"research" blog posts

Gallery: Professor Keith Dobney travels inland to further explore Chinese archaeology and culture

Posted on: 28 November 2019 | Category: 2019 posts

After several weeks in Shanghai, spent writing, lecturing and discussing labs and potential projects, I headed northeast and inland to Xi’an where I visited colleagues in the large Department of Archaeology, School of Cultural Heritage, Conservation and Restoration at Northwest University.


Mapping Jersey’s forgotten military past

Posted on: 18 November 2019 | Category: 2019 posts

Jersey is well known for its World War 2 military remains that are scattered across the island, relics of the Nazi occupation. Many are tourist attractions, and both local inhabitants and visitors are well aware of this aspect of Jersey’s heritage. Much less well known, however, is that Jersey’s contribution to the British war effort in World War 1 included not only sending men and women to join the armed forces, but also housing German prisoners of war.


Gallery: Professor Keith Dobney invited to Institute of Archaeological Science at Fudan, China

Posted on: 14 November 2019 | Category: 2019 posts

I’m here for the whole of November at the kind invitation of my good friend and colleague (Professor Yuan Jing) who is the Director of a newly established Institute of Archaeological Science at Fudan. I’ll be giving some public lectures, meeting students and staff, attending lab meetings, doing some guest teaching and discussing new facilities, research collaborations and links with ACE.


Bio: Sydney Hunter, Fulbright Scholar at the University of Liverpool

Posted on: 12 November 2019 | Category: 2019 posts

During the academic year 2019-20 we are very happy to welcome to the department Fulbright scholar Sydney Hunter, who is pursuing an MA in Archaeology. The prestigious Fulbright program allows the exchange of knowledge and cultural experiences between the United States and the other participating countries. It is a life-changing opportunity that helps build stronger career profiles, and provides students with new connections to other scholars in the field and access to different approaches to research.


SACE Digging Day at the Williamson Tunnels

Posted on: 17 October 2019 | Category: 2019 posts

Following their trip to the Williamson Tunnels Heritage Centre, Megan Clark discusses a successful day spent digging by the Society of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology.


Before Egypt app launch — bringing the Garstang collection to life

Posted on: 9 October 2019 | Category: 2019 posts

Dr Ardern Hulme-Beaman and the ACE photogrammetry team introduce the Before Egypt app — a new augmented reality app from the University of Liverpool's Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology created to bring objects from the Garstang Museum's collection to life.


Introducing the 2019/20 Work in Progress seminar series

Posted on: 2 October 2019 | Category: 2019 posts

The Work in Progress seminar series is a weekly selection of papers presented by postgraduate researchers to an audience of specialists and non-specialists alike.


The crunch – and a time for dancing

Posted on: 30 September 2019 | Category: 2019 posts

Larry Barham, Professor of African Archaeology at the University of Liverpool, is Principal Investigator of the AHRC-funded Deep Roots research project, which seeks to gain a greater understanding into the origins of human technology by excavating areas of interest in Zambia. Read an excerpt from his blog following an excavation that took place in the summer, and watch as an Early Stone Age artefact is uncovered at the site of Kalambo Falls.


Meet the Lecturer: Dr Frederick Jones ARBSA

Posted on: 10 September 2019 | Category: 2019 posts

Dr Frederick Jones is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology at the University of Liverpool. A specialist in Classic languages, Dr Jones is also an accomplished artist and is an Associate of the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists (RBSA). Find out how his work in Classics is intertwined with his art.


Hafting and the development of combinatorial technology

Posted on: 10 July 2019 | Category: 2019 posts

Professor Larry Barham of the University of Liverpool's Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology explains how the use of experimental archaeology can be used to uncover the history of hafting, which gave rise to the combinatorial technology we rely on today.


Guest speaker: Exploring evolution and entanglement

Posted on: 8 March 2019 | Category: 2019 posts

Ian Hodder and students

Two of our graduate students in Archaeology, Emily Prtak and Eleanor de Spretter Yates, reflect on our recent Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology (ACE) flagship seminar, on the theme of 'Evolution and Entanglement' featuring guest speaker Professor Ian Hodder (Stanford University):


Classics and Ancient History seminars this semester: Sicily and rhetoric

Posted on: 4 March 2019 | Category: 2019 posts

The Classics and Ancient History seminars this semester have got off to a great start, with the emergence of a surprise emphasis on Sicily in our first two seminars.


