Members

Steering Committee


Staff

Dr Harald Braun

Senior Lecturer in European History, 1300-1700, Department of History. Editor of Routledge Studies in Renaissance and Early Modern Worlds of Knowledge.

I work on Renaissance and early modern political culture, with particular interests in the integration of political and intellectual history, early modern political-theological discourse, and the Iberian world. My Oxford D.Phil. and first book explored early modern Spanish political language and imagination, mainly through the prism of the writings of the Jesuit Juan de Mariana (1535-1624).

I have lead and participated in international and interdisciplinary research projects on Spanish Atlantic history and culture. I continue to work and publish on the intersections of expertise (legal, theological, historical), print, and political thought and culture. Currently, I am researching how political advice was conceived, communicated, and received in the medieval and early modern world.

Dr Pollie Bromilow

Lecturer in French, Department of Modern Languages and Cultures

My recent work has concentrated on the interface between textualities and the materiality of the book. My 2013 edited collection of essays entitled 'Authority in European Book Culture 1400-1600' examined the ways in which authority manifested itself in the circulation of texts in the period.  I have also recently published several articles on the theme of reading and its relationship to women and representations of women.

My current major project is a monograph which is emerging from these preoccupations provisionally entitled 'Books for the Girls? Secular Women Readers and Vernacular Printed Books in Renaissance France'. This book will examine the ways in which book culture started to respond to the perceived needs of secular women readers in the sixteenth century through adaptation, format, typography, illustration and paratexts.

Dr Alexandrina Buchanan

Lecturer in Archives Studies, Department of History

My research falls into two broad, and occasionally intersecting, areas: archives and architectural history.  My architectural history research looks in particular at the post-medieval reception, interpretation and use of medieval architecture. I am fascinated by how medieval buildings continue to shape and be shaped by both our everyday experience and our highest ideals.

My 2013 book, Robert Willis and the Foundation of Architectural History, used the pioneering historian of medieval architecture to explore the development of architectural history both in relation to other disciplines and in parallel to the Gothic Revival. I am now working on projects on architectural terminology and the role of the medieval architect.

In terms of archives, I'm primarily interested in exploring their use for artistic and activist practices. I've been involved in two AHRC-funded research projects: 'Memories of Mr Seel's Garden' and 'Sustaining Time', both of which have worked with community and activist groups and used archives both to research the past and to imagine alternative futures.

Dr Marios Costambeys

Reader in Medieval History, Department of History

My principal focus is on the social dynamics of early medieval Europe. This is best approached through the many transaction records (charters) that have survived from this distant period because they were preserved by (and often in some way benefitted) monasteries. An early paper explored the possibilities of this evidence for a region of north-western Europe. Since then, my focus has switched to central Italy, to the men and women responsible for the wealth and power, sustained over centuries, of monasteries like Farfa and Monte Cassino.

Like everything in the region, these institutions fell into the influential orbit of the city of Rome. Though far less populous than previously, and now no longer the capital of an empire, Rome was still a place of unique dimensions and attraction. I've examined some aspects of its position in recent articles. My current work aims at a more holistic view of the city and its hinterland across the broad period from late antiquity to the age of the communes.

Dr Godfried Croenen

Reader in French, Department of Modern Languages and Cultures

I am a specialist of the medieval history of France and the Low Countries. My particular interests are medieval chronicles and the history of the book in the medieval and early modern period. Most of my recent publications concern Jean Froissart's Chronicles and the manuscripts and early prints through which this important historical work was transmitted.

Professor Nandini Das

Professor of English Literature, Department of English

I work on Renaissance romance, fiction and early travel and cross-cultural encounters. Other research interests include early modern cultural and intellectual history, editing theory and history of the book, Shakespeare, Renaissance theatre and popular culture, women’s writing (especially Renaissance women writers and female pseudo-autobiographies from the sixteenth to the early eighteenth century), the development of early eighteenth century Orientalism, and digital humanities.

My recent publications include 'Robert Greene's Planetomachia' (2007), 'Renaissance Romance: The Transformation of English Prose Fiction, 1570-1620' (2011), and essays on Richard Hakluyt and early modern travel. I am currently working on 'Common Places', a Leverhulme Trust funded project on Renaissance travel and cultural memory. I also run the UKIERI funded 'Envisioning the Indian City' project (http://eticproject.wordpress.com/).

