History BA (Hons) Add to your prospectus

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: V100
  • Year of entry: 2019
  • Typical offer: A-level : AAA-AAB / IB : 36-35, with no score less than 4 / BTEC : Applications considered
history-2

Module details

Programme Year One

  • 90 credits of History modules
  • 30 credits of optional modules outside History.

These may include Ancient History, Archaeology, Egyptology, or modules focusing on the histories of Ireland or Latin America. You may also choose modules from other subjects.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • History Matters (HIST105)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To discuss the discipline of History, its relevance and significance asa means of understanding the past and the present

    To appreciate thecomplex nature of historical knowledge through engagement with a keyhistoriographical debate

    To develop writtenand oral skills and aptitudes developed by the study of history

    To understand therules and procedures of the scholarly community in the department of historyand to enter into the research culture through engagement with one tutor’s work

    To encourage theindependent and self-reflective attitudes which are essential touniversity-level study
    Learning Outcomes

    An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextuallyupon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretationsof historians

    An understanding of the development of different historiographies and anawareness of different historical approaches.

    A foundational knowledge of the professional practice of History

  • Presenting the Past (HIST106)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    AimsTo introduce a variety of transferable skills;
    To build group skills – through regular weekly meetings and the preparation of the group project;
    To inculcate clear and accurate written and oral presentation skills;
    To encourage an ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon contemporary texts and other primary sources;
    To explore the importance of independence of mind;
    To introduce the skills relevant to the types of employment to which history graduates aspire i.e. team-working, interpersonal skills, self-confidence, oral/visual presentation.
    Learning Outcomes

    ​​​​An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon primary sources.

    An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

    A foundational knowledge of the professional practice of History.

  • Power, Belief and Identity: Medieval and Early Modern Worlds, C. 500-1600 Ce (HIST115)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims 

    To introduce students to the history of Europe between Late Antiquityand the Enlightenment

    ​To develop empathetic understanding of the period

    ​To develop critical evaluation of primary sources

    ​To develop an ability to analyse problems, construct an argument andpresent it clearly in written form.


    Learning Outcomes

    ​An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextuallyupon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretationsof historians

    An understanding of comparative perspectives, through the ability to identify and to assess similarity and difference by temporal and/or spatial comparison.

    Understanding of continuity and change over extended time spans.

    A foundational knowledge of the history of Europe between Late Antiquityand the Enlightenment

  • Modern Britain: Democracy, War, and Modernity (HIST116)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims


    Acquire a broad foundational coverage of the history of modern Britain;

    Gain an introduction to some of the major historiographical controversies relating to modern Britain and thus to the competing perspectives on Britain’s recent past adopted by historians working in different historiographical traditions;

    Enhance critical awareness of the sources of evidence deployed by historians of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries;

    Develop skills in the interpretation of sources.

     


     






     

    Learning Outcomes

    An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

     

    An understanding of comparative perspectives, through the ability to identify and to assess similarity and difference by temporal and/or spatial comparison.

    A foundational knowledge of the history of modern Britain.

     

  • Politics, Economy and Society in Modern Europe (HIST117)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

     

    To provide students with an introduction to continental European history between 1870 and 1939;

    To encourage students to broadens their understanding of the role of multiple factors in historical processes;

    ​To develop an ability to analyse problems, construct an argument and present it clearly in written form.


    Learning Outcomes

    An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

     

    An understanding of comparative perspectives, through the ability to identify and to assesssimilarity and difference by temporal and/or spatial comparison.

    A foundational knowledge of the history of modern continental Europe.

     

  • The Global History of the Present (HIST114)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    ​To make students aware that historical investigation enriches urgent contemporary debates;

    To introduce students to a range of new ways of approaching the past (both in terms of subject matter and in terms of new approaches to history – for example, gender history, environmental history);

    To introduce students to parts of the world that they have never studied before and, equally importantly, to get them to see the myriad connections between different parts of the world;

    To better prepare students for the range of subject matter, geographical areas and approaches available to them from their second year onwards.

     

    Learning Outcomes

    An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

     

    An understanding of comparative perspectives, through the ability to identify and to assess similarity and difference by temporal and/or spatial comparison. 

    Understanding of continuity and change over extended time spans.

    A foundational knowledge of major issues in global history

     

Programme Year Two

Students choose 8 x 15 credit modules.

Year Two Optional Modules

  • America's Emergence to World Power: Us Foreign Relations From Mckinley to Truman (HIST215)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

     

    Familiarise students with the main features of American foreign policies from the 1890s to the 1950s;

    Identify key themes, in particular isolation and intervention, in US policy;

    Assess the roles of key individuals in shaping policy.

     

    Learning Outcomes

    An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

     

    An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and an awareness of different historical methodologies.

     

    ​Students who complete this module will have a grasp of the essential pattern of US foreign policy and its main historical debates.

  • Animals and Beasts in the Middle Ages (HIST297)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to concepts and theories about animals in the Middle Ages;

     

    To explore select case-studies in detail and investigate the role of animals within medieval human society;

     

    To enhance the skills of essay writing, source criticism, conceptual thinking and historiographical evaluation.


    Learning Outcomes

    An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

    An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.     

    An understanding of the role of animals in medieval society.    

     

  • Bodies and Power: Encounters in Modern American Health, Medicine and Society (HIST268)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To explorehistories of health, medicine and the body in modern America through different humanexperiences and from various critical perspectives.

    Tointroduce students to a rich selection of theories, debates, and evidence usedin the historiography of American health, medicine and the body.

    To developstudents'' ability to present and organise informed and reflective oral andwritten arguments.

    Learning Outcomes

    An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

    An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

    To developan understanding of significant issues in the histories and historiography ofAmerican bodies, health and medicine.

