 May 2021

Bridgerton's Regency style - what was fashion really like in the early 19th century?19th century dress

Bridgerton's Regency style - what was fashion really like in the early 19th century?

Were you dazzled by Daphne Bridgerton's debutante dress in 'Bridgerton'? With its wardrobe of high waistlines and puffed sleeves, this hit show has made Regency fashion - and the idea of #regencycore - a key trend in 2021. We spoke to museum curator, Pauline Rushton, to find out what fashion was really like in the early 19th century.

Posted on: 29 April 2021

World Heritage Day: a student's viewLiverpool Museum and Library taken on a sunny day

World Heritage Day: a student's view

For World Heritage Day 2021, we spoke to History student Hannah Schofield-Lea, currently completing a placement at the World Museum, Liverpool.

Posted on: 19 April 2021

Four historic places to visit now in LiverpoolGreenbank Park

Four historic places to visit now in Liverpool

After feeling like we have been stuck inside for an eternity, students across Liverpool can slowly start to enjoy the beautiful locations in this historic city. Whilst Liverpool’s museums and indoor facilities are closed, take advantage of the sun and being allowed outdoors and explore some historic sites.

Posted on: 12 April 2021

Remembering the working class SuffragettesSuffragette protest 1910

Remembering the working class Suffragettes

Holding my £5 note with Winston Churchill’s face on it to buy my period supplies, would normally bring me anger, as this country still glorifies a man who worked against women having the right to vote.

Posted on: 15 March 2021

From Uzbekistan, with love: the communist career of Evgeniia Zel’kinaEvgeniia L. Zel’kina with son Kamil Ikramov

From Uzbekistan, with love: the communist career of Evgeniia Zel’kina

The biography of Evgeniia L’vovna Zel’kina cuts an unexpected path across the history of early Soviet Uzbekistan. Zel’kina was born in 1900 in Moscow, in the family of a Jewish doctor. After 1917, likely captivated by the new revolutionary ideology, she studied to become a professional activist at the Institute of Red Professors.

Posted on: 12 March 2021

Why we need to disrupt gendered perceptions of sexual crimeIllustration of two Indian women in the 19th century

Why we need to disrupt gendered perceptions of sexual crime

When it comes to an event such as Women’s History Month, we rightly celebrate women’s achievements and the historical contributions that they have made, in addition to exploring women’s lives and experiences.

Posted on: 1 March 2021

Out and proud - the legacy of the Gay Liberation FrontDemonstration with Gay Liberation Front

Out and proud - the legacy of the Gay Liberation Front

The Gay Liberation Front (GLF) originated in America, with the famous Stonewall Riots on 27 June 1969 and leading figures such as Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera. By 1970, the idea had been brought over to the London School of Economics and the first meeting was held in a basement with 19 people on the 13 October 1970. Within a month, after leafleting and more meetings, the crowds of attendees grew.

Posted on: 24 February 2021

Where are all the Trans People in History?Marsha P. Johnson Memorial

Where are all the Trans People in History?

Many trans people, myself included, wonder why we never learn about all of the amazing transgender people in history. Of course, being trans is not all there is to know about me, but it's still something I’m very proud of and that I continue to engage with. I love the community that I am a part of! I love both learning about history, as a history student, and being trans, so it's upsetting to see a lack of trans representation in history books. So where are all the trans people in history? Here are four trans people who have contributed to the progress of the trans community and our rights...

Posted on: 4 February 2021

Sex and 'Sexuality' in South Asian History British Library photograph of three people from the Hirja community

Sex and 'Sexuality' in South Asian History

While the British justified the conquest and colonisation of a quarter of the world’s population on the grounds that they were bringing the ‘rule of law’ to peoples who had none, in reality they superimposed an alien legal system upon often complex pre-existing legal norms.

Posted on: 29 January 2021

Five ways to explore LGBT+ history from homeStudent in gardens on campus

Five ways to explore LGBT+ history from home

For LGBT+ history month we asked Imogen, Deputy-President of the Guild, to collaborate with us on a list of media to watch and resources to explore. From campaigning for equal rights at Pride in London, to the Harlem ballroom scene in New York, find out more about LGBT+ history here.

Posted on: 27 January 2021

The Kremlin, the past and 2020 Kremlin, Moscow

The Kremlin, the past and 2020

2020 was meant to be a blockbuster year for the Kremlin: twenty years of Vladimir Putin, seventy-five years since the victory over fascism in the Great Patriotic War and constitutional changes approved overwhelmingly by the population in a referendum.

