Geography BSc (Hons)

Key information


geography-1

Module details

Due to the impact of COVID-19 we're changing how the course is delivered.

Programme Year One

Student will take the following compulsory modules and select from the optional modules detailed below.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Changes in Earth Surface Processes (ENVS163)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The module uses a lecture and fieldwork-based problem-solving approach to explore some of the fundamental physical andchemical processes underlying physical geography. It is designed to provide afoundation for physical geography modules in the second and third years.

    It also aims to provide training in field methodologies and procedures.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The core processes and landforms underlying major geomorphic systems

    (LO2) Long term environmental change –Pleistocene and Holocene

    (LO3) Practical skills training Physical geography including surveying,mapping, environmental change and hydrology

    (LO4) Data analysis techniques and processing of fieldwork data

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Teamwork

    (S3) Communication skills

  • Experiments in Physical Geography I (ENVS120)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    For students to learn:

    Careful observation, appropriate handing of liquid and solid samples, and correct use of analytical instruments.

    Approaches to measurement quality control via replication and reference materials.

    Appropriate use of descriptive and inferential statistics using MINITAB.

    Succinct and clear presentation of experimental results in poster form (Powerpoint)

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) A deeper understanding of processes that underlie the interaction between people and the physical environment.

    (LO2) Specific knowledge in the use of selected important analytical instrument; and general knowledge about the principles and practice of accurate and precise measurement.

    (LO3) Appropriate treatment of data, including quality control, graphical representation, and statistical analysis.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Teamwork

    (S4) Organisational skills

    (S5) IT skills

  • Experiments in Physical Geography II (ENVS154)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module uses laboratory experiments to allow students to gain firsthand experience of some fundamental physical, biological and chemical processes underlying physical geography. It is designed to provide a foundation for physical geography modules in the second and third years.

    It also aims to provide training in careful observation, appropriate handing of liquid and solid samples, and correct use of analytical instruments. Throughout there is emphasis on quality control via replication and reference materials, and appropriate use of descriptive and inferential statistics.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) A deeper understanding of processes that shape the earth’s surface

    (LO2) Specific knowledge in the use of selected important analytical instruments

    (LO3) Appropriate treatment of data, including quality control, graphical representation, and statistical analysis

    (LO4) General knowledge about the principles and practice of accurate and precise measurement

    (S1) Teamwork

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Problem solving skills

    (S4) IT skills

    (S5) Organisational skills

    (S6) Adaptability

  • Living With Environmental Change (ENVS119)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The over-arching aim of this module is to introduce students to the so-called ‘Grand Challenges’ facing society and what is being done to address them. Living with Environmental Change is a key interdisciplinary research theme currently being addressed worldwide; from tackling climate change and carbon emissions to promoting sustainable resource use and energy efficiency. This module illustrates that an interdisciplinary approach is crucial to identifying the underlying problems faced by humanity and to finding holistic and sustainable solutions.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Obtain an understanding of the Grand Challenges facing society;

    (LO2) Develop an appreciation of the significance of interdisciplinary working in addressing the Grand Challenges;

    (LO3) Understand that Geography plays a key role in the Living With Environmental Change (LWEC) research agenda;

    (LO4) Become familiar with the linkages between research, policy and sustainability.

    (S1) Abstraction and synthesis of information

    (S2) Assessing the merits of contrasting theories and explanations

    (S3) Taking responsibility for learning and reflection upon that learning

    (S4) Synthesising, contextualising and critically evaluating information of different styles and from different sources

  • Study Skills and Gis (ENVS100)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop essential study and disciplinary skills required by Geographers, both for their current studies and future employment.

    Introduce students to key approaches/concepts and ideas in Geography.

    To help students identify and effectively employ appropriate sources of data and information.

    Develop students' study skills and provide essential training for subsequent years Develop students' personal transferable skills.

    To enhance student employability and make students aware of the key skills taught throughout the programme relevant to career and employability development.

    To introduce the application of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and Global Positioning Systems (GPS) to Environmental/Social Science.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Use IT tools to find accurate and up to date information.

    (LO2) Undertake independent GPS data collection.