LGBT History Month - Homosexuality in Ancient Greece

Posted on: 27 February 2019 | Category: 2019 posts

Attic vase c. 500 B.C., attrib. to the Sosias-Painter, Antikensammlung Berlin F2278

This February in the department we have been reflecting about LGBT history, not least following the wonderful lecture by Prof Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones on Alexander the Great. In this post, Dr Ben Cartlidge dwells on a puzzling feature of the ancient Greek evidence for male homosexuality.


Alexander the Great or Alexander the Gay?

Posted on: 19 February 2019 | Category: 2019 posts

Montage of LGBT-themed Alexander the Great imagery

For LGBT history month, guest blogger Prof Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones (Chair of Ancient History, Cardiff University) asks: 'Alexander the Great or Alexander the Gay?' before his talk this week, exploring Alexander's sexuality and popular culture.


End of an era: ACE’s Penycloddiau field school comes to a natural close

Posted on: 25 October 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Penycloddia Field School - Foundation Stone

With the ACE field school now moved to Norton Priory, a small but perfectly-formed team completed the former field school site at the Penycloddiau Hillfort between 15 July - 11 August. The excavations worked to train eight students, in partnership with the Institute for Field Research (IFR Global), alongside onward employability training for recent graduates.


Vandals and fragments: what to expect from our classics and ancient history seminars

Posted on: 19 October 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Fragments of ancient writing

Research Fellow, Ben Cartlidge, gives us the inside track on the varied themes covered in our Classics and Ancient History seminars at Liverpool - from ancient religion to music and poetry.


New texts from an old site: discoveries from the September 2018 season at the Hatnub alabaster quarries

Posted on: 9 October 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Entrance to Hatnub Quarry P

Roland Enmarch is Senior Lecturer in Egyptology at the University of Liverpool and co-director of the Anglo-French Hatnub Survey / Mission de Hatnoub, along with Dr. Yannis Gourdon (IFAO). In this blog, Roland provides an overview of his visit to Hatnub, Egypt, examining the ancient inscriptions in the site's alabaster quarries.


Satterthwaite volunteers visit Archaeology labs

Posted on: 28 September 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Satterthwaite volunteers

Welcome Week was not just for new students – Professor Harold Mytum and Research Assistant Rob Philpott welcomed community volunteers from the Lake District who had worked as part of the team that surveyed and excavated a medieval iron smelting site at Satterthwaite in Cumbria in May. Read Harold's blog from the day.


Georgia's Archaeological Adventures in Alaska

Posted on: 24 September 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Georgia Hetherington - Nunalleq

Georgia Hetherington, second-year BSc Archaeology student, recently had the trip of a lifetime during a three week excavation in Alaska. Read her blog and discover some of her amazing experiences.


Mary Beard comes to Liverpool!

Posted on: 17 August 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

This summer, Prof Mary Beard came to Liverpool to give two lectures on the Meroë head of Augustus from the British Museum - which was temporarily on display at the Victoria Gallery & Museum on campus.


University Archaeology Day and London Anthropology Day 2018

Posted on: 10 August 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

University Archaeology Day and London Anthropology Day 2018 - Lego

This year, the University of Liverpool's Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology was represented at the British Museum as part of University Archaeology Day 2018 and London Anthropology Day 2018.


Five things to do in Merseyside for anyone interested in Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology this summer

Posted on: 7 June 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

ACE society

With summer now upon us, you might be looking for things to do in Merseyside before the start of the new term (trust us, this will come around very quickly!). While teaching may be over until September, there’s still plenty of things to do and see in the area that relate to Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology: from Neolithic monuments to Egyptian treasures…


Studying the past for success in the future: tips and tricks to get the most out of your degree

Posted on: 19 April 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

ACE staff and student group photo

Finishing university is daunting, especially when you’re not 100% sure which path you wish to take through life. For this reason, as a third year Evolutionary Anthropology student, I am always looking for new ways to improve my CV and ‘stand out from the crowd’. I have found plenty of opportunities through our Department, and so I have compiled some of the most crucial which have dramatically improved my applications.


Using modern technology to model ancient worlds

Posted on: 12 March 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Keith and Ardern

Would 3D digital objects help your project? Could you analyse aspects of your sites or objects in a new way by quantifying it in 3D space? Could you draw more people to interact with your work by engaging with them through a digital medium? Ardern Hulme-Beaman discusses how photogrammetry is revolutionising the work of our academics, and how you can learn more about this innovative technique.