  • Chairman Mao and Twentieth-century China (HIST203)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting85:15
    Aims

    To provide a goodfoundation in the life and work of Mao Zedong (1893-1976).


    ​To offer a criticalexamination of past and present writings on the key episodes in modern Chinesehistory.


    ​To gain the ability toengage in critical reading of Maoist texts.


    To gain anappreciation of how China’s developments can be situated in global historicaltrajectories
      Learning Outcomes

      Anability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondaryevidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians

      An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

      The ability to develop historicalarguments, utilise primary (translated) evidence, and sustain historiographicalengagement, with regard to twentieth-century Chinese history and the life andpolitics of Mao Zedong.

    • Christian Bodies, 200-800 Ce (HIST206)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      We will explore the central problems regarding late antique and early medieval gender that the readings variously thematize, namely the exercise of power, control and interpretation with regard to human bodies. These remain highly “modern” and relevant to us today.

       

      The purpose of reading the primary and secondary sources is to acquaint students with contemporary texts and the central axes of the gender debates in history and archaeology that have caused them to be reinterpreted in recent years.

       

      Though the course is focused on the question of gender, students will become familiar in a meaningful way with the varied way in which clerics and nuns were able to adapt Christian (and pagan) conventions to meet their individual and community needs in the expression of their religiosity.

      Learning Outcomes

      An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

      An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and an awareness of different historical methodologies.

      Students will learn of the traditions and conventions that shaped and restricted expectations of male and female behavior in late antique and early medieval Christianity.

    • Cinema and the Making of Modern India (HIST231)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      To introduce students to post-colonial Indian history;

      To introduce students to using films as historical sources;

      To encourage students to consider the role of culture in fashioning identities and about the nature and challenges of being ‘post-colonial’, as well as about the nature and effects of globalisation;

       

       

       

      Learning OutcomesAn ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.       An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and an awareness of different historical methodologies.      

      An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon films as primary sources.

    • Colonial Cosmovisions: Indigenous and Christian Worldviews in the Americas (HIST242)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      A greater critical understanding of the process of religious transformation in the Colonial (Early Modern) hispanic world;

      A greater familiarity with the fundamental role that religious life played and supernatural/preternatural beings were perceived to play in Latin American society;

      A greater familiarity with the diversity of approaches to religious transformation during the colonial period.

      Learning Outcomes

      An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

      An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

      A critical understanding of the process of religious transformation in the Colonial (Early Modern) Hispanic World and the fundamental role that religious life played and supernatural/preternatural, together with a critical understanding of the fundamental role that spiritual beings were perceived to play in Latin American society.

    • Conflict and Conciliation: Ireland 1870-1923 (HIST804)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      Module Aims:

      To present a wide-ranging picture of the state of Ireland from the late nineteeth century to the early twentieth century;

       

      To acquaint students with key historical concepts and debates such as modernisation, democratisation, nationalism, unionism, colonialism and demographic transition.

       

      Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to summarise and evaluate factual and technical information.

      Students will be able to evaluate and analyse contemporary documents to build essential historical skills of analysis.

      Students will be able to discuss particular historical problems and historical debates to enable independence of thought and persuasive argument.

       

      Students will be able to define and discuss key historical concepts, including modernisation, democratisation, nationalism, unionism, colonialism and demographic transition.

       

    • Conquest and Encounter: From Caesar to the Americas (HIST251)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      To introduce students to concepts, theories, debates and examples of the processes of conquest and encounter across a broad period of history;

      To explore select case studies in detail and investigate the similarities and differences in these processes over time, tracing features and transformations with reference to culture, religion and politics;

       

      To enhance the skills of essay writing, source criticism, theoretical and conceptual thinking, and historiographical evaluation.









        Learning Outcomes

        An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and an awareness of different historical methodologies.

        An understanding of the significance of conquests in the western world from Antiquity to the end of the medieval period.

      • Crime and Deviance in the Modern World (HIST220)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

           

        To develop a critical understanding of the theoretical and conceptual literature that uses studies of crime and deviance to understand the structure of power and governance in past societies;

        To reflect on similarities and differences in ideas about crime and deviance in different contexts and at different times;

        To develop a historical and comparative understanding of the origins of modern disciplines and projects such as criminology, penology and eugenics;

        To familiarise students with case studies in the relationships between domination, resistance, power and agency in past societies.​

        Learning Outcomes

        Anability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondaryevidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.     

        An understanding of the importance ofhistorical context in understanding crime and deviance.

      • Culture and Belief in Late Medieval England (HIST266)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        AimsTo introduce students to recent approaches to popular culture and belief in late medieval England.    
        To relate popular belief to broader developments in English society and culture, c.1300-c.1520.
        To enhance the skills of essay writing, historiographical evaluation and presenting.
        Learning Outcomes

        Anability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondaryevidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

        An understanding of English culture and belief between the earlyfourteenth and the early sixteenth centuries.

      • East-central Europe, 1740-1990 (HIST248)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        ​To survey the history of modern East-Central Europe;

        To engage with specific historiographical debates grounded in one geographical region;

         

        To explore how power functions within various regime types.

         

        Learning Outcomes

        An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.      

        ​An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and an awareness of different historical methodologies.

        An understanding of the relationship between identities, political mobilization, and social change.

      • Empire and Humanitarianism: Responsibility, Neglect and the Imperial Mission (HIST254)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        ​​​​To explore the history of humanitarianism within the particular context of the British Empire;

        To use the study of humanitarianism to understand the relationship between domestic Britain and its empire;

         

        To explore a variety of sources, methods and theories as they relate to the material and imagined networks of imperial humanitarianism.

        Learning Outcomes

        An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.     

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.     

        To understand the relationship between humanitarian and imperial practices and discourses.    

