English Literature MA

  • Programme duration: Full-time: 12 months   Part-time: 24 months
  • Programme start: Autumn 2021
  • Entry requirements: You will need a good 2:1 Honours degree in English studies or a similar subject.
English MA

Module details

Due to the impact of COVID-19 we're changing how the course is delivered

Students opting for the general pathway are required to take at least 60 credits from the modules offered across the whole portfolio of English Literature MA modules, in addition to the core modules (Research Skills, Dissertation Project, Dissertation). You must take two paired core modules from one of the other MA English Literature pathways in semester one and semester two respectively. These are either (a) Literature, Slavery and Empire AND Editing the Early Moderns (b) Yore Victorians AND Reading the Victorians (c) The Modern AND The Contemporary OR (d) Genre Definitions AND Fictions of Technology. The remaining 30 elective credits can be taken in any pathway run by the Department of English or across the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

 Please note: programme and module details are illustrative and subject to change.

Compulsory modules

Research Skills and Practice (ENGL700)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To equip the department's postgraduate students with the necessary research skills to make effective, critical interventions in the study of English Literature.

To equip students with the necessary presentational skills for advanced study in English Literature, including bibliographic and referencing conventions.

To equip students with para-academic professional skills relating to the development of materials for a public audience.

To equip students with the knowledge and confidence to reflect critically and creatively on the practices, contexts and real-world applications of literary study.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will have a comprehensive and practical understanding of techniques for accessing electronic and bibliographic sources.

(LO2) Students will have the ability to use scholarly referencing and bibliographic conventions appropriate for advanced literary scholarship.

(LO3) Students will acquire new skills fostering continued independent learning and a critical appreciation of complex issues within the broader context of the Arts and Humanities.

(S1) Students will gain a systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current debates and new insights within the field of literature and its contexts.

(S2) Students will gain an advanced critical and analytical skills in relation to diverse forms of discourse.

(S3) Students will gain advanced literacy, interpersonal and communications skills, and the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

(S4) Students will gain a systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current debates and new insights within the field of literature and its contexts.

(S5) Students will gain the ability to comprehensively understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to literature.

(S6) Students will have the ability to handle complex information and argument in a critical, creative and self-reflective manner.

(S7) Student will gain practical research skills to retrieve information, assemble bibliographic data, and critically evaluate, sift and organize material independently.

(S8) Students will gain the ability to use IT and other relevant tools and resources to present written and oral work to a professional, scholarly standard.

(S9) Student will have advanced skills and experience in selecting and using electronic and/or archival resources for planning and undertaking research and writing.

Dissertation Preparation Project (ENGL701)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The aim of this module is for students to set out the main lines of a research enquiry, its divisions and possible resources, and to undertake independent research to identify and evaluate key reading and critical contexts for the proposed topic. The object at this stage is not to try to 'solve' or 'conclude' or 'cover' the proposed topic: a much more thorough-going examination of the topic will be proper to the dissertation itself. The module also aims to help students develop public speaking skills and digital skills through the creation of an audio-visual recording. In order to qualify for a degree in a named pathway (Renaissance and Eighteenth-Century, Victorian, Modern and Contemporary or Science Fiction), the subject of their assignment for this module must be on a relevant author(s).

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will gain the ability to read, analyse, interpret and compare with competence and independence a wide variety of literary texts

(LO2) Students will gain a comprehensive and practical understanding of techniques for accessing electronic and bibliographic sources

(LO3) Students will gain the ability to use scholarly referencing and bibliographic conventions appropriate for advanced literary scholarship

(LO4) Students will gain new skills fostering continued independent learning and a critical appreciation of complex issues within the broader context of the Arts and Humanities

(LO5) Students will gain research skills enabling critical evaluation of different research methodologies and selection of appropriate methodologies

(LO6) research skills to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively in order to generate new and independent research

(S1) Students will gain a systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current debates and new insights within the field of literature and its contexts

(S2) Students will gain an advanced critical and analytical skills in relation to diverse forms of discourse

(S3) Students will gain advanced literacy, interpersonal and communications skills, and the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments to specialist and non-specialist audiences

(S4) Students will gain the ability to autonomously design and self-direct an extended research project

(S5) Students will gain the ability to comprehensively understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to literature

(S6) Students will gain the ability to handle complex information and argument in a critical, creative and self-reflective manner

(S7) Students will gain the ability to use IT and other relevant tools and resources to present written and oral work to a professional, scholarly standard

(S8) Students will gain advanced skills and experience in selecting and using electronic and/or archival resources for planning and undertaking research and writing

(S9) Students will gain organisational skills in managing time and workloads, and in meeting deadlines

Dissertation (ENGL702)
LevelM
Credit level60
SemesterWhole Session
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Students must develop and deliver an original capstone research project: more specifically, a 14,000-15,000-word dissertation, incorporating extensive secondary research, textual analysis, use of appropriate evidence and referencing and engagement with the contexts of literature. Students work with a supervisor who is an expert in their field. As the module requires students to plan a large project months ahead, to find and select relevant material, to maintain a coherent and complex argument and to analyse large amounts of information and text, it provides an excellent grounding in many key professional skills.

Students will build on skills developed in the Research Skills and Practice module (ENGL700) and on the lessons of the preliminary research for the Dissertation Preparation Project module (ENGL701).

