International Relations and Security MA

  • Programme duration: Full-time: 12 months   Part-time: 24 months
  • Programme start: Autumn 2021
  • Entry requirements: You will need a good 2:1 Bachelor's degree in Politics studies or a related area e.g. other social science degrees. On occasion, we will also consider a good 2:1 Bachelor's degree from a non social science area.
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Module details

The programme, based on the strength of the department, will furnish its participants with and advanced understanding of the key issues in international relations and security. There are four core modules, as follows:

International Relations Theories module

Through this module you will begin to understand the main theories in the international relations literature and apply these theories to your specific field of research interest.

International System module

The international system module provides you with a comprehensive introduction to today’s international system and security challenges. In particular, the module will explore to what extent the International Relations theories can help us to understand today’s developments. The module draws on the unique expertise in the Department of Politics at Liverpool: violent non-state actors. We are experts on terrorism, international criminal actors, human trafficking, insurgents and private military and security companies.

Research Methods in Politics module

The research methods module will familiarise you with some of the most commonly used quantitative methods for political research. These include case study design and a basic introduction to descriptive statistics.

Dissertation module

In this module students will put all their research skill to work and develop a 12,000 – 15,000 word dissertation. One of the major advantages of the module is the freedom of choice: the student is free in choosing the research subject, theory and methodology.

The core modules are complemented by optional modules. Students are free to choose three modules at their own discretion. Still, the programme design provides pathways suggestions (which are not mandatory) in order to assure coherency of studies. Each pathway is designed to complement the core modules, yet offers a unique additional specialization and qualification.

Pathway I: International Relations and Security

The pathway would deepen you understanding on matters international relations and security discussed in the core modules.

  • POLI130 – The International Politics of the Mediterranean and the Middle East
  • POLI150 – Contemporary Anti-Slavery, Forced Labour and Human Rights
  • POLI 303 – Intelligence and Security
  • ENVS434 – Space, Power & Culture
  • POLI 347 Strategies Studies in Conflict and Terrorism
  • POLI 328 EU as an International Actor
  • POLI 321 International Intervention

Pathway II: Conflict Resolution

The conflict resolution pathway complements the discussions on conflict, violence and security in the core modules as it provides a deeper insight into conflict analysis and peaceful conflict solutions tools.

  • POLI133 – Comparative Peace Processes 
  • POLI 307 - Comparative and International Judicial Politics

Pathway III: Political Communication

The political communications pathway provides an additional perspective on international politics by adding the role of media to the picture.

  • COMM713 – Political & Media 1
  • COMM714 – Political & Media 2
  • COMM724 – Media and Human Rights

Please note, all modules are subject to availability and it may be necessary to remove modules due to changes in staffing and research leave. Where modules are removed following registration, students will be notified as far in advance as possible.

Pathway IV: International Law

The International Law pathway is aimed at providing students with knowledge and understanding of the impact of international law on international relations.

  • LAW 353 Principles of International Law
  • LAW 073 Human Rights Law
  • LAW 354 Law and current affairs
  • LAW 320 Security Conflict and Law

Compulsory Modules

  • International Relations Theories (POLI132)
  • Research Methods in Politics (POLI116)
  • The International System (POLI131)
  • Masters Dissertation (POLI119)

 Optional Modules

  • The International Politics of the Mediterranean and the Middle East (POLI130)
  • Security and Intelligence (POLI303)

Compulsory modules

International Relations Theories (POLI132)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To understand the main theories in the international relations literature;

Ability to apply these theories to their specific fields of research interest.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Possess a comprehensive understanding of the strengths and weaknessess of the key theories of international relations

(LO2) Ability to apply International Relation theories to key issues in international relations.

(S1) Information skills - Information accessing:Locating relevant information, identifying and evaluating information sources.

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

(S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

Research Methods in Politics (POLI116)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module will familiarise students with some of the most commonly used quatitative and qualitative methods for political research. These include case study design and a basic introduction to descriptive statistics. In addition, students will be familiarised with the theoretical debates relating to their choice of research methodology with particular reference to the quantitative-qualitative dichotomy and comparative methods.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To introduce students to the theoretical debate surrounding the major methods for research work in the field of politics.

