Politics BA (Hons) Add to your prospectus

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: L210
  • Year of entry: 2018
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB / IB : 33 / BTEC : Applications considered
politics-5

Module details

Programme Year One

8 modules (120 CATS points)

  • 6 in Politics
  • Up to 2 modules outside of Politics

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • British Politics (POLI101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    ​To analyse the context of British Politics

    To understand the key ideological and policy approaches of British political parties

    ​​To examine the basis of British electoral choice

    ​To explore the wider context of British politics, in terms of Atlanticist and European relationships


    Learning Outcomes

    ​To encourage students to think analytically about the British political system and engage with the academic literature

    ​To analyse the major British political events and how they have affected or been shaped by the political system.

    ​To develop students'' written and oral skills.

  • British Politics II (POLI102)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    ​To examine the distribution of power in Britain and the operation of power within the contemporary British state.

    ​To outline the traditional conception of the British political system as the ‘Westminster Model’ and consider the extent to which this conception has been undermined  in recent decades.​

    ​​To introduce the principal ''theories of the state'' and illustrate their application to the study of the British political system.​

    ​​To provide an overview of the key institutional components of the British political system (such as the Prime Minister and Cabinet, Parliament, the civil service, local government and devolved institutions)

    To highlight key currents in political participation and accountability in Britain. ​

    ​To illustrate how economic and political decision making ‘outside’ the UK nation state impacts on political power in Britain.

    Learning Outcomes​You will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the key controversies associated with the distribution of power in Britain.
    ​You will be able to discuss the formal and informal structure and operation of power both within and beyond the contemporary British state.
    ​​You will be able to outline the key elements of the ''Westminster Model’ and debate its validity as a description of the location and structuring of power in the British political system today.

    ​You will be able to explain the primary ''theories of the state'' and apply them in discussing the operation of a range of British political institutions and processes.

    ​You will be able to show an understanding of the role of the key institutions making up the British political system, their relative power and the relationships between them. 


    You will be able to debate how political participation and accountability impact on the exercise of power in British politics.


    You will be able to discuss the ways in which economic and political decision making ‘outside’ the UK nation state impacts on political power in Britain. ​

  • Foundations in International Politics (POLI104)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The principal objective of this module is to provide introductory foundations to the study of international politics by introducing the main theories and approaches

    To provide an overview of the major developments of international politics since the 20th century, paying particular attention to the Cold War and its aftermath. ​

    To offer brief introductions to four main issues of international politics: globalisation, Europeanisation and regional integration, environmentalism and poverty and development. ​

    Learning OutcomesBy the end of the module, students will have acquired a working knowledge of the main theories of International Relations and a greater awareness of their applicability in analysing specific issues in international politics. Of equal importance, students should have acquired a familiarity with the main themes that characterise both the Cold War and the post-Cold War period. 
    More specifically, students will have acquired the following:
    An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the major IR theories. 


     

    ​​​​​​​​​

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


     

    Students should have developed the ability to compare and contrast the various theories when discussing questions and issues affecting international politics;Students will be familiar with the main events, issues and themes in international relations;
  • European Politics I (POLI107)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    To provide an introduction to European politics by focusing on key contemporary issues while introducing some basic concepts of political science encountered in studying this subject

    To examine key challenges encountered when attempting to define and conceptualise Europe​

    To develop understanding of key debates around status of democracy and crisis of the nation-state in the European context​

    To examine salient transversal themes encountered in the politics of Europe, such as integration, international migration​ and security

    Learning Outcomes

    An understanding of the historical development and contemporary practice of European politics

    A working knowledge of the principles underlying political processes and systems (electoral systems and party systems) and how they operate in the European political space​

    An understanding of the political importance of different government structures (parliaments, the executive) at national and regional (EU) levels

    A knowledge of the challenges posed by contemporary political trends to European nation-states and European integration​

  • European Politics II (POLI108)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    Aims

    To introduce students to the distinctive characteristics of political institutions in selected European states

    To introduce the main features of political development in a range of European countries​

    To provide a basis for comparison between different European political systems​

    Learning Outcomes

    Knowledge of key features of contemporary European political systems in a range of countries