Posted on: 6 January 2021

2020: My year in review as a History studentHistory student Amy Ward.

2020: My year in review as a History student

2020 is not what any of us expected. History student Amy Ward talks us through some of the positives that she is taking note of this year despite 2020’s hard times and unpredictability.

Posted on: 1 December 2020

Can you display statues relating to empire sympathetically?Problematic statue previously at the front of Dunham Massey

Can you display statues relating to empire sympathetically?

Elizabeth Colenso is a first-year student studying Sociology and History at the University of Liverpool. Here she chats to us about conversations she and fellow History classmates had with the National Trust after the Trust's removal of a problematic statue previously in front of the Dunham Massey estate.

Posted on: 25 November 2020

Mary Mary, quite contrary: a statue for WollstonecraftSilver statue of a naked female body

Mary Mary, quite contrary: a statue for Wollstonecraft

Dr Myriam Wilks-Heeg gives her view on the contraversial new statue honouring feminist icon, Mary Wollstonecraft.

Posted on: 18 November 2020

How to have a Black history year - five ways to be an ally all year roundWoman reading a book

How to have a Black history year - five ways to be an ally all year round

Say goodbye to October, and hello to the rest of your life! Black History Month runs throughout October every year and is fundamentally about allowing healing by providing information that bridges different experiences. By spending time understanding what someone else’s experience, knowledge and insights are we can be more empathetic and better people.

Posted on: 9 November 2020

Will Kamala Harris be the first female president of the United States?Kamala Harris in a crowd

Will Kamala Harris be the first female president of the United States?

US political history expert, Dr Cheryl Hudson, gives her view on the Democratic vice-presidential candidate and the possibilities for her future in the corridors of power. \"Regardless of who is elected as the 46th President of the United States, they will be male. Just as the previous 45 were. Not a single American woman has served as head of state and Commander in Chief.

Posted on: 28 October 2020

How to have a Black history year - ways to rest, recharge and connect with your identityWoman holding her face and looking up

How to have a Black history year - ways to rest, recharge and connect with your identity

It's a Black Radical Present. Will you like how history remembers you? If you are Black, your identity is your history and also your future. Locked within you is a story that millions of ancestors fought to make sure it exists today.

Posted on: 9 October 2020

Welcome to Liverpool! 5 tips for History students new to University of LiverpoolStudent with coffee

Welcome to Liverpool! 5 tips for History students new to University of Liverpool

Welcome week runs from 28 September – 2 October 2020 and is set to be a little different this year, however there are still tons of events and tools that you can use to interact with the department, explore the city and get to know the University of Liverpool as a new student. Here are 5 tips for History students during Welcome Week to get your university experience off to a flying start:

Posted on: 26 September 2020

Connecting the power of African Ancestors

Connecting the power of African Ancestors

When I confirmed my upcoming talk with the University of Liverpool and National Museums Liverpool, it was February 2020. In some ways, it was a completely different world. I couldn’t have known that Black History Month 2020 could see us operating in a second lockdown, as the first lockdown was still a myth and a whisper on the UK agenda.

Posted on: 25 September 2020

Misunderstanding Black Lives MatterMan holding sign saying 'The UK is not innocent' during Black Lives Matter protest

Misunderstanding Black Lives Matter

History student Caleb Howie gives his opinion on how the Black Lives Matter movement has been misunderstood and misrepresented by some sections of society.

Posted on: 21 July 2020

After Edward Colston: The Bristol Library Society and the Slave TradeThe statue of Edward Colston

After Edward Colston: The Bristol Library Society and the Slave Trade

The toppling of the statue of the slave trader Edward Colston (1636-1721) in Bristol on 7 June 2020 has reminded a whole country – and many other parts of the world – of the city’s historical involvement in the slave trade. In the eighteenth century, Bristol prided itself as the second city of the British Empire and the traffic in human beings played a seminal role in creating the city’s wealth. In the second half of the century, the city used its increased prosperity to found cultural institutions, and one of the most notable ones was the Bristol Library Society, established in 1772-73. As a postdoctoral member of Professor Mark Towsey’s AHRC project on ‘Libraries, Reading Communities and Cultural Formation in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic’, I conduct research on this institution and recently signed a contract with Bristol Record Society to publish an edition of its eighteenth-century committee minutes in book form.

