Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and Sustaining Peace

Developing New Insights into Peacebuilding

Articles, briefings and reports

About the Project

This knowledge exchange project aims to enhance knowledge and understanding of the role of economic and social rights (ESRs) in sustaining peace. The idea is to exchange knowledge and share practices and experiences of the use of such rights within the peacebuilding and human rights communities and across disciplines to influence policy at international and national level and to develop innovative practice.

In particular we aim to:

  • Assist in networking traditional and non-traditional actors in peacebuilding (for example those involved in economic, social and cultural Rights, transitional justice, conflict prevention, conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction, gender and security and development actors)
  • Advance innovative practice and thinking on peacebuilding and ESRs
  • Support and strengthen the relationship between academia, human rights actors and peacebuilding actors including the UN Peace and Security Institutions, UN OHCHR, and relevant UN agencies and NGOs.
  • Expand space for dialogue across different institutions and sectors about realising rights, resolving conflict and sustaining peace.
  • Develop an enhanced and broader understanding amongst practitioners and academics of promising practices in the peacebuilding and economic, social and cultural rights fields.

Sponsors

We would like to thank the following organisations for funding this project:

In collaboration with:

 

Back to: Liverpool Law School

    Why have such a project?

    Our aims and objectives

    • Promoting greater understanding: The role of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights within Peacebuilding is under researched and underdeveloped. This project seeks to address this gap in research by developing new insights into how such rights contribute to peacebuilding in a preventative context, in transition and post-conflict.

    • Knowledge exchange: To strengthen collaboration and dialogue across academia and practice (policy based and in the field)

    • Impact: To challenge current fragmented policy approaches and develop innovative policy and practice at international, national and local levels. Understanding the links between economic, social and cultural rights and sustaining peace will help to strengthen the case for increased attention to be given to such rights in all stages of conflict transformation by states, the UN and civil society.

    • Needed and Important: In light of the new ‘sustaining peace’ approach at the UN which recognises that ‘development, peace and security, and human rights are interlinked and mutually reinforcing’ and which calls for a comprehensive and system wide approach to sustaining peace, including conflict prevention with a focus on tackling root causes, strengthening the rule of law, poverty eradication, social and sustainable development, transitional justice, accountability, good governance, gender equality and respect for and protection of human rights (Security Council Resolution 2282) and in recognition of the integrated ‘2020 Agenda for Sustainable Development’ (General Assembly Resolution a/70/1) that advocates the need to foster peaceful, just and inclusive societies, this project offers a timely and important opportunity to develop an enhanced and broader understanding amongst practitioners and academics of the role of economic, social and cultural rights in sustaining peace.
    Past event highlights

    #AHRI 2018 Renewing Rights in Times of Transition, 7-8 September 2018, Edinburgh

    'Economic, social and Cultural Rights and Sustaining Peace: The Missing Part of the Peace Puzzle' - Karol Balfe, amanda Cahill-Ripley, Claire Duncanson

    View the conference website

    Below are the PowerPoint presentation slides from the conference:

     

    Briefing on the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and Sustaining Peace, Monday 26 March 2018, Palais des Nations, Geneva.

    A lunchtime briefing on the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural rights and Sustaining Peace. The briefing presented the project’s work to the United Nations Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR) on emerging issues in the field of sustaining peace and ESCRs, in addition to presenting experiences from the field and suggestions for further addressing sustaining peace in the work of the Committee. Lancaster University was represented by the project’s lead, Dr Amanda Cahill-Ripley, as well as Professor Sigrun Skogly. Other speakers included Karol Balfe, Head of Tackling Violence and Building Peace at Christian Aid Ireland. This briefing was kindly organised by partner organisations FES Geneva and QUNO.

     

    Knowledge Exchange Symposium: Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and Sustaining Peace: Developing New Insights into Peacebuilding

    Wednesday 5th and Thursday 6th July 2017, Lancaster University, UK

    A successful and ground-breaking two-day knowledge exchange symposium has taken place at Lancaster University Law School in Lancaster, UK.

