Photo of Prof Chris Halloran

Prof Chris Halloran BSc, MB ChB (commend), MD, FRCS (Eng), FRCS (Gen Surg), FAcadTM, SFHEA.

Professor of Pancreatic Surgery Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine

About

Personal Statement

Chris Halloran graduated from Liverpool University (Intercalated BSc in Microbiology 1992; MB ChB with commendation 1994). Following house jobs, he taught anatomy in Liverpool, attaining part 1 Fellow Royal College of Surgeons (FRCS). Chris then undertook basic surgical training across Merseyside receiving full FRCS (Eng) in 1998. Further research was undertaken (with Eithne Costello and John Neoptolemos) into the effects of combination chemo-gene therapy on pancreas cancer, resulting in award of an MD in 2005. Chris was appointed clinical lecturer in 2002, awarded FRCS (Gen. Surg) in 1998 and completed higher surgical training in 2009 and awarded his completion of surgical training certification (CST). Chris was appointed Clinical Senior Lecturer and Honorary Consultant Pancreato-Biliary Surgeon in Liverpool in 2009. Chris was promoted to Reader in 2017 and to Professor of Pancreatic Surgery in 2018.

Chris extensively publishes on basic science (SPION technology), clinical research into pancreatic cancer and acute pancreatitis and clinical trials. He is recognised as a trials methodologist, specialising in conduct of surgical trials and as a surgical leader across many committee's and National and International collaborations.


Prizes or Honours

  • European Pancreatic Club Gold Medal (European Pancreatic Club, 2016)
  • Pump Prime Award (RCS England, 2010)
  • Society Tankard (North West Society of Surgeons, 2007)

Funded Fellowships

  • Pump Priming Award (Pancreatic Soceity GBI, 2006)

Other Personal Distinctions

  • EPC award for clinical pancreatic science (European pancreatic Club, 2002)
  • Pancreatic Society Travel Bursary (Pancreatic Society, 2001)
  • Surgical Research Society Research Bursary (Surgical Research Society, 2000)
  • Royal College of Surgeons of England Research Fellow (Royal College of Surgeons of England, 1999)