Posted on: 10 June 2020

Professor Elaine Chalus discusses women and elections in the age of revolutionScreenshot of the University of Kent's Age of Revolution website

Professor Elaine Chalus discusses women and elections in the age of revolution

Professor Elaine Chalus, Head of the Department of History at the University of Liverpool, was recently recorded discussing women and elections with Megan King from the University of Kent’s Age of Revolutions research project.

Posted on: 6 May 2020

21 of the Best Things to Watch on Netflix if You Are a History Lover!Laptop streaming Netflix.

21 of the Best Things to Watch on Netflix if You Are a History Lover!

If you’re looking for your historical fix during these strange times then look no further. We’ve put together a list of the movies and tv shows that we will be watching over the next few weeks. A mixture of documentaries from top historians to comical interpretations of historical events, there will be something to suit any mood.

Posted on: 9 April 2020

VE day Special: Liverpool’s Most Famous SitesMen scouting a bombed area in Crosby after the May Blitz.

VE day Special: Liverpool’s Most Famous Sites

Just like the rest of Europe, the face of Liverpool changed drastically during the Second World War. The May Blitz was the most devastating event that shook Liverpool to its core. The bombings lasted for eight nights and devastated the city and its surrounding suburbs. 1,900 people were killed, 1,450 seriously injured and over 70,000 people were made homeless. Winston Churchill later praised the strength of Liverpudlians, stating: “I see the damage done by the enemy attacks, but I also see the spirit of an unconquered people.” The effects of the war are still felt today and can be seen through our iconic buildings that many of us have passed without really taking notice. Perhaps next time we encounter the buildings on our list below we will appreciate everything that they symbolise and all that they have done and still do for the Liverpool community.

Posted on: 9 April 2020

Stop What You're Doing and Listen to These History Podcasts Mug of coffee and headphones on wooden table.

Stop What You're Doing and Listen to These History Podcasts

It's time to put on those headphones and get into the listening zone. You are in for an audio treat. Get ready to be transported back in time and experience the horror, the chaos and the unimaginable. The following shows are all highly popular but which one will you pick to be your overall favourite? Get listening to decide.

Posted on: 1 April 2020

'Untold Histories of Empire': The truths about empire that museums don’t want to tell you – and why Statue of Hindu God with many arms.

'Untold Histories of Empire': The truths about empire that museums don’t want to tell you – and why

Dr Deana Heath is a Reader in Indian and Colonial History at the University of Liverpool, and organiser of the Untold Histories of Empire project at the World Museum as part of the Being Human Festival.

Posted on: 13 November 2019

Libraries, Reading Communities and Cultural Formation in the Eighteenth-Century AtlanticNational Libraries Week logo.

Libraries, Reading Communities and Cultural Formation in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic

7-12 October is National Libraries Week 2019 – a time to celebrate the power of libraries to change lives through reading. The theme this year is how libraries engage communities through technology, building skills and encouraging participation. It’s fitting, therefore, that this week also marks the launch of a major new digital humanities project funded by the AHRC exploring the history of libraries, led by Professor Mark Towsey from the Department of History at the University of Liverpool.

Posted on: 9 October 2019

Opinion: What’s special about Robert Mugabe?Photo of Robert Mugabe.

Opinion: What’s special about Robert Mugabe?

Following the death of Robert Mugabe earlier this month, Dr Diana Jeater reflects on the life of the former President of Zimbabwe and the response to his passing in the media.

Posted on: 18 September 2019

Five things to do during Welcome WeekLiverpool skyline - photo by Charles Pragnell from Pexels

Five things to do during Welcome Week

Welcome Week kicks off on Monday, giving new students the opportunity to get to know their new flatmates, explore Liverpool and settle in before they start lectures. Take a look at our top five tips to help you get started with university life.

Posted on: 13 September 2019

Department of History Graduation 2019 — Social media roundupHistory Students' Graduation Ceremony.

Department of History Graduation 2019 — Social media roundup

Last week we said goodbye to our Class of 2019 at the School of Histories, Languages and Cultures graduation ceremony as they begin the next step of their journey as University of Liverpool graduates. Check out our roundup of social media messages from the day.

Posted on: 23 July 2019

Q&A: What's it like to study a PhD in History at the University of Liverpool?PhD History student: Emily Gibbs.

Q&A: What's it like to study a PhD in History at the University of Liverpool?

