Politics BA (Hons)

Key information


politics-5

Module details

Programme Year One

75% Politics students to take either POLI101+POLI102 or POLI105

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • British Politics 1 (POLI101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To analyse the context of British politics;

    To understand the key ideological and policy approaches of British political parties;

    To examine the basis of British electoral choice;

    To explore the wider context of British politics, in terms of Atlanticist and European relationships.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To encourage students to think analytically about the British political system and engage with the academic literature.

    (LO2) To analyse the major British political events and how they have affected or been shaped by the political system.

    (LO3) To develop students' written and oral skills.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills - written.

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills – oral.

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - listening skills.

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - evaluation.

    (S5) Information skills - critical reading.

  • British Politics II (POLI102)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To examine the distribution of power in Britain and the operation of power within the contemporary British state, with respect to both constitutional design and social divisions of class, gender and ethnicity;

    To outline the traditional conception of the British political system as the ‘Westminster Model’, place it in a comparative international context and consider the legacies of the Westminster Model’s imposition on/adoption in former British colonies and dependencies.;

    To consider the extent to which the Westminster Model was challenged as a result of EU membership, constitutional reform and electoral change from the 1970s onwards and the extent to which Brexit, constitutional reforms and electoral change from 2015 onwards are leading to its reassertion;

    To provide an overview of the key institutional components of the British political system (such as the Prime Minister and Cabinet, Parliament, the judiciary, the civil service, local government and devolved institutions);

    To evaluate the emerging impact of Brexit on the UK political system and for the distribution of political power within it;

    To evaluate the legacies of imperialism for the evolution of the contemporary British state and in shaping imaginaries of its post-Brexit future.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) You will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the key controversies associated with the distribution of power in Britain.

    (LO2) You will be able to discuss the formal and informal structure and operation of power both within and beyond the contemporary British state, with respect to both constitutional design and social divisions such as gender, ethnicity and social class.

    (LO3) You will be able to outline the key elements of the 'Westminster Model’, demonstrate an understanding of how it has been impacted by a variety of reforms and political changes and debate its validity as a description of the location and structuring of power in the British political system today.

    (LO4) You will be able to place the Westminster Model in a comparative international context and consider the legacies of its imposition on/adoption in former British colonies and dependencies.

    (LO5) You will be able to show an understanding of the role of the key institutions making up the British political system, their relative power and the relationships between them.

    (LO6) You will be able to evaluate the emerging impact of Brexit on the UK political system and for the distribution of political power within it.

    (LO7) You will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the legacies of imperialism for the evolution of the contemporary British state and in shaping imaginaries of its post-Brexit future.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Information skills - Critical reading

  • Comparative Politics (POLI107)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting65:35
    Aims

    To provide an introduction to European politics by focusing on key contemporary issues while introducing some basic concepts of political science encountered in studying this subject;

    To examine key challenges encountered when attempting to define and conceptualise Europe;

    To develop understanding of key debates around status of democracy and crisis of the nation-state in the European context;

    To examine salient transversal themes encountered in the politics of Europe, such as integration, international migration and security.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the historical development and contemporary practice of European politics.

    (LO2) A working knowledge of the principles underlying political processes and systems (electoral systems and party systems) and how they operate in the European political space.

    (LO3) An understanding of the political importance of different government structures (parliaments, the executive) at national and regional (EU) levels.

    (LO4) A knowledge of the challenges posed by contemporary political trends to European nation-states and European integration.

    (S1) Information skills - information accessing: locating relevant information, identifying and evaluating information sources

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S4) Global citizenship - relevant economic / political understanding

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - influencing skills – argumentation

  • Foundations in International Relations (POLI104)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The principal objective of this module is to provide introductory foundations to the study of international politics by introducing the main theories and approaches;

    To provide an overview of the major developments of international politics since the 20th century, paying particular attention to the Cold War and its aftermath;

    To offer brief introductions to four main issues of international politics: globalisation, Europeanisation and regional integration, environmentalism and poverty and development.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students will have acquired a working knowledge of the main theories of international relations (IR) and a greater awareness of their applicability in analysing specific issues in international politics. Of equal importance, students should have acquired a familiarity with the main themes that characterise both the Cold War and the post Cold War period. More specifically, students will have acquired the following: An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the major IR theories.  

    (LO2) Students should have developed the ability to compare and contrast the various theories when discussing questions and issues affecting international politics.

    (LO3) Students will be familiar with the main events, issues and themes in international relations.

    (S1) Students will be able to access and make effective use of bibliographical and electronic sources of knowledge and information.

    (S2) Students will be able to demonstrate that they are able to write arguments in a coherent and effective manner.

    (S3) Students will acquire the ability to engage and interact with the main themes in a specific body of intellectual knowledge.

  • Foundations in Politics (POLI109)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Students will demonstrate a foundational understanding of key political concepts;  

    Students will explore and engage with how key concepts effect our understanding of politics;

    Students will analyse expressions of political power;

    Students will demonstrate a knowledge of major political theories and arguments of key political scientists, political sociologists, and political philosophers;

    Students will understand what the study of politics is;

    To give students the skills necessary to master their degree in politics and to maximise their grade potential within the Department of Politics;

    To ensure students develop the skills necessary to be active rather than passive learners;

    To enable students to link study skills and research methods with their own academic success on the modules available in the first year and beyond.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a foundational knowledge of politics and the study of politics.

    (LO2) Demonstrate an ability to relate political theory to real world politics.

    (LO3) Identify the problems faced by democratic and non-democratic political systems and the means by which they can be understood.

    (LO4) Students will learn to reflect on their feedback and to apply that in later modules.

    (LO5) Students will develop academic writing, communication, and presentation skills.

    (LO7) Students will develop an understanding of using sources and acquire referencing skills and awareness of plagiarism

    (S1) Enhanced research skills.

    (S2) Ability to communicate complex ideas both written and orally.

  • Introduction to Political Theory (POLI105)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to key concepts and approaches in political theory;

    To enable students to understand and critique texts in political theory;

    To equip students with the tools, skills and abilities commonly used in political theory;

    To help students develop their own arguments about key debates in political theory, as well as their ability to defend these arguments.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will have an understanding of different concepts in political theory and the relationship between them.

    (LO2) Students will have an understanding of the different approaches to political theory.

    (LO3) Students will be able to critique competing interpretations of concepts and approaches to political theory.

    (LO4) Students will be able to communicate their arguments, objections, and comments in a clear, cohesive and well-informed manner.

    (S1) Communication (oral and written)

    (S2) Information (identifying, locating, and accessing relevant material)

    (S3) Critical thinking (critiquing arguments using common tools in analytical political theory)

  • Studying Politics Successfully: Skills and Methods (POLI103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To give students the skills and methods necessary to master their degree in politics and to maximise their grade potential within the Department of Politics;

    To ensure students develop the skills and methods necessary to be active rather than passive learners;

    To enable students to link study skills and research methods with their own academic success on the modules available in the first year and beyond;

    To enable students to embed themselves into the scholarly community of a research-led institution;

    To develop an appreciation of the scholarly process, including contributing towards the academic life of the Department and broader University.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will develop the study and research skills necessary to perform effectively over the course of their studies.

    (LO2) Students will develop academic writing, communication, and presentation skills.

    (LO3) Students will develop the skills necessary to reflect on critical feedback to submitted work.

    (LO4) Students will develop an awareness of academic integrity, plagiarism and how to avoid it.

    (LO5) Students will develop an understanding of the scientific method and the different ways research is conducted in politics.

    (S1) Enhanced study skills.

    (S2) Enhanced understanding of referencing and academic integrity.

    (S3) Enhanced understanding of politics as a scientific field of enquiry.

    (S4) Enhanced understanding of the ingredients to good analysis and investigation.

Year Two Optional Modules

  • American Politics and Society (POLI205)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To acquaint students with the US constitutional system;

    To help students explore how actors and institutions residing outside the state influence the governing processes.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the Federal Government.

    (LO2) An understanding of how federal institutions interact with those residing at the state level (via the Federalist nature of the US Constitutional system) to shape the character of the US political system.

    (LO3) An understanding of the relationships between the branches of the federal government.

    (LO4) An understand of the power of the federal judiciary, particularly in relation to civil rights and civil liberties.

    (LO5) An understanding of how public opinion, political parties, and the media interact with governing institutions to shape the overall governing processes found in the United States.