    The second event of a collaborative project between the Quaker UN Office (QUNO), Friedrich Ebert Stiftung (FES) and Dr Amanda Cahill-Ripley of Lancaster University Law School, which aims to enhance knowledge and understanding of the role of economic, social and cultural rights (ECSRs) in sustaining peace.

    In particular, we aim to:

    • Assist in networking traditional and non-traditional actors in peacebuilding (including ESCRs actors)
    • Advance innovative practice and thinking on peacebuilding and ESCRs
    • Strengthen the relationship between academia, human rights actors and peacebuilding actors and expand space for dialogue about realising rights, building peace and resolving conflict across different institutions and sectors.
    • Develop an enhanced and broader understanding amongst practitioners and academics of promising practices in the peacebuilding and economic and social rights fields.

    This event built on a previous workshop held in Geneva in February 2017 which brought together academics and representatives of peacebuilding and human rights organisations to identify the intersections between ESCRs and peacebuilding in theory, policy, and practice. As a result of this workshop, the need for further exploration of ideas and exchange of dialogue in order to strengthen mutual knowledge and understanding was clearly identified. With this in mind, the purpose of this symposium was to provide an opportunity for a wider group of academics and practitioners to present their research and experiences in relevant areas, to further enrich the debate and build upon the initial discussions.

    The symposium brought together  participants from the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, international NGOs such as the Global Initiative for Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, Swisspeace, Christian Aid Ireland and International Alert as well as academics from University of Edinburgh, Madrid, University of Nottingham, University of Manchester, Coventry University Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations, An Najah University and the Transitional Justice Institute, University of Ulster, to discuss their academic, practitioner and policy insights on a theme or experiences related to the central topic of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and Sustaining Peace. Topics discussed included:

    • Local /Grassroots Peacebuilding and the Role of Civil Society
    • Women, Peace and Security with a focus on Economic Empowerment
    • Conflict Transformation
    • Rights and Non-Violent Resistance
    • Early Warning, Risk Analysis and Conflict Prevention
    • Transitional Justice
    • Business and Due Diligence Obligations to advance Peace
    • Structural Violence
    • Resilience
    • Human Security
    • Inequality
    • Development
    • Specific ESCRs in a peacebuilding context including Reproductive rights
    • Specific case studies including Honduras, Colombia; Palestine

    Copies of the presentations, along with a list of participants and speaker biographies can be found under the 'Publications' drop-down menu.

     

    Collaborative Workshop I: Shared Practices and Building Bridges between the Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and Conflict Transformation Communities

    17th February 2017, Quaker United Nations Office and Friedrich Ebert Stiftung (FES), Geneva

    This event brought together academics and representatives of peacebuilding and human rights organisations to share research and discuss theoretical and practice based experiences of using economic and social rights as a tool for sustaining peace. The aim of the workshop was to enable the group to identify common practice and differential practice to date (good practice and obstacles to an integrated appraoch); to ascertain where misconceptions exist between the two fields and to recognise commonalities on which to begin to build shared knowledge and understanding and thus nurture innovative policy and practice of sustaining peace.

    Project Team

    Dr Amanda Cahill-Ripley – Principal Investigator 

    This project is led by Dr Amanda Cahill-Ripley. Previously a Lecturer in Law at Lancaster University Law School (where this project originated), Dr Cahill-Ripley will be joining the University of Liverpool in September 2019.

    Dr Cahill-Ripley’s expertise is economic, social and cultural rights particularly in the context of conflict, peace and development. She has also written on the right to water and the right to food. Geographical areas of interest include the Occupied Palestinian Territories and Northern Ireland.

    Find out more about Amanda's research
    Email: a.cahill@lancaster.ac.uk

     

    Florence Foster – QUNO Representative for Peace and Disarmament 

    Florence holds an MA in International Relations from Bristol University, UK, and has since specialized in displacement and conflict analysis, with an increasing emphasis on disarmament, mediation and conflict transformation. She began her career as an intern at the Global Protection Cluster and the International Service for Human Rights in Geneva, before moving on to focus on West African conflict dynamics at the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre, with work in Côte d’Ivoire and Mali. Through her latest roles as Programme Manager at the Fondation Suisse de Déminage and Finn Church Aid, Florence led mediation and armed violence reduction initiatives in the Central African Republic. Laurel Townhead, Representative on Human Rights and Refugees, and Cassandra Moll, Programme Assistant on Peacebuilding and Climate Change, complete the QUNO team supporting the project.