    Analytical understanding of processes of democratisation in southern and eastern Europe​

    Ability to compare and contrast forms of executive leadership, party systems, state institutions and the political evolution of European political systems since the latter half of the nineteenth century​

  • Foundations in Politics (POLI109)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting20:80
    Aims·         Students will demonstrate a foundational understanding of key political concepts.·         Students will examine democratic theory and its challenges. ·         Students will analyse expressions of political power.·         Students will demonstrate a knowledge of major political theories and arguments of key political scientists, political sociologists, and political philosophers. ·         Students will understand what the study of politics is, and they will be able to distinguish the different ways in which one can study politics (empirical and normative approaches).
    Learning OutcomesDemonstrate a foundational knowledge of politics and the study of politics.Demonstrate an ability to relate political theory to the real world application of political power.Identify the problems faced by democratic and non-democratic political systems and the means by which they can be understood.

    Deconstruct the relationship between power, the state, democratic theory and the application of political authority.

Programme Year Two

8 modules (120 CATS points)

  • Up to 8 in Politics
  • Up to 2 outside the school

Year Two Optional Modules

  • American Politics and Society (POLI205)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    ​​To help students understand how governmental actors and institutions interact to shape the nature and outcomes of the US political process;

    ​To help students explore how actors and institutions residing outside the state influence the governing processes

    To acquaint students with the US constitutional system

    Learning Outcomes

    ​An understanding of how the institutional relationships occurring at the federal level shape the overall political process​

    An understanding of how public opinion, political parties, and the media interact with governing institutions to shape the overall governing processes found in the United States.​

    An understanding of how institutions interact with those residing at the individual state level (via the Federalist nature of the US Constitutional system) to shape the character of the US political system;​

  • Aspects of Media and Politics (POLI208)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    ​To give students an appreciation of the relationship between the mass media, politicians and the public.

    ​To make students aware of the way the different aspects of the communication process act, react and interact, and with what political and social implications

    ​To familiarise students with the manner in which the mass media respond to political pressure and spin, and with the way coverage affects those exposed to it.

    ​To explore the way the media contribute to (or compromise) democracy.

    Learning Outcomes

    ​Students will be able to place the mass media''s political role in theoretical, empirical, moral and legal context

    ​Students will be able to appreciate the role of economic pressure, public relations and political lobbying on the way journalists cover politics

    Students should have a grasp ​of how far the media trivialise politics, or inflects it in a biased fashion 

    ​Students should be able to understand how, in a variety of contexts, the media relates to the health, or otherwise, of contemporary democracy

  • British Political Ideologies (POLI237)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
    • To examine several theoretical issues relating to political ideologies in Britain. These include what meanings can be attached to the concept of ideology itself and the relationship between political debate and ideology. Particular emphasis will be placed on the idea of the British political tradition as developed by W.H. Greenleaf and the various criticisms that have been made of that approach by subsequent academics.
    • To examine the changing content of the main ideologies themselves. Conservatism will be analysed through the ideas of One Nation Conservatives, traditionalists and the New Right. British social democracy will be discussed through an analysis of the works of C.A.R. Crosland and other Revisionists, the thinkers associated with the Labour left and contemporary social democracy.
    • To analyse the contrast between classical and social liberalism.
    • To examine the nature of contemporary ideological debates, asking if there is still room for ideology in contemporary British politics.
    Learning Outcomes

    Students will gain an undertstanding of the ''British political tradition'' and its limitations.

    Students will gain knowledge of the content of several ideologies in Britain, notably Conservatism, social democracy and Liberalism.

    ​Students will be able to understand the nature of debates within British political ideologies.

  • Comparative Politics (POLI222)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    ·         Demonstrate knowledge of various global political systems.·         ​Identify the similarities and differences between those systems.·         Define and analyse concepts such as political competition, different forms of political systems, different forms of political regimes.
    Learning Outcomes

    ​Comparative knowledge of the various features of different global political systems.

    Knowledge of the similarities and differences between global political systems.

    Ability to understand and discuss the approaches underpinning quantitative analysis of the various features of political orders.