(LO2) To familiarise students with the practical dilemmas and tensions connected to research in the field of politics.

(LO3) To teach students to choose appropriate methodological approaches for a particular research project and to work out a suitable research plan.

(LO4) To teach students a number of transferable skills, namely IT skills, analytical skills, especially with regard to quantitative data, communication and interactive skills, time management and organisational skills.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

The International System (POLI131)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To equip students with the necessary empirical knowledge and analytical tools to study international relations at an advanced level;

To explore relationship between theory, history and contemporary developments in the international sphere.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) By the end of the module, students will: Possess a comprehensive base of empirical knowledge with respect to the politics of the international system

(LO2) Have developed an understanding of the key debates in the field of international relations.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

Masters Dissertation (POLI119)
LevelM
Credit level60
SemesterWhole Session
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The dissertation gives students the opportunity to produce a lengthy piece of work (12-15,000 words, including footnotes and references) on a topic of their choice. The aim is to enhance the student's analytical and critical skills that have been developed in the rest of their Master's degree, and apply these to a research project. The dissertation need not be reliant upon new primary data, but it must demonstrate an element of originality, either in terms of its analytical approach, methods or application of theory to case studies. It is essential that the work is rigorous and coherent, and is located within the wider context of contemporary scholarship in political studies and international relations; The dissertation is an independent piece of work, but must be supervised by a member of the academic staff in the department of Politics. The supervisor is responsible for giving advice on reading, structure and presentation of dissertations. Students are expected to see their supervisor at least four times during the dissertation preparation and writing stages. Some of these sessions may occur within other taught modules.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To enable students to engage with a wide range of literature, research methodologies and methods to carry out a study on a topic of their choice.

(LO2) To produce a significant and robust piece of analysis in the area of international relations and/or political studies

(LO3) To enable students to understand the research process and develop their ability to manage this process in their time effectively.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing including referencing skills.

Optional modules

Comparative and International Judicial Politics (POLI307)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
Aims

To introduce students to courts as political institutions and their core functions in national, regional and international governance;

To familiarize students with the temporal and spatial expansion of judicial power;

To enable students to critically assess the impacts of courts on national and international politics;

To overview key theoretical debates and current developments on judicial power and politics.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To identify and explain how courts are political institutions and what governance roles they serve.

(LO2) To describe the global expansion of judicial power.

(LO3) To critically assess the impacts of courts in national, regional, and global governance.

(LO4) To analyse key theoretical debates and current development on judicial power and politics.

(S1) Enhanced presentation skills.

(S2) Enhanced research skills.

(S3) Ability to communicate complex ideas both written and orally.

(S4) Employability: Digital literacy

Comparative Peace Processes (POLI133)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
Aims

To outline the concept and components of peace processes; To assess the impact of peace processes within a range of polities.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Upon completion of the module, students should be able to identify the key conceptual principles of peace process and their essential components.

(LO2) Understand how peace processes develop.

(LO3) Assess the impact of peace processes in a range of selected countries.

(LO4) Comprehend the key factors in shaping successful or unsuccessful peace processes in each country of study.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

Contemporary Anti-slavery, Forced Labour and Human Rights (POLI150)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To develop students’ familiarity with contemporary examples of human exploitation analogous with slavery;

To develop students’ analysis of current practice and assist them in drawing reasoned conclusions for future action ;

To contribute to the process of developing anti-slavery and anti-trafficking strategies, amongst governments and NGOs, and raising awareness of issues related to their development .

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Analyse theoretical approaches to contemporary forms of ‘slavery’ and human exploitation.

(LO2) Evaluate the role of scholarly concepts, rhetorical analogies, legal definitions and national or international legislation in identifying and eliminating forms of modern ‘slavery’.

(LO3) Formulate conclusions regarding the role of current practice and the potential for future development in a specific area of voluntary, legislative or enforcement efforts to end contemporary ‘slaveries’.