Emily Gibbs is a postgraduate research student in the Department of History, specialising in the anxieties felt by British society during the Cold War. Find out Emily's thoughts on studying a PhD at the University: from her topic of study to the city of Liverpool.

Posted on: 2 April 2019

Opinion: British Empire is still being whitewashed by the school curriculum – Dr Deana Heath on why this must changeThe Empire in red in 1886

Opinion: British Empire is still being whitewashed by the school curriculum – Dr Deana Heath on why this must change

Dr Deana Heath: Jeremy Corbyn has recently proposed that British school children should be taught about the history of the realities of British imperialism and colonialism. This would include the history of people of colour as components of, and contributors to, the British nation-state – rather than simply as enslaved victims of it. As Corbyn rightly noted: “Black history is British history” – and hence its study should be part of the national curriculum, not segregated in a single month each year.

Posted on: 8 November 2018

Black History Month: reflecting on racialised beauty standardsWoman with afro hair

Black History Month: reflecting on racialised beauty standards

For Black History Month, history student Alaina Heath reflects on racialised beauty standards and representations of Black beauty in the media.

Posted on: 26 October 2018

Why were Suffragettes force-fed in prison?Votes for Women banner

Why were Suffragettes force-fed in prison?

Modern history expert, Dr Sam Caslin, talks about the practise of force-feeding Suffragettes in prison, as we continue to reflect on the centenary of the Representation of the People Act, which allowed (some) women the right to vote in 1918.

Posted on: 27 September 2018

Explore the history of urban dog mess at the Plop Up Dog Poo Family Fun DayPlop-Up Dog Poo Family Fun Day

Explore the history of urban dog mess at the Plop Up Dog Poo Family Fun Day

Dog mess is a messy and infuriating presence on our streets. Awareness raising campaigns and fining and have made some progress in encouraging dog owners to do the responsible thing and scoop the poop. But dog mess continues to pose difficult management issues for councils who receive thousands of complaints each year about the 3,000 tons that hit British streets daily.

Posted on: 14 September 2018

What are the Terracotta Warriors? Four amazing facts!Head of a Chinese sculpture

What are the Terracotta Warriors? Four amazing facts!

We explore the Terracotta Warriors exhibition at World Museum in this video with Chinese history expert, Leon Rocha. Find out how they were discovered, how they were made and more!

Posted on: 14 August 2018

World Cup stories: Football and national identity in postwar GermanyGerman team world cup 1974

World Cup stories: Football and national identity in postwar Germany

When you grow up in the North East of England, you can’t really escape the notion that to millions, maybe billions of people around the world, football is a lot more than a game.

Posted on: 12 June 2018

Five things to do in Merseyside for anyone interested in History this summerWestern Approaches Naval Teleprinter Station

Five things to do in Merseyside for anyone interested in History this summer

With summer now upon us, you might be looking for things to do in Merseyside before the start of the new term (trust us, this will come around very quickly!). While teaching may be over until September, there’s still plenty of things to do and see in the area that relate to History: from a World War Two bunker to Liverpool’s Old Dock.

Posted on: 8 June 2018

Extreme Weather - how human stories can help us engage with climate changeFlooded river

Extreme Weather - how human stories can help us engage with climate change

Climate change is a global phenomenon but it can often feel abstract and detached from our everyday lives. Engagement with the public about climate change can be more effective if human experiences of extreme weather are used, in the form of memories and personal stories.

Posted on: 15 May 2018

Talia immerses herself in Chinese history and culture during her Study Abroad adventureTalia at The Bund

Talia immerses herself in Chinese history and culture during her Study Abroad adventure

Since getting back from China in June 2017, I have become ‘that girl’ who’s always referring back to her year abroad. The reason I do is because I had such an amazing time, and I highly encourage anyone thinking of studying abroad to do so!

Posted on: 16 April 2018

From the White House to Niagra Falls — Emily McIndoe embraces her Study Abroad opportunityUMD group photo

From the White House to Niagra Falls — Emily McIndoe embraces her Study Abroad opportunity

I spent a semester at the University of Maryland, USA in 2015 and it was the best decision I made at university. When I received my study abroad offer, and even after a quick Google search, I couldn’t point to Maryland on a map and had no idea about what I should expect when I arrived. The University of Maryland (UMD), is actually only a short metro ride from Washington DC and not that far from Baltimore either.