    (LO6) Understand the role of the states in the electoral process.

    (LO7) Understand the role of the media in the electoral process.

    (LO8) To understand how contemporary policy reflects the interaction of politics, political institutions, and society.

    (LO9) To understand the operations of the Branches of the Government

    (LO10) To understand how the Constitution shapes the decision-making processes of the Federal Court system

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – persuading

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S7) Skills in using technology - Information accessing (including within the CANVAS environment)

    (S8) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills

    (S9) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S10) Ability to read a text for specific detailed information (critical points)

  • Aspects of Media and Politics (POLI208)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To give students an appreciation of the relationship between the mass media, politicians and the public;

    To make students aware of the way the different aspects of the communication process act, react and interact, and with what political and social implications;

    To familiarise students with the manner in which the mass media respond to political pressure and spin, and with the way coverage affects those exposed to it;

    To explore the way the media contribute to (or compromise) democracy.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to place the mass media's political role in theoretical, empirical, moral and legal context.

    (LO2) Students will be able to appreciate the role of economic pressure, public relations and political lobbying on the way journalists cover politics.

    (LO3) Students should have a grasp of how far the media trivialise politics, or inflects it in a biased fashion.

    (LO4) Students should be able to understand how, in a variety of contexts, the media relates to the health, or otherwise, of contemporary democracy.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis.

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - creative thinking.

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills - written.

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills – oral.

  • Comparative Politics of the Middle East and North Africa (POLI215)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the history of state society relations since the emergence of Middle Eastern states in the early 20th century;

    To enable students to compare different cases within the region;

    To provide students with knowledge of other regions to explain outcomes such as authoritarian resilience or the rise of political Islam.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The ability to apply theories of comparative politics to Middle Eastern and North African cases and critically assess these theories in the light of the Middle Eastern experience.

    (LO2) A knowledge of key debates in Middle Eastern and North African politics including the role of oil in politics, political Islam, and authoritarian resilience.

    (LO3) Acquire knowledge of the political history of key Middle Eastern states, including Iran, Egypt and Saudi Arabia.

    (LO4) The ability to write a cogent, well-argued research paper that deals with a significant aspect of these debates and theories.

    (S1) Experience applying social-scientific theories to particular cases, augmenting students' analytical skills.

    (S2) Familiarity with the techniques of qualitative research in comparative government and political sociology.

    (S3) Experience in critically analysing primary sources (e.g. wikileaks cables or local media reports).

  • Contemporary Populist Politics: Britain in Comparative Perspective (POLI223)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
    Aims

    To introduce students to the distinctive character of contemporary populist political parties and movements in Britain and other established democracies;

    To equip students with an understanding of the factors which have driven the rise of political populism in Britain and other established democracies;

    To enable students to identify and debate the potential consequences of populism for mainstream party politics and for established democratic norms and institutions;

    To engage students with some of the most important questions in contemporary western political science.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to identify and discuss the common and distinctive features of left- and right-wing populism in a range of established democracies.

    (LO2) Students will be able to compare and contrast the character of contemporary populist political parties and movements in Britain with those in other established democracies.

    (LO3) Students will be able to demonstrate a sound understanding of the factors which have driven the rise of political populism in Britain and other established democracies.

    (LO4) Students will be able to outline and discuss the potential consequences of populism for mainstream party politics and for established democratic norms and institutions.

    (S1) Time management, organisation and adaptability

    (S2) Communicate complex ideas both written and orally.

    (S3) Teamwork

    (S4) Ability to apply topic-specific knowledge and concepts; critical and analytical thinking

    (S5) Information gathering, evaluation and synthesis

    (S6) Ability to work under pressure

    (S7) Enhanced research skills.

  • Politics of State Hegemony (POLI217)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This module will develop understanding of: texts, case studies and hegemonic practice in a global context law-making within social, sectarian, ethnic, philosophical and political contexts problems and ambiguities of state hegemony both in conceptual and practical delivery terms the complex legal relationship between past and inheritor regimes the use of evidence-based research in challenging laws of lustration/vetting conflicting 'moral' discourses and politics of exclusion.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will understand the meaning, construction and  impact of state hegemony.

    (LO2) Students will have gained an insight as to how state hegemony can be guided by negative as well as positive strategies.

    (LO3) Students will understand state hegemony is practiced through, de-barring and vetting across different legal systems.

    (LO4) Students will understand the complex legal relationship between past and inheritor regimes.

    (LO5) Students will understand vetting, disbarring and lustration processes and the their construction and impact.

    (LO6) Students will achieve inter-disciplinary learning between politics, social policy, law and criminology.

    (LO7) Students will study relationships of power and how these affect power-making and its delivery.

    (LO8) Students will learn how to read the social, political and cultural context of law making.

    (S1) International awareness

    (S2) Ethical awareness

    (S3) Organisational skills

    (S4) Communication skills

  • Foreign Policy Analysis and World Politics (POLI236)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Through participating in the lectures, seminar discussions and by completing assessments students will gain:

    Knowledge of the main approaches to foreign policy and the classic contributions to the subfield, as well as relevant contributions from conflict studies, political psychology and historical sociology;

    Awareness of the agent structure debate, the important question of how far human beings can consciously shape the course of world politics;

    Understanding of the various factors that shape the process of decision-making in international relations;

    Appreciation of some of the most significant factors shaping overall patterns of peace and conflict, friendship and enmity in world politics;

    In addition, the course is designed to augment student skills, providing:

    Experience deploying causal mechanisms theorised by scholars and  developing  original 'middle range' explanations for international events;

    Familiarity with the levels of analysis issue, an important issue in empirical research across the social sciences;

    Experience gathering, analysing and synthesising empirical evidence from news reports, policy briefings and primary sources.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) You will be able to outline the main approaches to foreign policy and the classic contributions to the subfield, as well as describe the relevant contributions from conflict studies, political psychology and historical sociology.  

    (LO2) You will improve in your ability to think critically and rigorously about the reasons why certain foreign policies are pursued over others in world politics.

    (LO3) You will be able to explain the significance of the levels of analysis problem for the study of international relations and the social sciences more generally.

    (LO4) You will be able to give an account of how structural factors within the international system shape foreign policy, what scholars mean by system and structure, and why scholars disagree about the nature of the international system.

    (LO5) You will be able to explain how 'second image' factors such as the internal organisation of the state, competition between government bureaucracies and domestic politics may influence foreign policy.

    (LO6) You will be able to explain how a foreign policy decision such as the initiation of war can be explained at different levels of analysis, such as the system, the dyad and/or the individual.

    (LO7) You will be able to locate reliable sources of information about events in world politics, and to utilise these information sources to write a cogent analysis of an event in world politics or a foreign policy decision - applying a theoretical framework to an empirical topic.

    (LO8) You will be able to explain what the agent-structure debate is and why it is analytically, morally and politically significant for how we think about the choices available to actors in world politics.

    (LO9) You will be able to explain how scholars combine causal mechanisms from multiple levels of analysis into theoretical explanations of foreign policy decisions and patterns of activity in international relations. You will be able to evaluate how successful these theories are in revealing the sources of foreign policy.

    (S1) Communication skills

    (S2) IT skills

    (S3) International awareness

    (S4) Problem solving skills

    (S5) Organisational skills

  • Contemporary Populist Politics: Britain in Comparative Perspective (POLI223)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
    Aims

    To introduce students to the distinctive character of contemporary populist political parties and movements in Britain and other established democracies;

    To equip students with an understanding of the factors which have driven the rise of political populism in Britain and other established democracies;

    To enable students to identify and debate the potential consequences of populism for mainstream party politics and for established democratic norms and institutions;

    To engage students with some of the most important questions in contemporary western political science.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to identify and discuss the common and distinctive features of left- and right-wing populism in a range of established democracies.

    (LO2) Students will be able to compare and contrast the character of contemporary populist political parties and movements in Britain with those in other established democracies.

    (LO3) Students will be able to demonstrate a sound understanding of the factors which have driven the rise of political populism in Britain and other established democracies.

    (LO4) Students will be able to outline and discuss the potential consequences of populism for mainstream party politics and for established democratic norms and institutions.

    (S1) Time management, organisation and adaptability

    (S2) Communicate complex ideas both written and orally.

    (S3) Teamwork

    (S4) Ability to apply topic-specific knowledge and concepts; critical and analytical thinking

    (S5) Information gathering, evaluation and synthesis

    (S6) Ability to work under pressure

    (S7) Enhanced research skills.

