Other options

If you study Biological Sciences BSc at XJTLU you can choose from these options to study at the University of Liverpool on the XJTLU 2+2 programme.

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Biochemistry BSc (Hons): XJTLU 2+2 programme

Course details

If you have a natural curiosity for science and a proven understanding of biology and chemistry, coupled with a desire to learn how science can be exploited for the benefit of mankind, then you have a fascinating career ahead of you.

Course overview

How does the structure and function of proteins and other macromolecules explain life at the molecular level? What is the biochemical basis of disease? How does DNA control our development, our metabolism and our personal characteristics? How do enzymes work and how do hormones control biological function? These are just some of the fascinating questions addressed in this programme.

Biochemists are in great demand by employers and this degree will provide you with the knowledge and skills that employers want in medical and agricultural research, the pharmaceutical and other biotechnology industries, as well as in education.

Course content and modules

Year two

In addition to core modules, you will choose two modules from the indicative optional module list.

On the 2+2 programme, you'll study your third and fourth years at the University of Liverpool. These will be year two and year three of the University of Liverpool's programme of study.

Compulsory

Advanced Biochemical Techniques (LIFE224)

Credits: 7.5 / Semester: semester 2

This module will provide practical experience in advanced biochemical techniques. Students, working in small groups (of 4, exceptionally 3) will plan and perform two experimental projects: one on enzyme stability, and the other on protein purification. This module is required for students intending to enter the Biochemistry Honours School and is continuously assessed.

Cell Signalling in Health and Disease (LIFE202)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 2

This module will describe the molecular mechanisms that allow cells to communicate with each other;

The basic properties common to all signalling pathways will be studied and then a series of individual pathways will be examined in more detail, in the light of these general principles;

The importance of cellular signalling mechanisms will be illustrated by examining diseases (e.g. cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obesity, neurological disorders) that result from defects in these mechanisms;

The lectures will be supplemented with on-line resources. Students will be given guided reading, and regular formative assessment exercises will enable students to evaluate their understanding of the module;

The module will be assessed by continuous assessment

E-Biology: Informatics for Life Sciences (LIFE225)

Credits: 7.5 / Semester: semester 1

Many aspects of modern biology are being revolutionized by high-throughput methods that make copious amounts of data available in digital form. The aim of this module is to provide students with a practical appreciation of the nature and significance of this revolution. While the focus will be on analysis of data from areas such as genome sequencing, gene expression, and protein structure studies, the module will also look at use of such data in the context of understanding higher order phenomena within cells, such as metabolism, gene regulation, and protein-protein interaction. The module is continuously assessed.​​

E-Biology: Informatics for Life Sciences (S2) (LIFE242)

Credits: 7.5 / Semester: semester 2

Many aspects of modern biology are being revolutionized by high-throughput methods that make copious amounts of data available in digital form. The aim of this module is to provide students with a practical appreciation of the nature and significance of this revolution. While the focus will be on analysis of data from areas such as genome sequencing, gene expression, and protein structure studies, the module will also look at use of such data in the context of understanding higher order phenomena within cells, such as metabolism, gene regulation, and protein-protein interaction. The module is continuously assessed.​​​

Essential Skills for the Life Sciences 2 (LIFE223)

Credits: 15 / Semester: whole session

This module will continue, extend, and broaden the transferable skills developed in Year 1. It will focus on improving the students’ analytical, communication, quantitative, and employability skills. The communication skills component is assessed through a portfolio whereas the quantitative skills component is assessed through a group poster and SAQ.

Molecular Science (LIFE237)

Credits: 7.5 / Semester: semester 1

This module is a 6 weeks molecular biology practical to provide experience in techniques to isolate, clone and analyse genes (analysis of DNA fragments by agarose gel electrophoresis, PCR, transformations, plasmid DNA preparations, gene cloning). The module has a range of different formative and summative assessments to include in-course problem-solving exercises, online quizzes and abstract writing, which ensure the student becomes confident to continue genetic manipulations in specialist Year 2 Semester 2 practical modules and for project work in Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology.  ​The module will encourage confidence, teamwork and communication through active learning in lectures and practicals centred around authentic assessments.

Structure and Dynamics of Macromolecules (LIFE203)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 2

This module aims to provide an introduction to the detailed structure of biomolecules (particularly nucleic acids and proteins), the different techniques used to determine this structure and how structural features define biological function. LIFE245 is a prerequisite. Examples will be included to show how altered structure leads to altered function in disease. It will introduce cutting-edge technologies used to investigate protein structure and behaviour from actually visualising molecules using cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, to determining how molecules move and interact using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The uses, advantages and limitations of these techniques will be illustrated using case studies of specific macromolecular complexes. The lectures will be supplemented with on-line resources.

Students will be given guided reading, and regular formative assessment exercises will enable students to evaluate their understanding of the module.

The module will be assessed by both continuous assessments and by a final examination.

Techniques in Cell Biology (LIFE227)

Credits: 7.5 / Semester: semester 1

This practical module aims to provide practical and theoretical experience in techniques currently used in cell biology. These techniques include assay, culture, histology and microscopy. The module is assessed through coursework and a final exam.