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will gain the ability to read, analyse, interpret and compare with competence and independence a wide variety of literary texts

(LO2) Students will gain a comprehensive and practical understanding of techniques for accessing electronic and bibliographic sources

(LO3) Students will gain the ability to use scholarly referencing and bibliographic conventions appropriate for advanced literary scholarship

(LO4) Students will gain new skills fostering continued independent learning and a critical appreciation of complex issues within the broader context of the Arts and Humanities

(LO5) Students will gain research skills enabling critical evaluation of different research methodologies and selection of appropriate methodologies

(LO6) Students will gain research skills to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively in order to generate new and independent research

(LO7) Students will gain the ability to work with a supervisor to identify as well as autonomously plan and implement an independent, dissertation-length research project

(S1) Students will gain a systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current debates and new insights within the field of literature and its contexts

(S2) Students will gain advanced critical and analytical skills in relation to diverse forms of discourse

(S3) Students will gain advanced literacy, interpersonal and communications skills, and the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments to specialist and non-specialist audiences

(S4) Students will gain the ability to autonomously design and self-direct an extended research project

(S5) Students will gain the ability to comprehensively understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to literature

(S6) Students will gain the ability to handle complex information and argument in a critical, creative and self-reflective manner

(S7) Students will gain practical research skills to retrieve information, assemble bibliographic data, and critically evaluate, sift and organize material independently

(S8) Students will gain the ability to use IT and other relevant tools and resources to present written and oral work to a professional, scholarly standard

(S9) Students will gain advanced skills and experience in selecting and using electronic and/or archival resources for planning and undertaking research and writing

(S10) Students will gain organisational skills in managing time and workloads, and in meeting deadlines

Optional modules

Bodies in Space (ENGL783)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module enables students to re-conceptualise a number of established tropes of SF writing within a broader contextual and theoretical framework. Using theories and theorists of the body, of environments, and of systems, the sf texts under consideration will be interrogated for the politics they adopt, reject, or appropriate, as well as the ways in which they position the body historically, socially, and culturally.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to analyse the ways in which science fiction, and its associated tropes, can be situated within relevant historical, theoretical, and cultural contexts.

(LO2) Students will be able to reflect critically on the ways in which science fiction utilises notions such as ‘the body’ and ‘space’ to reflect social concerns and positions.

(LO3) Students will be able to demonstrate a nuanced understanding in which texts can be oriented in relation to their conceptions of ‘the body’ and the frameworks in which it is placed.

(LO4) Students will be able to engage rigorously with relevant critical debates.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual).

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving.

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual).

(S4) Information skills.

(S5) Research skills.

(S6) Skills in using technology.

(S7) Research skills.

Editing the Early Modern (ENGL752)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module aims to: introduce students to the practice of scholarly editing; familiarise students with historical trends in editing and current debates in editing/textual theory; develop in students a knowledge of printing practice and book history over the course of the Renaissance and eighteenth century; encourage students to consider the artistic and interpretative implications of practical editorial decisions; consider the relationship between editing and interpretation.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will gain the ability to read, analyse, interpret and compare with competence and independence a wide variety of literary texts.

(LO2) Students will gain an advanced knowledge and systematic understanding of the political and ideological aspects of literary texts and how they can be situated within appropriate cultural and social contexts.

(LO3) Students will gain a critical appreciation of the ways in which texts can be situated within literary history, including issues of genre, influence, and creation and reception.

(LO4) Students will gain an advanced knowledge and critical awareness of current and new literary, critical and theoretical debates.

(LO5) Students will gain a comprehensive and practical understanding of techniques for accessing electronic and bibliographic sources.

(LO6) Students will gain the ability to use scholarly referencing and bibliographic conventions appropriate for advanced literary scholarship.

(LO7) Students will gain research skills enabling critical evaluation of different research methodologies and selection of appropriate methodologies.

(LO8) Students will gain research skills to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively in order to generate new and independent research.

(S1) Students will gain a systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current debates and new insights within the field of literature and its contexts.

(S2) Students will gain advanced critical and analytical skills in relation to diverse forms of discourse.

(S3) Students will gain advanced literacy, interpersonal and communications skills, and the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments.

(S4) Students will gain the ability to autonomously design and self-direct a research project that brings together historical and literary approaches.

(S5) Students will gain the ability to comprehensively understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to literature.

(S6) Students will gain the ability to handle complex information and argument in a critical, creative and self-reflective manner.

(S7) Students will gain practical research skills to retrieve information, assemble bibliographic data, and critically evaluate, sift and organize material independently.

(S8) Students will gain the ability to use IT and other relevant tools and resources to present written and oral work to a professional, scholarly standard.

(S9) Students will gain advanced skills and experience in selecting and using electronic and/or archival resources for planning and undertaking research and writing.

(S10) Students will gain organisational skills in managing time and workloads, and in meeting deadlines.

Fictions of Technology (ENGL782)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module examines the role that technology has played in literature, and how literature engages with discourses of technology. Reading texts from across history—and considering Victorian representations of technology, mechanisation and industrialisation, the optimism of Golden Age SF, cyberpunk and internet culture, and techno-thrillers—we will explore: the social hopes and fears that representations of new technologies encode; what literature reveals about the relationship between humanity and technology (as tool, opportunity, threat, and so on); the extent to which technology is conceived of as a solution, as a problem, or as both simultaneously, in relation to particular cultural concerns; the ways in which technologies and representations of technologies can be understood in relation to issues such as race, gender, disability, sexuality, nationality, wealth, and power; the “fictions” that we tell ourselves about technology, and about its impact on society.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to demonstrate a systematic understanding of the ways in which a given technology has been situated in relation to social conventions and expectations.