  • Gender and Feminist Politics: Core Concepts and Theories (POLI257)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To convey core concepts and ideas in gender politics;

    To compare and contrast gender and feminist approaches to understanding politics;

    To encourage the application of theoretical gender debates to practical political issues;

    To evaluate various strategies for encouraging gender equality and justice;

    To critically present theories of identity and their role in politics.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of concepts and debates about gender and feminist politics.

    (LO2) A detailed knowledge of a variety of key issues and case studies in gender politics.

    (LO3) An ability to apply theoretical and normative frameworks to evaluate the above.

    (LO4) An ability to critically reflect on, and discuss feminist political ideas.

    (LO5) An ability to write clearly and analytically, making use of the relevant material.

    (LO6) An ability to research political events by analysing information from different sources.

    (S1) Development of critical thinking skills

    (S2) Presentation skills.

    (S3) Ability to link concepts and ideas to contemporary political issues.

    (S4) Research skills

  • Institutions and Political Actors (POLI253)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    To develop an understanding of research methods in comparative research through the examination of key methodological issues including: Large versus small N studies, “most-different versus most-similar” research design, external versus internal validity, inferences and “causality” in case selection;

    To understand how and to which extent political phenomena can be operationalized, measured and tested in empirical analyses;

    To review the procedural and substantive factors accounting for the variation of democracies and autocracies around the world;

    To examine the differences across democratic institutions and critically assess the impact of democratic institutions on policy making and policy stability;

    To investigate the origins of different electoral systems and their variety;

    To analyse the effect of the electoral design on policy choices and the performances of political representatives;

    To analyse voters’ behaviour and the processes of preferences’ aggregation and electoral choices;

    To analyse the conditions under which political leaders are more likely to be held responsible for political outcomes;

    To understand the rationale of political parties’ formation and their role in democratic settings;

    To investigate the influence of special interest groups and the effects of lobbying on political accountability.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Identify the differences and similarities between the institutional and political structures across countries.

    (LO2) Understand the functioning of institutions and their effects on both the types of political actors present in a country and the likely policy outcomes resulting from the chosen institutional design.

    (LO3) Grasp the logic of social science research methods and critically; understand the strengths and limitations of empirical research.

    (LO4) Interpret the findings of the empirical literature on institutional and partisan constraints and their implication for policy outcomes.

    (S1) Ability to interpret critically the validity and generalizability of research claims and findings.

    (S2) Ability to produce a review of the literature summarizing the status of the research on a given subject.

    (S3) Ability to carry out descriptive data analysis and familiarity with basic statistical techniques using statistical software packages

    (S4) Ability to advance arguments in a logically consistent way and to understand the flows of scientific research that is not based on a rigorous research design.

  • International Political Economy (POLI209)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This module aims to examine the interplay between politics and economics and the way this relationship is influenced by domestic and international forces.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1)  Basic appreciation of the dynamic processes of international politics and economics.

    (LO2) An understandiung of a range of IPE theories, and why and how they evolved in response to developments

    (LO3) Familiarity with recent developments in IPE (globalisation, regionalism, economic crises, etc.), and how they relate to IPE theories.

    (LO4) Ability to compare and contrast theories and examine how they ‘fit’ with different periods of time and national and international circumstances.

    (LO5) The ability to use technical vocabulary fluently.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) The ability to apply abstract ideas to real world contexts.

    (S3) The appreciation of complexity, diversity of situations, events and distinguish the most relevant information.

    (S4) To engage with new ideas and perspectives and develop that information into a presentable format.

    (S5) Basic critical skills, including testing validity of statements and the operating the rules of evidence.

    (S6) Intellectual and research independence, derived from setting tasks and solving problems, exercising bibliographic skills, organising information, formulating appropriate questions, understanding the nature of the discipline.

    (S7) Marshalling of argument in written and/or oral form.

  • Politics of International Human Rights (POLI251)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide an overview of the philosophical foundations and debates on human rights;

    To introduce the history and institutions of human rights in international politics;

    To enable students to critically assess different political efforts to protect human rights;

    To familiarize students with contemporary human rights problems and the types of actors who undermine and/or promote human rights.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To critique the central philosophical perspectives on human rights

    (LO2) To describe the historical development and institutions of human rights in international politics.

    (LO3) To compare and contrast policy approaches for the realization of human rights

    (LO4) To identify and explain how various actors contribute to the violation and protection of human rights.

    (LO5) To analyse contemporary human rights problems and reflect on possible policy solutions.

    (S1) Research skills.

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis.

    (S3) Ability to communicate complex ideas both written and orally.

  • Public Ethics (POLI260)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to a range of ethical issues in public policy;

    To provide students with an understanding of different moral approaches;

    To enable students to critique the philosophical and moral merits of competing positions in the academic literature and public debate;

    To develop the ability of students to communicate their ideas in an analytical and persuasive way.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to understand and analyse challenging texts in political and moral theory.

    (LO2) Students will be able to outline competing moral positions on key public policy issues.

    (LO3) Students will be able to defend and critique moral positions on key public policy issues.

    (LO4) Students will understand the role ethics and moral philosophy play in helping us to understand and evaluate public policy.

    (S1) Communication (oral and written)

    (S2) Information (identifying, locating, and accessing relevant material)

    (S3) Critical thinking (critiquing arguments using common tools in analytical political theory)

  • Introduction to Political Economy (POLI259)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    To get a grasp of the research methods in political economy through the examination of key methodological issues including: regression analysis, instrumental variables, inferences and “causality” in case selection;

    To understand how and to which extent political phenomena can be operationalized, measured and tested in empirical analyses;

    To review the procedural and substantive factors in the study of democratic and autocratic politics;

    To understand the effect of electoral systems on policy choices and the performances of political representatives;

    To analyse the conditions under which political leaders are more likely to be held responsible for political outcomes;

    To analyse the effect of economic shocks on the demand for populist parties;

    To examine channels of influence of Special Interest Groups;

    To analyse the influence of the media and the effect of media bias;

    To understand the functioning of autocratic regimes and institutions relative to democratic settings;

    To understand the use of violence in autocracies.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand the functioning of democracies and autocracies.

    (LO2) Understand the functioning of institutions and their effects on both the types of political actors present in a country and the likely policy outcomes resulting from the chosen institutional design.

    (LO3) Grasp the logic of social science research methods and critically; understand the strengths and limitations of empirical research.

    (LO4) Interpret the findings of the empirical literature on institutional and partisan constraints and their implication for policy outcomes.

    (LO5) Understand the importance of research design for scientific knowledge.

    (S1) Ability to interpret critically the validity and generalizability of research claims and findings.

    (S2) Ability to produce a review of the literature summarizing the status of the research on a given subject.

    (S3) Ability to carry out descriptive data analysis and familiarity with basic statistical techniques using statistical software packages.

    (S4) Ability to advance arguments in a logically consistent way and to understand the flows of scientific research that is not based on a rigorous research design.

  • Security in A Globalised World (POLI231)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To provide an overview of how security has been affected by globalisation;

    To explore how the understandings of security and globalisation have developed over time;

    To develop a theoretical focus on security in global politics;

    To explore the main themes, issues, and political debates around security in a globalised world.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students will have acquired knowledge of the main debates around security and globalisation.

    (LO2) The ability to critically discuss these issues.

    (LO3) The ability to write a cogent, well-argued research paper that deals with a significant aspect of these debates and theories.

    (LO4) The ability to engage and interact with the main themes in a specific body of intellectual knowledge.

    (LO5) An ability to access and make effective use of bibliographical and electronic sources of information.

    (LO6) An ability to deliver short, small-group presentations where they convey information and ideas succinctly and effectively.

    (LO7) How to make arguments in a coherent and effective manner.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Working in groups and teams - Time management

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

  • British Political Ideologies (POLI237)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To examine several theoretical issues relating to political ideologies in Britain. These include what meanings can be attached to the concept of ideology itself and the relationship between political debate and ideology;

    To examine the range of ideologies present within British politics, looking in particular at the differences between and within each ideology in historical and contemporary contexts.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain an understanding of the nature of political ideologies.

    (LO2) Students will gain knowledge of the content of ideologies in Britain.

