Other options

If you study Bioinformatics BSc at XJTLU you can choose from these options to study at the University of Liverpool on the XJTLU 2+2 programme.

Study   ›  Undergraduate courses  ›   XJTLU 2+2

Biological Sciences BSc (Hons): XJTLU 2+2 programme

Course details

Study Biological Sciences at Liverpool to focus on the study of living things, and understand how they respond to each other and the world around them.

Course overview

This programme allows you to pursue your own areas of specific interest and to have an appreciation of the full range of the subject.

A progressive series of field, laboratory and lecture modules cover most aspects of the Biological Sciences, with students able to select topics to match their interests.

Across both years there are options to choose laboratory practicals or field courses. Each experience gives an invaluable opportunity to see what real scientific research is like and to work alongside staff who are international authorities in their fields.

Fees and funding

Tuition fees cover the cost of your teaching and assessment, operating facilities such as libraries, IT equipment, and access to academic and personal support.

Tuition fees

All XJTLU 2+2 students receive a partnership discount of 10% on the standard fees for international students. We also offer 50 XJTLU Excellence Scholarships providing a 25% discount on tuition fees to the students that score most highly in stage 2 at XJTLU across the different subject areas. Allocation is based on the number of applications received per programme.

The net fees (inclusive of the discounts) can be seen below.

XJTLU 2+2 fees
2024 tuition fee (full) £27,200
2024 tuition fee for XJTLU 2+2 students (inclusive of 10% discount) £24,480
2024 tuition fee for XJTLU 2+2 students qualifying for Excellence Scholarship (inclusive of 25% discount) £20,400
Fees stated are for the 2024-25 academic year.

Course content and modules

Year two

In year two, you will take one compulsory module which serves to develop the essential life science skills that aim to enhance the employability prospects of students and career awareness. You then select entirely from a range of optional modules that allows you to pursue a focal point for your own specific areas of interest in biological sciences.

You will choose four modules from the following eight practical module options:

  • LIFE225 or LIFE242
  • LIFE238
  • LIFE237
  • LIFE227
  • LIFE224
  • CHEM022
  • LIFE228
  • LIFE226

You will choose five modules from the 14 theory module options.

Options include

Semester 1: LIFE209, LIFE201, LIFE205, LIFE221, LIFE207, LIFE213, LIFE245.

Semester 2: LIFE210, LIFE208, LIFE202, LIFE204, LIFE206, CHEM038, LIFE203.

We suggest a balance across both semesters so please take note of which semester a module runs in.

On the 2+2 programme, you'll study your third and fourth years at the University of Liverpool. These will be year two and year three of the University of Liverpool's programme of study.

Programme details and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.

Compulsory

Essential Skills for the Life Sciences 2 (LIFE223)

Credits: 15 / Semester: whole session

This module will continue, extend, and broaden the transferable skills developed in Year 1. It will focus on improving the students’ analytical, communication, quantitative, and employability skills. The communication skills component is assessed through a portfolio whereas the quantitative skills component is assessed through a group poster and SAQ.

Optional

Advanced Experimental Design and Analysis (LIFE238)

Credits: 7.5 / Semester: semester 2

This module extends and puts into practice the knowledge and understanding students gained from LIFE223. In a series of interactive seminars and practicals, students will design and perform their own experiments, choose and perform the appropriate data analysis, and write up the results in a report.

Advanced Biochemical Techniques (LIFE224)

Credits: 7.5 / Semester: semester 2

This module will provide practical experience in advanced biochemical techniques. Students, working in small groups (of 4, exceptionally 3) will plan and perform two experimental projects: one on enzyme stability, and the other on protein purification. This module is required for students intending to enter the Biochemistry Honours School and is continuously assessed. The module is delivered via lectures, lab work and workshops and assessed by practical exam and two scientific reports.

Advanced Genetics Techniques (LIFE226)

Credits: 7.5 / Semester: semester 2

This practical module aims to provide practical experience in a range of modern genetic techniques including genetic manipulation, mutagenesis, population genetics, molecular analysis of genomes and bioinformatics. Students will also develop the skills required to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve biological problems. This module is continuously assessed.

Advanced Microbiological Techniques (LIFE228)

Credits: 7.5 / Semester: semester 2

This practical module aims to provide students with an opportunity to learn and apply a range of microbiological laboratory techniques in order to develop their ability to plan and execute research projects in microbiology. The module is continuously assessed.

Biological Chemistry (LIFE245)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 1

The Biochemistry and Pharmacology programmes, and at UoL require students to have studied chemistry to A level or equivalent standard. The Biological Chemistry module is designed to build on this background, and the chemical content of the Year 1 modules, especially LIFE101 and LIFE102 (which is designed for all students) to develop chemical understanding and analytical skills to support later modules in structural and mechanistic biochemistry, medicinal chemistry and pharmacokinetics. The module may also be taken by C130 or C100 students with the appropriate chemical background to equip them to study some of these later modules as part of their general programmes.