    ​​Appropriate cognitive and transferable skills through independent study and using appropriate research resources

  • Contemporary Populist Politics: Britain in Comparative Perspective (POLI223)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    ·         To introduce students to the distinctive character of contemporary populist political parties and movements in Britain and other established democracies. ·         To equip students with an understanding of the factors which have driven the rise of political populism in Britain and other established democracies. ·         To enable students to identify and debate the potential consequences of populism for mainstream party politics and for established democratic norms and institutions.·         To engage students with some of the most important questions in contemporary western political science.
    Learning Outcomes

    Students will be able to identify and discuss the common and distinctive features of left- and right-wing populism in a range of established democracies.

    Students will be able to compare and contrast the character of contemporary populist political parties and movements in Britain with those in other established democracies.

    Students will be able to demonstrate a sound understanding of the factors which have driven the rise of political populism in Britain and other established democracies.

    Students will be able to outline and discuss the potential consequences of populism for mainstream party politics and for established democratic norms and institutions.

  • Democratisation: From Ancient Athens to Southeast Asia (POLI235)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    ​Through participating in the lectures, seminar discussions and by completing assessments students will gain: 

    • awareness of the course of historical struggles over civil and political rights, as well as the main approaches to explaining the process of democratisation in comparative political science
    • a solid grasp of the debates over the most important factors associated with democratisation and democratic endurance  
    • knowledge of some of the classic cases of democratisation and democratic breakdown, as well as some of the important hybrid regimes of the modern world 
    • an empathetic understanding of the difficult choices that those living under undemocratic political systems face, and the continuing challenges of maintaining a democratic society 

    In addition, the course is designed to augment student skills, providing 

    • experience applying social-scientific theories to particular cases, augmenting students'' analytical skills 
    • familiarity with the techniques of qualitative research in comparative government and political sociology 
    • experience using elementary techniques of data analysis and data visualisation to engage in cross-sectional and longitudinal comparison of democratising countries​

    Learning Outcomes

    ​You will be able to summarise the development and spread of representative democracy across the world, and identify the key events in this process.

    ​You will be able to compare and contrast the three most important theoretical perspectives on democratisation: modernisation theory, transition theory and the social forces tradition. 

    ​You will be able to identify the strengths and weaknesses of theories of democratisation, and to evaluate them against the empirical evidence.


    You will be able to conduct paired qualitative case studies in order to identify factors and processes that relate to democratic transition and breakdown.​


    ​You will be able to use simple quantitative techniques in order to identify potential correlations between democratisation and socio-economic change. 

    ​You will be able to explain the relevance of key pieces of quantitative evidence for debates about democratisation.

    ​You will be able to explain what is meant by a hybrid regime, describe the characteristic features of hybrid regime types such as competitive authoritarianism and discuss problems associated with these concepts.​

    ​You will be able to give an account of the progress of democratisation in Southeast Asia, accounting for the successes and failures of pro-democracy movements in at least two states​.

  • Devolution in the Uk (POLI227)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
    • ​To analyse the impact of devolution in the UK upon its different parliaments and assemblies, assessing how politics in the different parts of the UK has changed
    • To assess how the Parliaments and assemblies in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland were introduced and have developed
    • To explore what has been the impact of these parliaments and assemblies for the party system in each country
    • ​To examine how do devolved institutions address societal divisions within each country
    • ​To assess what are the implications for the future of the United Kingdom of devolution
    Learning Outcomes

    ​​​Upon completion of the module, students should be able to:

    Identify the key conceptual principles of integration, federalism and devolution and their application to the UK;

    ​Understand the historical attempts to devolve parliaments

    ​Comprehend the different powers of each devolved institution in the UK and assess the distinctive aspects of the Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish politics and society that have shaped devolved institutions.