    See more about QUNO’s work 

     

    Hannah Peters – Lead researcher

     

     

    Hannah Peters is the Programme Officer for Human Rights and Development at the Geneva Office of the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung. She has a human rights background and focuses on economic, social and cultural rights and the international human rights system in particular. She is currently working on a cross-cutting project on Sustaining Peace and Human Rights in the work of the United Nations.

    See more about the work of FES Geneva 

    Email: info@fes-geneva.org 

    Publications

    Most recent publications

    Cahill-Ripley. A, 'Exploring the Local: Vernacularizing Economic and Social Rights for Peacebuilding within the Protestant/Unionist Borderland Community in Northern IrelandInternational Journal of Human Rights, April 2019, pp.1-28

    Cahill-Ripley.A, ‘Economic and social rights must be addressed to stop violent conflict and sustain peace’, The Conversation,  May 24, 2018 BST

    Cahill-Ripley, A and Hendrick, D (March 2018) Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and Sustaining Peace: An Introduction, Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, Quaker United Nations Office, and Lancaster University. 

    Select Publications

    Cahill-Ripley, A. Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and Peacebuilding Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (forthcoming)

    Cahill-Ripley, A. “Challenging Neoliberalism: Making Economic And Social Rights Matter In The Peacebuilding Agenda”  In: Economic And Social Rights In A Neoliberal World. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018.

    Michelle Parlevliet and Mie Roesdahl (eds.) (February 2018) Special Issue of the Journal of Human Rights Practice

    Cahill-Ripley, A. “Reclaiming The Peacebuilding Agenda: Economic And Social Rights As A Legal Framework For Building Positive Peace: A Human Security Plus Approach To Peace-Building” Human Rights Law Review, vol. 16 (2), 2016, pp. 223-246

    Cahill-Ripley, A. “Foregrounding Socio-Economic Rights In Transitional Justice: Realising Justice For Violations Of Economic And Social Rights” Netherlands Quarterly Of Human Rights, vol. 32(2), 2014, pp. 183-213

    Dudonet, V. and Schmelzle, B. “Human Rights and Conflict Transformation The Challenges of Just Peace” Berghof Handbook for Conflict Transformation Dialogue Series Issue No. 9, 2010

    Estrada-Tanck, D. “Human Security and Human Rights under International Law” Hart Publishing LTD, Oxford, 2016

    German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) “Connecting Human Rights and Conflict Transformation: Guidance for Development Practitioners” Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Programme, Peace and Security Cross Sectoral Project, Realising Human Rights in Development Cooperation, 2010

    McAuliffe, P. “Dividing the Spoils: The Impact of Power-Sharing on Possibilities for Socio-Economic Transformation in Post-Conflict States” International Journal of Transitional Justice, 2017, pp. 1-21

    Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights “Early warning and economic, social and cultural rights” [Last Accessed at http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/ESCR/EarlyWarning_ESCR_2016_en.pdf on 11/05/2017], 2016

    Parlevliet, M. “Human Rights and Conflict Transformation: Towards A More Integrated Approach” [Last Accessed at https://pure.uva.nl/ws/files/1431340/97876_parlevliet_handbookII.pdf on 11/05/2017]

    Parlevliet, M. “Connecting Human Rights & Conflict Transformation. What Can Human Rights Workers and Peacebuilders Learn From Each Other?” KOFF Newsletter, 108, 2012, pp. 5-6

    Parlevliet, M. “Icebergs and The Impossible: Human Rights and Conflict Resolution in Post-Settlement Peacebuilding,” In Babbit, E. And Lutz, E. “Human Rights and Conflict Resolution in Context” Syracuse University Press, Syracuse: pp. 248-288.