Posted on: 20 March 2018

Careers - “What are you going to do with a degree in history?”Archivists looking at records

Careers - “What are you going to do with a degree in history?”

We found out how history graduate Lindsey Sutton turned her degrees in history and archive management into a career.

Posted on: 19 March 2018

"Empowered working-class housewives" - Big Flame, Women and the Kirkby Rent Strike 1972-73'Women's struggle on Tower Hill' leaflet

"Empowered working-class housewives" - Big Flame, Women and the Kirkby Rent Strike 1972-73

Inspired by the #PressForProgress theme for International Women's Day 2018, we hear from PhD student Kerrie McGiveron, who has been researching the fascinating story of the women of Big Flame, who were involved in the Kirkby rent strike in Liverpool, during the 1970s.

Posted on: 6 March 2018

Digging and Controlling the Past — Unmasking Ideology in Imperial and Colonial ArchaeologyPueblo Bonito at Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. Photo by mksfca, Creative Commons Flickr.

Digging and Controlling the Past — Unmasking Ideology in Imperial and Colonial Archaeology

We are all familiar with the “Indiana Jones” myth, in which young (and attractive) archaeologists conquer and explore exotic landscapes in search of hidden treasures, defeating “bad guys” as they grab precious jewels or unlock ancient secrets. These fantasy films have encouraged the public to dream romantically of archaeological adventures abroad without thinking of their consequences. In fact, real archaeologists like Aurel Stein (1862-1943), Hiram Bingham (1875-1956), and Langdon Warner (1881-1955), are reputed to have served as the models for Steven Spielberg’s “hero”. Yet, as much fun as they are to watch, these movies hide ugly realities of the closely entangled relationship among imperial and colonial war, capitalism, and archaeology.

Posted on: 1 March 2018

Liverpool: Celebrating 10 years as the Capital of CultureLiverpool Docks

Liverpool: Celebrating 10 years as the Capital of Culture

This year, Liverpool will come together once more to celebrate the 10-year anniversary of being named the European Capital of Culture. Here, we will explore some of the highlights 2018 will bring as a celebration, and check out some other big names that turn 10, too!

Posted on: 14 February 2018

"It’s two institutions presenting rival claims on the loyalties of North African Christians" – Dr Robin Whelan discusses Being Christian in Vandal AfricaBaptismal font from a church in later sixth-century Clupea (modern Kélibia, Tunisia). Now in the Bardo Museum in Tunis.

"It’s two institutions presenting rival claims on the loyalties of North African Christians" – Dr Robin Whelan discusses Being Christian in Vandal Africa

Following the recent publication of Dr Robin Whelan’s book 'Being Christian in Vandal Africa: The Politics of Orthodoxy in the Post-Imperial West', Dr Chris Pearson sat with the author and Lecturer in Mediterranean History at the University of Liverpool to discuss their research and how their interest in the topic began.

Posted on: 8 February 2018

Why did Suffragette Edith Rigby plant a bomb at the Cotton Exchange in Liverpool?Woman in front of a monument

Why did Suffragette Edith Rigby plant a bomb at the Cotton Exchange in Liverpool?

We hear from modern history expert, Dr Sam Caslin about how a Suffragette from Preston shook the foundations of the Cotton Exchange in the heart of Liverpool in 1913. Did campaigns like Edith's help contribute to the passing of the Representation of the People Act, which allowed (some) women the right to vote in 1918?

Posted on: 6 February 2018

"I decided we should have an illustration that is not a body factory" — MA Cultural History student chats to Michael SappolBody Modern by Michael Sappol

"I decided we should have an illustration that is not a body factory" — MA Cultural History student chats to Michael Sappol

As usual we all had a lot to say in our Themes in Cultural History seminar. The key text of the week was one of five cultural histories we have been studying in depth for the module and the response was very positive.

Posted on: 31 January 2018

Opinion: Anti-Roma stigma of Czech president Miloš Zeman threatens progress over Romani rightsA woman holding a Roma flag

Opinion: Anti-Roma stigma of Czech president Miloš Zeman threatens progress over Romani rights

Czech president Miloš Zeman faces a tough run-off against rival Jiří Drahoš in the second round of the presidential election on 26-27 January 2018. Voters will deliver their verdict on Zeman’s open hostility to refugees, Muslims, and the European Union, and his support for Russia.