Biological Chemistry (LIFE245)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 1

The Biochemistry and Pharmacology programmes, and at UoL require students to have studied chemistry to A level or equivalent standard. The Biological Chemistry module is designed to build on this background, and the chemical content of the Year 1 modules, especially LIFE101 and LIFE102 (which is designed for all students) to develop chemical understanding and analytical skills to support later modules in structural and mechanistic biochemistry, medicinal chemistry and pharmacokinetics. The module may also be taken by C130 or C100 students with the appropriate chemical background to equip them to study some of these later modules as part of their general programmes.

From Genes to Proteins (LIFE201)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 1

This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental processes whereby genetic information is expressed as proteins in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Lectures will be supplemented with on-line resources. Students will be given guided reading, and regular formative assessment exercises will enable students to evaluate their understanding of the module. The module will be assessed two assessments.

Optional

Biotechnology (LIFE210)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 2

This module will examine the ways in which biological processes are applied for solving technological processes.

Examples of specific processes will be used including production of antibiotics, biomass, single cell protein, biopolymers, vaccines and other therapeutic agents.

The lectures will be supplemented with on-line reading resources. Students will be given guided reading, and regular formative assessment exercises will enable students to evaluate their understanding of the module.

The module will be assessed by two assessments.

DRUG ACTION (LIFE206)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 2

This module aims to enable students to develop their understanding of the cardiovascular, endocrine and central nervous systems and the mechanisms by which drugs interact with physiological processes operating within each of these systems. They will also gain an appreciation of the drug development process, including clinical trials and drug regulation. The lectures will be supplemented with on-line resources. Students will be given guided reading, and regular formative assessment exercises in class will enable students to evaluate their understanding of the module. The module will be assessed by through two online assessments.

MOLECULAR AND MEDICAL GENETICS (LIFE208)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 2

This module aims to introduce students with an interest in Genetics and Molecular Biology to the range of biological mechanisms that control structure and stability of the genetic material and their impact on health and disease.

It uses examples from both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, to develop principles that explain DNA replication, repair and recombination. These principles and processes are then discussed in a clinical/medical genetics context.

The lectures will be supplemented with on-line resources. Students will be given guided reading, and regular formative assessment exercises will enable students to evaluate their understanding of the module.

The module will be assessed by both continuous assessments and by a final examination.

Organic Chemistry for Pharmacology (CHEM038)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 2

A year 2 Chemistry module for Life Sciences. Whilst designed and aimed to offer Pharmacology students a grounding in directly relevant organic chemistry and spectroscopy, other Life Science students with an interest in Pharmacology may wish to take this as an optional module.

Principles of Pharmacology (LIFE207)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 1

This module will provide an understanding of the quantitative aspects of drug action on cellular receptors and will address the relationship between drug efficacy and chemical structure.

The module will introduce the basic principles of pharmacokinetics, outline the relationship between drug concentration and response, and include an introduction to the principles of toxicity of drugs and their metabolites.

The module will provide knowledge of the molecular biology of receptors.

The lectures will be supplemented with online resources. Students will be given guided reading, and regular formative assessment exercises will enable students to evaluate their understanding of the module.

The module will be assessed by both continuous assessments and by a final examination.

The Immune System in Health and Disease (LIFE221)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 1

The module will develop knowledge and understanding of the immune system, the molecules, cells and tissues that are involved in its function, its role in combating infection and how its dysfunction can contribute to disease.

Lectures will be supplemented with on-line resources. Problem solving workshops dedicated to case studies will be held to help students prepare for the assessments. Students will be given guided reading, and formative and summative assessment exercises held during the course will enable students to monitor and evaluate their progress and to prepare for the final assessment.

The module will be assessed by two assessments.

The Multicellular Organism: tissues, development, regeneration and aging (LIFE205)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 1

This module aims to describe the structure and function of fundamental tissues, such as epithelial and connective tissue and of specialised tissues such as bone, muscle and the nervous system. An introduction to the mechanisms by which cells differentiate to form different tissues and regenerate following injury will be included. The processes that occur during aging will be explained with special reference to changes in key tissues and organs. The lectures will be supplemented with on-line resources, guided reading and formative assessment exercises that will enable students to evaluate their understanding of the module. The module will be assessed by both continuous assessment and by a final examination.​

Virology (LIFE209)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 1

This module is an introduction to modern virology.

The module provides an overview of different virus families and aims to explain the fundamental properties of different viruses, their infection in different organisms, their detection and control, and positive applications of viruses.

The lectures will be supplemented with online resources. Students will be given guided reading, and regular formative assessment exercises will enable students to evaluate their understanding of the module.

The module will be assessed by both continuous assessments and by a final examination.

Your experience

Virtual tour

What students say...

Su Yuhe

As a Biochemistry student, we have access to both the high-standard teaching labs and research labs.
We can do experiments like genotyping PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction), western blotting and immunofluorescence assays.
These are crucial skills we need to be equipped with as Biochemistry students.

Su Yuhe