Early SS wrecks: ROBERT BRUCE, PRINCE REGENT, ST GEORGE, ROTHSAY CASTLE, LORD BLAYNEY, LEEDS, PRINCE ARTHUR, SUPERB, VENUS, WATER WITCH, KILLARNEY, ST PATRICK, GRANA UILE, ETC

Chris Michael

Index of vessels:
Robert Bruce 1821, fire, Anglesey, 0 lost
Prince Regent 1822, aground, Mersey, 9 lost
Belfast 1822, aground, Mersey, 0 lost
Lusitano 1823, aground, Portugal, 60 lost
Earl of Bridgewater 1824, explosion, Liverpool, 3 lost
City of Glasgow 1825, aground, Douglas, 0 lost
Town of Liverpool 1828, aground, Ireland, 0 lost
Venus 1828, aground, Ireland, 9 lost
Sheffield 1828, aground, Ireland, 0 lost
Earl of Roden 1828, aground, DerbyHaven, 0 lost
Manchester 1829, foundered, Irish Sea, 0 lost
St. George 1830, aground, Douglas, 0 lost
Rothsay Castle 1831, aground, Anglesey, 130 lost
St. Patrick 1831, aground, Ireland, 0 lost
Escape 1832, wave damage, off Holyhead, 2 lost.
Restaurador Lusitano 1832 (ex St. Patrick), foundered, Portugal, 200 lost
Lord Blayney 1833, aground, Hoyle Bank, 46 lost
Water Witch 1833, aground, Ireland, 7 lost
Thetis 1834, fire, Mersey, 0 lost
Superb 1835, aground, Burbo Bank, 0 lost.
Rhyl steamers 1835/6(Countess of Glasgow; George), aground Mersey/Rhyl, 0 lost
Killarney 1838, aground, Ireland, 36 lost
St. Patrick 1838, aground, Ireland, 6 lost
Urgent 1839, explosion, Mersey, 0 lost
St David 1839, exposure, Irish Sea, 3 lost
Lee 1840, foundered, Irish Sea, 0 lost.
Earl of Roden 1843, aground, Ireland, 0 lost
Prince 1846, aground, Ireland, 0 lost
Grana Uile 1847, fire, Irish Sea, 20 lost
Londonderry 1848, suffocation, Ireland, 72 lost
Prince Arthur 1850, aground, Southport, 2 lost
Leeds 1852, foundered, Irish Sea, 0 lost
Queen Victoria 1853, aground, Ireland, 57 lost

The first sea-going steam-powered ship was PS Comet on the Clyde in 1812. By 1815, the PS Elizabeth (a wooden paddle-steamer) was providing a ferry service on the Mersey. The first paddle steamers to cross to Ireland were in the 1820's. Steam ships were more expensive and had less cargo space -- so they were initially used for passenger transport (where time was of the essence) or as tugs to tow sailing vessels in and out of port. The early steamships had wooden hulls, masts with sails, and paddle engines amidships. Image of typical early steamer.
Screw propulsion became more common after the mid 1840s and iron (later steel) was used for hulls increasingly from a similar date.
Passenger numbers were often not accurately recorded - so numbers lost are often estimates only.

For a brief summary of some of the leading early steamship companies:
  City of Dublin Steam Packet Company,
  St. George Steam Packet Company

Details of some early steamship wrecks (all except Prince Arthur are wooden paddle steamers) in the Liverpool area (or with connections to Liverpool); mainly passenger vessels:
[see also "Report of Steam-vessel Accidents. July 1839" by Board of Trade; here]


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