Philosophy MA

  • Programme duration: Full-time: 12 months   Part-time: 24 months
  • Programme start: September 2020
  • Entry requirements: You will need a 2:1 Honours degree, or equivalent in a suitable subject; many subjects are acceptable here, Philosophy, Law, Politics, Sociology, Humanities, Science and Maths subjects.
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Module details

 

Compulsory modules

Research Skills (PHIL703)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterWhole Session
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To enhance skills in logic and reasoning. To acquaint students with philological issues raised by philosophical terminology. To enhance students' abilities to use library resources for research purposes. To provide experience of presenting research ideas in a conference situation.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to identify valid argument forms and detect fallacies.

(LO2) Students will be able to recognise common rhetorical devices and reconstruct professional philosophers' arguments from their prose.

(LO3) Students will be aware of factors involved in evaluating information sources.

(LO4) Students will be aware of DISCOVER and other sources of academic information.

(LO5) Students will be aware of semantic development of philosophically significant terms.

(LO6) Students will be aware of the sorts of semantic unities that underlie different traditions of philosophical thought.

(S1) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources].

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral.

(S3) Confidence in dealing with matters of logic.

(S4) Students will enhance their ability to identify and reflect critically upon the issues that underlie debates.

(S5) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches.

(S6) Students will enhance their ability to marshal ideas and arguments and present them in writing.

Religion, Ethics and Practical Philosophy (PHIL704)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module introduces current issues in ethics, philosophy of religion and practical philosophy, as considered by academics who are actively researching them. The module serves both to introduce students with no previous detailed know of the areas studied to such issues and to show how active researchers approach them. The module thus functions both as a research preparation module and module for consolidating knowledge in these areas of philosophy.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will gain an appreciation of recent developments in ethics, philosophy of religion and practical philosophy.

(LO2) Students will improve their understanding of philosophical research in the areas of ethics, religion and practical philosophy.

(LO3) Students will improve their ability to research a philosophical topic.

(S1) Research skills.

(S2) Comprehension of abstract ideas and arguments.

(S3) Application of abstract ideas and arguments to ethical, religious and other practical issues.

(S4) Exposition of philosophical theories and arguments.

(S5) Construction and analysis of philosophical theories and arguments.

Metaphysics, Language and Mind (PHIL705)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module introduces current issues in metaphysics, philosophy of language and philosophy of mind, as considered by academics who are actively engaged in researching them. The module serves both to introduce such issues to students with no previous detailed knowledge of the areas studied and to show how active researchers approach them. Thus it serves as both a research preparation module and a module for gaining and consolidating knowledge of these areas of philosophy.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students be able to explain recent developments in metaphysics, philosophy of language and philosophy of mind.

(LO2) Students will improve their ability to research a philosophical topic.

(LO3) Students will improve their ability to write at length on philosophical topics.

(S1) Research skills

(S2) Comprehension of abstract ideas and arguments

(S3) Ability to present abstract ideas and arguments orally

(S4) Written exposition of philosophical theories and arguments

(S5) Construction and analysis of philosophical theories and arguments

M.a. Dissertation (PHIL706)
LevelM
Credit level60
SemesterWhole Session
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The aim is for the student to choose a topic of special interest in philosophy and conduct research into this area of interest via reading and private study under the supervision of the supervisor to whom they have been allocated.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To produce a systematic piece of written work, organised in chapters/sections in the manner of professional and published work in philosophy, so as to show that the research referred to in the Aims has been mastered in a way appropriate to someone with a grasp of the practice of professional philosophy.

(S1) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

(S2) Digital scholarship participating in emerging academic, professional and research practices that depend on digital systems

(S3) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

(S4) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

(S5) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

(S6) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

(S7) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

Optional modules

Metaphysical and Epistemic Issues in Philosophy of Religion (PHIL715)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To give the student a detailed grasp of the current state of discussion in the major arguments for the existence of God, and in problems concerning the concept of God, predominantly in the Western tradition.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will demonstrate an advanced awareness of various issues and controversies in the philosophy of religion.

(LO2) Students will show the capacity to systematically analyze contemporary debates in the philosophy of religion.

(LO3) Students will demonstrate the ability to advance arguments with appropriate rigour and to come to reasoned conclusions.

(LO4) Students will show an ability to appreciate and evaluate different points of view on matters relevant to the philosophy of religion.

(S1) Students will enhance their abilities in the reading and analysis of complex texts

(S2) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically and analysing arguments with clarity, precision and rigour

(S3) Students will enhance their capacities to respond creatively and critically to intellectual challenges.

(S4) Students will develop their competence in undertaking independent research and information retrieval

(S5) Students will develop their capacities to marshall and structure arguments in academic form

(S6) Students will develop their willingness critically to evaluate to arguments, beliefs, proposals and values, both their own and of others

(S7) Students will enhance their capacity to participate, respectfully and reflectively, in debates about controversial and profound matters

(S8) Students will develop their skills in time management

(S9) Students will develop the fluency and maturity of their academic writing skills

(S10) Students will enhance their skills in oral debate about complex and controversial matters

Aesthetics (PHIL716)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Students will explore in detail arguments of some of the most important philosophers on art, aesthetics and cultural theory, including Kant, Hegel, Danto and Tolstoy. Students will critically engage with key concepts and theories in aesthetics, including the aesthetic judgement, disinterestedness, the institutional theory of art, the nature of representation and expression and feminism and post-modern critiques. Students will be encouraged to develop connections between works of art and artistic practices of the past and present.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in aesthetics.