(S1) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

(S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

Controversy and Conflict (IRIS533)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims
  • To create an understanding of the conflict in Ireland and the means through which it can be resolved
  • ​To assess the unique nature of Irishness and its contribution to the conflict
  • ​To demonstrate the impact that Irish historical controversies and revisionism have had upon identities and the conflict
  • ​To enable students to critically assess and analyse both primary and secondary material relating to these topics and frame them within a wider discourse on Irish society.
Learning Outcomes

By the conclusion of this module students will have have gained an understanding of the unique nature of Irishness and its development, the historical controversies and revisionism surrounding Ireland as well as the nature of the conflict and its resolution from ancient to modern Ireland, with a specific focus on Ulster.

Eu As An International Actor (POLI328)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Students will gain a foundational understanding of foreign policy evaluation of the EU that can be transferred to analyse other (international) organisations;

Students will develop the ability to analyse the foreign policy system of the EU, the actors involved in it, and the main political framework such as the Common Foreign, Security and Defence Policy;

Students will analyse the main theories for analysing foreign policy and the analytical concepts used to explain the EU’s development of its own distinct foreign, security, and defence policies;

Students will explore the way the EU interacts with partners at a regional and a global level, particularly its partnerships with the Mediterranean area as well as the US and Russia.

Students will debate problems and challenges that face the EU as an international actor;

Students will foster different skills of research and assessment.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Demonstrate foundational knowledge of foreign policy evaluation and how far this applies to the EU as a foreign policy actor.

(LO2) Relate theories on EU integration and governance to the rise and development of the European security and defence policy and the practice of civilian and military operations deployed.

(LO3) Identify problems and challenges that face the EU as an international actor

(LO4) Critically reflect on the challenges and consequences that emerge for third-states from the EU’s actions and policies

(S1) Enhanced research skills.

(S2) Enhanced skills of communication, negotiation and debating.

(S3) Ability to communicate complex ideas both written and orally.

Gender and Global Politics: Women, Peace and Security (POLI349)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To illustrate what feminist approaches contribute to our understanding of world politics;

To understand the implications of identity and difference in the practice of global politics;

To encourage the application of theoretical gender debates to practical political issues;

To critically engage with feminist approaches to policy making.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) The ability to deploy gender as a category of analysis in relation to issues in global politics.

(LO2) Knowledge of literature applying feminist theory and concepts to the study of global politics.

(LO3) Ability to understand and critically analyse gendered issues and policy responses within global politics.

(LO4) Ability to synthesise and present key issues on a particular topic.

(S1) Critical thinking and reasoning

(S2) Presentation skills

(S3) Policy analysis

(S4) Enhanced research skills

Histories of Slavery (HIST581)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To develop students' familiarity with historical contexts for slavery and introduce them to potential areas for specialisation;

To introduce comparative concepts and ideas of "slavery", "freedom" and "forced labour" for students reflecting on their context in very different historical societies;

To allow staff and students to benefit from ambitious and broad discussion of slavery as a concept beyond discrete research contexts.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) A sophisticated understanding of slavery as a conceptual category of analysis and the extent to which it aids our understanding of contemporary and historical experiences of freedom and "un-freedom".

(LO2) Appropriate disciplinary skills, becoming familiar with a range of techniques, methods and concepts deployed in the analysis of slaveries and their legacies.

(LO3) Knowledge of "slavery" in a wide variety of historical and contemporary contexts.

(S1) Skills of written communication and rational argument, drawing on appropriate disciplinary methods.

(S2) Expertise in identifying and deploying appropriate evidence to support analysis and conclusions.

(S3) Confident and constructive oral argument.

International Intervention (POLI321)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Students will gain a foundational understanding of the law, theory, and practice of international intervention, international peace and security;

Students will develop the ability to analyse critically the gap between the laws and the practice of international interventions;

Students will explore the way how intervention practices have changed over time and how norms surrounding interventions have shifted;

Students will debate problems and challenges that face states intervening in third-states including issues of sovereignty, and the UN Charter articles on non-intervention and non-use of force.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Demonstrate foundational knowledge of the law, politics, and practice of international intervention.

(LO2) Relate the role and framework of international institutions such as the UN to the practice and laws surrounding international intervention.