         

      • Enlightenment: Ideas, Politics and Society in 18th-century Europe (HIST219)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims 

        To explore the historyof Europe in the Age of Enlightenment, assessing the impact of ideas on thepolitical, cultural and social history of the eighteenth century


        To introduce students toa variety of techniques and methodologies in intellectual history, encouragingthem to think about the relationship between ideas and events in the past – andthe relationship between thinkers and policy-makers today



        To examine a range oftextual, visual and material evidence, understanding how primary sourcematerial has been used and interpreted by different historians



        To encourage students tothink about history comparatively and to draw parallels, connections andcontrasts between different countries and regions.




        Learning Outcomes

        Anability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondaryevidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

        To develop acommand of comparative perspectives, identifying and assessing similarity anddifference across different regions and countries.

      • Europe Since 1945: An Emotional History (HIST285)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        AimsTo explore the history of Europe since 1945 from a comparative and transnational perspective;

         

        To explore questions of social, cultural, political and economic change over time in Europe since 1945;

         

        To consider the importance of emotions in politics, society and culture, and as a lens for historical research.

        Learning Outcomes

        An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and an awareness of different historical methodologies.

        An understanding of key themes in the social, cultural and political history of postwar Europe.

      • Eyes On the Prize: the Long Struggle for Civil Rights (HIST299)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting85:15
        Aims

        To examine the changing character and nature of the long Civil Rights Movement from the late 19th century to the end of the 1960;

         

        To assess the role and significance of individual leaders, their personalities and strategy-making, in relation to the importance of broader ‘structural’ forces that have transformative social and political effects;

         

         To foster and develop undergraduates’ understanding of the historical processes by which societies may be changed and their established power relationships challenged and re-negotiated, using the American CRM as a case study.

         

        Learning OutcomesAn ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians      

         

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and an awareness of different historical methodologies.      

         

        To acheive a critical understanding of historical process through analysis of a range of primary and secondary texts relating to the Civil Rights Movement.

         

      • From Cradle to Grave: British Health and Medicine Since 1750 (HIST239)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

         

        To explore the history of health through a series of topics and themes which examine how experiences and expectations of health for individuals and populations have changed;

        ​To investigate how the health responds to a wide variety of determinants, including income levels, housing conditions, diet and medical care;

        ​To study the role of the patient, the practitioner and the state in health care;

        ​To understand how health has been measured in the past; how authorities have understood health and produced strategies to reduce health inequalities.

        Learning Outcomes

        ​An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and an awareness of different historical methodologies.

         

        An ability to analyse the determinants of health, the role of the patients, the practitioner and the state in health care, and a broad understanding of how experiences and expectations of health for individuals and populations have changed.​

         

      • Human Rights in History (HIST288)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        To familiarise students with keythemes and concepts relating to the recent history of human rights, with aparticular focus on Europe in the twentieth century. (This is not a course inhuman rights law or advocacy).

        To introduce students to therelevant historiography on human rights, enabling them to situate key humanrights texts and debates within a broader historical context.

        To hone students'' ability tocritically evaluate these debates

        Learning Outcomes

        Anability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondaryevidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

        Knowledge and understanding ofthe main events and themes in the recent history of human rights

      • Suffragette to Ladette: Gender, Society and Culture in Twentieth-century Britain (HIST250)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        Toexplore how do ideas about gender change over time

        Toconsider how dominant gender ideals relate to lived experiences.

        Toexplore what power structures are at play in particular cultural understandingsof gender.


        Learning Outcomes

        Anability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondaryevidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

        Students will have developed asophisticated understanding of how the gendered expectations placed upon womenhave varied and been contested in Britain throughout the twentieth century.

      • Liverpool: History and Heritage (HIST209)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        To explore the history of Liverpool, placing it in the context of international urban history;

        To use Liverpool’s experience to explore the issue of heritage and its relationship with history;

        ​To explore a variety of sources, methods and theories as applied to a case study city of global importance to urban historians.​






        Learning Outcomes

        An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline an awareness of different historical methodologies.

        ​An understanding of the relationship between history and heritage in modern Liverpool.

      • Living the Global Eighteenth Century (HLAC200)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        To offer students an introduction to some key aspects of European culture and society in the eighteenth century;

        To make students who come from a range of major subject areas aware of the ways in which study of that period is approached by and can enrich a range of disciplines.;

        To help students to grasp and reflect on the historical dimensions of their own shared and contested culture(s) and the contemporary political and global order.;

        To develop students'' capacity for asking questions (curiosity) as well as for answering them (research skills) by engaging them in active and interactive learning.​

        Learning Outcomes

        A sound knowledge of key aspects of European culture, society and politics in the eighteenth century and insight into the historical dimensions of European and global modernity 

        An understanding of the ways in which study of the eighteenth century is approached by scholars in a range of disciplines and in working with people from disciplinary backgrounds different from their own​

        Ability to analyse and respond to primary texts critically in terms of their historical and geographical context​

        Ability to devise and carry out an independent research project, deploying both data and imagination​

        A sound knowledge of aspects of material culture of the eighteenth century and ability to analyse artefacts of material culture critically and in their geographical historical context​

      • Making America: North America From 'first Contact' to Revolution (HIST295)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting85:15
        Aims

        To explore the history of British colonialismin continental North America, its impact on the peoples of the Atlantic worldand its significance in the establishment of the United States of America.

        To use the North American example as a casestudy in colonialism and its social, political, demographic and environmental[?] consequences.   

        ​To foster and develop undergraduates’ understandingboth of the use of primary sources and of the appropriate methodologies forstudying such a complex and multifaceted phenomenon as colonialism. 