    (LO3) Students will be able to understand the nature of debates within and between British political ideologies.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

  • Varieties of Democracy (POLI232)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce students to democratic theory;

    To equip students with an understanding of the diverse forms of democracy found both historically and in contemporary politics;

    To enable students to identify and debate the rival merits and shortcomings of different models of democracy;

    To provide students with an understanding of the contemporary threats to democracy.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to summarise and evaluate the contrasting conceptions of democracy advanced by political theorists.

    (LO2) Students will be able to demonstrate a clear understanding of the diverse forms which democracy has taken historically and how it has evolved in a range of democratic models in the modern world.

    (LO3) Students will be able to describe the contrasting models of participatory, direct, representative and associative democracy and debate the rival merits and shortcomings.

    (LO4) Students will be able to assess the extent to which a range of existing political systems adhere to core democratic principles and their future scope to provide for democratic political stability and legitimacy.

    (LO5) Students will be able to evidence knowledge of the contemporary threats to democracy internationally and be able to evaluate and apply tools suitable for the task of assessing the extent to which democracy is advancing or regressing.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

  • Politics in Action (POLI200)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop materials and / or undertake tasks within a practical or vocational context;

    To apply within that context pedagogical and other theoretical or practical knowledge relevant to the development and delivery of those materials and / or tasks;

    To apply academic and / or theoretical knowledge within a practical context and to reflect and report on the relationship between the two;

    To develop and identify a range of personal / employability skills and to reflect and report on this.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to demonstrate an ability to develop materials and/or undertake tasks, according to a given specification and requirement, within a practical or vocational context.

    (LO2) Students should be able to reflect on and evaluate the efficacy of the materials developed and/or the tasks undertaken.

    (LO3) Students should be able to identify the connection between academic and/or theoretical knowledge and its practical or vocational application.

    (LO4) Students should be able to identify, reflect and report on a range of personal/employability skills.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - report writing

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills (oral)

    (S4) Time and project management - project management

    (S5) Information skills - networking skills

    (S6) Personal attributes and qualities - willingness to take responsibility

    (S7) Commercial awareness - relevant understanding of organisations

  • Political Communication and Public Speaking (POLI252)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Understand, describe, and utlilise communicative techniques designed to advance a political concept;

    Understand the impact of different approaches to political communication and their impact upon the health of the democratic process;

    Understand how political speeches are constructed with the intention of developing persuasive arguments;

    Understand and evaluate political authenticity within a shifting political environment where norms and values of democratic discourse are challenged.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Evaluate the stylistic construction of political speechmaking.

    (LO2) Classify and apply oratorical theories and use them to enhance their presentational skills.

    (LO3) Develop a cohesive mastery of the skills used by political figures to deliver convincing arguments and apply them to their own skillset to enhance student employability.

    (LO4) Critically evaluate the importance of political speechmaking, the techniques required, and the impact it can have on delivering a convincing message.

    (LO5) Deliver a ten minute political speech.

    (S1) Critical thinking and evaluating problems.

    (S2) Communication and debate skills.

    (S3) Respecting whilst influencing others.

    (S4) Interpret evidence to advance a critical argument.

  • British Party Politics (POLI239)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
    Aims

    Students will have a critical awareness of the origins and history of the British party system;

    Students will demonstrate an understanding of political competition within party structures;

    Students will be able to engage with theories of party organisation and how these relate to internal party democracy;

    Students will analyse the role of political parties in the UK, and the challenges they face.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate an in depth knowledge of the organisational structure that parties develop.

    (LO2) Demonstrate an understanding of developments in party ideology.

    (LO3) Identify the problems of power structures both within parties and within their operational environment.

    (LO4) Identify the relationships between political parties, elected representatives, members/activists, and voters.

    (S1) Time management, organisation and adaptability

    (S2) Communicate complex ideas both written and orally.

    (S3) Teamwork

    (S4) Ability to apply topic-specific knowledge and concepts; critical and analytical thinking

    (S5) Information gathering, evaluation and synthesis

    (S6) Ability to work under pressure

    (S7) Enhanced research skills.

  • Democratisation and Political Change in Southeast Asia (POLI235)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Through participating in the lectures, seminar discussions and by completing assessments students will gain:

    Awareness of the modern history of the struggle for democracy, as well as the main approaches to explaining the process of democratisation in comparative political science;

    A solid grasp of the debates over the most important factors associated with democratisation and democratic endurance;

    Knowledge of the political systems of Southeast Asia and some of the key cases of democratic transition and authoritarian endurance in the region;

    An empathetic understanding of the difficult choices that those living under undemocratic political systems face, and the continuing challenges of maintaining a democratic society.

    In addition, the course is designed to augment student skills, providing:

    Experience applying social-scientific theories to particular cases;

    Familiarity with conducting qualitative comparisons between cases;

    Experience using elementary techniques of data analysis and data visualisation to engage in cross-sectional and longitudinal comparison of democratising countries.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) You will be able to summarise the development and spread of representative democracy across the world, and identify the key events in this process.

    (LO2) You will be able to compare and contrast the three most important theoretical perspectives on democratisation: modernisation theory, transition theory and the social forces tradition.

    (LO3) You will be able to identify the strengths and weaknesses of theories of democratisation, and to evaluate them against the empirical evidence.

    (LO4) You will be able to conduct paired qualitative case studies in order to identify factors and processes that relate to democratic transition and breakdown.

    (LO5) You will be able to use simple quantitative techniques in order to identify potential correlations between democratisation and socio-economic change.

    (LO6) You will be able to explain the relevance of key pieces of quantitative evidence for debates about democratisation.

    (LO7) You will be able to describe the main regional patterns of democracy in Southeast Asia and how they have been influenced by historical processes.

    (LO8) You will be able to give an account of the progress of democratisation in Southeast Asia, accounting for the successes and failures of pro-democracy movements in at least two states.

    (S1) Communication skills (speaking, listening and debating)

    (S2) IT skills

    (S3) Numeracy

    (S4) Ethical awareness

    (S5) Problem solving skills

    (S6) Communication Skills (written)

  • Uk General Elections and Referendums Since 1945 (POLI204)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce students to key theoretical accounts of electoral behaviour and electoral competition;

    To equip students with a foundation knowledge of key changes and developments in the UK electoral and party systems since 1945;

    To introduce students to a variety of statistical data sources relating to UK General Elections and referendums;

    To furnish students with basic skills to analyse and visualise electoral statistics using Microsoft Excel and SPSS.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) You will be able to summarise the evidence relating to both trends in turnout over time and to differences in levels of turnout geographically and among key social groups, and to assess the relative merits of competing theoretical and empirical explanations of these trends and patterns.

    (LO2) You will be able to compare and contrast the principal theories of voting behaviour associated with the alignment and de-alignment debates in British electoral studies, including the application of theoretical assumptions to specific examples of voting behaviour.

    (LO3) You will be able to compare and contrast notions of 'issue voting' and 'valence voting', and debate the extent to which there is evidence to support the contention that the British electorate responds, rationally or otherwise, to the positioning and performance of parties in relation to key issues.

    (LO4) You will be able to evaluate how far evidence supports the proposition that perceptions of party image and party leaders are increasingly important determinants of voting behaviour in Britain and assess the implications of these developments for theories of electoralcompetition and for the practice of running successful election campaigns.

    (LO5) You will be able to summarise how campaigning and media coverage at UK general elections have changed since 1945 and analyse the reasons for these changes, as well as their consequences for election campaigns and outcomes.

    (LO6) You will be able to outline and apply appropriate criteria for assessing the performance of the electoral system for UK General Elections since 1945 and evaluate the arguments for and against electoral reform.

    (LO7) You will be able to describe in broad terms how the social composition of the House of Commons has changed since 1945, analyse the possible reasons for these trends, and evaluate the case for taking action to make the House of Commons more socially representative.

    (LO8) You will be able to outline the key changes to electoral law and administration since 1945 and discuss the reasons why such reforms have frequently been the subject of intense partisan controversy.

    (LO9) You will be able to discuss the outcomes of General Elections from 1983-2019 in relation to debates about a) dealignment, issue voting, and party image/leadership; b) the operation of the electoral system and the case for electoral reform; and c) for the 2017 and 2019 General Elections, the impact of Brexit.

    (LO10) You will acquire a knowledge of the key statistical datasets and techniques used in the study of UK general elections and referendums, including how to locate such data, and be able to apply a range of basic statistical techniques to compile, analyse and visualise electoral data.