    Rees, M. And Chinkin, C. “Exposing The Gendered Myth Of Post Conflict Transition: The Transformative Power Of Economic And Social Rights” New York University Journal Of International Law And Politics, vol. 48 (4), 2016, pp. 1211-1226

    Schmid, E. “Taking Economic Social and Cultural Rights seriously in International Criminal Law” Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2015

    Schmid, E. and Nolan, A. “Do No Harm?: Exploring The Scope Of Economic And Social Rights In Transitional Justice” International Journal Of Transitional Justice, vol. 8 (3), 2014, pp.362-382.

    Schmid, E. “Socio-Economic and Cultural Rights and Wrongs After Armed Conflicts: Using the State Reporting Procedure Before the United Nations Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights More Effectively” Netherlands Quarterly of Human Rights, vol. 31(3), 2013, pp. 241-270.

    Select Publications by Partner Organisations

    Women’s International League for Peace & Freedom

    Geneva Academy

    Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung

    Quaker United Nations Office

    July 2017 Conference Presentations 

    Speaker Biographies

    Panel 1 Sustaining Peace – What does it mean?

    Panel 2 Programme and Policy Perspectives

    Panel 3 Women, Peace and Security, and ESCRs

    Panel 4 Transitional Justice, ESCRs and Peacebuilding

    News

    Dr Amanda Cahill-Ripley and Karol Balfe brief the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

    13 April 2018 / Amanda Cahill-Ripley

    On 26th March 2018 Dr Amanda Cahill-Ripley and Karol Balfe briefed the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights on The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and Sustaining Peace at their 63rd session in Geneva.

    Dr Amanda Cahill-Ripley,  (Academic Lead, Lancaster University) and Karol Balfe, (Head of Tackling Violence and Building Peace, Christian Aid Ireland), presented the project’s research to the principle international human rights treaty body concerned with protecting and promoting economic, social and cultural rights at the United Nations. The briefing was hosted by the UN CESCR Secretariat and Freidrich Ebert Stiftung (project partners) and aimed to highlight how economic, social and cultural rights can contribute to sustaining peace, which includes conflict prevention, peace-making, transitional justice and post-conflict peacebuilding. It also provided the Committee with some country examples based on Christian Aid Ireland local partner’s experiences in the field of how attention to economic, social and cultural rights in conflict affected settings is necessary and how the Committee could address such issues within their engagement with State Parties to the Covenant.

    The briefing was very well attended by both Committee members and invited NGOs such as the Quaker UN Office (project partners); the Global Initiative for Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, as well as the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights Economic, Social and Cultural Rights Team.

    The briefing also marked the official launch of the project’s new report based upon groundbreaking research entitled, ‘Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and Sustaining Peace: An Introduction’ (see here). The main objective of the report is to enhance knowledge and develop understanding of how economic, social, and cultural rights can contribute to a sustaining peace approach to peacebuilding. It also makes concrete recommendations to States and other stakeholders, such as human rights and peacebuilding bodies, as well as NGOs and other civil society organisations, as to what they can do to highlight the nexus between economic, social, and cultural rights and sustaining peace, and how to incorporate such rights into their peacebuilding actions. With this objective in mind, the report provides an overview of the topic and offers analysis of the benefits and challenges to better understand how addressing economic, social and cultural rights can contribute to all peacebuilding processes – from conflict prevention to post-conflict peacebuilding.

    Briefing on the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and Sustaining Peace, Monday 26th March 2018, Palais des Nations, Geneva.

    11 February 2018 / Luke Graham

    Monday 26th March has been confirmed as the date for a lunchtime briefing on the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural rights and Sustaining Peace. The briefing will present the project’s work to the United Nations Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR) on emerging issues in the field of sustaining peace and ESCRs, in addition to presenting experiences from the field and suggestions for further addressing further sustaining peace in the work of the Committee. Lancaster University will be represented by the project’s lead, Dr Amanda Cahill-Ripley, as well as Professor Sigrun Skogly. Other speakers include Karol Balfe, Head of Tackling Violence and Building Peace at Christian Aid Ireland. This briefing is kindly organised by partner organisations FES Geneva and QUNO. 