    (LO3) Demonstrate basic GIS interpretation and analysis techniques.

    (LO4) Plan and structure written work to University standard.

    (LO5) Ability to critically evaluate academic publications.

    (LO6) Awareness of the importance of early planning for employability enhancement.

    (S1) Lifelong learning skills

    (S2) IT skills

    (S3) Communication skills

Year One Optional Modules

  • Climate, Atmosphere and Oceans (ENVS111)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    Introduce the climate system, the atmosphere and ocean:

    Address how the climate system varies and how climate is controlled by radiative forcing;

    How the structure of the atmosphere is determined and how the atmosphere circulates;

    How the structure of the ocean is determined and how the ocean circulates;

    How the atmosphere and ocean vary together in affecting the present and past climate system.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge and Understanding

    a. Understand how physical processes operate within the climate system, the atmosphere and the ocean.

    b. Appreciate the complexity of the climate system, the effect of radiative forcing, the concept of feedbacks, how rotation affects the circulation; the differences between currents and waves.

    c. Gain awareness of the similarities and differences between the atmosphere and ocean.

    (LO2) Intellectual Abilities

    a. To be able to evaluate the relative importance of different physical processes in the climate systemb.

    b. To develop critical skills in transferring insight gained from one problem to another problem, such as how the atmosphere circulates from one planet to another planet.

    (LO3) Subject Based Practical Skills

    a. Perform simple order of magnitude calculations and make inferences from the results.

    b. Understand the use of dimensions.

    (LO4) General Transferable Skills

    a. Application of numbers, involving order of magnitudes and dimensions.

    b. Time management.

    c. Problem solving.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

  • Earth Structure and Plate Tectonics (ENVS112)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The “Earth structure and plate tectonics” module provide an introduction to the Earth and aim to teach students about:
    1) the structure and composition of the Earth, the Earth’s gravitational and magnetic fields, and dynamics within the deep Earth; 2) the physics of Earth material and the geological time scale; and 3) plate tectonics.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completion of this module, students should have concepts and knowledge of the physical properties and behaviour of Earth materials.

    (LO2) On completion of this module, students should have concepts and knowledge of the geological time scale and radiometric dating methods.

    (LO3) On completion of this module, students should be able to understand the plate tectonic model and the relationship between plate tectonics and geological and geophysical observations in the major plate tectonic settings.

    (LO4) On completion of this module, students should be able to explain and evaluate the relationships between Earth structure, composition, physical behaviour and Earth dynamics.

    (LO5) On completion of this module, students should be able to explain and evaluate the relationships between plate tectonics and geological and geophysical processes and observations in the major plate tectonic settings.

    (S1) On completion of this module, students should be able to manipulate geological and geophysical data to help understand Earth structure and processes.

    (S2) On completion of this module, students should have developed their skills in problem solving including simple numerical problems.

    (S3) On completion of this module, students should have developed their skills in numeracy through completion of assignments.

    (S4) On completion of this module, students should have developed their skills in information synthesis and collation.

    (S5) On completion of this module, students should have developed their skills in time management through assignment deadlines.

  • Ecology and Conservation (ENVS157)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The module aims to introduce students to the key principles that govern the interactions between organisms and their environment, and how these can be used as the basis for conservation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand and explain fundamental principles of how ecological systems are structured and how they function at the scale of individuals, populations and communities

    (LO2) To understand the effects of human activities on communities and ecosystems at a range of timescales

    (LO3) Develop an ability to critically evaluate how ecological understanding and data can be used to inform conservation policy

    (S1) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

    (S2) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

    (S3) Learning skills online studying and learning effectively in technology-rich environments, formal and informal

    (S4) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

  • Environmental Chemistry (ENVS153)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    To provide a basic understanding of chemistry relevant for environmental sciences.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) a. describe the structure of an atom, its electronic configuration and predict some of its chemical behaviour based on its position in the periodic table;

    (LO2) b. understand the inter and intra-molecular forces that bond molecules and atoms together to form "matter" and thus be able to explain e.g. why water is a liquid at room temperature while oxygen is a gas;

    (LO3) c. name chemical compounds, write balanced chemical reactions and understand how the amount of products and reactants can be predicted;

    (LO4) d. understand what redox reactions are and be able to work them out;

    (LO5) e. understand basics of aquatic chemistry such as pH, concentration, dilution or equilibrium constants.