(LO3) Identify problems and challenges that face the international community of states regarding the practice of (unregulated) intervention in third-states.

(LO4) Critically reflect on the challenges and consequences that emerge from interventions that alter the practice and understanding of state sovereignty.

(S1) Enhanced research skills.

(S2) Enhanced skills of communication, negotiation and debating.

(S3) Ability to communicate complex ideas both written and orally.

International Law in Current Affairs (LAW354)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

International law knowledge: This module will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the complex international legal questions that make the headlines;

Interrelationship between law and politics knowledge: Students will learn to demonstrate and critically evaluate how law and politics interrelate and how issues of globalisation are incorporated into the international legal language;

Critical analysis of media and international law: The module will also encourage students to take a step back and critically analyse why it is that international law seems to be focussed on crises that make headlines;

Through the means of recognising and ranking complex issues, a further site of enquiry will be the question of whether there is also an every-day international law that is not discussed in the news?

Understanding doctrine and theory: The module will analyse the relationship between doctrine (treaties, statutes) and theory in international law. It will encourage an employment of critical legal theory to understand some of the power struggles of international law.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Identify and critically assess international legal debates in current affairs;

(LO2) Understand how current affairs themselves impact on international law;

(LO3) Critically analyse the predominant international legal issues prevalent in current affairs debates with reference to specific key issue-areas (e.g. the ‘war on terror’ in general and the Iraq and Afghanistan wars in particular, the ‘Arab Spring’ in general and the arrest warrant of Muammar Gaddafi in particular) and primary and secondary sources;

(LO4) Question and assess the emphasis of crises in international law and identify issues that are a concern to international law but do not make the headlines;

(LO5) Present a news item, in a group, in its international legal context;

(LO6) Speak elloquently about the complexitities of international law in current affairs, and the available sources

(S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

(S2) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

(S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

(S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

(S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience

(S8) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

(S9) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S10) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

(S11) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

(S12) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

(S13) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

(S14) Working in groups and teams - Time management

(S15) Information skills - Critical reading

(S16) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

(S17) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

(S18) Global citizenship - Relevant economic/political understanding

(S19) Global citizenship - Ethical awareness

(S20) Global citizenship - Understanding of equality and diversity

Media and Human Rights (COMM724)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To examine key debates relating to the interaction between news media and human rights. To critically understand the changing nature of human rights representation and the role media play in representing and responding to critical human rights issues. To subject the underlying rationale for media representation and reporting of critical human rights issues to scrutiny. To assess and examine specific cases of media and human rights interaction.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will develop and demonstrate an advanced understanding of the key theories of human rights and the development of international norms of human rights.

(LO2) Students will be able to analyse and compare the political and institutional structures involved in addressing human rights.

(LO3) Students will be familiar with and critically evaluate the historical and current changes in the relations between media and human rights.

(LO4) Students will be able to understand and critically explore a range of salient media issues which relate specifically to the definition, construction, protection or abuse of human rights.

(LO5) Students will acquire in-depth knowledge and assess, using case studies, specific issues that are problematising and, at times, re-defining the relations between media and human rights.

(S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation.

(S3) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity.

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills).

(S5) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information.

(S6) Research management

Politics and the Media 2: Economy and Society (COMM714)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Students will be encouraged to develop a critical understanding of neoliberalism and the relationship with/impact upon media texts, discourses and communication more generally. Students will be encouraged to develop a critical attitude towards media ownership, and processes/conventions of media production. Further, they will be given opportunities to analyse the ways in which these influences manifest themselves in media texts. Students will be encouraged to develop a critical and analytical understanding of various media discourses of and under austerity.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will have a familiarity with and understanding of theories of neoliberalism and late capitalism, in relation to media and communications.

(LO2) Students will have a familiarity with and understanding of media production contexts and their bearing on media discourses.

(LO3) Students will have a critical awareness of how austerity ideology/ies is/are naturalised in various media texts, and how this positions certain (vulnerable) groups.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills).

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation.

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis.

(S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

(S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual.

(S6) Global citizenship - Relevant economic/political understanding.

