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Anacharsis Conference 2021

Posted on: 5 November 2021 | Category: 2021 posts

The conference centred upon the figure of Anacharsis, a Scythian philosopher travelling around the Greek world during the age of Solon’s reforms, killed for adopting alien (Greek) religious practices upon his return to Scythia and pursuing too strong an interest in alterity. His peripatetic presence combined with his penchant for intellectual exploration and questioning of ‘otherness’ will soon make Anacharsis a paradigm of enlightened independence. His legend was revived in the age of the Enlightenment, when his philosophy returned to intellectual discourse as an agent of dissonance and rupture fostering an emergent cultural relativism and cosmopolitanism. Today, Anacharsis helps us understand how ancient and modern reacted to religious conflicts, cultural diversity and political transformation.

To rebury or not to rebury? That is the question...

Posted on: 19 August 2021 | Category: 2021 posts

Professor Harold Mytum discusses coffin fittings with Ashleigh Neil and Jane Owen

Professor Harold Mytum shares his experience of working at the Castle Street burial ground in Hull.

Our Favourite Places to Visit Outside of the City

Posted on: 8 August 2021 | Category: 2021 posts

Photograph of Crosby Beach

Sometimes you just want to take a break from city life, escape for a few hours. We know the feeling! We've put together a few suggestions of where you could go, including some stops along the way. So get your comfy trainers ready because you're about to go on an adventure.

Measuring the World Against the Body: Materialities and Meanings of Magnification and Miniaturization in Religious Communication in Antiquity and Modernity

Posted on: 26 March 2021 | Category: 2021 posts

blue and black individual ancient statues. Some statues look Ancient Egyptian in style

At the end of February (24-26 Feb. 2021), four colleagues from ACE (Bruce Gibson, Georgia Petridou, Anthony Sinclair, and Alexei Zadorozhny) had the pleasure of collaborating with leading research experts from the Universities of Erfurt (Germany), Graz (Austria), and Aarhus (Denmark; the UrbNet project) at an international 3-day interdisciplinary conference entitled ‘Measuring the World against the Body: Materialities and Meanings of Magnification and Miniaturization in Religious Communication in Antiquity and Modernity’

Sexuality in the Past: Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep

Posted on: 12 February 2021 | Category: 2021 posts

Tomb of Niankhkhnum & Khnumhotep

Despite living in our modern age, members of the LGBTQ+ community have been and continue to be subjected to forms of prejudice and oppression, from insults, to suppressive laws and legislation. But did these prejudices and a lack of understanding for LGBTQ+ people occur in the ancient past? Within this blog I explore Egyptologists’ findings from the joint tomb of Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep, and how examining the past can help to create a more inclusive present.

Barking Up the Right Tree - Further Updates from Deep Roots

Posted on: 9 February 2021 | Category: 2021 posts

three legged stools create a dining area outside in Kalambo Falls, Zambia

Professor Larry Barham provides a further update on the 'Deep Roots' project.

Evaluating West Derby’s changing landscape

Posted on: 4 November 2020 | Category: 2021 posts

Kate Sarbutt revealing a wall of the farm.

Professor Harold Mytum discusses a recent excavation in West Derby, Merseyside, on the site of a Stone Bridge Farm that is recorded from the 18th century.

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    Anacharsis Conference 2021

    Posted on: 5 November 2021 | Category: 2021 posts

    The conference centred upon the figure of Anacharsis, a Scythian philosopher travelling around the Greek world during the age of Solon’s reforms, killed for adopting alien (Greek) religious practices upon his return to Scythia and pursuing too strong an interest in alterity. His peripatetic presence combined with his penchant for intellectual exploration and questioning of ‘otherness’ will soon make Anacharsis a paradigm of enlightened independence. His legend was revived in the age of the Enlightenment, when his philosophy returned to intellectual discourse as an agent of dissonance and rupture fostering an emergent cultural relativism and cosmopolitanism. Today, Anacharsis helps us understand how ancient and modern reacted to religious conflicts, cultural diversity and political transformation.