    ​Analyse how devolution has impacted upon England

  • Foreign Policy Analysis and World Politics (POLI236)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting25:75
    Aims

    ​Through participating in the lectures, seminar discussions and by completing assessments students will gain: 

    • knowledge of the main approaches to foreign policy and the classic contributions to the subfield, as well as relevant contributions from conflict studies, political psychology and historical sociology 
    • awareness of the agent-structure debate, the important question of how far human beings can consciously shape the course of world politics  
    • understanding of the various factors that shape the process of decision-making in international relations
    • appreciation of some of the most significant factors shaping overall patterns of peace and conflict, friendship and enmity in world politics

    In addition, the course is designed to augment student skills, providing 

    • experience deploying causal mechanisms theorised by scholars and developing original ''middle range'' explanations for international events 
    • familiarity with the levels of analysis issue, an important issue in empirical research across the social sciences 
    • experience gathering, analysing and synthesising empirical evidence from news reports, policy briefings and primary sources​

    Learning Outcomes

    You will be able to outline the main approaches to foreign policy and the classic contributions to the subfield, as well as describe the relevant contributions from conflict studies, political psychology and historical sociology.  ​

    ​You will improve in your abilityto think critically and rigorously about thereasons why certain foreign policies are pursued over others in world politics​.

    You will be able to explain the significance of the levels of analysis problem for the study of international relations and the social sciences more generally.

    ​You will be able to give an account of how structural factors within the international system shape foreign policy, what scholars mean by system and structure, and why scholars disagree about the nature of the international system.

    ​​You will be able to explain how ''second image'' factors such as the internal organisation of the state, competition between government bureaucracies and domestic politics may influence foreign policy.

    ​You will be able to explain how a foreign policy decision such as the initiation of war can be explained at different levels of analysis, such as the system, the dyad and/or the individual.


    ​​You will be able to locate reliable sources of information about events in world politics, and to utilise these information sources to write a cogent analysis of an event in world politics or a foreign policy decision - applying a theoretical framework to an empirical topic.

    ​You will be able to explain what the agent-structure debate is and why it is analytically, morally and politically significant for how we think about the choices available to actors in world politics.

    ​You will be able to explain how scholars combine causal mechanisms from multiple levels of analysis into theoretical explanations of foreign policy decisions and patterns of activity in international relations. You will be able to evaluate how successful these theories are in revealing the sources of foreign policy.

  • From the Ira to Isis: Understanding Political VIolence in the Contemporary World (POLI240)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims
    • To help students think critically about the world we live in today, specifically focusing on terrorism
    • To consider why and how terrorist groups come into existence and disappear
    • To examine the historical evolution of terrorism, the importance of terrorism in the contemporary world, different types of terrorism, and the responses to such threats     
    • To think about why a universal definition of terrorism has proven so elusive and what this means for the study of terrorism
    • ​To explore the controversies that have been generated by terrorism and counter-terrorism
    Learning Outcomes

    The ability to think critically about the world in which we live today, especially regarding the legitimacy of political violence

    ​An understanding of the key debates and controversies in the study of terrorism and counter-terrorism

    ​The ability to engage in critical discussion about questions relating to terrorism and counter-terrorism

    ​The ability to engage and interact with the main themes in a specific body of intellectual knowledge

    ​ An ability to access and make effective use of bibliographical and electronic sources of information

    ​Make arguments in a coherent and effective manner

    The ability to write a cogent, well-argued research paper that deals with a significant aspect of these debates

  • Governing Britain: Westminster, Whitehall and Beyond (POLI230)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    ​​​​​Toconsider the functions ofpolitical institutions within the British political party system.

    To examine the structures and howthey develop, both as a result of their historical circumstances and theirattempts to deal with their current roles.

    To examine the power relationshipsbetween the institutions and the political parties.

    To better understand the environment faced byBritish political institutions and their operational relevance to contemporaryUK governance.


    Learning Outcomes

    ​Demonstrate in depth knowledge and understanding of the structures and processes of the UK Parliaments and Assemblies

    Compare and contrast powers held at Westminster, Holyrood, The Welsh Assembly, the Northern Ireland Assembly, and the London Assembly.​

    Understand and engage in contemporary debates surrounding the functioning of the power structures of the UK​

    Develop research skills to allow navigation and robust research of the institutions of British governance​

  • International Institutions (POLI225)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims
  • To provide an understanding of the nature of modern state systemand the role of institutions

    To explore central concepts and theories in International Relations andapply these in analyses of the challenges and conflicts faced by theinternational system

    To explore mechanisms and policy instruments that InternationalInstitutions possess in managing the new world order

    To assess critical arguments as to the limits of international institutions and the likelyfuture developments

    To assess interpretations of international law and main debates withinthe canon of human rights.