        Learning Outcomes

        ​​​Anability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondaryevidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians

        ​An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

        An understanding of thehistorically-contingent nature of ‘colonialism'', achieved through the study ofthe North American experience, and its significance in establishing the socialand political power structures that were the foundations of the modern UnitedStates.

      • Politics, Finance and Culture in England, 1660-1815 (HIST233)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting85:15
        Aims

        To study the history of English politics, finance and culture during the long eighteenth century;

        To use England’s experience between 1660 and 1815 to investigate the development of English politics, finance and culture and its relationship with history;

         

        ​To explore a variety of sources, methods and theories as applied to interpreting eighteenth-century England. ​


        Learning Outcomes

        An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

        On completion of this module the student should have a good foundation in political, financial and cultural change in Britain between 1760 and 1850.

        S/he should have the ability to take a critical look at past and present writings on eighteenth-century England, and have cultivated an appreciation of the reflexive nature of historiography.

         

      • Possible Futures: Utopian and Dystopian Thought (HIST210)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        To explore and compare the motivation and context of Utopian and Dystopian thought and action from the sixteenth century to the present day;

         

        To identify key themes and developments in Utopian and Dystopian thought and assess their relevance for the present day;

         

        ​To explore a variety of methods and theories that can be applied to the study of diverse source material and media, such as political treatises, literary polemics, and sci-fi animations.

         

        Learning Outcomes

        Anability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondaryevidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians     

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.     

        An understanding of the main themes andhistorical contexts of Utopian and Dystopian thought and action.

      • Poverty, Chastity and Obedience: the Monastic Life in Late Medieval Europe, 1300-1550 (HIST252)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        To introduce students to debates on late medieval religion and society, including the role of poverty, the place of women and the continuing relevance of the crusading ideal, through an examination of the religious orders;

        To explore the varying and evolving role of the religious orders across late medieval Europe;

        To relate developments in the monastic life to wider changes in late medieval society.

        Learning Outcomes

        ​​​An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

        Students should have developed anunderstanding of the changing role of the religious orders in late medieval andsixteenth-century Europe.

      • Practical Pieties: Moderates and Radicals in Early Modern England 1560-1625 (HIST292)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting85:15
        Aims

        ​To introduce ideas of religious and political change during the English reformations.

        To explore the English experience within a wider European framework. To explore the impact of radical religiosity on daily life and experience.

        To introduce source materials and the theories and interpretations related to these materials.


         

        Learning Outcomes

        Anability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondaryevidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

        Anunderstanding of the religio-political changes which took place during the periodof England’s reformations.

      • Projecting China: An Introduction to Chinese Cinema (HIST277)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        Todevelop students’ knowledge and understanding of contemporary Chinese cinema(principally produced in the People’s Republic of China), both in terms of itshistorical development and its recent spread around the world.

        Tointroduce a number of landmarks in the history of twentieth-century China,through their representations in filmic texts.

        Todevelop students’ abilities to present and organise arguments clearly, and toanalyse problems, in relation to these issues.

        Toenhance students’ skills in the critical evaluation of primary sources(specifically films) and historiography.

        Learning Outcomes

        Anability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondaryevidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians

        ​An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

        The ability to develop and sustainhistorical arguments and utilise evidence, with regard to the history andhistoriography of the development of Chinese cinema, as well as therepresentation of Chinese history in Chinese cinema. ​

      • Revolutionary Russia, 1825-1938 (HIST257)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        Toanalyse revolution as a category of analysis

        Toexplore the relationship between ideas, society, culture, and politics

        To survey modern Russian history

        Learning Outcomes

        Anability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondaryevidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

        A familiarity with nineteenth centuryRussian and European intellectual history and an understanding of the variety of ways in which historians have studied the earlySoviet Union.

      • Subaltern Histories of the Early Caribbean (HIST261)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        To develop a generalunderstanding of the early history of the Caribbean region and its centralconnections to Africa, Europe, Latin America, and North America.


        To analyze thedevelopment of the plantation complex and the development of slave societies.

         

        To compare and contrastthe elite-centered and subaltern-focused historiographies of the region.

         

        Learning Outcomes

        An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

        An understanding of the importance of nonelite historical actors in the making of the Caribbean region.

         

      • Testing Times: French History From the Commune to Charlie Hebdo (1871-2015) (HIST264)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting85:15
        Aims   

        To introduce students to keyepisodes and developments in modern French history through the study of primarysources and historiography.

        To develop students'' ability to present andorganise critically-informed arguments in written work and oral presentations.

        To develop students'' awareness of changes andcontinuities in modern French history.

         

        Learning Outcomes

        Anability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondaryevidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

        Studentswill develop an understanding of the key issues and in modern French historythrough primary sources and secondary literature.

      • The Conquest of Mexico: VIolence, Memory and Legacy (HIST282)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        ·         To compare the different ways in which the violence and trauma of conquest was experienced, remembered and communicated, and to explore its contested legacy.

        ·         To identify key themes and developments in the history and historiography of the “Conquest of Mexico” and the history of Early Modern European colonisation more widely. 

        ·         ​To establish in how far historians can make out the “Voices of the Vanquished” in the writings of the victors and after centuries have passed.

        Learning Outcomes

        Anability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondaryevidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

        An understanding of the main events,processes, themes and legacy of the “Conquest of Mexico”



      • The First Reich: Germany Under the Ottonians and Salians, 919-1125 (HIST279)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        To explore political and religious developments in the German-speaking lands in the tenth and eleventh centuries.  To introduce models of ‘change’ and ‘continuity’, and explore how they can be combined in an overall assessment of the central Middle Ages.  To explore the sources and evidence available for the study of Ottonian and Salian Germany.
        Learning Outcomes

        ​An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually uponsecondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations ofhistorians

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

        An understanding of German historybetween the end of the Carolingian Empire and the Investiture Contest.

