"archaeology" blog posts

Using modern technology to model ancient worlds

Posted on: 12 March 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Keith and Ardern

Would 3D digital objects help your project? Could you analyse aspects of your sites or objects in a new way by quantifying it in 3D space? Could you draw more people to interact with your work by engaging with them through a digital medium? Ardern Hulme-Beaman discusses how photogrammetry is revolutionising the work of our academics, and how you can learn more about this innovative technique.

Fall of Troy: the legend and the facts

Posted on: 6 March 2018 | Category: 2018 posts


The legendary ancient city of Troy is very much in the limelight this year. A big budget co-production between the BBC and Netflix 'Troy: Fall of a City' recently launched, while Turkey designated 2018 the “Year of Troy” and plans a year of celebration, including the opening of a new museum on the presumed site.

Chasing Rainbows: The Search for Gay Material Culture

Posted on: 1 March 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Illustration of explorer with rainbow flag

After thinking about LGBT+ History Month 2018 last month, I thought it would be interesting to take a look how much archaeology can contribute to our understanding of gay history.

The Blind School: Pioneering People and Places

Posted on: 27 February 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

FMcF exploring tactile map

Outside of her research, Archaeology PhD student Kerry Massheder-Rigby has been working on the HLF funded History of Place project since 2016 as Project Coordinator, investigating the history of the Royal School for the Blind in Liverpool. In this blog, Kerry shares her experience of working on the project and tells us how this work ties in with her research interests.

Terracotta warriors on the march

Posted on: 7 February 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Terracotta Warriors Exhibition

With the launch of the World Museum's 'China's First Emperor and the Terracotta Warriors' exhibition this week, Professor Douglas Baird provides an insight into the historical context of the Warriors and highlights their significance in today's world.

From the Ancient World to the near future - skills that can help you stand out from the crowd!

Posted on: 29 January 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Students in front of a museum

How has one of our archaeology MA students been using her skills outside of university studies? Chloé Agar tells us more about how the content of her degree is helping her explore different career ideas for the future, outside of academia

ACE researcher in the spotlight: Dr. Shirley Curtis-Summers

Posted on: 11 December 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Dr. Shirley Curtis Summers

I am currently an honorary research associate in ACE and since completing my PhD in 2015, I have held posts in ACE, History, Anatomy, Continuing Education and Public Health and Policy. I am also a consultant human osteologist, working with heritage companies and museums to provide human osteology assessments/reports and deliver public engagement events.

Early Village Societies research group seminar series

Posted on: 1 December 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Early Village Society Seminar

The first seminar of the Early Village Societies research group for this academic year recently took place, where two of our PhD students presented on the first stages of their research.

Spotlight: Professor Keith Dobney, Head of Department for ACE

Posted on: 29 November 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Creating a 3D image of a dog skull using photogrammetry in Bern, 2015

As the (relatively) new Head of Department for ACE, I’m extremely happy to contribute another blog post here, to help celebrate and promote our great department. Make no mistake, we do have a lot to shout about; our long and colourful heritage of over 100 years, the distinctive combination of related disciplines, our newly refurbished facilities, a dynamic and world-class profile for teaching and research and, of course, a great staff and student body.

Spotlight: Covering Neolithic botany to human skeletal anatomy - meet four of our researchers

Posted on: 13 November 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Dr Kimberly Plomp

This year we had a number of researchers land prestigious grants for their interesting and important work at ACE. Among these researchers, we have a few new postdocs who have written a brief introduction to the research they will be undertaking at ACE!

Archaeology as public spectacle: the 1st Archaeology Convention in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Posted on: 10 November 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

The session with the ministers of Antiquities of Palestine, Egypt, Zawi Hawass – the Chair, the Yemen minister, and Jordan minister, looking from left to right.

The 1st Archaeology Convention took place in November at the National Museum of Antiquities in Riyadh, the capitol of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Pets, Pests, & People: an evening of science and wine, discovering what animals have done for us

Posted on: 12 October 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

The panel – Ian Barnes, Camilla Speller, David Ashmore, Jacqui Mulville, and Mark Thomas.

Thank you to everyone who attended the public event, Pets, Pests, and People held at the VG&M on Friday, October 13. We had over 80 people present for the talks and the drinks reception. I’d call that a success!

Excavations, new skills and adventures in Halkidiki

Posted on: 9 October 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Archaeological site in Greece

In its time, Olynthos was an ancient classical Greek city in the Halkidiki region of modern-day Greece. The city sprawled across the two massive hills that dominate the surrounding landscape until its destruction in 348 BC by Philip II (Alexander the Great’s dad).

A tale of two universities

Posted on: 4 October 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Harris Manchester College, which I have always described as ‘chocolate box’. It’s one of the smaller colleges. Author’s own photograph, 04/05/2016.

Hey there, I’m Chloé. I’m studying Archaeology here in Liverpool this year. It’s been wonderful to get to know the department and the society over the last couple of weeks, after being so nervous about coming to a new university. As a thank you, I’m sharing my experiences about the transition between universities, and how postgraduate study compares to undergraduate study so far.

Digging it: learning skills in the trenches at ACE’s 2017 field school

Posted on: 25 September 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Penycloddiau Hillfort

Liverpool’s field school took place at the Penycloddiau Hillfort excavations from 16 July-11 August this year – our final year at this site. The field school provides practical skills training for our 1st year undergraduates and international students from the Institute of Field Research (IFR Global), as well as onward employability training for recent graduates and postgraduate students.

Putting the ace in SACE: join the Society of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology

Posted on: 6 September 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

SACE outing at the Manchester Museum

As a 1st year undergraduate at the University of Liverpool, both the Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology, and the Society of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology (SACE) have played an instrumental role in my life at the university so far.

Deep Roots: Day four of seven. Time to head out into the field

Posted on: 26 June 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Two men in Zambia, rhinos behind

My first blog about preparing for the 'Deep Roots' research project looked at our initial work examining museum collections and locating key sites for excavation. This time, I'll be giving an insight into the ups and downs we encountered as we went out into the field...

Deep Roots: An old jigsaw puzzle...with some key pieces missing

Posted on: 16 June 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

hand holding stone artefacts

The ‘Deep Roots’ research project will begin in earnest in July 2017 with the first of four seasons of excavation. In the first of two blogs, I'll be giving you a behind the scenes look at the work we've been doing in preparation.

Lost in the sand - investigating early humans and their tools in Zambia

Posted on: 4 May 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Archaeologist digging at a river

Prof Larry Barham gives us a taste of what it's like to excavate in Zambia, as he heads off to begin new research into early humans and how they made tools.

Student experience - discovering ancient and modern Greece

Posted on: 20 April 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Photo collage of Greek trip

Archaeology student Jake Morley-Stone gives us the lowdown on his research in Greece and how The Chris Mee Mediterranean Travel Award enabled him to make the trip. Find out how this experience has transformed his research on Ancient Greece.

A new way of exploring the past

Posted on: 17 March 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Neandertal teeth

Professor Keith Dobney was part of a team of researchers who recently made the exciting discovery of ancient DNA found in the dental plaque of Neandertals from Belgium and Spain.

A passion for LEGO and archaeology

Posted on: 18 January 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Lego comic strip

My latest research project has been inspired by my interest in digital humanities research, teaching methods - and a love of LEGO.

Ask our curator anything! Join in #askacurator day at Garstang Museum

Posted on: 12 September 2016 | Category: 2016 posts

Two curators examining a mummy

‌If you've ever wondered why cats ended up as mummies in ancient Egypt or what it takes to become a museum curator - then this week is your chance to ask a curator for yourself.