    (LO6) f. know the basics of organic chemistry.

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S2) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

  • Human Geography Through Merseyside (ENVS162)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting35:65
    Aims

    This module is designed with the following aims in mind:

    Introduce students to key areas of human geography inquiry practised at the University of Liverpool through engagement in practical exercises.

    Ground learning in a particular geographic context through focus on human geographic processes in Merseyside and Liverpool.

    Provide students with practical experience in a variety of methods for collecting and analysing geographic data.

    Allow students to practise speaking and writing about geographic concepts and linking these concepts to real-world examples.

    Provide experience working independently and in groups.

    Prepare students for studying Human Geography in subsequent years.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate an understanding of key areas of Human Geography inquiry, and relate important geographic concepts to examples in Liverpool and Merseyside.

    (LO2) Demonstrate basic skills in the collection and interpretation of geographical data, both qualitative and quantitative.

    (S1) Numeracy

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Organisational skills

    (S4) IT skills

    (S5) Teamwork

  • Introduction to Sedimentary Rocks and Fossils (ENVS118)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to the study of sediments and sedimentary rocks and to introduce the main groups of common fossil.

    The module aims to cover the basic language used to describe sediments and fossils and gives an introduction to a range of physical, chemical and biological concepts.

    The students are introduced to the economic significance of sediments and sedimentary rocks and how fossils provide information on geological time, evolutionary history and ancient environments.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of this module, a student will be able to describe sediments and sedimentary rocks at outcrop, hand specimen and thin section scales, identifying and naming key structures and fabrics.

    (LO2) On successful completion of this module, a student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the relationships between process and product for both depositional and diagenetic features, and be able to discuss the utility of sedimentary rocks to determine processes and, to a lesser extent, environment.

    (LO3) On successful completion of this module, a student will be able to describe, identify and interpret the main features of common invertebrate and plant fossils.

    (LO4) On successful completion of this module, a student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of how organisms are preserved as fossils, and of the utility of fossils to identify ancient modes of life, environments and relative ages of rocks.

    (S1) Problem solving skills - practical work aimed at development of logical interpretation

    (S2) Collecting, recording and analysing data using appropriate techniques in the laboratory

    (S3) Commercial awareness - lecture and practical course content covering economic applications of sedimentology and palaeontology

    (S4) Communicating appropriately in written and graphical forms

    (S5) Analysing, synthesising and summarising information.

    (S6) Applying knowledge and understanding

  • Marine Biology: Life in the Seas and Oceans (ENVS121)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    This module will introduce students to the main groups of organisms found in the marine environment. Students will develop knowledge of the taxonomic diversity of marine life, and from lectures, workshops and practicals will develop the skills to be able to recognise the major groups from their key identifying features. Students will develop knowledge of the function and form of marine organisms and the adaptational solutions organisms adopt to become successful in the marine environment.

    Students will encounter a variety of marine organisms in subsequent modules and field studies and gaining a familiarity with them in this module will enable them to recognise them and understand their role in marine ecosystems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire knowledge and understanding on the taxonomic and functional diversity of marine life.

    (LO2) Develop the ability to recognise the major groups of marine organisms using their key features

    (LO3) Experience how to examine marine organisms and understand their functional biology using different kinds of specimens and approaches.

    (LO4) Recognise the adaptational solutions to functional problems adopted by marine organisms

    (LO5) Teamwork

    (LO6) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (LO7) Problem solving skills

  • Marine Ecosystems: Diversity, Processes and Threats (ENVS122)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    This module aims to introduce students to the diversity of ecosystem types in the marine environment and the various threats that they face.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire knowledge and understanding of representative key ecosystems found in the marine environment.

    (LO2) Be familiar with the marine organisms that live in representative key marine ecosystems.

    (LO3) Acquire a basic knowledge of fundamental ecological principles, transferable to later marine and non-marine modules.

    (LO4) Be aware of the threats that humans may pose to marine ecosystems.