      • The Hundred Years' War: England and France At War, 1337-1453 (HIST269)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        To explore the combined history of France and England during the later medieval period;

         

        To use the Hundred Years’ War to explore the nature of late medieval society in Western Europe;

        To explore the medieval and modern interpretations of the war and its significance.

        Learning Outcomes

        Anability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondaryevidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

        Anunderstanding of the relationship between military conflict and societal changein the Middle Ages

      • The Industrial Revolution in Britain (HIST272)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting85:15
        Aims


        To study the history of Britain’s Industrial Revolution and placing it within a global context;

         

        To use britain’s experience to investigate the issue of industrial development and its relationship with history;


        ​To explore a variety of sources, methods and theories as applied to interpreting the Industrial Revolution.

         

        Learning OutcomesAn ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

         

        ​An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

        ​On completion of this module the student should have a good foundation in economic, technological and cultural change in Britain between 1760 and 1850.

      • Korean War to the War On Terror: Us Foreign Relations Since 1950 (HIST216)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        Familiarise students with the main features of American foreign policies from the 1890s to the 1950s;

        Identify key themes, in particular isolation and intervention, in US policy;

        Assess the roles of key individuals in shaping policy.

         

         

         

        Learning Outcomes

        An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

        Students who complete this module will have a grasp of the essential pattern of US foreign policy and its main historical debates.

         

      • The Meaning of Freedom in the Modern Caribbean (HIST273)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        To develop a general understanding of the history of the modern Caribbean and its global connections and influences;

        To analyse emancipation and decolonization as political projects;

        To examine the complex and contradictory conceptions of freedom and their political uses during the past two centuries of Caribbean history.

         

        Learning Outcomes

        An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.     

        An understanding of freedom as a key—andextraordinarily complex—problem of modern Caribbean history   

      • The Politics of Gender: Male and Female Rule in Early Modern Europe (HIST229)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting85:15
        Aims

        To develop a depth of knowledge about early modern gender roles and how these were related to family, religion, and culture;
         
        To explore a range of early modern theories of statecraft, and how these could be related to beliefs about gender;

        ​To examine the cultural resources that monarchs used to establish and enhance their personal and political authority.

        Learning Outcomes

        An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

         

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and an awareness of different historical methodologies.

        To demonstrate an understanding of how early modern religious belief, perceptions of gender and theories of statecraft impacted upon the running and development of states.

         

      • The Pursuit of Happiness: American Revolutions, 1720-1812. (HIST271)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting85:15
        Aims

        To explore the history of the American Revolution, placing it in the context of eighteenth-century social, political and imperial developments;

        To investigate the complex relationship between ideas and experiences in American history;

        To employ a variety of sources and methods to illuminate the multiple dimensions of American revolutionary change;

        To use the American experience to explore the significance of historical heritage and cultural memory.

        Learning Outcomes

        An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.      

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.     

        An understanding of the causes and consequences of the American Revolution.

      • The Transformation of Ireland, 1923-2000 (HIST820)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        ​To provide a detailed overview of the political, social, economic and cultural changes that have taken place in Ireland since 1923;

        To acquaint students with these changes and to determine how the political, social, economic and cultural factors worked together to transform Ireland into a Nation State.​
        Learning Outcomes

        An understanding of the key changes that have occurred in Irish society since 1923.   

        An ability to determine the causes of these changes and the importance of each in the transformation of Ireland.  ​

        The consolidation of analytical and research skills by using a wide-range of source material, both secondary and primary. ​

        An ability to debate the merits of historical material and present arguments concisely.​

      • The VIkings in Britain and Ireland (HIST262)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        To intensify knowledge and appreciation of the impact of the vikings on the societies of Britain and Ireland;

        To develop awareness of the interdisciplinary character of studies of the viking age;

        To gain appreciation of different types of primary data and the different methods used in interpreting them.

        Learning Outcomes

        An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

        Critical engagement with the main categories of source material for the Viking age in Britain and Ireland, and identification of their problems and limitations​.

         

      • War, Famine, Pestilence and Death: Europe and the Mediterranean From the Fall of Rome to the Rise of Islam (HIST293)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting85:15
        Aims 

        Todevelop students’ awareness of the main events and protagonists across theperiod.

        Tohelp students to identify themes and concepts in the relevant historiography,and to apply these to particular texts and problems.

        Tointensify knowledge and appreciation of the interconnection of differenthistorical forces, movements and events

         


        Learning Outcomes

        Anability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondaryevidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians

        An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

        Students will become familiar with the principal themes in thehistoriography of Europe and the Mediterranean in the period c.450-c.650.

      • The Indian Freedom Struggle(s) (HIST235)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        To cultivate principles of study that will serve students well at university and in their careers, such as the development of verbal and written communication skills, critical analysis and time management;

        To hone and develop both research skills and the analysis of a range of different types of primary materials;

        To encourage students to critique the significance of concepts such as ‘tradition’, ‘modernity’, ‘imperialism’, ‘religion’, ‘culture’, ‘nation’, and ‘East’ and ‘West – and in, in the process, to question the nature not only of South Asia, but of Western and non-Western societies and of their interactions with each other.

        Learning Outcomes

        An overview of Indian politics, society and culture between the the 1880s and the end of colonial rule in 1947;

        An understanding of the varied conceptions of the nation that came into being in colonial India, as well as some of the myriad other beliefs and ideologies that envisioned models of freedom outside the framework of the nation-state;

        An appreciation of the possibilities, challenges and drawbacks of nationalism not just in India but in the former colonial world and much closer to home;

        The ability critically to discuss and write about major theoretical, thematic and topical issues, in particular the relationship between colonialism and nationalism.