    ​To develop students'' skills in synthesis andanalysis, and in the presentation of clear and cogent arguments (both orallyand in writing) of issues and controversies surrounding international systemand its institutions.







      Learning Outcomes

      Ability to understand role of institutions in international system.

       

      ​Ability to apply core theories of international relations to major international insitutions.

      ​Awareness of the role of international institutional policy in the new world order.

      Ability to explore limits of international insitutions and the role of international law and human rights.

    • International Political Economy (POLI209)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims

      This module aims to examine the interplay between politics and economics and the way this relationship is influenced by domestic and international forces. 

       

      Learning Outcomes​​​ Basic appreciation of the dynamic processes of international politics and economics.

        An understandiung of a range of IPE theories, and why and how they evolved in response to developments

        Familiarity with recent developments in IPE (globalisation, regionalism, economic crises, etc.), and how they relate to IPE theories.​ 

        Ability to compare and contrast theories and examine how they ‘fit’ with different periods of time and national and international circumstances.​ 

        ​The ability to use technical vocabulary fluently.

      • Security in A Globalised World (POLI231)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
        Aims
        • To provide an overview of how security has been affected by globalisation.
        • ​​To explore how the understandings of security and globalisation have developed over time.​
        • ​To develop a theoretical focus on security in global politics.
        • ​To explore the main themes, issues, and political debates around security in a globalised world.
        Learning Outcomes​​​​​​By the end of the module, students will have acquired knowledge of the main debates around security and globalisation.

        ​The ability to critically discuss these issues

        ​The ability to write a cogent, well-argued research paper that deals with a significant aspect of these debates and theories.​

        ​The ability to engage and interact with the main themes in a specific body of intellectual knowledge.

        ​An ability to access and make effective use of bibliographical and electronic sources of information

        ​An ability to deliver short, small-group presentations where they convey information and ideas succinctly and effectively.

        ​How to make arguments in a coherent and effective manner.​

      Programme Year Three

      8 modules (120 CATS points)

      • Up to 8 in Politics (including optional dissertation)
      • Up to 2 outside the school

      Year Three Optional Modules

      • Comparative Peace Processes (POLI336)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
        Aims
        • To outline the concept and components of peace processes
        • ​To assess the development and impact of peace processes within a range of polities
        • ​To understand the range of political solutions available in divided societies​​
        • To critically evaluate the validity of comparative approaches to peace processes
        Learning Outcomes

        Upon completion of the module, students should be able to identify the key conceptual principles of peace process and their essential components.

        ​Understand how peace processes develop

          

        Assess the impact of peace processes in a range of selected countries   

        ​Comprehend the key factors in shaping successful or unsuccessful peace processes in each country of study and judge whether a comparative approach to conflict management is viable

      • Comparative Voting Behaviour (POLI322)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
        Aims

        ​This module seeks to equip students with the analytical skills needed to analyse election outcomes from the perspective of both voters'' behaviour and parties'' strategies. The module also aims to enable students to analyse survey data using quantitative methods; to provide them with sufficient knowledge of the statistical package SPSS; and to prepare students to write reports and interpret data in a way that can be used to advise politicians, political parties, or any organisation concerned with public opinion and voting. By fulfilling these goals the module also aims at widening students'' employability, enabling them to develop some of the main analytical and statistical skills which are demanded by employers.