(LO2) Students will be able to demonstrate advanced skills in textual analysis of a range of texts with detailed attention to the ways in which technology is represented.

(LO3) Students will be able to analyse, evaluate, and contextualise the ways in which technologies and representations of technology reflect—and may reinforce—established social hierarchies.

(LO4) Students will be able to critically engage with academic research and/or theoretical discourses about technology, and relate these to specific texts.

(LO5) Students will be able to present their knowledge in a format appropriate to advanced academic study, and suitable for different audiences.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc referencing skills).

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral.

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills.

(S5) Information skills - Critical reading.

(S6) Research skills - All Information skills.

(S7) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (word processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.).

(S8) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity.

Poetry and the Forms of Experience (ENGL753)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The aims of this module are: to develop in students an informed and sophisticated understanding of a selection of Renaissance and eighteenth-century literary forms, modes, and genres; to advance students' knowledge of poetic form and literary genre, and their employment, development, and adaptation by a wide range of Renaissance and eighteenth-century authors; to explore some key developments in literary history, and in some related aspects of cultural and social history, over the course of both the Renaissance and eighteenth-century periods; to enhance a critical awareness of the problems and insights raised by an interdisciplinary approach to the study of literature in the contexts both of the Renaissance and of the eighteenth century; to provide students with a formal text-based reading course that complements other modules in the programmes.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will have the ability to read, analyse, interpret and compare with competence and independence a wide variety of literary texts

(LO2) Students will have an advanced knowledge and systematic understanding of the political and ideological aspects of literary texts and how they can be situated within appropriate cultural and social contexts

(LO3) Students will have a critical appreciation of the ways in which texts can be situated within literary history, including issues of genre, influence, and creation and reception

(LO4) Students will have an advanced knowledge and critical awareness of current and new literary, critical and theoretical debates

(LO5) Students will have new skills fostering continued independent learning and a critical appreciation of complex issues within the broader context of the Arts and Humanities

(S1) Students will have a systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current debates and new insights within the field of literature and its contexts

(S2) Students will have advanced critical and analytical skills in relation to diverse forms of discourse

(S3) Students will have advanced literacy, interpersonal and communications skills, and the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments to specialist and non-specialist audiences

(S4) Students will have the ability to comprehensively understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to literature

(S5) Students will have the ability to handle complex information and argument in a critical, creative and self-reflective manner

(S6) Students will have the ability to use IT and other relevant tools and resources to present written and oral work to a professional, scholarly standard

(S7) Students will have advanced skills and experience in selecting and using electronic and/or archival resources for planning and undertaking research and writing

(S8) Students will have organisational skills in managing time and workloads, and in meeting deadlines

Genre Definitions (ENGL780)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The purpose of this module is to introduce students to the critical debates within and about the field of Science Fiction. Over the module, Science Fiction texts and cinematic adaptations will be compared to analyse the potentialities and limitations of each medium, alongside an exploration of a broad gamut of its sub-genres, side-genres, and modes, from scientific romance to the New Weird. The module compares “mainstream” Science Fiction texts (including short stories) with selected texts which might be said to explore comparable imaginative territory, or to be conducting similar experiments with language, narrative, and the mythologies of scientific progress and decline. In so doing, this module attempts to address a most basic question as directly as possible: what does Science Fiction do that other kinds of fiction doesn’t, or can’t?

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to demonstrate a systematic understanding of the ways in which science fiction has been defined, historically and conceptually.

(LO2) Students will be able to analyse and evaluate the ways in which texts can connect with each other to comprise a body of knowledge and field of study.

(LO3) Students will be able to demonstrate advanced skills in textual analysis of a range of science fiction works with detailed attention to questions of genre, form, content, and narrative structure.

(LO4) Students will be able to critically engage with academic research and/or theoretical discourses, and relate these to specific science fiction texts.

(LO5) Students will be able to present their knowledge in a format appropriate to advanced academic study, and suitable for different audiences.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual)

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual)

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual)

(S5) Information skills - Critical reading

(S6) Research skills

(S7) Skills in using technology

(S8) Research skills

Literature and Crisis (ENGL771)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To deepen student critical awareness of non-canonical and canonical literatures. To advance student understanding of the social and political aspects of literature as a response to the present. To enable students to undertake individual research on lesser-known approaches and topics across time periods.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will gain the ability to read, analyse, interpret and compare with competence and independence a wide variety of literary texts.

(LO2) Students will gain an advanced knowledge and systematic understanding of the political and ideological aspects of literary texts and how they can be situated within appropriate cultural and social contexts.

(LO3) Students will gain a critical appreciation of the ways in which texts can be situated within literary history, including issues of genre, influence, and creation and reception.

(LO4) Students will gain an advanced knowledge and critical awareness of current and new literary, critical and theoretical debates.

(LO5) Students will gain new skills fostering continued independent learning and a critical appreciation of complex issues within the broader context of the Arts and Humanities.

(S1) Students will gain a systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current debates and new insights within the field of literature and its contexts.