        Improved essay writing skills through submission of assessed work;

        Improved presentation skills through assessed presentation.

      Programme Year Three

      Students choose a 30-credit special subject, a 30 credit dissertation, a 15 credit core module preparing them for dissertation, 2 x 15 credit option modules and all students also take 15 credit core module, a history “impact” module.

      Year Three Compulsory Modules

      • History Dissertation (HIST396)
        Level3
        Credit level30
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims 

        To give students the opportunity to carry out and successfully deliverindependent study at an advanced level.

        Todraw on and extend the skills and knowledge of relevant historical,historiographical and theoretical debates, issues and materials acquired duringthe first five semesters of the programme
        Learning Outcomes

        An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextuallyupon primary sources.

        An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

        An ability to design, research and present a sustained andindependently-conceived piece of historical writing.

      • Reviewing History (HIST393)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        To give students the opportunity develop a high level of engagement with key secondary sources of relevance to their dissertation; To explore historians’ approaches to the practice of book reviewing, and inculcate those in students’ own analysis and presentation of findings.  
        Learning Outcomes

        An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

        An ability to present a scholarly book review essay in accordance with the conventions of such tasks in the published work of historians.  

      Year Three Optional Modules

      • The Age of Catastrophe: Politics, Culture and the Self in Europe, 1930-1950 (HIST361)
        Level3
        Credit level30
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims 

        Investigatehow the mid-twentieth century crisis in Europe transformed the relationshipbetween politics, culture, and the individual.

        Use primarysources such as diaries, memoirs, films and fiction to explore how Europeansexperienced fascism and antifascism, dictatorship, war, occupation, violenceand liberation, leading to new forms of individuality and selfhood between 1930and 1950.

        Ask howcultural forms as well as the everyday experiences of economic depression,political extremism and mass violence influenced the making and remaking of theself during Europe''s age of catastrophe.


        Learning Outcomes

        An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextuallyupon primary sources.

        An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually uponsecondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations ofhistorians

        Knowledgeand understanding of key themes in European history between 1930 and 1950 witha particular focus on the shifting relationships between politics, culture andthe self.

      • America and the World, 1939-1945 (HIST349)
        Level3
        Credit level30
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        To examine how US foreign policy was made and implemented during the Second World War (key actors, policy processes etc);

         

        To introduce students to some of the key debates in the historiography over key developments in US foreign policy during the Second World War;

         

        To engage in critical evaluation of key primary sources (ranging from State Department documents through to newspaper accounts) and to interpret them in the light of the key historiography.

         

          Learning Outcomes

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon primary sources.

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually uponsecondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations ofhistorians

          To havedeveloped an understanding of the way in which foreign policy decisions in theUnited States were shaped during the Second World War by both domestic andforeign influences.

        • Christian Conversion in Late Antiquity (HIST368)
          Level3
          Credit level30
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          Aims

          To explore the historyof Christian conversion from a historical and archaeological perspective, andthereby complicate traditional tellings of the spread of Christianity with acombination of inputs from the historical, archaeological, and art historical sources.

           

          To explore variousfacets of the syncretic nature of early Christianity and its ability to adaptto changing cultural, economic, and governmental conditions.

           

          To introduce students toa wide range of primary sources and critical literature, as well as key debatesand concepts used in the historiography and archaeology of late antique andearly medieval Christianity.

          Learning Outcomes

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextuallyupon primary sources.

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually uponsecondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations ofhistorians

          An understanding of the historicaldevelopment and spread of Christianity in the wider context of the late Romanempire and early Germanic kingdoms.

        • Confronting Catastrophe?: Environmental Histories of Britain, Europe and the United States Since 1800 (HIST332)
          Level3
          Credit level30
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          Aims


          This module will explore the environmentalhistories of Britain, Europe and the United States since 1800 so as to betterunderstand the changing relationships between humans and the environment.

          The modulewill introduce students to the study of a wide range of primary sources andsecondary literature related to the environmental histories of Britain, Europeand the United States.

          It will develop students'' ability to presentand organise critically-informed arguments in written work and oralpresentations.

          Learning Outcomes

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextuallyupon primary sources.

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually uponsecondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations ofhistorians

          Students successfullycompleting this module will have developed their knowledge and understanding ofkey debates, themes and concepts in the environmental histories of Britain,Europe and the United States through the analysis of primary sources andsecondary literature.

        • Digital Histories of Crime and Punishment in VIctorian and Edwardian England (HIST359)
          Level3
          Credit level30
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          AimsTo provide students with an intensive, interactive engagement in digital historical research and e-learning, utilizing online sources for the history of crime and punishment in Victorian and Edwardian England. To familiarize students with the range, scope, possibilities and challenges of online research sources, of the methods and techniques involved in online historical investigation, analysis and projects and of the ways in which the history of crime and punishment is being transformed by the availability of digital sources. To allow students to undertake a sustained individual research project based on online cultural and social history sources. To link detailed individual projects with an understanding of the existing historical scholarship in the student’s area of interest
          Learning Outcomes

          ​An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextuallyupon primary sources.

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually uponsecondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations ofhistorians

          An understanding of the possibilities, potential scope and challenges of historical researchusing digitized primary sources.

        • Disasters (HIST386)
          Level3
          Credit level30
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          Aims

          ​To apply a disaster studies framework to the historical study of disasters;

          To explore and explain the ways that vulnerability and susceptibility to disasters have been created and by whom throughout time;

          To introduce students to a wide range of primary sources and critical literature, as well as key debates and concepts used in the historiography of disaster.

           

          Learning Outcomes

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextuallyupon primary sources.

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

          An understanding of disasters as historically contingent political and cultural phenomena.

