Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology blog

Welcome to our blog

If you're avid about archaeology, committed to classics or excited about Egyptology, then this is the blog for you.

We'll give you an alternative look at our degree courses, bring out the stories behind our research and talk to you about the subjects you are most passionate about.

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Late spring at Khirbet al-Mudayna al-‘Aliya, Jordan

Posted on: 19 May 2022 | Category: 2022 posts

Diederik documenting the massive tower structure with the wadi in the background

In order to tackle some of these questions I organised the fieldwork project we’re currently enjoying. I really wanted to visit the site to take a closer look at its many structures, and pay particular attention to building techniques, potential quarrying locations, and the order the site was built in. Then I got to thinking, how will I be able to address all the questions I’ll have, especially as throughout my PhD I’ll likely come up with more and more questions that I can’t even think of yet? If only there was a way of ‘bringing the site home with me’!

Your Wellbeing: Top Tips

Posted on: 10 May 2022 | Category: 2022 posts

Lynsey Shale

Being at university is often a really stressful time, even when you don’t have exams or deadlines coming up. The change in routines and environment can feel very difficult and it is easy to feel like you’re in a sink or swim situation. I know that when I first came to university, I thought I would have to change everything about my routine and hobbies. That was not good for my wellbeing, so here are some of my tips from my experiences that I hope will help some of you.

ACE & Creativity: Talk To Me

Posted on: 10 May 2022 | Category: 2022 posts

ACE & Creativity

I’ve always been interested in drama and write, act and direct in community theatre, including my own community theatre group, ‘Grass Roots’. In 1998 I gained an MA in Screenwriting from John Moores University. This year I gained my PhD at Liverpool University with the thesis ‘Classics, Empire and Didacticism, 1919-1939’. Prior to this, in 2013, I gained my MA in Classics with the dissertation ‘The Unheeded Voice: Receptions of Cassandra in Dramatic and Narrative Texts’.

Introducing: ACE & Creativity

Posted on: 6 April 2022 | Category: 2022 posts

Love, War and Macarons

It is my pleasure and honour to write the first short post for our new blog, which aims to bring together academic and creative work in Ancient World Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology.

Make Do and Mend: How to make your clothing consumption more sustainable

Posted on: 31 March 2022 | Category: 2022 posts

Earth Month - Lynsey Shale

In the UK, every week, around 11 million items of clothing end up in landfill, which has a huge impact on the environment. There are lots of ways to reduce this waste, especially if what you are throwing away is still perfectly functional or just in need of some TLC. Here are some of my tips for how to prolong the life of your clothes and what to do with those you no longer want or aren’t usable.

Normalising Queer Representation in Archaeology

Posted on: 16 February 2022 | Category: 2022 posts

Normalising Queer Representation in Archaeology

Heteronormativity, the idea that heterosexual identity and desire is considered the norm, is being transformed by the use of Queer Theory in archaeology. Queer Theory is used to explore aspects of culture that is traditionally rejected as valid depictions of gender and sexuality. Commonly used for gender representation at burial sites, the identity of deceased individuals is being radically transformed through the consideration of Queer relationships; intersexual identities, and non-binary status. The requirements used to identify biological sex is typically constructed through heteronormative approaches, where intersexual identities are rarely considered. In order to fill the gap in knowledge that heteronormativity fails in, scholars have been using Queer Theory to challenge socially constructed views of gender. First used in the 1990’s to offer a more balanced approach to gender, Queer Theory was used by various different fields, during a time that Third-Wave Feminism was at its height. During the Third-Wave, the concept that a male-dominating society does have an impact on the value of women led to the rise of Queer minority voices currently underrepresented.

Anacharsis Conference 2021

Posted on: 5 November 2021 | Category: 2021 posts

The conference centred upon the figure of Anacharsis, a Scythian philosopher travelling around the Greek world during the age of Solon’s reforms, killed for adopting alien (Greek) religious practices upon his return to Scythia and pursuing too strong an interest in alterity. His peripatetic presence combined with his penchant for intellectual exploration and questioning of ‘otherness’ will soon make Anacharsis a paradigm of enlightened independence. His legend was revived in the age of the Enlightenment, when his philosophy returned to intellectual discourse as an agent of dissonance and rupture fostering an emergent cultural relativism and cosmopolitanism. Today, Anacharsis helps us understand how ancient and modern reacted to religious conflicts, cultural diversity and political transformation.

To rebury or not to rebury? That is the question...

Posted on: 19 August 2021 | Category: 2021 posts

Professor Harold Mytum discusses coffin fittings with Ashleigh Neil and Jane Owen

Professor Harold Mytum shares his experience of working at the Castle Street burial ground in Hull.

Our Favourite Places to Visit Outside of the City

Posted on: 8 August 2021 | Category: 2021 posts

Photograph of Crosby Beach

Sometimes you just want to take a break from city life, escape for a few hours. We know the feeling! We've put together a few suggestions of where you could go, including some stops along the way. So get your comfy trainers ready because you're about to go on an adventure.

    Blog

    Late spring at Khirbet al-Mudayna al-‘Aliya, Jordan

    Diederik documenting the massive tower structure with the wadi in the background

    Posted on: 19 May 2022 | Category: 2022 posts

    In order to tackle some of these questions I organised the fieldwork project we’re currently enjoying. I really wanted to visit the site to take a closer look at its many structures, and pay particular attention to building techniques, potential quarrying locations, and the order the site was built in. Then I got to thinking, how will I be able to address all the questions I’ll have, especially as throughout my PhD I’ll likely come up with more and more questions that I can’t even think of yet? If only there was a way of ‘bringing the site home with me’!

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