Politics and the Media I: Theories and Cases (COMM713)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To examine key theories and debates relating to the relationship between politics and media. To encourage an understanding of the media-political relationship within a context of change in political culture and in media and information technology. T o assess and examine the power dynamics, contested representations and consequences of media reporting of selected contemporary political conflicts. To subject the underlying rationale for media representation and reporting of politics to scrutiny.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of key theories and debates relating to the relationship between media and politics.

(LO2) Students will be able to critically analyse the theoretical approaches to media/politics relationship.

(LO3) Students will be able to evaluate media power through a focus on selected contemporary cases and controversies.

(LO4) Students will acquire an advanced understanding of different models of the relationship between media, society and the state.

(S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral.

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills).

(S4) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity.

(S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation.

Principles of International Law (LAW353)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module provides students with an in-depth specialist knowledge of the principles and structure of international law, with special emphasis on law-making processes;

Critical tools for an understanding of the interaction of political and legal factors in the conduct of international relations;

Ability to identify the law and apply it correctly to hypothetical scenarios informed by major doctrinal and policy concerns;

Ability to undertake independent research and reflect on today’s most debated theoretical and practical issue in the field;

Ability to construct coherent legal arguments orally and in writing;

Ability to interpret and evaluate international legal materials against the backdrop of multiple international, regional and domestic legal and policy frameworks.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) A critical understanding and knowledge of the principles that form the basis of the law governing inter-state relations

(LO2) An ability to identify complex international legal issues and problems including those suitable for further research

(LO3) An ability to work effectively with all relevant primary and secondary international legal sources, including complex materials, and to inform and develop understanding of a given topic

(LO4) An awareness of the interaction of political and legal factors in the conduct of international relations

(LO5) An ability to apply legal knowledge to complex situations including those involving doctrinal disputes over the theory and practice of international law, and to offer own reasoned views over such legal disputes

(LO6) An ability to construct coherent legal arguments orally and in writing

(LO7) An ability to undertake independent research, and to think critically about international legal issues

(LO8) An ability to interpret and evaluate international legal materials within the wider context of international relations and domestic practices

(S1) Conduct independent research and critical analysis

(S2) Problem Solving

(S3) Verbal communication and reasoning

(S4) Effective legal reasoning

Public Service Broadcasting (ma) (COMM723)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims
  • ​Students will be encouraged to develop a critical and analytical understanding of the character of the British broadcasting system in comparison with other models worldwide.

  • ​Students will be encouraged to develop a critical and analytical understanding of notions of the public interest and their role in dtermining the development and form of broadcasting in Britain.

  • ​Students will be encouraged to develop a critical and analytical understanding of the extent to which British broadcasting has been able to develop autonomy from the state and to maintain it at times of government pressure.

  • ​Students will be encouraged to develop a critical and analytical understanding of ideological and economic arguments concerning collectivist and libertarian approaches to the distribution of broadcast goods.

  • Learning Outcomes

    Demonstrate​​​​​familiarity with and an in-depth understanding of the place of publicservice broadcasting within the British broadcasting system.​

    Demonstratefamiliarity with and an in-depth understanding of the concept of the publicinterest as it applies to British broadcasting now and in the past.​

    Demonstratea critical awareness of relationships between British broadcasting and thestate.​

    Demonstratefamiliarity with and an in-depth understanding of arguments about whetherbroadcasting should be considered a public good.​
    Security and Intelligence (POLI303)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To provide students with the opportunity to study the particular issues and controversies surrounding intelligence in contemporary security;

    To enable students to develop their analytical and research skills inexamining academic debates on intelligence.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The student should be able to explain and assess the role of intelligence processes in contemporary security.

    (LO2) The student should be able to assess academic debates on intelligence.

    (LO3) The student should be able to evaluate the changing significance of intelligence since the Cold war.