Fall of Troy: the legend and the facts

Posted on: 6 March 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Troy

The legendary ancient city of Troy is very much in the limelight this year. A big budget co-production between the BBC and Netflix 'Troy: Fall of a City' recently launched, while Turkey designated 2018 the “Year of Troy” and plans a year of celebration, including the opening of a new museum on the presumed site.


ACE researcher in the spotlight: Dr. Shirley Curtis-Summers

Posted on: 11 December 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Dr. Shirley Curtis Summers

I am currently an honorary research associate in ACE and since completing my PhD in 2015, I have held posts in ACE, History, Anatomy, Continuing Education and Public Health and Policy. I am also a consultant human osteologist, working with heritage companies and museums to provide human osteology assessments/reports and deliver public engagement events.


Early Village Societies research group seminar series

Posted on: 1 December 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Early Village Society Seminar

The first seminar of the Early Village Societies research group for this academic year recently took place, where two of our PhD students presented on the first stages of their research.


Spotlight: Professor Keith Dobney, Head of Department for ACE

Posted on: 29 November 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Creating a 3D image of a dog skull using photogrammetry in Bern, 2015

As the (relatively) new Head of Department for ACE, I’m extremely happy to contribute another blog post here, to help celebrate and promote our great department. Make no mistake, we do have a lot to shout about; our long and colourful heritage of over 100 years, the distinctive combination of related disciplines, our newly refurbished facilities, a dynamic and world-class profile for teaching and research and, of course, a great staff and student body.


Spotlight: Covering Neolithic botany to human skeletal anatomy - meet four of our researchers

Posted on: 13 November 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Dr Kimberly Plomp

This year we had a number of researchers land prestigious grants for their interesting and important work at ACE. Among these researchers, we have a few new postdocs who have written a brief introduction to the research they will be undertaking at ACE!


Pets, Pests, & People: an evening of science and wine, discovering what animals have done for us

Posted on: 12 October 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

The panel – Ian Barnes, Camilla Speller, David Ashmore, Jacqui Mulville, and Mark Thomas.

Thank you to everyone who attended the public event, Pets, Pests, and People held at the VG&M on Friday, October 13. We had over 80 people present for the talks and the drinks reception. I’d call that a success!


Excavations, new skills and adventures in Halkidiki

Posted on: 9 October 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Archaeological site in Greece

In its time, Olynthos was an ancient classical Greek city in the Halkidiki region of modern-day Greece. The city sprawled across the two massive hills that dominate the surrounding landscape until its destruction in 348 BC by Philip II (Alexander the Great’s dad).


Deep Roots: Day four of seven. Time to head out into the field

Posted on: 26 June 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Two men in Zambia, rhinos behind

My first blog about preparing for the 'Deep Roots' research project looked at our initial work examining museum collections and locating key sites for excavation. This time, I'll be giving an insight into the ups and downs we encountered as we went out into the field...


Deep Roots: An old jigsaw puzzle...with some key pieces missing

Posted on: 16 June 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

hand holding stone artefacts

The ‘Deep Roots’ research project will begin in earnest in July 2017 with the first of four seasons of excavation. In the first of two blogs, I'll be giving you a behind the scenes look at the work we've been doing in preparation.


Lost in the sand - investigating early humans and their tools in Zambia

Posted on: 4 May 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Archaeologist digging at a river

Prof Larry Barham gives us a taste of what it's like to excavate in Zambia, as he heads off to begin new research into early humans and how they made tools.


Student experience - discovering ancient and modern Greece

Posted on: 20 April 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Photo collage of Greek trip

Archaeology student Jake Morley-Stone gives us the lowdown on his research in Greece and how The Chris Mee Mediterranean Travel Award enabled him to make the trip. Find out how this experience has transformed his research on Ancient Greece.


A new way of exploring the past

Posted on: 17 March 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Neandertal teeth

Professor Keith Dobney was part of a team of researchers who recently made the exciting discovery of ancient DNA found in the dental plaque of Neandertals from Belgium and Spain.


On this day in history: Julius Caesar assassination

Posted on: 15 March 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Julius Caesar painting

Our Roman history expert, Fred Hirt, looks back on this pivotal moment in ancient history and the unusual way he was first introduced to Shakespeare's version of events.


A passion for LEGO and archaeology

Posted on: 18 January 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Lego comic strip

My latest research project has been inspired by my interest in digital humanities research, teaching methods - and a love of LEGO.