    (LO5) Appreciate how humans assess and may mitigate detrimental impacts to the environment.

    (LO6) Be introduced to the importance to their future studies of critical reading of scientific literature.

  • Essential Mathematical Skills (ENVS117)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To create a firm foundation of mathematics relating to pure maths, physics (mechanics) and statistics.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) At the end of the module a student should be able to demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of pure mathematics, mathematics mechanics, and statistical mathematics.

    (LO2) At the end of the module the student should be able to;

    - Demonstrate skills in the application of mathematical methods to the solution of problems.

    - Use dimensional analysis and apply it to real world problems.

    (LO3) At the end of the module a student should be able to;

    - Do simple estimations by hand

    - Rearrange algebraic formulae to make the required quantity the subject

    - Insert values in a formula and calculate the correct answer

    - Basic calculus.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

  • New Horizons in Human Geography (ENVS116)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To identify key geographical factors to demonstrate how geography may influence and individuals health.

    Utilise concepts including race, othering and exclusion and demonstrate how they relate to real world case studies

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To identify key population trends in health and how these vary geographically

    (LO2) Understand critical arguments about the role of geography in health research

    (LO3) Utilise concepts including race, othering and exclusion

    (LO4) Apply social geography theories to real world case studies

    (S1) Develop reasoned arguments

    (S2) Critically evaluate evidence

    (S3) problem-solving and decision-making skills

    (S4) self-reflective learning

    (S5) good written communication and presentation

  • Research Frontiers in Human Geography (ENVS161)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This module aims to provide students with an introduction to cutting edge debates in contemporary human geography.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate an understanding of key issues in contemporary human geography

    (LO2) Recognize the contribution and interplay of key subdisciplinary areas within contemporary human geography

    (LO3) Demonstrate knowledge of a range of subdisciplinary approaches to key concepts in human geography including space and place

    (S1) Critical thinking

    (S2) Written communication

  • Introduction to Geoscience and Earth History (ENVS123)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    Provide a broad introduction to the geosciences, emphasising the interdisciplinary nature of the subject. Assuming no prior knowledge of geoscience, this module is accessible for non-geoscience disciplines (as an optional module);
    Equip students to understand the relevance of the more detailed geoscience material following in the rest of their programmes;
    Begin to equip students with key practical skills across a range of geoscience disciplines;
    Begin to expose students to an indicative range of research expertise in the School of Environmental Sciences;
    Develop skills for learning by group interaction and guided research.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Explain current models for the origin and structure of the Earth, and summarise supporting evidence

    (LO2) Explain, with examples, the nature of most common Earth materials, with basic knowledge of why they are important

    (LO3) List processes that are modifying the Earth and its biosphere, including human processes

    (LO4) Define the time and spatial scales involved in the Earth structure and evolution

    (LO5) Relate the 3D structure and evolution of regions of the Earth's crust using typical geological media such as geological maps and cross sections

    (LO6) Introduce the problem of a sustainable biosphere for a rapidly growing human population and the role the geoscience has in defining and tackling this problem

    (S1) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, influencing, presenting work

    (S2) Learning skills online studying and learning effectively in technology-rich environments, formal and informal

    (S3) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S4) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S5) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

Programme Year Two

Student will take the following compulsory modules and select from the optional modules detailed below.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Physical Geography Fieldwork Course (ENVS228)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To understand environmental processes and characteristics ;
    To understand interactions of various components of the environment;
    To design and execute a research project;
    To undertake fieldwork in an unfamiliar environment;
    To understand the application and interpretation of common statistical methods.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To understand how to measure and interpret the processes and characteristics and their interactions in an environment.