    (S1) Numeracy/computational skills - Confidence/competence in measuring and using numbers

    (S2) Numeracy/computational skills - Reason with numbers/mathematical concepts

    (S3) Numeracy/computational skills - Numerical methods

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S6) Working in groups and teams - Time management

    (S7) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills

    (S8) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S9) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S10) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

  • International Organisations (POLI225)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide an understanding of the nature of modern state system and the role of international organisations within it;

    To explore central concepts and theories in International Relations and apply these in analyses of the challenges and conflicts faced by the international system;

    To explore mechanisms and policy instruments that International Institutions possess in managing the new world order;

    To assess critical arguments as to the limits of international institutions and the likely future developments;

    To assess interpretations of international law within global governance debates;

    To develop students' skills in synthesis and analysis, and in the presentation of clear and cogent arguments (both orally and in writing) of issues and controversies surrounding international system and its organisations.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Ability to understand the role of institutions in the international system.

    (LO2) Awareness of the role of global governance in the new world order.

    (LO3) Ability to explore powers and limits of international organisations and the role of international law and human rights.

    (LO4) Ability to apply core theories of international relations to major international organisations.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - influencing skills – argumentation

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual)

    (S3) Time and project management - personal organisation

  • The Politics of 'race' and Marginalisation (POLI265)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to introduce students to the critical notions of race and racialization and the subsequent development of marginalised communities and individuals.
    Students will understand, describe and critique the role of race in British and International politics, analyse and evaluate the theory and practices of racialization and marginalisation, be able to evaluate racial tropes and the undercurrents of stereotypes in the dealings between state and citizens. Understand how issues around race are presented and maintained in contemporary politics.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The ability to understand, describe and critique the role of ‘race’ in British and international politics.

    (LO2) An understanding of the key theories underscoring ‘race’ and marginalisation.

    (LO3) The ability to work in groups to produce a case study of racialization and marginalisation in politics.

    (LO4) To compare and contrast how different agents, crises and authorities invoke racialised politics.

    (LO5) The ability to demonstrate their awareness of the legacy of slavery, colonisation and structural disadvantage in contemporary society.

    (S1) Develop a more critical understanding of how issues of race and ethnicity are employed directly and less explicitly.

    (S2) The ability to absorb and examine complex theoretical models and apply them to contemporary politics

    (S3) Provide an advanced understanding of the causes and consequences of marginalisation in historical and contemporary settings.

    (S4) Work as a group to illustrate a live issue concerning race and marginalisation in contemporary politics.

    (S5) Provoke and sustain critical skills in communication during seminars

    (S6) Develop broader research skills such as the ability to identify relevant political and intellectual information and organise materials into a cohesive argument.

    (S7) A more sophisticated approach when examining political and academic texts.

    (S8) Gain marketable skills (presentations, group work, participation) that can be applied to a diverse range of career options.

  • Representation in Advanced Democracies (POLI244)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to make students understand how representative democracy works;

    How to critically engage with theories and hypotheses in comparative politics with a focus on political representation;

    How to assess the empirical validity of these theories by making sense of high quality academic research;

    How to navigate different approaches to study public opinion and representation;

    How to apply these theories to specific contexts and countries.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to contrast the arguments and assumptions of theories and contemporary debates in political representation, and apply them to specific countries and contexts.

    (LO2) Students will be able to critically assess the potential and limitations of such theories and their empirical approaches.

    (LO3) Students will be able to critically assess how policy representation and public responsiveness varies across policy issues, institutions, opinion signals and groups, as well as the dynamic relationship between the behaviour of voters and parties.

    (LO4) Students will be familiar with research design aspects and able to develop a research proposal.

    (S1) Critical thinking and evaluating problems.

    (S2) Communication skills.

    (S3) Interpret evidence to advance a critical argument.

    (S7) Teamwork.

    (S4) Numeracy

    (S5) Organisational skills.

    (S6) International awareness.

    (S8) Adaptability.

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Comparative Voting Behaviour (POLI322)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module seeks to equip students with the analytical skills needed to analyse election outcomes from the perspective of both voters' behaviour and parties' strategies;

    The module also aims to enable students to analyse survey data using quantitative methods; to provide them with sufficient knowledge of the statistical package SPSS; and to prepare students to write reports and interpret data in a way that can be used to advise politicians, political parties, or any organisation concerned with public opinion and voting. By fulfilling these goals the module also aims at widening students' employability, enabling them to develop some of the main analytical and statistical skills which are demanded by employers.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) You will be able to contrast the theoretical assumptions of structural, social-psychological and rational-choice models of voting behaviour.

    (LO2) You will be able to critically analyse the potential and limitations of voting behaviour models both in general and when applied to specific elections and contexts.

    (LO3) You will be able to critically analyse how voting behaviour varies across types of party, as well as the dynamic relationship between the behaviour of voters and parties.

    (LO4) You will be able to use the statistical package SPSS to prepare datasets for data analysis.

    (LO5) You will acquire knowledge of key statistical techniques and be able to apply them to analyse specific election outcomes.

    (LO6) You will be able to apply notions of statistical inference and generalise findings based on survey data.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) IT skills

    (S4) Organisational skills

    (S5) International awareness

    (S6) Teamwork

    (S7) Communication skills

    (S8) Adaptability

  • Contemporary Parliamentary Studies (POLI304)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To evaluate the structures and functions of Parliament;

    To relate those functions to the UK constitutional makeup;

    To understand the environment faced by British political actors and how they respond to the operations of UK governance;

    To communicate complex constitutional issues in an informed and clear manner.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate understanding and breadth of knowledge about the workings and organisation of parliamentary activity.

    (LO2) Identify and critically evaluate the different roles performed by the UK Parliament.

    (LO3) Identify and critically evaluate the key changes that have affected the role of the UK Parliament.

    (LO4) Demonstrate the ability to use primary sources to support research on the UK Parliament.

    (LO5) Compare and contrast evidence to support a critical discussion of concepts.

    (LO6) Demonstrate knowledge of the structures, procedures and roles of key actors within the UK Parliament state.

    (LO7) Critically appraise empirical studies of legislative behaviour both quantitatively and qualitatively.

    (LO8) Critically appraise academic and journalistic accounts of legislative behaviour and the capacity of the legislature to hold the executive to account.

    (LO9) Apply conceptual tools such as executive mentality, party loyalty and institutional culture.

    (LO10) Demonstrate appropriate cognitive, communication and transferrable skills including making effective oral and written presentations, utilising specialist primary and secondary resources and having a critical awareness of these material.

    (S1) Development of research skills

    (S2) Awareness of the structures of political power.

    (S3) Preparation for participation in the Parliamentary Placement Scheme.

  • Dissertation (POLI401)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to enable student to formulate their own research questions;

    To encourage students to develop their own research under the supervison of a member of the academic staff;

    To provide an opportunity for students to manage their own learning through independent study;

    To encourage students to manage their own time and organise appointments with supervisors.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completion of the dissertation students will be able to apply core theoretical and/or conceptual approaches in politics to their chosen area of research.

    (LO2) Synthesise and analyse complex empirical and conceptual material in their chosen area of research.

    (LO3) Use empirical and conceptual material in coherent and sustained argumentation.

    (LO4) Use a range of IT skills including word processing, where appropriate e-mail, spreadsheets, and the Internet to locate and retrieve information in support of their dissertation research.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S3) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S4) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

  • Gender and Global Politics (POLI349)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To illustrate what feminist approaches contribute to our understanding of world politics;

    To understand the implications of identity and difference in the practice of global politics;

    To encourage the application of theoretical gender debates to practical political issues;

    To critically engage with feminist approaches to policy making.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The ability to deploy gender as a category of analysis in relation to issues in global politics.

    (LO2) Knowledge of literature applying feminist theory and concepts to the study of global politics.

    (LO3) Ability to understand and critically analyse gendered issues and policy responses within global politics.

    (LO4) Ability to synthesise and present key issues on a particular topic.

    (S1) Critical thinking and reasoning

    (S2) Presentation skills

    (S3) Policy analysis

    (S4) Enhanced research skills

  • Identity in Contemporary International Politics (POLI332)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To analyse the political significance of identity in international politics;

    To examine the interrelationship between national identity, territory, sovereignty and democracy in terms of ideological foundations and in the context of international relations;

    To draw implications for the construction of stable political communities in conditions of cultural diversity.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the course students will be familiar with the concepts of identity - national, political and ethnic.