    Update on ‘Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and Sustaining Peace Project: Recent Activities

    23 October 2017 / Luke Graham

    1. The team have been busy working on the Knowledge Exchange publication and we would like to extend an invitation out to anyone who has interesting case study material that they could contribute to the publication on any of the themes that were discussed at the conference. Please send these to escr@lancaster.ac.uk We aim to launch this booklet at an event in the beginning of the New Year. Please keep an eye on the website for details (but we will also be sending out information as soon as it is confirmed). 

    2. We are planning to participate in the Collaborative Research Network on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights at the Law and Society Annual Meeting in Toronto in June 2018, with the aim of continuing the knowledge exchange between practitioners and academia and broadening these discussions ‘over the pond’ with a wider range of actors. If anyone is interested in knowing more please see the website.

    3. Amanda, Hannah (FES) and Anna (swisspeace) took part in an expert seminar in Geneva this month on “Approaching New Realities: Human Rights in Conflict Situations – Expanding the Scope of the Human Rights Council”, sponsored by  the German Institute for Human Rights, Forum Menschenrechte, Geneva Academy  and Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung. The podcast by Dr. Amanda Cahill-Ripley will be uploaded shortly.

    4. We have approached several highly-esteemed peer-reviewed journals regarding hosting a Special Edition. Once we have heard from the editors in chief we will send out further details. At this point we would be grateful for expressions of interest to participate in this special issue. We are hoping to have a good balance of academic and policy/practitioner submissions. 

    5. We would like to update the website with any relevant publications that you have been working on. Please send details of any publications (policy; academic; practice notes) or any relevant events that you would like to advertise. We are also happy to advertise such events via our Twitter account @escrsp

    We hope in the future to secure further funding for undertaking research into the themes raised by the project to date and any new relevant themes that participants raise. Please do get in touch if you would be interested in further research collaboration.

     

    Ground-breaking knowledge exchange symposium has taken place at Lancaster University.

    12 July 2017 / Amanda Cahill-Ripley

    Knowledge Exchange Symposium: Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and Sustaining Peace: Developing New Insights into Peacebuilding

    Wednesday 5th and Thursday 6th July 2017, Lancaster University, UK

    A successful and ground-breaking two-day knowledge exchange symposium has taken place at Lancaster University Law School in Lancaster, UK.

    The second event of a collaborative project between the Quaker UN Office (QUNO), Friedrich Ebert Stiftung (FES) and Dr Amanda Cahill-Ripley of Lancaster University Law School, which aims to enhance knowledge and understanding of the role of economic, social and cultural rights (ECSRs) in sustaining peace.

    In particular, we aim to:

    • Assist in networking traditional and non-traditional actors in peacebuilding (including ESCRs actors)
    • Advance innovative practice and thinking on peacebuilding and ESCRs
    • Strengthen the relationship between academia, human rights actors and peacebuilding actors and expand space for dialogue about realising rights, building peace and resolving conflict across different institutions and sectors.
    • Develop an enhanced and broader understanding amongst practitioners and academics of promising practices in the peacebuilding and economic and social rights fields.

    This event built on a previous workshop held in Geneva in February 2017 which brought together academics and representatives of peacebuilding and human rights organisations to identify the intersections between ESCRs and peacebuilding in theory, policy, and practice. As a result of this workshop, the need for further exploration of ideas and exchange of dialogue in order to strengthen mutual knowledge and understanding was clearly identified. With this in mind, the purpose of this symposium was to provide an opportunity for a wider group of academics and practitioners to present their research and experiences in relevant areas, to further enrich the debate and build upon the initial discussions.