        • Emancipation, Sexuality, Repression: Women in Ireland, 1800-1939 (HIST814)
          Level3
          Credit level15
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          Aims

          ​Present an overview of the role and status or Irish women at a time of considerable change 1800 to 1939;

          Examine women''s involvement in four key areas: religion, politics, work and family;

          Using both secondary and primary sources, to highlight the contribution which women made to the economy, society and politics of Ireland.




          Learning OutcomesStudents will evaluate a wide range of secondary texts and primary source material concerning the role and status of Irish women at a time of considerable change, 1800 to 1939. This will enhance research and analytical ability.

          Students will evaluate and engage with the debates that surround the writing of women''s history to enhance independence of thought.

          Students will evaluate what the study of women in history can contribute to our knowledge of the past to build knowledge of recent developments in historiography.

        • European Social Movements Since 1760 (HIST377)
          Level3
          Credit level30
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:99
          Aims

          To debate the usefulness of analytic categories for the study of the past.

           

          To explore why and how people have organized collectively in a variety of historical contexts.

           

          To introduce concepts of success and failure in social movements.

           

          Learning Outcomes

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextuallyupon primary sources.

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually uponsecondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations ofhistorians

          An understanding of how people organizecollectively for political ends.

        • Generations of Hurt: Histories of Human Experimentation in the United States (HIST341)
          Level3
          Credit level30
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          Aims

          To explore human experiments in histories of American medicine from social, cultural and bioethical perspectives;

          To develop historical, critical and ethical awareness through exposure to histories of human experiments;

           

          To introduce students to a wide range of primary sources and critical literatures, in particular the key concepts, debates and approaches used in the historiographies of American medicine and human experiments.

           

          Learning Outcomes

          ​​​​An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon primary sources.

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

          An understanding of histories of human experimentation in the United States and an awareness of the ethical issues raised by these experiments.

        • History Dissertation (HIST396)
          Level3
          Credit level30
          SemesterSecond Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          Aims 

          To give students the opportunity to carry out and successfully deliverindependent study at an advanced level.

          Todraw on and extend the skills and knowledge of relevant historical,historiographical and theoretical debates, issues and materials acquired duringthe first five semesters of the programme
          Learning Outcomes

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextuallyupon primary sources.

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

          An ability to design, research and present a sustained andindependently-conceived piece of historical writing.

        • History Research Essay (HIST394)
          Level3
          Credit level15
          SemesterSecond Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          Aims

          To give students the opportunity to carry out and successfully deliver independent study at an advanced level;

          To draw on and extend the skills and knowledge of relevant historical, historiographical and theoretical debates, issues and materials acquired during the first five semesters of the programme.

           

          Learning Outcomes

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon primary sources.

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

          An ability to design, research and present a sustained and independently-conceived piece of historical writing.

        • Knowledge and Power in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (HIST372)
          Level3
          Credit level30
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          Aims

          To introduce students to a wide and diverse rangeof sources, the relevant literature, and key concepts and debates in thehistory of knowledge.

           

          To help students identify key themes anddevelopments in the history knowledge and its relationship to political powerin medieval and early modern Europe.

           

          ​Tointroduce students to the physical, institutional, cultural and intellectualcontexts of knowledge production during the medieval and early modern period inEurope.

           

          Learning Outcomes

          ​​​​An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextuallyupon primary sources.

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually uponsecondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations ofhistorians

          Anunderstanding of key issues and developments in the relationship betweenknowledge and power in Europe, especially from the Middle Ages to theseventeenth century.

        • Invented Histories: British Uses of the Past, C1750-1900 (HIST319)
          Level3
          Credit level30
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          Aims
          • Toexplore the intellectual and cultural development of historical writing between1700 and 1900

          • To developan understanding of the relationship between historical narratives and nationalidentity

          • Tointroduce students to a wide range of primary sources and critical literature,as well as key debates and concepts used in studying intellectual history,historiography and the history of the book

          Learning Outcomes

          ​​​​An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextuallyupon primary sources.

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually uponsecondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations ofhistorians

          Todevelop a critical understanding of the ways in which the past can be recycled,repackaged and recreated to suit present needs​

        • Metropolis: Crisis and Reform in the Great Cities 1840-1920 (HIST328)
          Level3
          Credit level15
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          Aims 

          Todevelop a historical and comparative understanding of arguments for urbansocial reform and protective legislation in North America and Britain duringthe nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

          ​Toreflect on the significance of political and social activism in the shaping ofmodern cities and city life.

          ​Todevelop a historical and comparative understanding of the role played byjournalistic, artistic and sociological representations in the understanding ofurban problems and solutions and reform campaigns. 


          Learning Outcomes

          ​An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextuallyupon primary sources.

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

          An understanding of the historical lessons of the nineteenth-centuryurban crisis and its solutions. 

        • Neighbours Or Enemies? Muslims and Christians At the Time of the Crusades (HIST348)
          Level3
          Credit level30
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          AimsTo explore the history of the relationships between Christians and Muslims; 

          To analyse case-studies in detail and investigate the ways in which Western Christians perceived Islam;

          To enhance the skills of essay writing, source criticism, conceptual thinking and historiographical evaluation.

          Learning Outcomes

          ​An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextuallyupon primary sources.

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually uponsecondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations ofhistorians

          An understanding of the extent of the relationships between Christians and Muslims at the time of the Crusades.

        • Power, Knowledge and Debt: British Industrialisation, 1640-1842 (HIST365)
          Level3
          Credit level30
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          Aims

          To explore the history of British industrialisation between 1640 and 1842 within an Atlantic context;

          To develop international comparative awareness through the history of industrialisation within an Atlantic context;

           

          To introduce students to a wide range of primary sources and critical literature, as well as key debates and concepts used in the historiography of British industrialisation.

