Geography BSc (Hons) Add to your prospectus

  • Offers study abroad opportunities Offers study abroad opportunities
  • Opportunity to study for a year in China Offers a Year in China
  • This degree is accreditedAccredited

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: F800
  • Year of entry: 2019
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB / IB : 33 / BTEC : D*DD
geography-1

Module details

Programme Year One

Student will take the following compulsory modules and select from the optional modules detailed below.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Changes in Earth Surface Processes (ENVS163)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The module uses a lecture and fieldwork-basedproblem-solving approach to explore some of the fundamental physical andchemical processes underlying physical geography. It is designed to provide afoundation for physical geography modules in the second and third years.

    It also aims toprovide training in field methodologies and procedures.

    Learning Outcomes

    The core processes and landforms underlying major geomorphic systems​

    Long term environmental change –Pleistocene and Holocene​​

    Practical skills training Physical geography including surveying,mapping, environmental change and hydrology​

    Data analysis techniques and processing of fieldwork data​
  • Experiments in Physical Geography I (ENVS120)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    For students to learn:-

    • Careful observation, appropriate handing of liquid and solid samples, and correct use of analytical instruments.
    • Approaches to measurement quality control via replication and reference materials.
    • Appropriate use of descriptive and inferential statistics using MINITAB.
    • Succinct and clear presentation of experimental results in poster form (Powerpoint)
    Learning Outcomes

    A deeper understanding of processes that underlie the interaction between people and the physical environment.  

    ​Specific knowledge in the use of selected important analytical instrument; and general knowledge about the principles and practice of accurate and precise measurement.  

    ​Appropriate treatment of data, including quality control, graphical representation, and statistical analysis.  

  • Experiments in Physical Geography II (ENVS154)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module uses laboratory experiments to allow students to gain firsthand experience of some fundamental physical, biological and chemical processes underlying physical geography. It is designed to provide a foundation for physical geography modules in the second and third years.

    It also aims to provide training in careful observation, appropriate handing of liquid and solid samples, and correct use of analytical instruments. Throughout there is emphasis on quality control via replication and reference materials, and appropriate use of descriptive and inferential statistics.

    Learning Outcomes​A deeper understanding of processes that shape the earth’s surface​​

    ​Specific knowledge in the use of selected important analytical instruments 

    ​Appropriate treatment of data, including quality control, graphical representation, and statistical analysis ​​

    ​General knowledge about the principles and practice of accurate and precise measuremen​​t

  • Living With Environmental Change (ENVS119)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The over-arching aim of thismodule is to introduce students to the so-called ‘Grand Challenges’ facingsociety and what is being done to address them. Living with Environmental Change is a key interdisciplinaryresearch theme currently being addressed worldwide; from tackling climatechange and carbon emissions to promoting sustainable resource use and energyefficiency. This module illustrates that an interdisciplinary approach iscrucial to identifying the underlying problems faced by humanity and to findingholistic and sustainable solutions.

    ​ 

    Learning Outcomes

    ​Obtain an understanding of the Grand Challenges facing society;

    ​Develop an appreciation of the significance of interdisciplinary working in addressing the Grand Challenges;

    ​Understand that Geography plays a key role in the Living With Environmental Change (LWEC) research agenda;

    ​Become familiar with the linkages between research, policy and sustainability.

  • Study Skills and Gis (ENVS100)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    ​The aim of this module is to help students develop theessential study and disciplinary skills required by Geographers andEnvironmental Scientists, both for their current studies and future employment.

    Specifically, this module aims to help students:

    • Gain an introduction to key approaches/concepts and ideas in Geography and Environmental Science
    • Identify and effectively employ appropriate sources of data and information
    • Gain study skills essential for subsequent years
    • Develop personal transferable skills
    • Enhance their employability
    • Gain practical experience of applying Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and Global Positioning Systems (GPS) to Environmental and Social Science​
    Learning Outcomes

    Ability to record field observations and ideas. 

    ​Use IT tools to find accurate and up to date information. 

    Undertake independent GPS data collection.

    ​Demonstrate basic GIS interpretation and analysis techniques.

    Plan and structure written work to University standard. 

    Ability to critically evaluate academic publications.

    Prepare and deliver poster presentations.​

    Awareness of the importance of early planning for employability enhancement.