    The symposium brought together  participants from the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, international NGOs such as the Global Initiative for Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, Swisspeace, Christian Aid Ireland and International Alert as well as academics from University of Edinburgh, Madrid, University of Nottingham, University of Manchester, Coventry University Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations, An Najah University and the Transitional Justice Institute, University of Ulster, to discuss their academic, practitioner and policy insights on a theme or experiences related to the central topic of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and Sustaining Peace. Topics discussed included:

    • Local /Grassroots Peacebuilding and the Role of Civil Society
    • Women, Peace And Security  with a focus on Economic Empowerment
    • Conflict Transformation
    • Rights and Non-Violent Resistance
    • Early Warning, Risk Analysis and Conflict Prevention
    • Transitional Justice
    • Business and Due Diligence Obligations to advance Peace
    • Structural Violence
    • Resilience
    • Human Security
    • Inequality
    • Development
    • Specific ESCRs in a peacebuilding context including Reproductive rights
    • Specific case studies including Honduras, Colombia; Palestine

     

    Call for Papers!

    8 May 8 2017 / Amanda Cahill-Ripley

    Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and Sustaining Peace: Developing New Insights into Peacebuilding

    Knowledge Exchange Symposium, Wednesday 5th July 2017, Lancaster University, UK

    The topic of human rights and conflict transformation is not a new one. However, increasingly attention is being given to the lack of consideration of economic, social and cultural rights within peacebuilding. This one day knowledge exchange symposium to be held at Lancaster University Law School in Lancaster, UK on Wednesday 5th July 2017, is the second event of a collaborative project between the Quaker UN Office (QUNO), Friedrich Ebert Stiftung (FES) and Dr Amanda Cahill-Ripley of Lancaster University Law School.  The project aims to enhance knowledge and understanding of the role of economic, social and cultural rights (ECSRs) in sustaining peace. In particular, we aim to:

    • Assist in networking traditional and non-traditional actors in peacebuilding (including ESCRs actors)
    • Advance innovative practice and thinking on peacebuilding and ESCRs
    • Strengthen the relationship between academia, human rights actors and peacebuilding actors and expand space for dialogue about realising rights, building peace and resolving conflict across different institutions and sectors.
    • Develop an enhanced and broader understanding amongst practitioners and academics of promising practices in the peacebuilding and economic and social rights fields.
    • Further information on the project can be found here: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/escr-peacebuilding/

    This event will build on a previous workshop held in Geneva in February 2017 which brought together academics and representatives of peacebuilding and human rights organisations to identify the intersections between ESCRs and peacebuilding in theory, policy, and practice. As a result of this workshop, the need for further exploration of ideas and exchange of dialogue in order to strengthen mutual knowledge and understanding was clearly identified. With this in mind, the purpose of this symposium is to provide an opportunity for a wider group of academics and practitioners to present their research and experiences in relevant areas, to further enrich the debate and build upon the initial discussions.

    The event will be organised around a number of panels where speakers will present their academic, practitioner and policy insights on a theme or experiences related to the central topic concerning ESCRs and Sustaining Peace, including but not limited to:

    • Economic Crimes And Corruption
    • Local /Grassroots Peacebuilding
    • Gender /Women, Peace And Security
    • Conflict Transformation
    • Early Warning, Risk Analysis and Conflict Prevention
    • Post-Conflict Peacebuilding
    • Transitional Justice
    • Non-State Actors (Including Business; NSAC)
    • Structural Violence
    • Resilience
    • Human Security
    • Inequality
    • Discrimination/Vulnerable Groups
    • Political Settlements/Legal Agreements
    • Fragility
    • Development
    • Specific ESCRs in a peacebuilding context
    • NB. Cross-cutting themes and presentations on particular case studies/ programme level experiences are also encouraged.

    Time will be included within each panel session to ask questions and debate issues raised.
     
    In the evening all symposium participants will be invited to attend supper on board The Kingfisher canal barge for a cruise through the countryside of Lancaster. There is a nominal fee of £25 per person for the evening cruise including dinner.

    Abstract Deadline

    We look forward to receiving your abstract. Please submit a 200-500 word abstract to: escr@lancaster.ac.uk by Friday 26th May 2017.
     
    I really hope you can join us for what promises to be a very interesting and formative event.