    (LO2) Students will gain the understanding of the main debates within the citizenship studies and minority rights.

    (LO3) Students will be confident with transnational politics, diasporas and how they are reflected in international politics.

    (LO4) Students will be able to accompany theoretical concepts and discussions by examples and appropriate case studies.

    (LO5) Students will be familiar with the emergence of the nation-state and ethnic exclusion

    (LO6) Students will be able to analyse issues and controversies surrounding this most interdisciplinary and contested area of political science - identity and its effects on international politics.

    (S1) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

    (S2) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S3) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S4) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

  • Media, Politics and Climate Change (POLI345)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    Introduce students to the political and scientific realities of climate change and energy, as they are currently understood and contested;

    Explore journalistic practice in the realm of climate change and energy security, and the economic and political imperatives that drive it;

    Investigate how a range of media (and media genres, like documentaries) cover climate change and energy security, and with what impact on those exposed;

    Review the social and political implications of media (under) representations of climate change, and what this tells us about contemporary democracy.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be achieve a basic understanding of the science behind climate change and energy security, alongside an appreciation of how politics impinges on climate change address/policy and the mediation of the topic

    (LO2) Students will be able to appreciate how journalists struggle to engage with the climate change and energy security issues, and do so in an increasingly pressured environment

    (LO3) Students will become aware of how the conventional and new media cover climate change and energy security; how climate scepticism impinges on the framing of stories; and how exposure to coverage influences public perceptions

    (LO4) Students will develop a grasp of what the mediation and politicisation of climate change tell us about power and democracy in contemporary society

    (LO5) Students should be able to communicate their understanding in cogent form in a varierty of non-written media

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

    (S5) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S6) Working in groups and teams - Negotiation skills

  • Parliamentary Placement Scheme (POLI342)
    Level3
    Credit level45
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of the module is to allow students to work with an MP in the Houses of Parliament. They will do so in the third year, semester two. The placement will allow for the development of subject knowledge and specifically to allow students to relate theories of the legislative process with direct practical experience.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module students will have a detailed knowledge of the theory and practice of Parliament and legislative processes through a combination of reading of academic texts and practical work experience and be able to demonstrate this through the reflective essay that is summatively assessed.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S5) Working in groups and teams - Time management

    (S6) Personal attributes and qualities - Flexibility/Adaptability

  • The Changing Faces of African Politics (POLI329)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Broaden students comparative understanding of political models and approaches beyond Western political thought;

    Encourage students to engage with and overcome personal biases when thinking about ‘African politics’;

    Empower students to use different approaches to disseminating political knowledge and understanding;

    Encourage students to engage with a range of source materials beyond journal articles and books.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Engage reflectively with the biases associated with the study of African politics and African political theory.

    (LO2) Apply their understanding of different approaches to sharing academic knowledge to the creation of innovative outputs.

    (LO3) Relate the history of the colonial period to the political decision making processes of post-colonial leaders.

    (LO4) Evaluate and apply research of both academic and non-academic source material to deepen their knowledge and understanding of the influence of colonialism on African politics.

    (S1) Ability to disseminate research through the use of podcasts- employability skills

    (S2) Critical thinking and self-reflection

    (S3) Working effectively in a group - authentic assessment.

    (S4) Research skills

  • Religion, Freedom and Equality (POLI350)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to a range of moral issues concerning religion, politics and law;

    To provide students with different normative approaches for tackling those moral issues;

    To enable students to critique normative theories and their policy implications;

    To develop the ability of students to communicate their ideas in an analytical and persuasive way.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will have an understanding of various moral issues related to religion in contemporary politics and law.

    (LO2) Students will have an understanding of various approaches in political theory to religious issues in contemporary politics and law.

    (LO3) Students will be able to critically assess normative theories about religious toleration and accommodation.

    (LO4) Students will be able to construct logical, coherent, and persuasive philosophical arguments.

    (S1) Communication (oral and written)

    (S2) Information (identifying, locating, and accessing relevant material)

    (S3) Critical thinking (critiquing arguments using common tools in analytical political theory)

  • Security and Intelligence (POLI303)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To provide students with the opportunity to study the particular issues and controversies surrounding intelligence in contemporary security;

    To enable students to develop their analytical and research skills inexamining academic debates on intelligence.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The student should be able to explain and assess the role of intelligence processes in contemporary security.

    (LO2) The student should be able to assess academic debates on intelligence.

    (LO3) The student should be able to evaluate the changing significance of intelligence since the Cold war.

    (LO4) The student should be able to assess the political and societal implications of current intelligence practices.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation

  • The Media, the Internet and Political Science (POLI319)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce students to the ways in which contemporary notions of what constitutes political science have a bearing upon what we think we know about conventional and new media;

    To explore the way in which conceptions of power are related to our understanding of how the old and new media function in contemporary society;

    To explore a range of themes that connect the new media to its conventional counter parts (including the political economy of journalism, web-based political mobilisation, citizen journalism and mediate elections);

    To explore particularly illuminating examples of power exertion by or through the mass media. 

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to understand what constitutes the 'canons and conventions' of contemporary Political Science, and how these relate to research on, and evidence about, the old and new media.

    (LO2) Students will be able to appreciate the role and importance of the various media in power structures of society.

    (LO3) Students will be aware of how the old and new media relate to each other, both nationally and internationally, and how both relate to contemporary political realities.

    (LO4) Students will have a grasp of the key themes and case studies that link media practice, to politics/politicians, and the principal power models.

    (LO5) Students should be able to communicate their understanding in cogent form in a varierty of non-written media.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - creative thinking

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills - written

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills - visual

    (S5) Working in groups and teams - group action planning

    (S6) Working in groups and teams - negotiation skills

  • From the Ira to Isis: Understanding Political Violence in the Contemporary World (POLI324)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To help students think critically about the world we live in today, specifically focusing on terrorism;

    To consider why and how terrorist groups come into existence and disappear;

    To examine the historical evolution of terrorism, the importance of terrorism in the contemporary world, different types of terrorism, and the responses to such threats;

    To think about why a universal definition of terrorism has proven so elusive and what this means for the study of terrorism;

    To explore the controversies that have been generated by terrorism and counter-terrorism.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The ability to think critically about the world in which we live today, especially regarding the legitimacy of political violence.

    (LO2) An understanding of the key debates and controversies in the study of terrorism and counter-terrorism.

    (LO3) The ability to engage in critical discussion about questions relating to terrorism and counter-terrorism.

    (LO4) The ability to engage and interact with the main themes in a specific body of intellectual knowledge.

    (LO5) An ability to access and make effective use of bibliographical and electronic sources of information.

    (LO6) Make arguments in a coherent and effective manner.

    (LO7) The ability to write a cogent, well-argued research paper that deals with a significant aspect of these debates.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual).

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis.

    (S3) Working in groups and teams - group action planning.

  • Africa-china Relations in A Changing Global Order (POLI305)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Understand key historical and contemporary policy debates and issues regarding the evolution of Africa’s relations with China;

    Evaluate competing traditional and critical IR theories and frameworks to analyse issues pertaining to China-Africa relations and the combined effect of China’s rise and African agency on development and security;

    Identify and evaluate various forms of and factors influencing development of China-Africa relations;

    Critically analyse the evolving role of China-Africa relations in global governance;

    Deploy theoretical arguments and apply them to empirical case studies.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Evaluate the nature and forms of Africa-China relations in the context of South-South Cooperation.

    (LO2) Apply their understanding of historical and contemporary policy debates and issues to the creation of policy-oriented outputs.

    (LO3) Classify and apply traditional and critical IR theories to analyse issues pertaining to China-Africa relations and the combined effect of China’s rise and African agency on development and security.

    (LO4) Reflect on the impact of China-Africa relations on global and contemporary issues such as development, peacekeeping, multilateralism and security.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem evaluating skills.

    (S2) Communication and debate skills.

    (S3) Produce and disseminate policy-oriented outputs.

    (S4) Interpret evidence to advance a critical argument.

  • Eu As An International Actor (POLI328)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Students will gain a foundational understanding of foreign policy evaluation of the EU that can be transferred to analyse other (international) organisations;

    Students will develop the ability to analyse the foreign policy system of the EU, the actors involved in it, and the main political framework such as the Common Foreign, Security and Defence Policy;

    Students will analyse the main theories for analysing foreign policy and the analytical concepts used to explain the EU’s development of its own distinct foreign, security, and defence policies;

    Students will explore the way the EU interacts with partners at a regional and a global level, particularly its partnerships with the Mediterranean area as well as the US and Russia.