Year One Optional Modules

  • Climate, Atmosphere and Oceans (ENVS111)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    Introduce the climate system, the atmosphere and ocean:

    • Address how the climate system varies and how climate is controlled by radiative forcing;
    • How the structure of the atmosphere is determined and how the atmosphere circulates;
    • How the structure of the ocean is determined and how the ocean circulates;
    • How the atmosphere and ocean vary together.
    • How the past state of the climate system is affected by the ocean circulation
    Learning Outcomes

    1. Knowledge and Understanding
     

    a. Understand how physical processes operate within the climate system, the atmosphere and the ocean.

    b. Appreciate the complexity of the climate system, the effect of radiative forcing, the concept of feedbacks, how rotation affects the circulation; the differences between currents and waves.

    c. Gain awareness of the similarities and differences between the atmosphere and ocean.​

    2. Intellectual Abilities
     

    a. To be able to evaluate the relative importance of different physical processes in the climate system

    b. To develop critical skills in transferring insight gained from one problem to another problem, such as how the atmosphere circulates from one planet to another planet.​

    3. Subject Based Practical Skills
     

    a. Perform simple order of magnitude calculations and make inferences from the results.

    b. Understand the use of dimensions.​

    ​​​​​​

    4. General Transferable Skills
     

    a. Application of numbers, involving order of magnitudes and dimensions.

    b. Time management.

    c. Problem solving.​

  • Ecology and Conservation (ENVS157)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The module aims tointroduce students to the key principles that govern the interactions betweenorganisms and their environment, and how these can be used as the basis forconservation.​ 

    Learning OutcomesUnderstandand explain fundamental principles of how ecological systems are structured andhow they function at the scale of individuals, populations and communities​Tounderstand the effects of human activities on communities and ecosystems at arange of timescales​

    Developan ability to critically evaluate how ecological understanding and data can beused to inform conservation policy​

  • Environmental Chemistry (ENVS153)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting55:45
    Aims

    This module aims to provide a basic understanding of chemistry relevant for environmental sciences.


    Learning Outcomes

    a. describe the structure of an atom, its electronic configuration and predict some of its chemical behaviour based on its position in the periodic table;​

    ​b. understand the inter andintramolecular forces that bond molecules and atoms together to form "matter", and thusexplain why for instance water is a liquid atroom temperature while oxygen is a gas;​

    ​c. name chemical compounds, write balanced chemical reactions and understand howthe amount of products and reactants can be predicted;​

    ​d. understand what redox reactions are and be able to work them out;

    ​e. understand basics of aquatic chemistry such aspH, concentration, dilution; understand energy changes in chemical reactions;​

    ​f. know the basics of organic biogeochemistry.​

  • Human Geography Through Merseyside (ENVS162)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module is designed with the following aims in mind:

    • Introduce students to key areas of human geography inquiry practised at the University of Liverpool through engagement in intensive day-long practical exercises.
    • Ground learning in a particular geographic context through focus on human geographic processes in Merseyside and Liverpool.
    • Provide students with practical experience in a variety of methods for collecting and analysing geographic data.
    • Allow students to practise speaking and writing about geographic concepts and linking these concepts to real-world examples.
    • Provide experience working independently and in groups.
    • Prepare students for studying Human Geography in subsequent years.
    Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this module, successful students will be able to

    • Demonstrate an understanding of key areas of Human Geography inquiry, and relate important geographic concepts to examples in Liverpool and Merseyside.

    • Demonstrate basic skills in the collection and interpretation of geogrpahical data, both qualitative and quantitative.​
  • Introduction to Marine Biogeochemistry (ENVS158)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims
    1. To introduce students to marine chemistry of the major and trace elements.
    2. To demonstrate the dynamic relationship between the chemical ocean environment and biological processes.
    3. To identify the main ocean basins and main oceanic transport routes of chemical species
    4. To teach the necessary practical skills for oceanographic sampling and measurement of chemical species.
    Learning Outcomes1. Students will be able to identify ocean basins, their major characteristics and transport pathways.

    2. Students will gain knowledge of the sources and distributions of major and minor elements in the ocean, including dissolved gases, nutrients and carbon.​

    3. Students will understand the chemical and biological processes that control the distribution of major and minor elements including dissolved gases, nutrients and carbon.​

    ​3. Students will recognize the form and function of different components of the marine ecosystem including viruses, bacteria, phytoplankton and zooplankton. ​

    ​4. Students will be able to synthesis knowledge of key biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus to understand how they are linked in the modern and past ocean environment. 

    5. Students will know how to measure key properties of the ocean and interpret why they vary in space and time

  • Introduction to Sedimentary Rocks and Fossils (ENVS118)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    Aims
    • The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to the study of sediments and sedimentary rocks and to introduce the main groups of common fossil.
    • The module aims to cover the basic language used to describe sediments and fossils and gives an introduction to a range of physical, chemical and biological concepts.   
    • The students are introduced to the economic significance of sediments and sedimentary rocks and how fossils provide information on geological time, evolutionary history and ancient environments.
    Learning Outcomes

    ​1. On successful completion of this module, a student will be able to describe sediments and sedimentary rocks at outcrop, hand specimen and thin section scales, identifying and naming key structures and fabrics.

    ​2. On successful completion of this module, a student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the relationships between process and product for both depositional and diagenetic features and be able to discuss the utility of sedimentary rocks to determine processs and, to a lesser extent, environment.

    ​3. On successful completion of this module, a student will be able to describe, name and identify