Biotechnology (LIFE210)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 2

This module will examine the ways in which biological processes are applied for solving technological processes.

Examples of specific processes will be used including production of antibiotics, biomass, single cell protein, biopolymers, vaccines and other therapeutic agents.

The lectures will be supplemented with on-line reading resources. Students will be given guided reading, and regular formative assessment exercises will enable students to evaluate their understanding of the module.

The module will be assessed by two assessments.

Cell Signalling in Health and Disease (LIFE202)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 2

This module will describe the molecular mechanisms that allow cells to communicate with each other;

The basic properties common to all signalling pathways will be studied and then a series of individual pathways will be examined in more detail, in the light of these general principles;

The importance of cellular signalling mechanisms will be illustrated by examining diseases (e.g. cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obesity, neurological disorders) that result from defects in these mechanisms;

The lectures will be supplemented with on-line resources. Students will be given guided reading, and regular formative assessment exercises will enable students to evaluate their understanding of the module;

The module will be assessed by continuous assessment

Chemical Techniques (CHEM022)

Credits: 7.5 / Semester: semester 2

This laboratory module covers the basic techniques of chemical experimental science, including analysis of unknown chemicals, basic chemical synthesis and separation and computerised search for molecular information.

DRUG ACTION (LIFE206)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 2

This module aims to enable students to develop their understanding of the cardiovascular, endocrine and central nervous systems and the mechanisms by which drugs interact with physiological processes operating within each of these systems. They will also gain an appreciation of the drug development process, including clinical trials and drug regulation. The lectures will be supplemented with on-line resources. Students will be given guided reading, and regular formative assessment exercises in class will enable students to evaluate their understanding of the module. The module will be assessed by an online test and a final examination.

E-Biology: Informatics for Life Sciences (LIFE225)

Credits: 7.5 / Semester: semester 1

Many aspects of modern biology are being revolutionized by high-throughput methods that make copious amounts of data available in digital form. The aim of this module is to provide students with a practical appreciation of the nature and significance of this revolution. While the focus will be on analysis of data from areas such as genome sequencing, gene expression, and protein structure studies, the module will also look at use of such data in the context of understanding higher order phenomena within cells, such as metabolism, gene regulation, and protein-protein interaction. The module is continuously assessed.​​

E-Biology: Informatics for Life Sciences (S2) (LIFE242)

Credits: 7.5 / Semester: semester 2

Many aspects of modern biology are being revolutionized by high-throughput methods that make copious amounts of data available in digital form. The aim of this module is to provide students with a practical appreciation of the nature and significance of this revolution. While the focus will be on analysis of data from areas such as genome sequencing, gene expression, and protein structure studies, the module will also look at use of such data in the context of understanding higher order phenomena within cells, such as metabolism, gene regulation, and protein-protein interaction. The module is continuously assessed.​​​

Evolutionary Biology (LIFE213)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 1

This module seeks to explain how the process of natural selection underpins the origins of biodiversity.

The module will address the origins of phenotypic diversity, focussing on where heritable phenotypic variation comes from and how it shapes the evolutionary process within species (microevolution).

Having established a basic model for understanding how evolution works, the second part of the module will explain the link between microevolution and evolution above the species level (macroevolution), overviewing the major evolutionary transitions.

The lectures will be supplemented with online resources. Students will be given guided reading.

The module will be assessed by two coursework assessments in semester 1.

Endocrine and Neuro-physiology (LIFE204)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 2

This module aims to provide the essential background knowledge to understand key concepts in neuroscience. It covers the principles of operation of nervous system, systematic and sensory neurophysiology, excitotoxicity and behaviour. The module also provides essential background knowledge to understand the key principles of endocrinology, and how it contributes to physiological homeostasis. It covers the secretions, functions and regulation of the major endocrine glands. The module also explores the role of the nervous and endocrine systems in the integrative control of the digestive tract. The lectures will be supplemented with on-line resources. Students will be given guided reading, and regular formative assessment exercises will enable students to evaluate their understanding of the module. The module will be assessed by continuous assessment.

From Genes to Proteins (LIFE201)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 1

This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental processes whereby genetic information is expressed as proteins in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Lectures will be supplemented with on-line resources. Students will be given guided reading, and regular formative assessment exercises will enable students to evaluate their understanding of the module. The module will be assessed two assessments.

MOLECULAR AND MEDICAL GENETICS (LIFE208)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 2

This module aims to introduce students with an interest in Genetics and Molecular Biology to the range of biological mechanisms that control structure and stability of the genetic material and their impact on health and disease.

It uses examples from both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, to develop principles that explain DNA replication, repair and recombination. These principles and processes are then discussed in a clinical/medical genetics context.

The lectures will be supplemented with on-line resources. Students will be given guided reading, and regular formative assessment exercises will enable students to evaluate their understanding of the module.