    Students will debate problems and challenges that face the EU as an international actor;

    Students will foster different skills of research and assessment.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate foundational knowledge of foreign policy evaluation and how far this applies to the EU as a foreign policy actor.

    (LO2) Relate theories on EU integration and governance to the rise and development of the European security and defence policy and the practice of civilian and military operations deployed.

    (LO3) Identify problems and challenges that face the EU as an international actor

    (LO4) Critically reflect on the challenges and consequences that emerge for third-states from the EU’s actions and policies

    (S1) Enhanced research skills.

    (S2) Enhanced skills of communication, negotiation and debating.

    (S3) Ability to communicate complex ideas both written and orally.

  • Strategic Studies in Conflicts and Terrorism (POLI347)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
    Aims

    Examine which factors are more likely to trigger the outbreak of wars within a country and the evidence in favour and against the advanced theoretical arguments;

    Analyse the strength and shortcomings of the advanced theories by looking at recent empirical contributions in the field;

    Understand how and to which extent wars, terrorism and conflicts can be operationalized, measured and tested in empirical analyses;

    Investigate the effect of peacekeeping operations on peace conditions and peace duration by a review of cases of success and failure of peacekeeping activities;

    Examine the likely effects of terrorism on governments’ responses and the domestic and international factors leading to “suboptimal” counterterrorist policies;

    Analyse the relationship between terrorism and public opinion and investigate the mechanisms advanced by selected theories on public responses and the empirical strategies used to test them.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand the main theoretical puzzles in the areas of conflicts and terrorism and how empirical research can address some of these puzzles while others are remain still open.

    (LO2) Interpret the findings advanced by the empirical literature against or in line with the theoretical predictions advanced by the literature and students’ own pre-theoretical intuitions on the determinants of wars and conflicts.

    (LO3) Become familiar with some of the empirical techniques used in conflict and terrorism studies.

    (LO4) Reach a critical evaluation of the likely domestic and international triggers of wars, conflicts and terrorism and extrapolate recommendations for policy making.

    (S1) Acquire solid knowledge of the main theoretical puzzles in the areas of conflicts and the main obstacles to conflict resolution.

    (S2) Interpret the empirical findings advanced by the literature and familiarity with the main methodological tools used to estimate the determinants and effects of conflicts and terrorism.

    (S3) Carry out descriptive data analysis and basic statistical exercises using statistical software packages (Stata).

    (S4) Grasp the importance of research design in social science research and assess the validity of the arguments, hypotheses and findings in conflict and terrorism studies.

  • Local Placement Scheme (POLI343)
    Level3
    Credit level45
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with an in-depth understanding of the work of a local political representative (MP, Elected Mayor etc);

    To understanding the strengths and weaknesses of local political representation and possible areas for reform to improve such local political representation..

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire a knowledge of local political representation.

    (LO2) Students will gain an understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of existing local political representation and the scope for reform.

    (S1) Time management, including punctuality, meeting deadlines and managing own workload.

    (S2) Develop written and verbal communication skills.

    (S3) Research.

  • The Theory and Practice of Rhetoric in British Politics (POLI323)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Understand, describe, and critique the role of rhetoric and oratory in British politics;

    Understand, analyse, and evaluate the theory and practices of rhetoric with a focus on the modes of persuasion;

    Understand, analyse, and evaluate political performance with an awareness of social impact;

    Understand how to craft a political speech for delivery by high profile political figures.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The ability to understand, describe and critique the role of oratory and rhetoric in British politics.

    (LO2) An understanding of the key theories underscoring political rhetoric.

    (LO3) The ability to construct a political speech using the outlined rhetorical theories.

    (LO4) To compare and contrast how different political figures use oratorical devices.

    (LO5) The ability to demonstrate their awareness of political speechwriting and delivery.

    (S1) Develop a more critical understanding of how political elites communicate with the electorate/audience directly and through the media.

    (S2) The ability to absorb and examine complex theoretical models and apply them to contemporary politics

    (S3) Provide an advanced understanding of the ethical dimensions faced during the communication process.

    (S4) Produce political speeches as a way of appreciating how arguments can be constructed.

    (S5) Through seminar debates develop persuasive speaking skills

    (S6) Develop broader research skills such as the ability to identify relevant political and intellectual information and organise it into a cohesive argument.

    (S7) A more sophisticated approach when examining political and academic texts.

    (S8) Gain marketable skills that can be applied to a diverse range of career options.

  • Public Policy: An Advanced Introduction (POLI310)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to concepts such as ‘the public’, ‘the private’, ‘power’;

    To introduce students to the core ideas that explain societies acceptance of and/or desire for state intervention in the form of a public policy;

    To introduce students to the ways state theory can be used to explain how decisions are reached in the policy process.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will understand the key theoretical ideas underpinning public policy.

    (LO2) Students will understand the frameworks that have been developed to inform our understanding of the policy and decision-making processes.

    (LO3) Students will understand the difficulties policymakers encounter while engaged in policymaking.

    (LO4) Students will understand how to analyse policy options.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S6) Skills in using technology - Information accessing

    (S7) Information skills - Evaluation

  • Local Government in the Uk (POLI337)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting25:75
    Aims

    Students will be able to identify and critically discuss the changing scope of powers of local government in Britain, with particular focus on England’s local government;

    Students will be able to demonstrate a sound understanding of the factors which have driven the relationship between local and national government;

    Students will be able to demonstrate a sound understanding of the relationship between different levels of local government;

    Students will be able to comprehend the major debates, themes and issues pertaining to the contemporary system of local government, and show awareness of the problems confronted by local government in meeting the various demands placed upon it;

    Students will be able to demonstrate a sound understanding of the role of party politics, elections, and electoral campaigning in relation to local government.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to identify and critically discuss the changing scope of powers of local government in British, with particular focus on England’s local government.

    (LO2) Students will be able to demonstrate a sound understanding of the factors which have driven the relationship between local and national government.

    (LO3) Students will be able to demonstrate a sound understanding of the relationship between different levels of local government.

    (LO4) Students will be able to comprehend the major debates, themes and issues pertaining to the contemporary system of local government, and show awareness of the problems confronted by local government in meeting the various demands placed upon it.

    (S1) Time management, organisation and adaptability

    (S2) Communicate complex ideas both written and orally.

    (S3) Teamwork

    (S4) Ability to apply topic-specific knowledge and concepts; critical and analytical thinking

    (S5) Information gathering, evaluation and synthesis

    (S6) Ability to work under pressure

  • Politics of Development (POLI314)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module will familiarise students with the historical development of the state in the global south, and the developmental trajectories, of key states in Asia, Latin America, Africa and the Middle East. The module will teach students how to compare country cases within and across regions. Students will compose a policy paper, which challenges them to marshal empirical evidence to translate academic debates they encoutered during the module into a coherent analysis of policy options and clear policy.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The ability to critically engage with institutional theories of development.

    (LO2) A knowledge of key debates in the politics of development including the role of the state, democracy, good governance and the "resource curse".

    (LO3) To acquire knowledge of the developmental pathways of key countries in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East.

    (LO4) The ability to write a cogent, well-argued policy paper that deals with a significant aspect of these debates and theories.

    (S1) Experience in applying social-scientific theories to particular cases, augmenting students' analytical skills.

    (S2) Familiarity with the techniques of qualitative research in comparative government and political sociology.

    (S3) Experience interpreting socio-economic development indicators.

  • Political Broadcasting (radio) (POLI339)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop students’ skills in a range of journalistic tasks required for political broadcasting on radio, including planning, research, writing, interviewing, reporting, producing, social media usage and blogging;

    To enable students to plan, prepare and deliver different forms of political broadcasting, including news bulletins, expert interviews and special reports, both in a studio environment and on location;

    To engage students in a simulation of real world broadcasting that will enable them to apply and develop their academic knowledge of politics through the demands of responding rapidly and authoritatively to political events as they unfold, in Britain, Europe and the world;

    To provide students with an understanding of the range and inter-dependencies of roles in a broadcasting environment and of the responsibilities of journalists, including ethical and regulatory considerations;

    To equip students with a range of advanced transferable skills of relevance to professional contexts beyond journalism, including communication, teamwork, problem-solving and time-management skills;

    To enable students to understand the significance of the audience in political broadcasting and to develop the skills require to expand and engage audiences;

    To develop students’ confidence in engaging in critical self-reflection and peer-review as a means of improving the quality of their work, both individually and collectively.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will develop skills in a range of journalistic tasks required for political broadcasting on radio, including planning, research, writing, interviewing, presenting, reporting, producing, audio editing, social media usage and blogging.

