"international" blog posts

'Untold Histories of Empire': The truths about empire that museums don’t want to tell you – and why

Posted on: 13 November 2019 | Category: 2019 posts

Statue of Hindu God with many arms.

Dr Deana Heath is a Reader in Indian and Colonial History at the University of Liverpool, and organiser of the Untold Histories of Empire project at the World Museum as part of the Being Human Festival.


Libraries, Reading Communities and Cultural Formation in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic

Posted on: 9 October 2019 | Category: 2019 posts

National Libraries Week logo.

7-12 October is National Libraries Week 2019 – a time to celebrate the power of libraries to change lives through reading. The theme this year is how libraries engage communities through technology, building skills and encouraging participation. It’s fitting, therefore, that this week also marks the launch of a major new digital humanities project funded by the AHRC exploring the history of libraries, led by Professor Mark Towsey from the Department of History at the University of Liverpool.


Opinion: What’s special about Robert Mugabe?

Posted on: 18 September 2019 | Category: 2019 posts

Photo of Robert Mugabe.

Following the death of Robert Mugabe earlier this month, Dr Diana Jeater reflects on the life of the former President of Zimbabwe and the response to his passing in the media.


Opinion: British Empire is still being whitewashed by the school curriculum – Dr Deana Heath on why this must change

Posted on: 8 November 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

The Empire in red in 1886

Dr Deana Heath: Jeremy Corbyn has recently proposed that British school children should be taught about the history of the realities of British imperialism and colonialism. This would include the history of people of colour as components of, and contributors to, the British nation-state – rather than simply as enslaved victims of it. As Corbyn rightly noted: “Black history is British history” – and hence its study should be part of the national curriculum, not segregated in a single month each year.


What are the Terracotta Warriors? Four amazing facts!

Posted on: 14 August 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Head of a Chinese sculpture

We explore the Terracotta Warriors exhibition at World Museum in this video with Chinese history expert, Leon Rocha. Find out how they were discovered, how they were made and more!


World Cup stories: Football and national identity in postwar Germany

Posted on: 12 June 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

German team world cup 1974

When you grow up in the North East of England, you can’t really escape the notion that to millions, maybe billions of people around the world, football is a lot more than a game.


How studying History at Liverpool led to an internship with UNESCO in Paris

Posted on: 20 April 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Francesca - UNESCO

Francesca Lee describes how studying History at the University of Liverpool provided a springboard for a new life in Paris, where she's studying for a Masters degree in International Relations and working as an intern with UNESCO.


Talia immerses herself in Chinese history and culture during her Study Abroad adventure

Posted on: 16 April 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Talia at The Bund

Since getting back from China in June 2017, I have become ‘that girl’ who’s always referring back to her year abroad. The reason I do is because I had such an amazing time, and I highly encourage anyone thinking of studying abroad to do so!


From the White House to Niagra Falls — Emily McIndoe embraces her Study Abroad opportunity

Posted on: 20 March 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

UMD group photo

I spent a semester at the University of Maryland, USA in 2015 and it was the best decision I made at university. When I received my study abroad offer, and even after a quick Google search, I couldn’t point to Maryland on a map and had no idea about what I should expect when I arrived. The University of Maryland (UMD), is actually only a short metro ride from Washington DC and not that far from Baltimore either.


"It made me realise that history really was just outside my doorstep" — Lois shares her study abroad experience in Prague

Posted on: 27 February 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Prague - Lois Roberts blog piece

My name is Lois and I’m currently a third-year history student. Writing about my experience at Charles University, Prague, in only one article is going to be difficult as I have so many amazing memories from my Erasmus experience; but I’ll try and squeeze everything in! Before I start though, to anyone who has any doubts or worries about having difficulties making friends abroad, homesickness or just not fitting in, I hope this blog convinces you that you have absolutely nothing to worry about.


"It’s two institutions presenting rival claims on the loyalties of North African Christians" – Dr Robin Whelan discusses Being Christian in Vandal Africa

Posted on: 8 February 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

Baptismal font from a church in later sixth-century Clupea (modern Kélibia, Tunisia). Now in the Bardo Museum in Tunis.

Following the recent publication of Dr Robin Whelan’s book 'Being Christian in Vandal Africa: The Politics of Orthodoxy in the Post-Imperial West', Dr Chris Pearson sat with the author and Lecturer in Mediterranean History at the University of Liverpool to discuss their research and how their interest in the topic began.


Opinion: Anti-Roma stigma of Czech president Miloš Zeman threatens progress over Romani rights

Posted on: 24 January 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

A woman holding a Roma flag

Czech president Miloš Zeman faces a tough run-off against rival Jiří Drahoš in the second round of the presidential election on 26-27 January 2018. Voters will deliver their verdict on Zeman’s open hostility to refugees, Muslims, and the European Union, and his support for Russia.


Taking a year abroad - are you adventurous enough to come and live in China?

Posted on: 19 January 2018 | Category: 2018 posts

A group of young people on a boat in Shanghai

Hello! Or should I say 你好 (ni hao)? I’m currently sitting in my flat in Suzhou revising for my exams. Yes, Study Abroad does actually involve studying, but don’t worry, there’s so much more!