(S2) Students will gain advanced critical and analytical skills in relation to diverse forms of discourse.

(S3) Students will gain advanced literacy, interpersonal and communications skills, and the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

(S4) Students will gain the ability to comprehensively understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to literature.

(S5) Students will gain the ability to handle complex information and argument in a critical, creative and self-reflective manner.

(S6) Students will gain the ability to use IT and other relevant tools and resources to present written and oral work to a professional, scholarly standard.

(S7) Students will gain advanced skills and experience in selecting and using electronic and/or archival resources for planning and undertaking research and writing.

(S8) Students will gain organisational skills in managing time and workloads, and in meeting deadlines.

Literature and Science (ENGL754)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module aims to enhance understanding of and stimulate interest in the relationship between literature and science in the Renaissance and long eighteenth century. Science is considered in its broadest definition, including medicine, technology, and pseudo-sciences such as alchemy. Students will read a wide range of texts (in dramatic, poetic, and prose forms, and including scientific or medical writings) from the early modern period, and will consider how they pay attention to emerging ways of knowing, the scientific principles of observation and experiment, and rival narratives of nature. Students will also gain a critical awareness of an interdisciplinary approach to the study of literature and the history of science.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will gain the ability to read, analyse, interpret and compare with competence and independence a wide variety of literary and historical texts related to science.

(LO2) Students will gain an advanced knowledge and systematic understanding of the scientific and ideological aspects of literary texts and how they can be situated within appropriate cultural and social contexts.

(LO3) Students will gain a critical appreciation of the ways in which texts can be situated within literary and scientific history, including issues of genre, influence, and creation and reception.

(LO4) Students will gain an advanced knowledge and critical awareness of current and new literary, critical and theoretical debates.

(LO5) Students will gain a comprehensive and practical understanding of techniques for accessing electronic and bibliographic sources.

(LO6) Students will gain the ability to use scholarly referencing and bibliographic conventions appropriate for advanced literary scholarship.

(LO7) Students will gain research skills enabling critical evaluation of different research methodologies and selection of appropriate methodologies.

(LO8) Students will gain research skills to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively in order to generate new and independent research.

(S1) Students will gain a systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current debates and new insights within the field of literature and science.

(S2) Students will gain advanced critical and analytical skills in relation to diverse forms of discourse.

(S3) Students will gain advanced literacy, interpersonal and communications skills, and the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments.

(S4) Students will gain the ability to autonomously design and self-direct a research project that brings together historical and literary approaches.

(S5) Students will gain the ability to comprehensively understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to literature.

(S6) Students will gain the ability to handle complex information and argument in a critical, creative and self-reflective manner.

(S7) Students will gain practical research skills to retrieve information, assemble bibliographic data, and critically evaluate, sift and organize material independently.

(S8) Students will gain the ability to use IT and other relevant tools and resources to present written and oral work to a professional, scholarly standard.

(S9) Students will gain advanced skills and experience in selecting and using electronic and/or archival resources for planning and undertaking research and writing.

(S10) Students will gain organisational skills in managing time and workloads, and in meeting deadlines.

Literature, Slavery and Empire (ENGL750)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module aims to:
- introduce students to texts of both real and imaginary travel and cross-cultural encounter produced in Renaissance and eighteenth-century England.
- add to the student's understanding of literary history, and introduce them to ways of using interdisciplinary research in cultural and social history to illuminate literary texts.
- develop the student's critical awareness of key theoretical debates about cross-cultural interaction, otherness and travel/colonial writing.
- explore questions such as the relationship between travel writing and nationalism, the influence of travel on literary genres, as well as the involvement of such textual records in the formation of England’s imperialist ambition in these periods.
- consider the ways in which texts in the period construct concepts such as 'Englishness' and 'the foreign'.
- examine literary and non-literary responses to servitude and the slave trade.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will gain the ability to read, analyse, interpret and compare with competence and independence a wide variety of literary texts.

(LO2) Students will gain an advanced knowledge and systematic understanding of the political and ideological aspects of literary texts and how they can be situated within appropriate cultural and social contexts.

(LO3) Students will gain a critical appreciation of the ways in which texts can be situated within literary history, including issues of genre, influence, and creation and reception.

(LO4) Students will gain an advanced knowledge and critical awareness of current and new literary, critical and theoretical debates.

(LO5) Students will gain a comprehensive and practical understanding of techniques for accessing electronic and bibliographic sources.

(LO6) Students will gain the ability to use scholarly referencing and bibliographic conventions appropriate for advanced literary scholarship.

(LO7) Students will gain research skills enabling critical evaluation of different research methodologies and selection of appropriate methodologies.

(LO8) Students will gain research skills to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively in order to generate new and independent research.

(S1) Students will gain a systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current debates and new insights within the field of literature and its contexts.

(S2) Students will gain advanced critical and analytical skills in relation to diverse forms of discourse.

(S3) Students will gain advanced literacy, interpersonal and communications skills, and the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments.

(S4) Students will gain the ability to autonomously design and self-direct a research project that brings together historical and literary approaches.

(S5) Students will gain the ability to comprehensively understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to literature.

(S6) Students will gain the ability to handle complex information and argument in a critical, creative and self-reflective manner.

(S7) Students will gain practical research skills to retrieve information, assemble bibliographic data, and critically evaluate, sift and organize material independently.