Posted on: 24 January 2018

Taking a year abroad - are you adventurous enough to come and live in China?A group of young people on a boat in Shanghai

Taking a year abroad - are you adventurous enough to come and live in China?

Hello! Or should I say 你好 (ni hao)? I’m currently sitting in my flat in Suzhou revising for my exams. Yes, Study Abroad does actually involve studying, but don’t worry, there’s so much more!

Posted on: 19 January 2018

Exploring perceptions of Liverpool’s International Slavery MuseumNewspaper article about the International Slavery Museum

Exploring perceptions of Liverpool’s International Slavery Museum

Third year history student, Tiria Barnes, explores perceptions of Liverpool’s International Slavery Museum using articles from Gale Primary Sources.

Posted on: 15 December 2017

An experience to remember - PhD research at University of Georgia University of Georgia campus.

An experience to remember - PhD research at University of Georgia

Early in 2017, I was awarded a University of Georgia (UGA) Franklin College – University of Liverpool Short-Term International Research Fellowship. So a few months later, I found myself in Athens, Georgia, enjoying a week of beautiful fall weather and the generous hospitality of the southern United States.

Posted on: 8 December 2017

Let's meet...a history masters graduateEmma Copestake

Let's meet...a history masters graduate

Find out what it's like to study a history masters with us at Liverpool, from prize-winning graduate Emma Copestake.

Posted on: 7 December 2017

Robert Mugabe’s resignation - an extraordinary week in Zimbabwe's historyPhoto of Robert Mugabe.

Robert Mugabe’s resignation - an extraordinary week in Zimbabwe's history

‘What’s happening?’ ‘Have you seen the news?’ ‘Is this it?’- these were the messages that started coming in from contacts all over the world, as I was preparing to head out to the Annual Meeting of the African Studies Association in Chicago last month.

Posted on: 1 December 2017

Victorian vagrants - researching female criminals from the Victorian eraHistoric records.

Victorian vagrants - researching female criminals from the Victorian era

One of the most fascinating aspects of my research is going beyond the stats and the figures and constructing biographies of the women I’m researching. In order to do this I’ve been utilising material held in local archives, such as newspapers held on microfilm, but I’ve also been making extensive use of digital sources.

Posted on: 5 October 2017

Statues of medical racist who experimented on enslaved people should also be taken downBlack and white portrait of James Sims

Statues of medical racist who experimented on enslaved people should also be taken down

Stephen Kenny blogs about how statues of a medical racist who experimented on enslaved people should be removed.

Posted on: 23 August 2017

Nuclear stories: understanding nuclear anxiety through storytelling'But if it DID happen' headline from newspaper

Nuclear stories: understanding nuclear anxiety through storytelling

When I first undertook my History PhD research on nuclear anxiety in Britain, I was instantly surprised by how much people wanted to tell me their 'nuclear stories'. It appeared to me that the legacies of Cold War nuclear anxieties ran much deeper than I had originally believed.

Posted on: 23 August 2017

The 'Sniffing the Past' app - take a dog's eye view of the city in London, Paris and New YorkArchive image of a police officer and police dog

The 'Sniffing the Past' app - take a dog's eye view of the city in London, Paris and New York

What part do dogs play in urban history? Can their stories give us a fresh perspective on some of our most iconic cities? Chris Pearson has been researching dogs, humans and history in London, New York and Paris - and his new app is bringing these 'hidden histories' to life.

Posted on: 1 August 2017

Pursuing a career in academia - history alumna Wendy Asquith tells her success storyWendy Asquith

Pursuing a career in academia - history alumna Wendy Asquith tells her success story

As a Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow at the University of Nottingham, I am currently working on a new project \"The Spectacle of Universal Human Rights: A Century of Intergovernmental Display at World's Fairs\".

Posted on: 31 July 2017

Transforming Ideas about Gender at Sudley HouseGender blog post

Transforming Ideas about Gender at Sudley House

Issues of gender identity have increasingly entered mainstream conversation, and the new 'Transformation' exhibition at Sudley House aims to tackle these issues.

Posted on: 23 June 2017

Fine china cups and shipping tycoons - decorative art explored at the Victoria Gallery and MuseumGalleries showing ceramics and decorative arts

Fine china cups and shipping tycoons - decorative art explored at the Victoria Gallery and Museum

When you drink tea or coffee from your fine china cup and, perhaps, still secretly smoke tobacco, do you ever wonder where such objects and drugs came from?

