Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology blog

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If you're avid about archaeology, committed to classics or excited about Egyptology, then this is the blog for you.

We'll give you an alternative look at our degree courses, bring out the stories behind our research and talk to you about the subjects you are most passionate about.

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Top Podcasts You Should Listen to Right Now

Posted on: 25 March 2020 | Category: 2020 posts

Sometimes throwing a podcast into the mix can be a really beneficial tool when studying.


Understanding gender and sexuality through Dionysus

Posted on: 23 March 2020 | Category: 2020 posts

Ancient History and International Politics and Policy student Kian Goodsell illustrates how the figure of Dionysus serves as an example of sexual and gender fluidity in the ancient world.


The Ancestral Shape Hypothesis

Posted on: 17 March 2020 | Category: 2020 posts

Dr Kimberly Plomp, Marie Skłodowska-Curie Research Fellow in the Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology, explores the ancestral source of a problem faced by many people today: back pain.


Talking mental health on your year abroad

Posted on: 11 March 2020 | Category: 2020 posts

Third year Classical Civilisations and Egyptology student Charlotte Wylie discusses managing mental health issues during her semester abroad in Copenhagen.


Amelia Edwards: An International Women's Day Special

Posted on: 6 March 2020 | Category: 2020 posts

Amelia Edwards was a prominent travel writer and Egyptologist. On her travels throughout Egypt she famously wrote the travel text 'A Thousand Miles up the Nile' which provided a vivid and detailed account of the environment, monuments and local customs seen all over Egypt. In particular, Edwards' illustrations in this text opened up to new audiences the wonders and splendours of this little known country.


Vindaloo, Victorians, and Ancient Greek Colonisation Part 2: Intermarriage

Posted on: 21 February 2020 | Category: 2020 posts

While studying Ancient Greek Colonisation and British Imperial Thought (ALGY 336) we examined the theme of intermarriage between Greek settlers and the ‘Barbarians’ they met. Archaeologist Anthony Snodgrass examined parallels between this and the British Empire, arguing that marriage between British officers and local women as positively encouraged in Calcutta (now Kolkata) and Burma (now Myanmar) during the early British Empire but it was later outlawed when Victorian pseudo-scientific ideas about race appeared. The same was true of the ancient Greeks. According to Aristotle, the founder of Massalia (now Marseilles) married a local Celtic princess but after the Persian Wars Greek attitudes to ‘Barbarians’ solidified and became negative.


Managing and interpreting Maori heritage: Pā today

Posted on: 18 February 2020 | Category: 2020 posts

Pā in the process of transition in management with overgrown earthwork defences

Professor Harold Mytum concludes the blog series from his visit to New Zealand by exploring the relationship between the hill forts and contemporary Maori culture.


Vindaloo, Victorians, and Ancient Greek Colonisation Part 1: Hybridity

Posted on: 12 February 2020 | Category: 2020 posts

The Ancient Greek Colonisation and British Imperial Thought (ALGY336) module examines how academic understanding of ancient Greek overseas settlements was influenced by Victorian ideas of race, gender, and empire. This happened because British scholars made analogies between the ancient Greeks and the contemporary British Empire that they lived in, projecting their own imperialist values back onto history. Even the Victorian Prime Minister William Gladstone said in the House of Commons that the British Empire should treat its colonies like the Greeks had done theirs. We then applied Postcolonialism to critically consider relationships between ancient Greeks and the Celts, Sikels, and Egyptians that they encountered.


Exploring The Archaeology and Topography of Greece

Posted on: 10 February 2020 | Category: 2020 posts

Niamh Banner at the Sanctuary of Artemis

Niamh Banner (BA Classical Studies with Spanish) shares her experience at the British School at Athens on their Undergraduate Course: a three-week intensive course exploring ‘The Archaeology and Topography of Greece’ with lectures at dozens of sites, museums and even artefact handling sessions in the BSA fitch laboratory.


The Maori and Colonial contact: Pā in their landscape context

Posted on: 6 February 2020 | Category: 2020 posts

Rangihoua pā overlooking the Oihi mission site on the terrace in the foreground; the monument celebrates Marsden’s first Christian service on New Zealand soil.

The more pā sites Harold Mytum has visited as part of the Hill Fort Study Group (HFSG) visit, and we learn of the early relationships with the British, the more it is clear that the indigenous groups wielded considerable influence in the early decades of contact. The ways in which the Maori leaders of iwi (the largest kinship grouping) used interactions with foreigners for their own social advantage are clear.


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