(S8) Students will gain the ability to use IT and other relevant tools and resources to present written and oral work to a professional, scholarly standard.

(S9) Students will gain advanced skills and experience in selecting and using electronic and/or archival resources for planning and undertaking research and writing.

(S10) Students will gain organisational skills in managing time and workloads, and in meeting deadlines.

Reading VIctorians (ENGL762)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Reading Victorians aims to stimulate an interest in, and knowledge of, a topic that is self-evidently key to both understanding Victorian literature, and the wider practice of Victorian studies and literary studies more generally; it aims to bring together the historical and the literary in the study of the Victorians and reading, but it also ends to contextualize the way Victorians are read today, both inside and outside the academy. A wide range of Victorian texts, plus historical work on Victorian book culture, will be included, but also there will be extensive use of evidence from contemporary reading groups, work on research into the mental health implications of reading the Victorians, plus popular contemporary conceptions of the Victorians – together, these will form the intellectual heart of the module, which is to understand the complex relationship between Victorian literature and culture and the practice of reading both in its nineteenth-century and contemporary manifestations.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will have the ability to read, analyse, interpret and compare with competence and independence a wide variety of literary and other texts

(LO2) Students will have an advanced knowledge and systematic understanding of the political and ideological aspects of literary texts and how they can be situated within appropriate cultural and social contexts

(LO3) Students will have a critical appreciation of the ways in which texts can be situated within literary history, including issues of genre, influence, and creation and reception

(LO4) Students will have an advanced knowledge and critical awareness of current and new literary, critical and theoretical debates, plus knowledge of work in other disciplines and outside the academy

(LO5) Students will have a comprehensive and practical understanding of techniques for accessing electronic and bibliographic sources

(LO6) Students will have the ability to use scholarly referencing and bibliographic conventions appropriate for advanced literary scholarship

(LO7) Students will have research skills enabling critical evaluation of different research methodologies and selection of appropriate methodologies

(LO8) Students will have research skills to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively in order to generate new and independent research

(S1) Students will have a systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current debates and new insights within the field of literature and its contexts, including those from other disciplines and outside the academy

(S2) Students will have advanced critical and analytical skills in relation to diverse forms of discourse

(S3) Students will have advanced literacy, interpersonal and communications skills, and the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments

(S4) Students will have the ability to autonomously design and self-direct a research project that brings together historical and contemporary approaches

(S5) Students will have the ability to comprehensively understand and apply a variety of theoretical and practical approaches to literature

(S6) Students will have the ability to handle complex information and argument in a critical, creative and self-reflective manner

(S7) Students will have practical research skills to retrieve information, assemble bibliographic data, and critically evaluate, sift and organize material independently

(S8) Students will have the ability to use IT and other relevant tools and resources to present written and oral work to a professional, scholarly standard

(S9) Students will have advanced skills and experience in selecting and using electronic and/or archival resources for planning and undertaking research and writing

(S10) Students will have organisational skills in managing time and workloads, and in meeting deadlines

Science Fiction And/as the Archive (ENGL781)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module provides students with key skills of archival research, using the University’s excellent resources in the area, as well as encouraging them to consider how “the archive” can manifest more conceptually through sf writing. Its assessments encourage the acquisition of skills in presenting information suitable for different audiences.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to demonstrate advanced skills in textual analysis of a range of science fiction works with detailed attention to questions of genre, form and/or narrative structure

(LO2) Students will be able to analyse with a sophisticated conceptual grasp how science fiction texts engage with and inflect concepts such as archive, time, and their “contemporary” moment

(LO3) Students will be able to demonstrate a systematic understanding of ways in which science fiction texts are historically and culturally situated, reflecting their time and/or place of production

(LO4) Students will be able to critically engage with academic research and/or theoretical discourses, and relate these to specific science fiction texts

(LO5) Students will be able to demonstrate practical working knowledge of a specific aspect of a major archival collection, and its relevance to the field

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

(S5) Information skills - Critical reading

(S6) Research skills - All Information skills

(S7) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

(S8) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

Shakespeare & Co (ENGL751)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

‘Soul of the age’ or ‘not of an age, but for all time’? The aim of this module is to examine some of the immediate and subsequent ‘cultural contexts’ (linguistic and textual, theatrical and critical) of Shakespeare’s writings, and to develop a greater sensitivity to the play of historical and literary circumstance when unfolding them. Its specific aims are: to offer a series of comparative approaches to reading and interpreting Shakespeare both within and beyond his own ‘time’, and against eighteenth-century ideas of him as the great English poet of ‘Nature’, ‘Nation’, and ‘Genius’; to address the plays’ sources, adaptations, and related or relevant works by other writers alongside critical attention to Shakespeare’s contemporaries – especially Christopher Marlowe and Ben Jonson – as well as to his Restoration and eighteenth-century adapters and ‘improvers’, critics and performers, such as David Garrick and Samuel Johnson; to add to the students' understanding of literary history, and also of some related aspects of cultural and social history, over the course of both the Renaissance and eighteenth-century periods; to develop the student's critical awareness of the problems and insights raised by an interdisciplinary approach to the study of literature in the contexts both of the Renaissance and of the eighteenth century.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will gain the ability to read, analyse, interpret and compare with competence and independence a wide variety of literary texts.