Dr Michael Davies

Department of English

My research lies in the Renaissance and Restoration periods. Having worked extensively on theology and narrative in the writings of John Bunyan, I am now exploring literature and religion in the seventeenth century more broadly, with an emphasis on early modern Protestant poetics and polemics. My current research projects concern Calvinism in Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, particularly Shakespeare, as well as the relationship between literature and religion, and politics in the Restoration, centring on the issue of 'liberty of conscience'.

I am also interested in literature of the English Revolution, and of eighteenth-century authors of the Dissenting or Calvinist traditions - such as Daniel Defoe and William Cowper - as well as in John Bunyan's 'afterlife' in the twentieth century. I would welcome postgraduate students (MA or PhD) with interests in any of the following areas of research: John Bunyan and writers of the 'Puritan'/Nonconformist tradition Early Modern literature, religion, and politics (1550-1750) Shakespeare Renaissance poetry and drama Restoration literature Literature and the English Revolution Literature and theology

Dr Nick Davis

Senior Lecturer in English, Department of English

Nick Davis works mainly on early modern writing, popular writing, literature-science relations, and narrative theory. He has written two monographs: 'Stories of Chaos: Reason and its Displacement in Early Modern Narrative' and the forthcoming 'Early Modern English Writing and the Privatization of Experience'. A founding member of the Group for Research in Literature, Psychology and Medical Humanities, he co-edits the monograph series 'Texts and Embodiments in Perspective'.

Dr Rebecca Dixon

Lecturer in French, CLAS

My research focuses mainly on literature and visual culture in pre-modern France (especially the period 1450-1530). I have particular interests in text-image relations, book-historical issues, costume and material culture, and the wider field of cross-cultural literary studies, including translation and adaptation studies. My most recent project is a monograph, 'A Romance Spectacular', examining the ways in which illustrated prose romances, from the period c. 1445-68, conveyed and shaped lifestyle aspirations at the Burgundian court under duke Philip the Good, both through their (verbal and visual) narrative preoccupations and through their qualities as artefacts. In it, I combine literary-historical, visual-cultural, and social-semiotic methodologies to produce a materialist reading of these romances that goes beyond straightforward text-image relations, or suggestions that illustrations merely offer a pendant to or comment on the text, and argues for the complementarity of the literary and the visual, and for the indivisibility of this content and the artefact that contains them, the manuscript book.

Future plans include a critical edition of a Burgundian prose romance, the 'Roman de Buscalus', which is under contract with Editions Honore Champion for completion in 2016, and my second monograph. Provisionally entitled 'Teemwork: Figuring the Crowd in the Burgundian Netherlands 1435-77', this will take an interdisciplinary and 'multimedia' approach to Burgundian culture. It proposes an examination of the role of the crowd as mediator of identity in text (e.g. prose romance, verse, chronicle, verse chronicle, prosimetra) and image (such as manuscript miniatures, panel paintings, tableaux vivants, tapestry) in Burgundian courtly and urban society.

Dr Clare Downham

Senior Lecturer, Institute of Irish Studies

Clare was a student at St Andrews and Cambridge and lectured in Celtic Studies at the University of Aberdeen before arriving in Liverpool. Her research interests focus on contacts across the Irish Sea in the Middle Ages. She has published two books on Viking Age history, and edited a collection of essays on the twelfth century hagiographer, Jocelin of Furness. She is currently writing a Cambridge Medieval Textbook about Ireland and a Short History of the Vikings for Tauris.

Dr Anna French

Lecturer in Early Modern History

I work on early modern religious culture, focussing especially on the English Reformation.  My work explores issues revolving around the related concepts of sin and salvation, considering perceptions of child sin in particular.  Indeed, I am interested in the ways religious change impacted upon beliefs about the young, from infancy to youth, and how changes in doctrine shaped new and evolving perceptions of the lifecycle.  As part of these research endeavours I use various documents, including printed familial advice literature, tracts and sermons.  

My recently published monograph, Children of Wrath: Possession, Prophecy and the Young in Early Modern England (2015), considered dualistic portrayals of children in early modern printed literature, which presented the young as both close to divine and demonic influences.

Since 2015 I have led the European Reformation Research Group, and organised its annual conference.  I am a member of the Sixteenth Century Society and the Renaissance Society of America, and regularly speak at their international conferences.  I am also a member of the North West Early Modern Seminar research group, and Honorary Fellow in the Centre for Reformation and Early Modern Studies at the University of Birmingham.

