Liverpool Reviews and Implementation Group

Projects

Liverpool Reviews and Implementation Group are regularly involved in a number of collaborative projects.  Please see below for some of our current projects.  If you would like to collaborate with us, please contact us.


Systematic reviews to examine the clinical effectiveness and tolerability of chemotherapy treatment for older people with cancer

LRiG have been commissioned on behalf of the National Cancer Equity Initiative (NCEI) and the Pharmaceutical Oncology Initiative (POI) to conduct a series of six systematic reviews to explore the effectiveness and tolerability of chemotherapy used to treat older people with: breast cancer, lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma, colorectal cancer, chronic myeloid leukaemia and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

The overall purpose of the reviews is to determine the amount of available evidence and whether older people derive benefit from chemotherapy in terms of survival and/or response to treatment and their tolerance to the treatment.  The completed reports are available below.

Systematic review of chemotherapy treatment for older people with breast cancer

Systematic review of systemic anti-cancer therapy for older people with renal cell carcinoma

Systematic review of systemic anti-cancer therapy for older people with chronic myeloid leukaemia

Systematic review of chemotherapy for older people with colorectal cancer

Systematic review of chemotherapy for older people with lung cancer

Systematic review of chemotherapy to treat older people with NHL


Enhancing the safety, quality and productivity of perioperative care

LRiG are assisting with several systematic reviews undertaken as part of the NIHR Cochrane Collaboration Programme Grant, Enhancing the safety, quality and productivity of perioperative care. The grant, based at the Royal Lancaster Infirmary and in collaboration with the Cochrane Anaesthesia Review Group, aims to identify clinical questions in perioperative care where there is uncertainty about best practice, to summarise the available evidence in a series of systematic reviews and subsequently disseminate results to clinicians and health policy-makers. LRiG staff are currently working on the following review questions: whether altering the format or media of educational material given to patients before an operation increases their knowledge and reduces their anxiety about the operation; whether the use of nitrous oxide gas in general anaesthesia affects the risk of a patient becoming aware during the anaesthetic; and whether the decision that a patient is fit for surgery differs depending on whether the preoperative evaluation of a patient is performed by a nurse or by a doctor.


A randomised controlled trial of extended brief intervention for alcohol dependent patients in an acute hospital setting (ADPAC)  

This is a randomised controlled trial with a primary hypothesis that extended brief interventions (EBI) delivered to alcohol-dependent patients in a hospital setting by an Alcohol Specialist Nurse (ASN) will be effective when compared to usual care in reducing overall alcohol consumption and improving on the standard measures of alcohol dependence. Read more

Contact: Sophie Beale (LRiG)


Economic evaluation alongside SLEEPS (Safety profiLe, Efficacy and Equivalence in Paediatric intensive care Sedation)  

SLEEPS is a prospective, multi-centre randomised, double blind equivalence study comparing clonidine and midazolam as intravenous sedative agents in critically ill children. A cost-effectiveness analysis was undertaken alongside the trial focusing on the incremental cost per additional case of adequate sedation achieved.

Contact: Angela Boland (LRiG)


Economic evaluation alongside MAGNETIC (MAGnesium NEbuliser Trial In Children)   

MAGNETIC is a randomised placebo controlled, double blind multi-centre trial designed to compare nebulised magnesium sulphate with placebo along with standard therapy of nebulised salbutamol and ipratropium. Cost-effectiveness analyses were undertaken focusing on the incremental cost per unit reduction in Asthma Severity Score (ASS) score and incremental cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained.

Contact: Angela Boland (LRiG)


BEA (Multi-frequency Bioimpedance in the Early detection of lymphoedema after Axillary surgery)    

BEA is a trial of a new diagnostic technique to assess the extent of swelling which is being compared to conventional perometer measurement. Suitable BEA patients are invited to enrol in the PLACE trial.

Contact: Adrian Bagust (LRiG), Angela Boland (LRiG)


PLACE (Prevention of Lymphoedema After Clearance by External compression)   

PLACE is a trial designed to assess the value of compression sleeves, used when moderate swelling is first detected, to prevent the development of full lymphoedema. Suitable BEA patients are invited to enrol in the PLACE trial.

Contact: Adrian Bagust (LRiG) Angela Boland (LRiG)


LiVio (Liverpool Violence Research Group)

The Liverpool Violence (LiVio) Research Group is a multi-disciplinary partnership of academics and clinicians with a commitment to both qualitative and quantitative research approaches and their application to problems of violence and self-harm linked to mental health issues in real-world settings.

Contact: Juliet Hockenhull (LRiG) Richard Whittington (HACCRU)


Clinical and cost effectiveness of interventions for epilepsy in the NHS   

To provide evidence about the effectiveness of a range of interventions for epilepsy and, where appropriate, systematic reviews of health economic data or health economic modelling to inform the best use of resources in the NHS. The reviews will cover a range of key topics important to the treatment of patients with epilepsy including anti-epileptic drug (AED) treatment following first seizure, AED withdrawal for those in remission and generic substitution of AEDs. The management of particular quality of life issues (depression, anxiety and memory problems) for patients with epilepsy will be assessed as will the evidence for the teratogenic effects of AEDs.

Contact: Rumona Dickson (LRiG) Janette Greenhalgh (LRiG) Jennifer Pulman (Cochrane Epilepsy Group)


Enhancing the safety, quality and productivity of perioperative care.

LRiG are assisting with several systematic reviews undertaken as part of the NIHR Cochrane Collaboration Programme Grant, Enhancing the safety, quality and productivity of perioperative care. The grant, based at the Royal Lancaster Infirmary and in collaboration with the Cochrane Anaesthesia Review Group, aims to identify clinical questions in perioperative care where there is uncertainty about best practice, to summarise the available evidence in a series of systematic reviews and subsequently disseminate results to clinicians and health policy-makers. LRiG staff are currently working on the following review questions: whether altering the format or media of educational material given to patients before an operation increases their knowledge and reduces  their  anxiety about the operation; whether the use of nitrous oxide gas in general anaesthesia affects the risk of a patient becoming aware during the anaesthetic; and whether the decision that a patient is fit for surgery differs depending on whether  the preoperative evaluation of a patient is performed by a nurse or by a  doctor.