(LO2) Students will gain an advanced knowledge and systematic understanding of the political and ideological aspects of literary texts and how they can be situated within appropriate cultural and social contexts.

(LO3) Students will gain a critical appreciation of the ways in which texts can be situated within literary history, including issues of genre, influence, and creation and reception.

(LO4) Students will gain an advanced knowledge and critical awareness of current and new literary, critical and theoretical debates.

(LO5) Students will gain new skills fostering continued independent learning and a critical appreciation of complex issues within the broader context of the Arts and Humanities.

(S1) Students will gain a systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current debates and new insights within the field of literature and its contexts.

(S2) Students will gain advanced critical and analytical skills in relation to diverse forms of discourse.

(S3) Students will gain advanced literacy, interpersonal and communications skills, and the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

(S4) Students will gain the ability to comprehensively understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to literature.

(S5) Students will gain the ability to handle complex information and argument in a critical, creative and self-reflective manner.

(S6) Students will gain the ability to use IT and other relevant tools and resources to present written and oral work to a professional, scholarly standard.

(S7) Students will gain advanced skills and experience in selecting and using electronic and/or archival resources for planning and undertaking research and writing.

(S8) Students will gain organisational skills in managing time and workloads, and in meeting deadlines.

The Body (ENGL773)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module seeks to provide students an opportunity to read and analyse different theories of the body and explore them within literary texts drawn from the modern and contemporary period. The module offers students a supportive intellectual environment in which to critique representations of the body in society, thereby contributing to greater awareness of others and difference and promoting social cohesion in turn. It embodies a holistic approach to learning that is self-aware and intellectually rigorous through focused reading, learning and discussion as well as through modes of authentic assessment. It supports the university’s wider agenda for research-connected teaching and for students to gain confidence which reflects a key hallmark of the Liverpool graduate.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will gain the ability to read, analyse, interpret and compare with competence and independence a wide variety of literary texts, more specifically the different theoretical and conceptual approaches to the study of the body.

(LO2) Students will gain an advanced knowledge and systematic understanding of the political and ideological aspects of literary texts and how they can be situated within appropriate cultural and social contexts, particularly in independent interpretations of literary representations of the body.

(LO3) Students will gain a critical appreciation of the ways in which texts can be situated within literary history, including issues of genre, influence, and creation and reception, especially in the context of representations of the body in modern and contemporary literature.

(LO4) Students will gain advanced knowledge and critical awareness of current and new literary, critical and theoretical debates within theories of the body.

(LO5) Students will gain new skills fostering continued independent learning and a critical appreciation of complex issues within the broader context of the Arts and Humanities.

(S1) Students will gain a systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current debates and new insights within the field of literature and its contexts.

(S2) Students will gain advanced critical and analytical skills in relation to diverse forms of discourse.

(S3) Students will gain advanced literacy, interpersonal and communications skills, and the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

(S4) Students will gain the ability to comprehensively understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to literature.

(S5) Students will gain the ability to handle complex information and argument in a critical, creative and self-reflective manner.

(S6) Students will gain the ability to use IT and other relevant tools and resources to present written and oral work to a professional, scholarly standard.

(S7) Students will gain advanced skills and experience in selecting and using electronic and/or archival resources for planning and undertaking research and writing.

(S8) Students will gain organisational skills in managing time and workloads, and in meeting deadlines.

The Contemporary (ENGL772)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The aims of this module are as follows:
- To enable students to engage with a cross-section of literature, theory and criticism to understand the concept of ‘the contemporary’ as a scholarly discipline.
- To enable students to understand and engage with the historical and conceptual connections between ‘the contemporary’ and other periodisations such as ‘the modern’.
- To develop skills in the comparison of literary and critical/theoretical writing, and in the understanding of how to apply theoretical contexts to contemporary literary contexts.
- To develop skills in creative, cross-media approaches to coursework including the opportunity to create a podcast addressing the key ideas of the module.
- To provide students with the materials to develop a critical understanding of how ‘the contemporary’ might vary across diverse authors and writing practices.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will gain the ability to read, analyse, interpret and compare with competence and independence a wide variety of literary texts.

(LO2) Students will acquire an advanced knowledge and systematic understanding of the political and ideological aspects of literary texts and how they can be situated within appropriate cultural and social contexts.

(LO3) Students will gain a critical appreciation of the ways in which texts can be situated within literary history, including issues of genre, influence, and creation and reception.

(LO4) Students will acquire advanced knowledge and critical awareness of current and new literary, critical and theoretical debates.

(LO5) Students will gain new skills fostering continued independent learning and a critical appreciation of complex issues within the broader context of the Arts and Humanities.

(S1) Students will acquire a systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current debates and new insights within the field of literature and its contexts.

(S2) Students will gain advanced critical and analytical skills in relation to diverse forms of discourse.

(S3) Students will gain advanced literacy, interpersonal and communications skills, and the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

(S4) Students will gain the ability to comprehensively understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to literature.

(S5) Students will gain the ability to handle complex information and argument in a critical, creative and self-reflective manner.

(S6) Students will gain the ability to use IT and other relevant tools and resources to present written and oral work to a professional, scholarly standard.

(S7) Students will acquire advanced skills and experience in selecting and using electronic and/or archival resources for planning and undertaking research and writing.

(S8) Students will gain organisational skills in managing time and workloads, and in meeting deadlines.

