Research Impact

The findings from our research have applications across a variety of areas, bringing benefit to society in health and wellbeing for humans and animals, improving healthcare practice and bringing about cost savings. A selection of case studies demonstrating examples of impact achieved from our research are available below.

Food Policies & Disease Prevention – the IMPACT model fruit and vegetables

Food Policies & Disease Prevention – the IMPACT model

Heart disease, stroke, diabetes, dementia and cancers cause over 90% of premature UK deaths; however, most are preventable. Researchers at the University of Liverpool have developed computational models to quantify and compare different prevention policies, successfully advancing food policies such as the UK dietary salt reduction targets, sugary drinks tax, along with EU and WHO policies to eliminate industrial transfats from the world's food supplies.

Global access to a sight-saving therapy for children with arthritis-associated uveitis Close up of a child's eye

Global access to a sight-saving therapy for children with arthritis-associated uveitis

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) affects approximately 10,000 UK children with 1,000 new cases per year. JIA-associated uveitis can cause partial or complete sight loss. Standard treatments have significant side effects and 50% of cases may be unresponsive. In partnership with colleagues across the UK, researchers at the University of Liverpool successfully tested the drug adalimumab for addressing unresponsive cases, leading to rapid changes in prescribing policy, commercial licensing and approval across 65 countries with approximately 50,000 children now having access to this sight saving treatment.

Stratification of eye cancer patients into metastatic risk using the integrated Liverpool prognosticator tool uveal melanoma cell lines

Stratification of eye cancer patients into metastatic risk using the integrated Liverpool prognosticator tool

Uveal melanoma is a rare intraocular tumour but is the most common primary eye cancer in adults. Although the eye tumour treatment is usually successful, half of patients die after developing secondary tumours in the liver. The University of Liverpool, together with its NHS supraregional referral centre for eye cancer, spearheaded the development and implementation of prognostic tests to predict metastasis likelihood in individual patients. Their tool is recommended in NICE guidelines and is now used worldwide.

Improving methods for handling laboratory mice Mouse in handling tube

Improving methods for handling laboratory mice

The mouse is the most important laboratory animal used worldwide in biomedical research. How they are handled is well known to have profound effects on animal anxiety and stress, which affects both animal welfare and the reliability of scientific data collected. Research from the University of Liverpool has led to the development of refined handling methods, which have changed policies and practice worldwide.

Evidence and guidance to inform how consent should be sought for children's emergency and critical care trials External photo of a hospital emergency department

Evidence and guidance to inform how consent should be sought for children's emergency and critical care trials

Children are under-represented in clinical trials of life saving treatments as research in emergency settings is practically and ethically challenging. Researchers from the University of Liverpool provided new evidence to inform how consent should be sought for children’s critical care trials. The resulting guidance has since facilitated vital trials to provide evidence to optimise treatments for critically ill patients, including eight trials involving over 1000 children.

Improving recognition, management and prevention of obesity in dogs and cats Picture of an obese dog being measured

Improving recognition, management and prevention of obesity in dogs and cats

Obesity and excess weight affects approximately half of adult dogs and cats worldwide, causing negative effects on health and welfare. The University of Liverpool has developed novel therapeutic weight loss diets accompanied by evidence-based, veterinarian-led weight management protocols. These interventions together result in sustained weight loss, improved mobility and improved quality of life, with thousands of animals already having benefitted.

HPV-positive Head & Neck Cancer – Driving Change in Clinical Practice

Human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive Head & Neck Cancer – Driving Change in UK Vaccination Policy & Clinical Practice

Improving access to psychological therapies for perinatal depression in low- and middle-income countries

Improving access to psychological therapies for perinatal depression in low and middle-income countries

Perinatal depression affects one in four women in low and middle income countries with over 90% not receiving any treatment for this condition. This has devastating consequences for the mothers and their infants. Researchers from the University of Liverpool published the Thinking Healthy Programme (THP), becoming the first fully manualised psychological intervention to be adopted by the World Health Organization for global dissemination.

Equine laminitis

Equine laminitis - changing practice

Equine laminitis is a highly prevalent, painful, debilitating equine hoof condition, which affects one in ten horses / ponies annually. University of Liverpool research systematically proved the importance of the endocrine disorders that cause laminitis, which has had a major impact on the equine pharmaceutical industry, informing laminitis awareness initiatives and development of novel therapeutics.

Development of the first effective therapy for the rare disease Alkaptonuria

Development of the first effective therapy for the rare disease Alkaptonuria

Alkaptonuria is a rare, hereditary metabolic disease, affecting 1 in every 250,000 – 1,000,000 people, that causes severe early-onset osteoarthritis. Starting from mid to late 20s, multiple joint replacements and medication for chronic pain are typical in patients. Researchers at the University of Liverpool developed the first effective pharmacological treatment option for the disease which transforms management and experience of the disease. Young people with alkaptonuria can now expect to live free of its debilitating symptoms whilst existing older patients are seeing symptoms arrested and some reversed.