 

Dr Charlotte Harrison

Lecturer in Records and Archives Management, Department of History

I am interested in the historical development of record-keeping. My recent research has focused on the effect of manorial record-keeping on the late medieval English peasantry, examining the role which writing played in tenure, conveyancing and land litigation in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. I also teach medieval Latin and palaeography.

Dr Martin Heale

Senior Lecturer in Late Medieval History, Department of History

My central interest is in the history of religion between the twelfth and sixteenth centuries, including the Reformation. My research to date has focused mainly on the religious orders in late medieval England, including my Dependent Priories of Medieval English Monasteries (2004) and Monasticism in Late Medieval England (2009). This has included work on small monasteries, the relationship between monasteries and society in late medieval England and the role of the monastic superior. I am currently writing a book on The Abbot in Late Medieval and Reformation England.

Dr Damien Kempf

Senior Lecturer in Medieval History, Department of History

My PhD dissertation focused on the early medieval period and reconsidered the rise of the Carolingians through the analysis of a key source from this period, Paul the Deacon’s 'Liber de episcopis Mettensibus', written in the early 780s. I have edited, translated and introduced the text for the Dallas Medieval Texts and Translations Series (published by Peeters in 2013). I am currently completing a project initially started at the University of Bristol with Professor Marcus Bull, and which addresses the cultural history of the First Crusade and its reception in medieval Europe. More specifically, I am investigating the political, religious and cultural impact of the most successful account of the First Crusade, Robert the Monk’s 'Historia Iherosolimitana'. The number of surviving manuscripts - more than a hundred - makes the text one of the most popular historical works of the Middle Ages.

An important part of my work focuses on the cultural and political uses of the 'Historia Iherosolimitana' in the twelfth century (from which no fewer than 38 manuscripts survive), examining the text's journey from northern France, where it was first written and copied, to the German-speaking lands, where it enjoyed an enormous success. This research has already translated into a number of publications. In addition to a new edition of the text that Professor Marcus Bull and I have recently completed (Boydell & Brewer, 2013), I am writing a monograph tentatively called 'A cultural history of a medieval best-seller: Robert the Monk’s Historia Iherosolimitana', which examines the multifaceted nature of the reception of Robert's text in medieval Europe.

Dr Anne McLaren

Senior Lecturer in Early Modern Political and Cultural History, Department of History

I specialise in the cultural history of early modern political thought. I am especially interested in the challenges to kingship that arose as a consequence of religious reformation, and how kings (and queens) manoeuvred to position themselves in this new terrain. More generally, my work explores how prevailing sociocultural norms intersected with political thought and action in England, Scotland and France from the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries.

Dr Sarah Peverley

Professor of English, Department of English

Sarah Peverley’s current research focuses on literature produced during The Wars of the Roses, medieval kingship, and book history, especially manuscript culture. She is editing the two fifteenth-century chronicles written by John Hardyng, working on the oeuvre of a late medieval scribe, Richard Franceys, and writing a cultural history of the mermaid. Sarah has published on a range of subjects, including Historical Writing in Medieval and Tudor Britain, Early English Theatre, Anglo-Scottish Relations, War, Genealogy, the Political Consciousness of Late Medieval Authors, Arthurian Literature, and Origin Myths.

As an expert on medieval culture, she has appeared on BBC One's Breakfast programme, written and presented various radio broadcasts, and worked as a consultant for several BBC4 television documentaries. She regularly contributes to heritage events, offering public talks about the Middle Ages and medieval story-telling sessions for children. She also directs The Liverpool Players, a group of student-actors dedicated to making medieval and early modern drama accessible to the public. In addition to being a member of numerous professional bodies, learned societies, and research networks, Sarah is on the Editorial Advisory Board of Liverpool University Press and the Editorial Board of The Literary Encyclopedia.

Sarah Peverley’s current research focuses on literature produced during The Wars of the Roses, medieval kingship, and book history, especially manuscript culture. She is editing the two fifteenth-century chronicles written by John Hardyng, working on the oeuvre of a late medieval scribe, Richard Franceys, and writing a cultural history of the mermaid. Sarah has published on a range of subjects, including Historical Writing in Medieval and Tudor Britain, Early English Theatre, Anglo-Scottish Relations, War, Genealogy, the Political Consciousness of Late Medieval Authors, Arthurian Literature, and Origin Myths.