(LO2) Students will be able to analyse and critically assess key concepts and arguments relating to aesthetics and art.

(LO3) Students will be able to structure discussion of issues in aesthetics at an advanced level.

(LO4) Students will be able to identify and develop links between influential philosophical theories and artistic practices.

(LO5) Students will be able to articulate, defend and criticise positions in aesthetics and philosophy of art.

(LO6) Students will be able to present their ideas with clarity and confidence.

(LO7) Students will be able to develop in writing, coherent, structures and sophisticated accounts on abstract philosophical issues.

(S1) Develop skills in making appropriate use of information technology, information on the WWW and reference works and databases relevant to the discipline.

(S2) Enhance the capacity to participate in debates about controversial and profound issues.

(S3) Develop willingness to critically evaluate and reflect upon arguments, beliefs, proposals and values.

(S4) Enhance the ability in reading and understanding complex texts and abstract material.

(S5) Develop skills in thinking critically, analyse problems in detail and providing in depth evaluation of arguments.

(S6) Enhance ability to identify, develop and reflect critically upon the issues that underlie debates.

(S7) Develop confidence in considering ideas and approaches with which they may be less familiar.

(S8) Enhance ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

(S9) Advance ability to perform bibliographical searches, to include citations and bibliographies in their work, organise and produce presentations of work to professional standard.

(S10) Enhance oral and written communication skills and develop skills in explaining complex material in a precise manner.

Substance and Process in Indian Metaphysics (PHIL726)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to; explore the philosophy of Classical India considered as a dialogue between Buddhist and Brahminical thinkers, investigate what is distinctive about these Indian approaches and compare and contrast them with Western philosophical counterparts on matters of metaphysics, ethics and philosophy of religion.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to identify and evaluate key philosophical commitments in Classical Indian thought.

(LO2) Students will be able to contrast and compare some important Western and non-Western philosophical ideas and assumptions

(LO3) Students will gain an insight into researching non-Western philosophical theories and arguments

(LO4) Students will be able to contextualise information about the Indian worldviews they consider

(LO5) Students will gain an appreciation of the particularity of Western philosophical theory and assumptions

(S1) Confidence in considering unfamiliar ideas

(S2) Ability to understand some non-Western texts

(S3) Ability to research a philosophical topic

(S4) Ability to compare and evaluate philosophical ideas from different cultures

(S5) Ability to articulate and critically discuss philosophical ideas and arguments

Consciousness (PHIL709)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To give students a detailed grasp of some of the most significant debates in contemporary philosophy of mind. To enable students to engage at advanced level with the topics of consciousness, perception and artificial intelligence.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to appreciate the background context to current debates in the philosophy of mind.

(LO2) Students will be able to explain and assess the strengths and weaknesses of relevant competing doctrines, such as those concerning physicalism, dualism, functionalism, consciousness, perception and artificial intelligence.

(S1) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

(S2) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

(S3) Students will enhance their abilities in the reading and analysis of complex texts

(S4) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically and analysing arguments with clarity, precision and rigour

(S5) Students will develop their capacities to marshall and structure arguments in academic form

(S6) Students will develop their skills in time management

(S7) Students will enhance their skills in oral debate about complex and controversial matters

(S8) Students will enhance their capacity to participate, respectfully and reflectively, in debates about controversial and profound matters

Philosophy of Film (PHIL757)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To consider the variety of ways of thinking philosophically about film. To encourage students to think about film in ways they might not have previously considered. To help students understand the issues and arguments that arise when considering film as an art form. To familiarise students with filmmakers and their methods, and to encourage them to think critically about them. To help students reflect on the differences between film and other art forms, and on the philosophical implications of these differences.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to assess issues that arise in philosophers’ approaches to film.

(LO2) Students will be able to analyse some of the problems associated with the philosophy of film.

(LO3) Students will be able to explain philosophical difficulties involved in considering the relation of film to other art forms.

(LO4) Students will be able to assess philosophical issues raised by the methods of different filmmakers.

(LO5) Students will be able to evaluate arguments for and against film as art.

(LO6) Students will be able to reflect critically on various topics, such as adaptation, and the implications they might have for film as an art form.

(LO7) Students will be able to engage with philosophers and critics who hold controversial views on the importance of film.

(LO8) Students will be able to engage critically with the films presented on the module.

(S1) Students will further develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

(S2) Students will enhance their ability to identify and reflect critically upon the issues that underlie debates.

(S3) Students will develop further confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches.

(S4) Students will enhance their ability to analyse works of film art.

(S5) Students will develop their confidence in group discussion of philosophical topics.

(S6) Students will improve their writing skills, presenting difficult topics in an engaging and lucid manner.

Advanced Topics in Philosophy of Language (PHIL710)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To study the analytic philosophy of language.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students should gain a good understanding of the main issues in contemporary analytic philosophy of language, suitable to serve as a basis for research.