    (LO4) The student should be able to assess the political and societal implications of current intelligence practices.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    Space, Power and Culture (ENVS434)
    LevelM
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to stimulate students to think critically about the dynamic relationships between power, space and cultural change in relation to various political and social issues. Following a module introduction andcontextual session, the module then focuses on a wide-ranging set of contemporary perspectives on geographical thinking concerning power, space andculture. These range from thinking about knowledge as power; power and everydaypolitics; the body, surveillance and power and the power of the non-humanworld. Drawing on the research expertise of staff and case studies in both the Global North and South, students learn various social theories regardingpower and apply them at different geographical and temporal scales .

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To gain knowledge of a wide range of social and geographical theories relating to power, space and culture

    (LO2) To understand the role of power in relation to cultural forms at a range of scales

    (LO3) To be to be independent in the process of learning by choosing the essay topics and working closely with academics

    (LO4) To draw on evidence to support students' arguments

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) International awareness

    (S3) Communication skills

    Strategic Studies in Conflicts and Terrorism (POLI347)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    Examine which factors are more likely to trigger the outbreak of wars within a country and the evidence in favour and against the advanced theoretical arguments;

    Analyse the strength and shortcomings of the advanced theories by looking at recent empirical contributions in the field;

    Understand how and to which extent wars, terrorism and conflicts can be operationalized, measured and tested in empirical analyses;

    Investigate the effect of peacekeeping operations on peace conditions and peace duration by a review of cases of success and failure of peacekeeping activities;

    Examine the likely effects of terrorism on governments’ responses and the domestic and international factors leading to “suboptimal” counterterrorist policies;

    Analyse the relationship between terrorism and public opinion and investigate the mechanisms advanced by selected theories on public responses and the empirical strategies used to test them.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand the main theoretical puzzles in the areas of conflicts and terrorism and how empirical research can address some of these puzzles while others are remain still open.

    (LO2) Interpret the findings advanced by the empirical literature against or in line with the theoretical predictions advanced by the literature and students’ own pre-theoretical intuitions on the determinants of wars and conflicts.

    (LO3) Become familiar with some of the empirical techniques used in conflict and terrorism studies.

    (LO4) Reach a critical evaluation of the likely domestic and international triggers of wars, conflicts and terrorism and extrapolate recommendations for policy making.

    (S1) Acquire solid knowledge of the main theoretical puzzles in the areas of conflicts and the main obstacles to conflict resolution.

    (S2) Interpret the empirical findings advanced by the literature and familiarity with the main methodological tools used to estimate the determinants and effects of conflicts and terrorism.

    (S3) Carry out descriptive data analysis and basic statistical exercises using statistical software packages (Stata).

    (S4) Grasp the importance of research design in social science research and assess the validity of the arguments, hypotheses and findings in conflict and terrorism studies.

    The International Politics of the Middle East (POLI130)
    LevelM
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide in-depth analysis of the international politics of the Middle East, focusing primarily on identity and security issues;

    The role of external forces in shaping the development of region’s politics;

    Challenging the prevailing arguments about the Middle East, its culture and compatibility with democracy;

    Integrating political science and theories of international relations in Middle Eastern Studies.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Awareness of the ways in which security issues at local, national, regional and international levels interrelate with each other.

    (LO2) Ability to assess the contending interpretations of reasons for conflict and instability in the Middle East region.

    (LO3) A critical understanding of the prospects for regional cooperation and the building of security communities.

    (LO4) Ability to compare attempts to change regimes through mass action and reform from above

    (S1) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S2) Information skills - Evaluation

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S4) Communication (oral and written) - Influencing skills - argumentation

    (S5) Communication (oral and written) - Communicating for audience

    Understanding the Northern Irish Conflict: Interpretations and Solutions (IRIS538)
    LevelM
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims​​​​​This module will introduce issues of theory and explanation, looking among other things at religion, identity and nationality, and will move on to look at the peace process, the Good Friday Agreement and the difficulties encountered since April-June 1998.
    Learning Outcomes​​​​​​An understanding of the historical and contemporary background to the Northern Ireland conflict

    ​An understanding of the motivations and strategies of key elements including the state and the paramilitary organisations from the late 1960s onwards

    ​An understanding of the main stages of development of the conflict since the late 1960s

    An understanding of how and why the conflict in its violent aspect was wound down and the ‘peace process’ initiated​


    The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative and could be subject to change.