    (LO2) To understand how the setting influences processes and outcomes in the environment

    (LO3) To be able to design and execute a research project

    (LO4) To be able to apply appropriate field methods

    (LO5) To be able to apply appropriate analytical techniques

    (LO6) To learn how to work in a team

    (LO7) To be able to synthesise information from a variety of sources

    (LO8) To be able to produce a research project report

    (LO9) To be able to apply and correctly interpret common numerical/statistical methods (distribution testing, tests of difference; tests of association, and empirical modelling by regression)

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Teamwork

    (S4) Organisational skills

  • Principles and Theory in Geography (ENVS249)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop a critical and reflexive sense of the nature of geography as a dynamic, plural and contested discipline;
    To become aware of major theoretical and conceptual frameworks used in Geography;
    To develop an understanding of cutting edge debates in physical and human Geography;
    To develop an understanding of the interrelations and interface between physical and human Geography, particularly around environmental issues.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Critically evaluate key perspectives on human and physical geography, and to situate them in the history of the discipline.

    (LO2) Apply different styles of spatial thinking to particular contexts and research questions.

    (LO3) Engage in theoretical understanding of the behaviour of complex social and physical systems, and the approached to their modelling.

    (LO4) Understand the relevance of theoretical debates for their own research practices.

    (LO5) Understand the interface between physical and human Geography, and be able to illustrate how this can help in the analysis of environmental problems.

    (S2) Organisational skills: meeting essay deadlines

    (S3) IT skills: Students will be expected to engage with IT packages such as MS word and Power Point during the course

    (S4) Communication skills: essay writing; contributions to online discussion sessions

    (S5) Ethical awareness

  • Research Skills (geography and Environmental Science) (ENVS203)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Provide students with training in research methods and analysis techniques

    Develop students' understanding and appreciation of the Environmental Sciences as a contemporary academic discipline

    Nurture students' understanding of, and engagement with, theoretical and methodological issues in the Environmental Sciences

    Develop students' skills of critical analysis and academic writing

    Support students' preparation for individual research projects

    Develop students' study and personal transferable skills

    Develop students' awareness of careers and employability.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate knowledge of the development of Geography and the Environmental Sciences in recent decades

    (LO2) Demonstrate an appreciation of the nature and appropriate use of different methodological strategies

    (LO3) Making use of newly-developed research skills and knowledge, identify a research problem or subject and design an appropriate research strategy

    (LO4) Write a dissertation proposal in an academic style with appropriate illustrations, citations and references

    (LO5) Enhanced ability to write an essay in a technical English academic style

    (LO6) Make an oral presentation on a researched topic to a small group

    (LO7) Develop personal employability skills through application letter and CV development

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Numeracy

    (S4) Organisational skills

    (S5) Communication skills

    (S6) IT skills

Year Two Optional Modules

  • An Introduction to Environmental History (ENVS223)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    On completion of this module, students should be able to:
    1. Demonstrate a knowledge of global environmental history, from pre-history to the present day.
    2. To understand and critically evaluate the impact on the earth of: domestication of plants and animals; agricultural and industrial revolutions; and present day processes of globalisation and development.
    3. To explain critically the consequences of desertification and deforestation
    4. To critically evaluate present day academic and policy perspectives on the environment
    5. To contribute and evaluate debates on environmental philosophy and ethics

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completion of this module, students should be able:- 1. Demonstrate an understanding of global environmental history from the pre-history to the present day. 2. To have a demonstrable understanding and ability to critically evaluate the impact on the earth of: the domestication of plants and animals; the agricultural and industrial revolutions from the eighteenth century; and present day processes of globalisation and resource management. 3. To critically explain the consequences of desertification and deforestation.4. To critically evaluate present day academic and policy perspectives on the sustainability of agricultural and industrial systems. 5. To engage with debates on environmental philosophy and ethics. Achievement of these objectives will be assessed by examination.

    (S1) Communication skills

  • Catchment Hydrology (ENVS217)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to enable students to investigate and understand the main hydrological processes operating in drainage catchments in terms of their measurement, operation and controlling factors. The module will provide students with a 'hands-on' experience of both observing hydrology and modelling hydrological systems, with an emphasis on applied learning, which might be useful in a vocational sense in the future. The module will aim to deliver excellent training for students in the knowledge required to work in a wide variety of environmentally-facing careers, including those with the EA, Natural England or DEFRA, as well as Environmental Consultancies.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Describe the key hydrological components of the catchment system

    (LO2) Explain the main controlling factors on hydrological processes occurring within drainage catchments