           

          Learning Outcomes

          ​​​​An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon primary sources.

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually uponsecondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations ofhistorians

          An understanding of the historicaldevelopment of British industrialisation in the wider context of Atlanticdevelopment between 1640 and 1845.

        • 'satan's Guises: the Development of Protestant Demonologies in Early Modern England' (HIST321)
          Level3
          Credit level30
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          Aims

          To develop a clear understanding of the relationshipbetween ''popular'' and ''learned'' forms of belief and culture, as well as acritical approach to the meaning and usefulness of such terms.

          To use a wide range of primary texts which provide us with informationabout early modern demonological beliefs (including pamphlets, tracts andliturgies).

          To develop an appreciation of how early modern texts were written, howthey may have been used and the audiences for which they were intended.
           

          Learning Outcomes

          ​An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextuallyupon primary sources.

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually uponsecondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations ofhistorians

          A deep understandingof the religious changes which occurred during the English reformations.

        • African-american Odyssey: Slavery, Race, and Freedom in North America (HIST307)
          Level3
          Credit level30
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          AimsTo conduct a detailed investigation of thedevelopment of Slavery in North America from settlement to emancipation.


          To understand the development in the historiographyof American slavery from the 19th to the 21st century.


          To explore key moments in the history of western philosophy, disclosingthe extent to which this history participates in the production of the conceptsof race and racisms.


          ​To explore a variety of sources, methods andtheories as applied to understand the development of a race-based system ofslavery in North America.



          To explore a variety of sources, methods andtheories as applied to understand the experience of the enslaved. ​



          Learning Outcomes

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextuallyupon primary sources.

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually uponsecondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations ofhistorians

          Recognise and explain the particular issues anddebates associated with the history of slavery in the Americas and demonstratethe specific ability to cope with the methodological issues surroundingconcepts of race and involuntary servitude.

        • The Empire Strikes Back: the Impact of Decolonisation On British Society (HIST391)
          Level3
          Credit level30
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          Aims

          ​​​​

          To explore the historyof decolonisation from social and cultural perspectives.


           


          To develop a criticalunderstanding of the different types of primary sources used to study thedomestic history of decolonisation.


           


          To introduce students toa wide range of critical literature on post-war Britain, as well as key debatesand concepts used in the historiography of empire, identity and race.


           


          Learning Outcomes

          ​An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextuallyupon primary sources.

          An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually uponsecondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations ofhistorians

          An understanding of the multiple effectsof the British Empire on the attitudes and experiences of the British public.

        • The Henrician Reformation (HIST309)
          Level3
          Credit level30
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          Aims


          To introduce students to the varied and developing debates on the Henrician Reformation

          To develop students’ ability to present and organise clearly an argument and to analyse problems, in relation to these debates.


          To provide a strong acquaintance with a variety of primary sources on this topic - ranging from acts of Parliament to literary sources, wills and polemical writings.

          To enhance students’ skills in the critical evaluation of primary sources and historiography.


             



            Learning Outcomes

            ​An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextuallyupon primary sources.

            An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually uponsecondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations ofhistorians

            A competence in analysing a range of primarysource material from the sixteenth century.

          • Vikings in Ireland (HIST304)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterFirst Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
            AimsTo explore key problems in the interpretation of the Viking world;  To acquaint students with the range of primary and secondary sources used to analyse Ireland in the Viking Age;  To familiarize students with a range of perspectives on medieval history, and challenge them to broaden their chronological and conceptual assumptions.

             

             

             

             

             

             

             

             

             

             

             

             

             

             

            Learning Outcomes

            Anability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon primarysources.

            An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

            An ability to explain the significance of Vikings in Ireland within the broader phenomenon of the ''''Viking Age''''.

          • War and the People: Society and Culture in Second World War Britain (HIST392)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterFirst Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
            Aims

            To introduce students to the social and cultural history of Britain in World War Two;

            To be able to interrogate a wide variety of source types in ways that are empirically grounded as well as being informed by theoretical debates;

            To be able to critically reflect upon different historians’ arguments and approaches to the study of British society and culture during this conflict.



            Learning Outcomes

            An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextuallyupon primary sources.

            An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually uponsecondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations ofhistorians

            ​By considering the social and cultural history of this period, studentswill be able to critically analyse unity and difference in people’s experiencesof the Second World War.

          • The History of VIolence (HIST395)
            Level3
            Credit level30
            SemesterFirst Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
            Aims

            ​To introduce students to the role, nature and impact of violence on societies in modern history;

            To introduce students to historical sub-disciplines such as the histories of violence, emotions, trauma, and gender;

            To develop new theoretical and methodological approaches to understanding historical events and processes;

            To develop an understanding of the interconnections between Western and non-Western history;

            To enable students to reflect critically on, and carry out research and writing, on the history of violence;

            To introduce students to different types of primary materials and cultivate their skills in analysing these.

            Learning Outcomes

            ​An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon primary sources.

            ​An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

            ​An understanding of some of the many ways in which violence has shaped the historical development of modern societies in a variety of different contexts.

             

          The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


          Teaching and Learning

          Small group seminar teaching is a vital part of  our modules and you will have the opportunity to pursue independent work to a high level. In many modules, our students are introduced to team-work through the use of joint projects. Modules provide a range of different teaching techniques which include lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. You will also conduct independent study and research using the University Library’s extensive resources.


          Assessment

          Assessments test your capacity to synthesise and analyse material in oral and written formats. You will be assessed by a programme of examinations, essays, oral presentations and coursework. In Year Three, longer pieces of work test your research skills. Written and oral feedback on your assessment will help you improve your performance. You are always welcome to discuss your work with your module tutor in their office hour or by appointment.