The module will be assessed by continuous assessments.

Molecular Science (LIFE237)

Credits: 7.5 / Semester: semester 1

This module is a 6 weeks molecular biology practical to provide experience in techniques to isolate, clone and analyse genes (analysis of DNA fragments by agarose gel electrophoresis, PCR, transformations, plasmid DNA preparations, gene cloning). The module has a range of different formative and summative assessments to include in-course problem-solving exercises, online quizzes and abstract writing, which ensure the student becomes confident to continue genetic manipulations in specialist Year 2 Semester 2 practical modules and for project work in Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology.  ​The module will encourage confidence, teamwork and communication through active learning in lectures and practicals centred around authentic assessments.

Organic Chemistry for Pharmacology (CHEM038)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 2

A year 2 Chemistry module for Life Sciences. Whilst designed and aimed to offer Pharmacology students a grounding in directly relevant organic chemistry and spectroscopy, other Life Science students with an interest in Pharmacology may wish to take this as an optional module.

Principles of Pharmacology (LIFE207)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 1

This module will provide an understanding of the quantitative aspects of drug action on cellular receptors and will address the relationship between drug efficacy and chemical structure.

The module will introduce the basic principles of pharmacokinetics, outline the relationship between drug concentration and response, and include an introduction to the principles of toxicity of drugs and their metabolites.

The module will provide knowledge of the molecular biology of receptors.

The lectures will be supplemented with online resources. Students will be given guided reading, and regular formative assessment exercises will enable students to evaluate their understanding of the module.

The module will be assessed by both an online test and a final examination.

Structure and Dynamics of Macromolecules (LIFE203)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 2

This module aims to provide an introduction to the detailed structure of biomolecules (particularly nucleic acids and proteins), the different techniques used to determine this structure and how structural features define biological function. LIFE245 is a prerequisite. Examples will be included to show how altered structure leads to altered function in disease. It will introduce cutting-edge technologies used to investigate protein structure and behaviour from actually visualising molecules using cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, to determining how molecules move and interact using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The uses, advantages and limitations of these techniques will be illustrated using case studies of specific macromolecular complexes. The lectures will be supplemented with on-line resources.

Students will be given guided reading, and regular formative assessment exercises will enable students to evaluate their understanding of the module.

The module will be assessed by two coursework assessments.

Techniques in Cell Biology (LIFE227)

Credits: 7.5 / Semester: semester 1

This practical module aims to provide practical and theoretical experience in techniques currently used in cell biology. These techniques include assay, culture, histology and microscopy. The module is assessed through coursework and a final exam.

The Immune System in Health and Disease (LIFE221)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 1

The module will develop knowledge and understanding of the immune system, the molecules, cells and tissues that are involved in its function, its role in combating infection and how its dysfunction can contribute to disease.

Lectures will be supplemented with on-line resources. Problem solving workshops dedicated to case studies will be held to help students prepare for the assessments. Students will be given guided reading, and formative and summative assessment exercises held during the course will enable students to monitor and evaluate their progress and to prepare for the final assessment.

The module will be assessed by two assessments.

The Multicellular Organism: tissues, development, regeneration and aging (LIFE205)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 1

This module aims to describe the structure and function of fundamental tissues, such as epithelial and connective tissue and of specialised tissues such as muscle and the nervous system. An introduction to the mechanisms by which cells differentiate to form different tissues and regenerate following injury will be included. The processes that occur during aging will be explained with special reference to changes in key tissues and organs. The lectures will be supplemented with on-line resources, guided reading and formative assessment exercises that will enable students to evaluate their understanding of the module. The module will be assessed by both continuous assessment and by a final examination.​

Virology (LIFE209)

Credits: 15 / Semester: semester 1

This module is an introduction to modern virology.

The module provides an overview of different virus families and aims to explain the fundamental properties of different viruses, their infection in different organisms, their detection and control, and positive applications of viruses.

The lectures will be supplemented with online resources. Students will be given guided reading, and regular formative assessment exercises will enable students to evaluate their understanding of the module.

The module will be assessed by continuous assessment.

Your experience

We have a distinctive approach to education, the Liverpool Curriculum Framework, which focuses on research-connected teaching, active learning, and authentic assessment to ensure our students graduate as digitally fluent and confident global citizens.

Supporting your learning

From arrival to alumni, we’re with you all the way:

An exciting place for postrgradute study

  • Programmes taught by internationally-renowned scientists and clinicians
  • Research-connected education covering the full life science spectrum from biochemistry to zoology
  • Access to world-class facilities
  • Provide specialist training with taught and research components
  • Options for intercalating students
  • Vibrant postgraduate community.

What students say...

Zhang Minxing with sea in the background

In general, studying at University of Liverpool is a good experience. When I meet any difficulties with my studies, I know quite a lot of PhD students and professors who are willing to give their suggestions.