As an expert on medieval culture, she has appeared on BBC One's Breakfast programme, written and presented various radio broadcasts, and worked as a consultant for several BBC4 television documentaries. She regularly contributes to heritage events, offering public talks about the Middle Ages and medieval story-telling sessions for children. She also directs The Liverpool University Players, a group of student-actors dedicated to making medieval and early modern drama accessible to the public. In addition to being a member of numerous professional bodies, learned societies, and research networks, Sarah is on the Editorial Advisory Board of Liverpool University Press and she is a member of the AHRC Peer Review College.

Dr Andrew Redden

Lecturer in Latin American History, Department of History

Andrew's first book, 'Diabolism in Colonial Peru, 1560-1750', came out of his PhD investigation into the interaction between demons and the population of Colonial Peru. It centred on the diverse ways in which the perceived presence of demons was experienced and utilised by members of the various cultures that coexisted and intermingled in the Viceroyalty. Currently Andrew is completing a project that investigates the presence of angels and demons in the Early Modern Hispanic World, with a particular focus on the viceroyalties of New Spain (modern Mexico), Peru (including modern Bolivia and Chile) and New Granada (modern Colombia and Venezuela), but also including Spain and Southern Italy. Based on archival materials, theological treatises and religious art, the project assesses the various ways in which these spiritual beings were perceived to affect human lives. A co-edited anthology of essays on this topic was published by Cambridge University Press in 2013.

These studies incorporate a much broader interest in global Jesuit missions and, more generally, the transmission of religious ideas and practice in the early modern period throughout the Hispanic World, as well as the conflicts and surprising accommodations that resulted. Andrew has also worked on slavery and African witchcraft in Colonial New Granada, and conscience on Early Modern Hispanic frontiers. His next project will investigate martyrdom in the Hispanic World, linking the Colonial period with the modern or even contemporary periods and will be part of a network that seeks to understand martyrdom in a global context across time - for an interview in Spanish on these initial ideas with the Sinaloan newspaper, El Debate, please visit this link: El Debate interview with Andrew Redden, January 2011

Professor Gillian (Jill) Rudd

Department of English

I have published on Piers Plowman, Chaucer, the Gawain-poet as well as some medieval lyrics and The Cloud of Unknowyng. The main focus of my current research is eco-criticism, or green criticism and medieval literature (a topic I investigated in Greenery: ecocritical readings of late medieval literature). In general, I am interested in exploring the interplay between medieval literature and current concerns and literary approaches, often finding surprising correspondences between current outlook and medieval attitudes.

Dr Sizen Yiacoup

Lecturer in Iberian and Latin American Studies, Department of Modern Languages and Cultures

Sizen's research interests lie in the ways in which convivencia, the interaction between Jews, Muslims and Christians in medieval Iberia, is manifested and explored in Spanish literary and cultural forms of the medieval and early modern periods. She specialises primarily in the Castilian frontier ballads and the ways in which these poems reveal the extent and complexity of cultural exchange between Muslims and Christians on the late medieval frontier between Castile and Granada. Sizen's forthcoming book, Frontier Memory: Cultural Conflict & Exchange in the Romancero fronterizo, will be published in 2013 by the MHRA Texts & Dissertations Series.


Research Students

  • James Duffy (History) - Medieval Mystical Writings and the Reordering of High Medieval Society
  • Jane Lees (History) - The First and Second Crusade - configurations of power in the early twelfth century
  • Teng Li (History) - The Work of The Holy Spirit: Anselm of Havelberg on Historical Theology and Church Reunion
  • Anne Mearns (History) – Early Modern Queenship
  • Anna Turnbull (History) - The Leges Gentium under the Carolingians
  • Margaret Williams (History) - The Changing Face of Kingship 1461-1558
  • Charles (Jonathan) Wilson (History) - The Development of Crusading Ideology in Iberia and the Fifth Crusade
  • Johann Battaglini (English) -  King Arthur in the Middle English Prose Brut
  • Natalie Hanna (English) - Chaucer
  • David Jones (English)
  • Matthew McCall (English) - Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
  • Madelaine Smart (English) - The Albina Foundation Myth in the Middle English Prose Brut
  • Ben Broadbent (Irish Studies) - The writings of Adomnán of Iona
  • Joshua Copeland (Irish Studies) - Viking identities in the Irish Sea region
  • Ivy Manning (Irish Studies) - Piracy in sixteenth-century Ireland
  • Lynda McGuigan (Irish Studies) - The Pictish stones of Aberdeenshire
  • Raymond Ruhaak (Geography) - The Black Death in Ireland