        Learning Outcomes

        ​​You will be able to contrast the theoretical assumptions of structural, social-psychological and rational-choice models of voting behaviour

        ​​You will be able to critically analyse the potential and limitations of voting behaviour models both in general and when applied to specific elections ​​and contexts

        ​You will be able to critically analyse how voting behaviour varies across types of party, as well as the dynamic relationship between the behaviour of voters and parties

        You will be able to use the statistical package SPSS to prepare datasets for data analysis

        ​You will acquire knowledge of key statistical techniques and be able to apply them to analyse specific election outcomes

        You will be able to apply notions of statistical inference and generalise findings based on survey data

      • Dissertation (POLI401)
        Level3
        Credit level30
        SemesterWhole Session
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims
        • ​This module aims to enable student to formulate their own research questions
        • To encourge students to ​develop their own research under the supervison of a member of the academic staff
        • To provide an opportunity for students to manage their own learning through independent study​
        • To encourage students to manage their own time and organise appointments with supervisors​
        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of the dissertation students will be able to apply core theoretical and/or conceptual approaches in politics to their chosen area of research

        Synthesise and analyse complex empirical and conceptual material in their chosen area of research

        ​Use empirical and conceptual material in coherent and sustained argumentation

        ​Use a range of IT skills including word processing, where appropriate e-mail, spreadsheets, and the Internet to locate and retrieve information in support of their dissertation research.

      • Comparative Voting Behaviour (POLI322)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
        Aims

        ​This module seeks to equip students with the analytical skills needed to analyse election outcomes from the perspective of both voters'' behaviour and parties'' strategies. The module also aims to enable students to analyse survey data using quantitative methods; to provide them with sufficient knowledge of the statistical package SPSS; and to prepare students to write reports and interpret data in a way that can be used to advise politicians, political parties, or any organisation concerned with public opinion and voting. By fulfilling these goals the module also aims at widening students'' employability, enabling them to develop some of the main analytical and statistical skills which are demanded by employers.

        Learning Outcomes

        ​​You will be able to contrast the theoretical assumptions of structural, social-psychological and rational-choice models of voting behaviour

        ​​You will be able to critically analyse the potential and limitations of voting behaviour models both in general and when applied to specific elections ​​and contexts

        ​You will be able to critically analyse how voting behaviour varies across types of party, as well as the dynamic relationship between the behaviour of voters and parties

        You will be able to use the statistical package SPSS to prepare datasets for data analysis

        ​You will acquire knowledge of key statistical techniques and be able to apply them to analyse specific election outcomes

        You will be able to apply notions of statistical inference and generalise findings based on survey data

      • Labour Thinkers (POLI326)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
        Aims

        1.  To introduce students to a more in depth-focus on political ideas than was available in earlier years of study.

        2. To facilitate students with the capacity to evaluate political ideas and their application

        3. To develop writing skills in terms of module assessments


        Learning Outcomes

        Students will acquire a critical understanding of a selection of key LabourParty thinkers by examining their arguments.


        Gain a sophisticated understanding of how Labour’s ideologicaldivisions are constructed.

        Position Labour’s contemporary difficulties within their historicalcontext.


        ​Critically examine the political and intellectual significance ofLabour thought over the course of recent history.

        ​Analyse therelationship between Labour thinkers, economic capital, social justice, and theelectoral performance of the Party over the course of the 20thCentury.

      • Parliamentary Placement Scheme (POLI342)
        Level3
        Credit level45
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        The aim of the module is to allow students to work with an MP in the Houses of Parliament. They will do so in the third year, semester two. The placement will allow for the development of subject knowledge and specifically to allow students to relate theories of the legislative process with direct practical experience.

        Learning Outcomes

        By the end of the module students will have a detailed knowledge of the theory and practice of Parliament and legislative processes through a combination of reading of academic texts and practical work experience and be able to demonstrate this through the reflective essay that is summatively assessed.

      • Politics of Development (POLI314)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
        Aims

        ​The module will familiarise students with the historical development of the state in the global south, and the developmental trajectories, of key states in Asia, Latin America, Africa and the Middle East.

        The module will teach students how to compare country cases within and across regions.

        Students will compose a policy paper, which challenges them to marshal empirical evidence to translate academic debates they encoutered during the module into a coherent analysis of policy options and clear policy. Students will compose a policy paper, which challenges them to marshall empirical evidence to translate academic debates they encountered during the module into a coherent analysis of policy options and clear policy prescriptions.

        Learning Outcomes

        ​The ability to critically engage with institutional theories of development.

        A knowledge of key debates in the politics of development including the role of the state, democracy, good governance and the "resource curse".