Posted on: 19 June 2017

Genoa’s Freedom: Entrepreneurship, Republicanism, and the Spanish Atlantic Map of Genoa from 16th century

Genoa’s Freedom: Entrepreneurship, Republicanism, and the Spanish Atlantic

My new book 'Genoa’s Freedom: Entrepreneurship, Republicanism, and the Spanish Atlantic' is the result of many years of work. It all started one day at the Newberry Library, in Chicago, where I found a sixteenth-century account book of taxes paid in Peru to the Spanish monarchy.

Posted on: 14 June 2017

Libraries and life in Washington DC - building the foundations of my PhD thesisLibrary of Congress, Washington.

Libraries and life in Washington DC - building the foundations of my PhD thesis

I was lucky enough to move to Washington D.C. from September 2016 until February this year, to undertake a British Research Council Fellowship at the John W. Kluge Center, Library of Congress.

Posted on: 5 April 2017

Using our archives - hidden stories from LGBT historyHeadshot of April Ashley

Using our archives - hidden stories from LGBT history

Masters student and archivist, Emma Cummings, reflects on how archives and collections can act as an important part of highlighting hidden stories from LGBT history.

Posted on: 29 March 2017

'Be bold for change' and the origins of International Women’s DayInternational Women's Day poster from 1925

'Be bold for change' and the origins of International Women’s Day

Historian, Dr Myriam Wilks-Heeg, looks back at the origins of International Women's Day and reflects on this year's theme.

Posted on: 6 March 2017

BAFTA-nominated film-maker Tina Gharavi gives us an insight into her film ‘People Like Us’Screenshot from 'People Like Us'

BAFTA-nominated film-maker Tina Gharavi gives us an insight into her film ‘People Like Us’

How do you cope with being convicted of a crime you know you did not commit? What happens when you are condemned to death row and spend over 18 or 30 (sometimes many more) years of your life locked away; often not knowing how long you will be alive? How do people survive when placed in such extraordinary situations?

Posted on: 27 February 2017

A student's view: Harry Roberts on using our new history e-textbookStudent holding a piece of work

A student's view: Harry Roberts on using our new history e-textbook

Still lugging heavy history books around? Student, Harry Roberts, gives us the lowdown on how he's been using the new history e-textbook, 'Using Primary Sources' and how it's changed the way he researches the subjects he's passionate about.

Posted on: 22 February 2017

Jackie Kennedy - America’s most recognisable First LadyPresident John F. Kennedy and Jacqueline Kennedy arrive in Dallas.

Jackie Kennedy - America’s most recognisable First Lady

This week sees the release of ‘Jackie’, a film about First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy in the days following the assassination of her husband, President John F. Kennedy, in 1963.

Posted on: 19 January 2017

'Fashion and Freedom' - women and the First World WarBrightly coloured contemporary fashion designs

'Fashion and Freedom' - women and the First World War

Corsets. Flares. Mini-skirts. They all tell us something about what was happening in society at the time that they first became popular. Looking back at fashion can give us a fresh perspective on key moments in history and on social change.

Posted on: 24 November 2016

'Asylum Squad' - exploring religion and mental illnessBlack and white graphic novel image.

'Asylum Squad' - exploring religion and mental illness

The Victoria Gallery and Museum's 'Phantom Limb' exhibition focuses on medicine, memory and the treatment process. It features around 20 works by nine artists, most of whom work from their own personal experiences of operations and illnesses.

Posted on: 15 November 2016

Researching the slave trade in LiverpoolSlavers and privateers cover

Researching the slave trade in Liverpool

For Black History Month, we take a look at some of the stories behind the slave trade in Liverpool with PhD student Nicholas Fuqua:

Posted on: 21 October 2016

Urban street photography - piecing together the pastBlack and white photo of a crowd standing next to bomb damaged houses.

Urban street photography - piecing together the past

Liverpool is bursting with museums and for History PhD student Dan Warner, the Museum of Liverpool's current photography exhibition has been a key piece of inspiration for his research:

Posted on: 29 September 2016

A handy guide to our 2016 Open DaysUniversity of Liverpool -  Your open day journey

A handy guide to our 2016 Open Days

An open day is a great opportunity to meet with your future lecturers and current students, who can give you a unique insight into your course, the University and Liverpool itself. So here's our handy guide to some of the highlights of our open days - join us on on Saturday 24 September and Saturday 8 October.

Posted on: 16 September 2016