    (LO2) Students will be able to plan, prepare and deliver different forms of political broadcasting, including news bulletins, expert interviews and special reports, both in a studio environment and on location.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate a capacity to apply and develop their academic knowledge of politics through the demands of responding rapidly and authoritatively to political events as they unfold, in Britain, Europe and the world.

    (LO4) Students will have a clear understanding of the range and inter-dependencies of roles in a broadcasting environment and of the responsibilities of journalists, including ethical and regulatory considerations.

    (LO5) Students will acquire a range of advanced transferable skills of relevance to professional contexts beyond journalism, including communication, teamwork, problem-solving and time-management skills.

    (LO6) Students will understand the significance of the audience in political broadcasting and have acquired skills to expand and engage audiences.

    (LO7) Students will be confident in engaging in critical self-reflection and peer-review as a means of improving the quality of their work, both individually and as part of a team.

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Problem solving

    (S3) Numeracy

    (S4) Commercial awareness

    (S5) Teamwork

    (S6) Organisational skills

    (S7) Communication skills

    (S8) IT skills

    (S9) International awareness

    (S10) Lifelong learning skills

    (S11) Ethical awareness

    (S12) Leadership

    (S13) Business and customer awareness basic understanding of the key drivers for business success – including the importance of innovation and taking calculated risks – and the need to provide customer satisfaction and build customer loyalty

    (S14) Career and identity management online managing digital reputation and online identity

    (S15) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S16) Communication and collaboration online participating in digital networks for learning and research

    (S17) Digital scholarship participating in emerging academic, professional and research practices that depend on digital systems

    (S18) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

    (S19) Information technology (application of) adopting, adapting and using digital devices, applications and services

    (S20) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S21) Learning skills online studying and learning effectively in technology-rich environments, formal and informal

    (S22) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S23) Media literacy online critically reading and creatively producing academic and professional communications in a range of media

    (S24) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S25) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

    (S26) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions

    (S27) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

    (S28) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

    (S29) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

  • World Politics and the World Economy (POLI351)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    Through participating in the lectures, seminar discussions and by completing assessments students will gain:

    Knowledge of the major theoretical frameworks for analysing the relationship between politics and economics at the level of the global system, including world-systems theory, hegemonic stability theory, lateral pressure theory and long-cycle theory;

    Awareness of some of the major trends in terms of global economic growth, North-South inequality, trade, technological change, concentration of military power, rivalry between major states, arms spending, and patterns of conflict;

    Knowledge of some of the hypotheses that have been put forward about the relationship between these trends by theorists of the global system;

    An informed viewpoint on the consistency of these hypotheses with the evidence and their value in interpreting the development of the global political economy;

    In addition, the course is designed to augment student skills, providing:

    Experience conducting essential statistical tests using a statistical software package, including Pearson’s correlation coefficient, the t-test and ordinary least squares regression;

    Familiarity with problems specific to time series data, specifically the problem of non-stationarity in time series data and how it can be dealt with;

    Experience in interpreting the results of time series analysis and relating them to meaningful processes in the global system, encouraging a healthy awareness of the strengths and weaknesses of different methods.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) You will be able to outline some of the most important approaches to theorising the relationship between world politics and the world economy. You will be able to summarise and critique the arguments associated with systemic theories of global political economy.

    (LO2) You will improve in your ability to link particular events to wider processes and trends in world politics and the world economy, placing them in historical and global context.

    (LO3) You will be able to explain patterns and trends in areas of international relations and global political economy such as great power rivalry and global inequality.

    (LO4) You will gain an informed understanding of the possible trends, cycles and constants in global political economy over the long term, as well as an understanding of possible causal relationships between these processes.

    (LO5) You will be able to interpret and handle time series data. This includes generating and interpreting descriptive statistics and graphs.

    (LO6) You will be able to identify trends and patterns in time series by using basic techniques of statistical inference including Pearson’s correlation coefficient, the t-test and bivariate regression.

    (LO7) You will be able to explain some of the special challenges of time series data, diagnose serial correlation in a time series and take account of it through an autoregressive model.

    (LO8) You will be able to explain the essentials of multiple regression in a non-technical manner and to construct and interpret simple time series regression models with lagged dependent and independent variables.

    (LO9) You will be able to evaluate the strengths and limitations of different methods for evaluating theories and interpreting change in the global political economy. You will be able to draw upon different sources and types of data to present an account of the historical development of the global system.

    (S1) IT skills.

    (S2) Statistical and data-handling skills.

    (S3) Problem solving skills.

    (S4) Methodological awareness.

    (S5) Ability to contextualise historically and globally.

  • International Intervention (POLI321)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Students will gain a foundational understanding of the law, theory, and practice of international intervention, international peace and security;

    Students will develop the ability to analyse critically the gap between the laws and the practice of international interventions;

    Students will explore the way how intervention practices have changed over time and how norms surrounding interventions have shifted;

    Students will debate problems and challenges that face states intervening in third-states including issues of sovereignty, and the UN Charter articles on non-intervention and non-use of force.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate foundational knowledge of the law, politics, and practice of international intervention.

    (LO2) Relate the role and framework of international institutions such as the UN to the practice and laws surrounding international intervention.

    (LO3) Identify problems and challenges that face the international community of states regarding the practice of (unregulated) intervention in third-states.

    (LO4) Critically reflect on the challenges and consequences that emerge from interventions that alter the practice and understanding of state sovereignty.

    (S1) Enhanced research skills.

    (S2) Enhanced skills of communication, negotiation and debating.

    (S3) Ability to communicate complex ideas both written and orally.

  • Politics and the Brain (POLI346)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Understand how biological, psychological and health factors might affect citizens’ political perceptions, attitudes and behaviour;

    Learn how to make sense of and critically engage with high quality academic research;

    Learn how to motivate and generate original empirical hypotheses and test them using quantitative methods;

    Learn how to manage, analyse and interpret data from public opinion surveys;

    Learn how to write short academic papers that generate and test empirical hypotheses and interpret data in a way that can be used to advise politicians, political parties, or any organisation concerned with psychology / health and political behaviour.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to navigate key interdisciplinary research in political psychology and in health and political behaviour.

    (LO2) Students will be able to critically analyse how citizens perceive politics, develop attitudes, make political decisions, and how biases influence their making sense of politics.

    (LO3) Students will be able to use the statistical package SPSS to prepare datasets for data analysis.

    (LO4) Students will acquire knowledge of key statistical techniques and be able to apply them to analyse specific relationships between variables.

    (LO5) Students will be able to apply notions of statistical inference and generalise findings based on survey data.

    (S1) Problem solving skills.

    (S2) Numeracy.

    (S3) IT skills.

    (S4) Organisational skills.

    (S5) International awareness.

    (S6) Teamwork.

    (S7) Communication skills.

    (S8) Adaptability.

  • Race, Racism and Civilisation in World Politics (POLI348)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Understand the impact of racism and civilisationism in past and contemporary global politics;

    Understand how claims to superiority and legitimacy are made with reference to race and civilisation;

    Understand how race and civilisation are deployed in a variety of international practices, and be able to critically analyse them;

    Understand and evaluate the effectiveness of the different strategies used by anti-racism movements.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire awareness and knowledge of the ways racism and civilisationism have shaped global politics.

    (LO2) Develop the conceptual and theoretical baggage necessary to understand how race and civilisation have influenced global politics.

    (LO3) Critically evaluate the impact anti-racist campaigns have had and the strategies they have used.

    (S1) Critical thinking and evaluating problems.

    (S2) Communication skills.

    (S3) Interpret evidence to advance a critical argument.

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

All students are taught study skills, including essay writing and information literacy, as part of their first year programme.


Assessment

Assessment in Politics is through a mixture of coursework, examinations, in-class tests, presentations and other innovative approaches. Year Three students can undertake a dissertation in place of two of their taught course modules. The dissertation option is a piece of independent research pursued under the direction of a supervisor.