        ​To acquire knowledge of the developmental pathways of key countries in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East.

        ​The ability to write a cogent, well-argued policy paper that deals with a significant aspect of these debates and theories.

      • Public Policy: An Advanced Introduction (POLI310)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
        Aims
        • ​To introduce students to concepts such as ‘the public’, ‘the private’, ‘power’;
        • To introduce studetns to the core ideas that explain societies acceptance of and/or desire for state intervention in the form of a public policy
        • ​To introduce studetns to the ways state theory can be used to explain how decisions are reached in the policy process
        Learning Outcomes

        ​Students will understand the key theoretical ideas underpinning public policy

        ​Students will understand the frameworks that have been developed to inform our understanding of the policy and decision-making processes

        ​Students will understand the difficulties policymakers encounter while engaged in policymaking

      • The Media, the Internet and Political Science (POLI319)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
        Aims
        • To introduce students to the ways in which contemporary notions of what constitutes Political Science have a bearing upon what we think we know about conventional and new media.​
        • To explore the way in which conceptions of power are related to our understanding of how the old and new media function in contemporary society. ​
        • To explore a range of themes that connect the new media to its conventional counterparts (including the political economy of journalism, web-based political mobilisation, citizen journalism and mediate elections).​
        • To explore particularly illuminating examples of power exertion by or through the mass media ​
        Learning Outcomes

        Students will be able to understand what constitutes the ''canons and conventions'' of contemporary Political Science, and how these relate to research on, and evidence about, the old and new media

        Students will be able to appreciate the role and importance of the various media in power structures of society​

        Students will be aware of how the old and new media relate to each other, both nationally and internationally, and how both relate to contemporary political realities​

        Students will have a grasp of the key themes and case studies that link media practice, to politics/politicians, and the principal power models​

        Students should be able to communicate their understanding in cogent form in a varierty of non-written media​

      • Theories of Poverty and Wealth (POLI316)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
        Aims
      • ​To help Students understand the relationship that exists between poor/poverty/wealth in relation to the functions/purposes of the welfare state.

      • ​​To help students understand how the core theories of the welfare state interpret the relationship between those considered as living in poverty/poor/wealthy
      • To help Students feel comfortable and capable of undertaking positive and constructive interactions in large and small group environments
      • To help students understand How different theories interpret the development and use of welfare-to-work programmes.​
      • Learning OutcomesAn ability to make reasoned arguments linking the core theories of the welfare state to contempory issues

        ​An ability to make reasoned arguents relating to the connecton between poverty/poor/welath and how these help inform a range of different theories of the welfare state​

        ​​An ability to make reasoned arguments about how welfare-to-work and workfare are changing the nature and shape of the contemporary welfare state and how a number of different theories of the welfare state understand these moves
      • 'troubled Times': the Politics of the Conflict in Northern Ireland 1960-present (IRIS315)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting65:35
        Aims
      • An overview of the historical background to the late 20th century phase of the Irish conflict.

      • ​Knowledge of the immediate causes of the outburst of violence from 1968 onwards.

        ​​

      • Examination of the motives and strategies of the main participating elements in conflict.

      • ​​​Examination of the peace process leading to the Agreement of 1998.
      • Learning Outcomes

        An understanding of the historical and contemporary background to the Northern Ireland conflict.

        ​An understanding of the motivations and strategies of key elements including the state and the paramilitary organisations from the late 1960s onwards.

        ​An understanding of the main stages of development of the conflict since the late 1960s.

        ​An understanding of how and why the conflict in its violent aspect was wound down and the ‘peace process’ initiated​.

      The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


      Teaching and Learning

      All students are taught study skills, including essay writing and information literacy, as part of their first year programme.


      Assessment

      Assessment in Politics is through a mixture of coursework, examinations, in-class tests, presentations and other innovative ways. Most modules are assessed on the basis of an examination (worth 50% of the module mark) and a 2,000 to 3,000 words coursework essay (worth 50% of the module mark). Year Three students can undertake a dissertation in place of two of their taught course modules. The dissertation option is a piece of independent research pursued under the direction of a supervisor.