The Modern (ENGL770)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

- Students will demonstrate an advanced understanding of the concepts of ‘the modern’ and modernity, particularly as they relate to a range of early twentieth-century literary texts.

- Students will demonstrate advanced skills in analysing those texts in relation to relevant intellectual and material contexts.

- Students will demonstrate awareness of modernism as examples of individual art works and as a global network of related individuals, venues and works.

- Students will demonstrate skills in creative, cross-media approaches to coursework, including a digital assignment addressing the key ideas of the module.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will gain the ability to read, analyse, interpret and compare with competence and independence a wide variety of literary texts.

(LO2) Students will acquire an advanced knowledge and systematic understanding of the political and ideological aspects of literary texts and how they can be situated within appropriate cultural and social contexts.

(LO3) Students will gain a critical appreciation of the ways in which texts can be situated within literary history, including issues of genre, influence, and creation and reception.

(LO4) Students will acquire advanced knowledge and critical awareness of current and new literary, critical and theoretical debates.

(LO5) Students will gain new skills fostering continued independent learning and a critical appreciation of complex issues within the broader context of the Arts and Humanities.

(S1) Students will acquire a systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current debates and new insights within the field of literature and its contexts.

(S2) Students will gain advanced critical and analytical skills in relation to diverse forms of discourse.

(S3) Students will gain advanced literacy, interpersonal and communications skills, and the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

(S4) Students will gain the ability to comprehensively understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to literature.

(S5) Students will gain the ability to handle complex information and argument in a critical, creative and self-reflective manner.

(S6) Students will gain the ability to use IT and other relevant tools and resources to present written and oral work to a professional, scholarly standard.

(S7) Students will acquire advanced skills and experience in selecting and using electronic and/or archival resources for planning and undertaking research and writing.

(S8) Students will gain organisational skills in managing time and workloads, and in meeting deadlines.

Victorian Apocalypse (ENGL764)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Victorian Apocalypse aims to stimulate an interest in, and knowledge of, a topic that is found across a range of forms and genres within Victorian culture; it aims to bring together the historical and the literary in the study of the Victorians and the end of the world; it combines the religious and the secular, the technological and the spiritual, and the individual and the environmental. By reading a wide range of texts that deal either directly or indirectly with the idea of the end of the world as the Victorians knew it, students will be able to specialize in a debate that has as much contemporary resonance as it has historical significance.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will have the ability to read, analyse, interpret and compare with competence and independence a wide variety of literary and other texts

(LO2) Students will have an advanced knowledge and systematic understanding of the political and ideological aspects of literary texts and how they can be situated within appropriate cultural and social contexts

(LO3) Students will have a critical appreciation of the ways in which texts can be situated within literary history, including issues of genre, influence, and creation and reception

(LO4) Students will have an advanced knowledge and critical awareness of current and new literary, critical and theoretical debates

(LO5) Students will have a comprehensive and practical understanding of techniques for accessing electronic and bibliographic sources

(LO6) Students will have the ability to use scholarly referencing and bibliographic conventions appropriate for advanced literary scholarship

(LO7) Students will have research skills enabling critical evaluation of different research methodologies and selection of appropriate methodologies

(LO8) Students will have research skills to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively in order to generate new and independent research

(S1) Students will have a systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current debates and new insights within the field of literature and its contexts

(S2) Students will have advanced critical and analytical skills in relation to diverse forms of discourse

(S3) Students will have advanced literacy, interpersonal and communications skills, and the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments

(S4) Students will have the ability to autonomously design and self-direct a research project that brings together historical and literary approaches

(S5) Students will have the ability to comprehensively understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to literature

(S6) Students will have the ability to handle complex information and argument in a critical, creative and self-reflective manner

(S7) Students will have practical research skills to retrieve information, assemble bibliographic data, and critically evaluate, sift and organize material independently

(S8) Students will have the ability to use IT and other relevant tools and resources to present written and oral work to a professional, scholarly standard

(S9) Students will have advanced skills and experience in selecting and using electronic and/or archival resources for planning and undertaking research and writing

(S10) Students will have organisational skills in managing time and workloads, and in meeting deadlines

Victorian Gothic (ENGL761)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Victorian Gothic enables students to develop a detailed understanding of the range of Gothic writing produced in the Victorian period and its relationships to other literary forms and genres (in particular, the Victorian realist tradition). Students will be facilitated in reading Victorian Gothic texts in relation to contexts such as new technologies, emerging scientific theories, shifts in religious belief and practice, and environmental and ecological concerns. The module will also introduce current debates in Gothic criticism and examine key theoretical approaches to the genre. Students will develop awareness of critical approaches to Victorian Gothic texts and engage with existing scholarship in their own critical writing.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will gain the ability to read, analyse, interpret and compare with competence and independence a wide variety of literary texts.

(LO2) Students will gain an advanced knowledge and systematic understanding of the political and ideological aspects of literary texts and how they can be situated within appropriate cultural and social contexts.

(LO3) Students will gain a critical appreciation of the ways in which texts can be situated within literary history, including issues of genre, influence, and creation and reception.

(LO4) Students will gain an advanced knowledge and critical awareness of current and new literary, critical and theoretical debates.

(LO5) Students will gain a comprehensive and practical understanding of techniques for accessing electronic and bibliographic sources.

(LO6) Students will gain the ability to use scholarly referencing and bibliographic conventions appropriate for advanced literary scholarship.

