The History blog

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If you're hung up on history, then this is the blog for you.

We'll give you an alternative look at our degree courses, bring out the stories behind our research and talk to you about the subjects you are most passionate about.

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From the White House to Niagra Falls — Emily McIndoe embraces her Study Abroad opportunity

Posted on: 20 March 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

UMD group photo

I spent a semester at the University of Maryland, USA in 2015 and it was the best decision I made at university. When I received my study abroad offer, and even after a quick Google search, I couldn’t point to Maryland on a map and had no idea about what I should expect when I arrived. The University of Maryland (UMD), is actually only a short metro ride from Washington DC and not that far from Baltimore either.


Careers - “What are you going to do with a degree in history?”

Posted on: 19 March 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Archivists looking at records

We found out how history graduate Lindsey Sutton turned her degrees in history and archive management into a career.


"Empowered working-class housewives" - Big Flame, Women and the Kirkby Rent Strike 1972-73

Posted on: 6 March 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

'Women's struggle on Tower Hill' leaflet

Inspired by the #PressForProgress theme for International Women's Day 2018, we hear from PhD student Kerrie McGiveron, who has been researching the fascinating story of the women of Big Flame, who were involved in the Kirkby rent strike in Liverpool, during the 1970s.


Digging and Controlling the Past — Unmasking Ideology in Imperial and Colonial Archaeology

Posted on: 1 March 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Pueblo Bonito at Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. Photo by mksfca, Creative Commons Flickr.

We are all familiar with the “Indiana Jones” myth, in which young (and attractive) archaeologists conquer and explore exotic landscapes in search of hidden treasures, defeating “bad guys” as they grab precious jewels or unlock ancient secrets. These fantasy films have encouraged the public to dream romantically of archaeological adventures abroad without thinking of their consequences. In fact, real archaeologists like Aurel Stein (1862-1943), Hiram Bingham (1875-1956), and Langdon Warner (1881-1955), are reputed to have served as the models for Steven Spielberg’s “hero”. Yet, as much fun as they are to watch, these movies hide ugly realities of the closely entangled relationship among imperial and colonial war, capitalism, and archaeology.


"It made me realise that history really was just outside my doorstep" — Lois shares her study abroad experience in Prague

Posted on: 27 February 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Prague - Lois Roberts blog piece

My name is Lois and I’m currently a third-year history student. Writing about my experience at Charles University, Prague, in only one article is going to be difficult as I have so many amazing memories from my Erasmus experience; but I’ll try and squeeze everything in! Before I start though, to anyone who has any doubts or worries about having difficulties making friends abroad, homesickness or just not fitting in, I hope this blog convinces you that you have absolutely nothing to worry about.


Liverpool: Celebrating 10 years as the Capital of Culture

Posted on: 14 February 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Liverpool Docks

This year, Liverpool will come together once more to celebrate the 10-year anniversary of being named the European Capital of Culture. Here, we will explore some of the highlights 2018 will bring as a celebration, and check out some other big names that turn 10, too!


"It’s two institutions presenting rival claims on the loyalties of North African Christians" – Dr Robin Whelan discusses Being Christian in Vandal Africa

Posted on: 8 February 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Baptismal font from a church in later sixth-century Clupea (modern Kélibia, Tunisia). Now in the Bardo Museum in Tunis.

Following the recent publication of Dr Robin Whelan’s book 'Being Christian in Vandal Africa: The Politics of Orthodoxy in the Post-Imperial West', Dr Chris Pearson sat with the author and Lecturer in Mediterranean History at the University of Liverpool to discuss their research and how their interest in the topic began.\n


Why did Suffragette Edith Rigby plant a bomb at the Cotton Exchange in Liverpool?

Posted on: 6 February 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Woman in front of a monument

We hear from modern history expert, Dr Sam Caslin about how a Suffragette from Preston shook the foundations of the Cotton Exchange in the heart of Liverpool in 1913. Did campaigns like Edith's help contribute to the passing of the Representation of the People Act, which allowed (some) women the right to vote in 1918?\n\n


"I decided we should have an illustration that is not a body factory" — MA Cultural History student chats to Michael Sappol

Posted on: 31 January 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Body Modern by Michael Sappol

As usual we all had a lot to say in our Themes in Cultural History seminar. The key text of the week was one of five cultural histories we have been studying in depth for the module and the response was very positive.


Opinion: Anti-Roma stigma of Czech president Miloš Zeman threatens progress over Romani rights

Posted on: 24 January 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

A woman holding a Roma flag

Czech president Miloš Zeman faces a tough run-off against rival Jiří Drahoš in the second round of the presidential election on 26-27 January 2018. Voters will deliver their verdict on Zeman’s open hostility to refugees, Muslims, and the European Union, and his support for Russia.


    Blog

    From the White House to Niagra Falls — Emily McIndoe embraces her Study Abroad opportunity

    Posted on: 20 March 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

    UMD group photo

    I spent a semester at the University of Maryland, USA in 2015 and it was the best decision I made at university. When I received my study abroad offer, and even after a quick Google search, I couldn’t point to Maryland on a map and had no idea about what I should expect when I arrived. The University of Maryland (UMD), is actually only a short metro ride from Washington DC and not that far from Baltimore either.


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