(LO7) Students will gain research skills enabling critical evaluation of different research methodologies and selection of appropriate methodologies.

(LO8) Students will gain research skills to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively in order to generate new and independent research.

(S1) Students will gain a systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current debates and new insights within the field of Gothic literature and its contexts.

(S2) Students will gain advanced critical and analytical skills in relation to diverse forms of discourse.

(S3) Students will gain advanced literacy, interpersonal and communications skills, and the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments.

(S4) Students will gain the ability to autonomously design and self-direct a genre-based research project.

(S5) Students will gain the ability to comprehensively understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to literature.

(S6) Students will gain the ability to handle complex information and argument in a critical, creative and self-reflective manner.

(S7) Students will gain practical research skills to retrieve information, assemble bibliographic data, and critically evaluate, sift and organize material independently.

(S8) Students will gain the ability to use IT and other relevant tools and resources to present written and oral work to a professional, scholarly standard.

(S9) Students will gain advanced skills and experience in selecting and using electronic and/or archival resources for planning and undertaking research and writing.

(S10) Students will gain organisational skills in managing time and workloads, and in meeting deadlines.

Victorian Murder and Other Crimes (ENGL763)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Victorian Murder and Other Crimes aims:
-to examine the representation of murder and other serious crimes in a variety of Victorian texts
-to consider relevant contextual developments and the impact on literary genre
-to develop a comprehensive understanding of the key critical and theoretical debates in the area
-to engage with a wide range of primary texts on murder, including poetry, fiction, and non-fiction
-to meet the hallmark and attribute criteria of Curriculum 2021

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will have the ability to read, analyse, interpret and compare with competence and independence a wide variety of literary and other texts

(LO2) Students will have an advanced knowledge and systematic understanding of the political and ideological aspects of literary texts and how they can be situated within appropriate cultural and social contexts

(LO3) Students will have a critical appreciation of the ways in which texts can be situated within literary history, including issues of genre, influence, and creation and reception

(LO4) Students will have an advanced knowledge and critical awareness of current and new literary, critical and theoretical debates

(LO5) Students will have a comprehensive and practical understanding of techniques for accessing electronic and bibliographic sources

(LO6) Students will have the ability to use scholarly referencing and bibliographic conventions appropriate for advanced literary scholarship

(LO7) Students will have research skills enabling critical evaluation of different research methodologies and selection of appropriate methodologies

(LO8) Students will have research skills to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively in order to generate new and independent research

(S1) Students will have a systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current debates and new insights within the field of literature and its contexts

(S2) Students will have an advanced critical and analytical skills in relation to diverse forms of discourse

(S3) Students will have advanced literacy, interpersonal and communications skills, and the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments

(S4) Students will have the ability to autonomously design and self-direct a research project that brings together historical and literary approaches

(S5) Students will have the ability to comprehensively understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to literature

(S6) Students will have the ability to handle complex information and argument in a critical, creative and self-reflective manner

(S7) Students will have practical research skills to retrieve information, assemble bibliographic data, and critically evaluate, sift and organize material independently

(S8) Students will have the ability to use IT and other relevant tools and resources to present written and oral work to a professional, scholarly standard

(S9) Students will have advanced skills and experience in selecting and using electronic and/or archival resources for planning and undertaking research and writing

(S10) Students will have organisational skills in managing time and workloads, and in meeting deadlines

Yore VIctorians (ENGL760)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Yore Victorians aims to introduce students to the ideologies and aesthetics of the Victorian medieval revival, and to the conception of key terms such as “medieval” and “gothic”. Students will consider how Victorian literature constructs, represents and misrepresents ideas of the medieval past. Students will develop an understanding of the Victorian period through study of national and international writers and designers via the collections and material culture of Liverpool, and in doing so will consider Liverpool’s local and global impact during the nineteenth century. The module further aims to broaden students’ research skills by introducing them to archives, digital resources, and art collections, and to meet the hallmark criteria of Curriculum 2021.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will have the ability to read, analyse, interpret and compare with competence and independence a wide variety of literary texts.

(LO2) Students will have an advanced knowledge and systematic understanding of the political and ideological aspects of literary texts and how they can be situated within appropriate cultural and social contexts.

(LO3) Students will have an advanced knowledge and systematic understanding of the political and ideological aspects of literary texts and how they can be situated within appropriate cultural and social contexts.

(LO4) Students will have an advanced knowledge and critical awareness of current and new literary, critical and theoretical debates.

(LO5) Students will gain new skills fostering continued independent learning and a critical appreciation of complex issues within the broader context of the Arts and Humanities.

(S1) Students will have a systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current debates and new insights within the field of literature and its contexts

(S2) Students will have advanced critical and analytical skills in relation to diverse forms of discourse

(S3) Students will have advanced literacy, interpersonal and communications skills, and the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments to specialist and non-specialist audiences

(S4) Students will have the ability to comprehensively understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to literature

(S5) Students will have the ability to handle complex information and argument in a critical, creative and self-reflective manner

(S6) Students will have the ability to use IT and other relevant tools and resources to present written and oral work to a professional, scholarly standard

(S7) Students will have advanced skills and experience in selecting and using electronic and/or archival resources for planning and undertaking research and writing

(S8) Students will gain organisational skills in managing time and workloads, and in meeting deadlines