    (LO3) Analyse and predict the response of catchments to rainfall events

    (LO4) Evaluate methods used to measure and predict river flows

  • Changing Environments (ENVS214)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting34:66
    Aims

    At the end of this module, students will have  a strong understanding of the mechanisms that have shaped our landscape over time; laboratory and computer skills to yield environmental reconstructions; a critical insight of the different techniques and methodologies for reconstructing past environments; an understanding of the importance to study the past to forecast future environmental change.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) At the end of this module, students will have acquired theoretical knowledge of the global changes that have affected the Earth in the recent past

    (LO2) Students will have acquired theoretical knowledge of the key characteristics of important depositional environments

    (LO3) Students will have acquired theoretical knowledge of the major environmental indicators used  in these environments and the dating techniques

    (LO4) Through practical work, you will have acquired practical knowledge of different laboratory techniques needed for environmental reconstruction.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) IT skills

    (S4) Communication skills

  • Climatology (ENVS231)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to provide knowledge and understanding across a number of areas of meteorology and weather, covering physical processes. These processes are covered at a detailed level and supported by an overview of the subject area. This module gives the scientific foundation for more discursive as well as process orientated final year modules. The practicals provide an introduction to aspects of meteorological analysis. These are supported through the general lecture programme.  The practical series add to the learning experience and skills to enable students to apply what is learnt in the lecture programme.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Evaluate appropriate theories, methods and techniques

    (LO2) Recognise how selected environments interact with appropriate atmospheric and weather processes

    (LO3) Understand different weather from high, mid and tropical latitudes

    (LO4) Apply practical data analysis.

    (S1) The handling of large datasets

    (S2) Written and graphical communication

    (S3) Analysis and problem-solving through quantitative and qualitative methods

    (S4) Numeracy and statistical literacy

  • Environmental Sustainability (ENVS218)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to; introduce students to current thinking in relation to sustainable development and locate environmental sustainability within this broader framework of ideas;
    Develop an understanding of various dimensions of environmental sustainability and their relationship to patterns of human development;
    Develop an understanding of the role of the public and private sectors in promoting environmentally sustainable development.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students completing the course successfully should be aware of current thinking in relation to sustainable development and be able to locate environmental sustainability within this broader framework of ideas

    (LO2) Students completing the course successfully should have an understanding of various dimensions of environmental sustainability and their relationship to patterns of development;

    (LO3) Students completing the course successfully should develop an understanding of the role of the public and private sectors in promoting environmentally sustainable development.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Organisational skills

    (S4) Communication skills

    (S5) International awareness

  • Geomorphology: Ice, Sea and Air (ENVS252)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The module aims  to 1) develop an understanding of major geomorphic systems  and 2) how they create terrestrial landforms.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completion of this module the students will demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding ofthe functioning of major geomorphic processes

    (LO2) On completion of this module the students will demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the relationship between geomorphic processes and climate

    (LO3) On completion of this module the students will demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the magnitude, frequency and spatial scales and timescales under which geomorphic processes operate

    (LO4) On completion of this module the students will demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the importance of linkages between geomorphic process, material and resulting landform (energy/material interaction).

    (S1) Field work: measuring and quantifying an observable process

    (S2) Group work: generating data through team work

    (S3) Field work: logging and mapping sediments in lateral and vertical succession

  • Gis for Human Geography (ENVS257)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to develop an understanding of how and why GIS may be useful in the social sciences. It will introduce students to the fundamentals of GIS and enable students to develop both (i) theoretical knowledge of GIS and (ii) a practical ability to apply GIS in the handling and analysis of spatial data in a human geography context.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain a sound understanding of the principles of GIS in a social science context

    (LO2) Students will understand how to implement the basic functions of GIS.

    (LO3) Students will know how to apply a number of spatial analysis techniques and how to interpret the results, in the process of turning data into information.

    (LO4) Students will be able to locate a prepare a new dataset for analysis using a GIS.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S4) Time and project management - Project planning

    (S5) Numeracy/computational skills - Numerical methods

  • Key Skills for Environmental Data Analysis (ENVS202)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop skills in environmental data analysis by applying the Matlab  computing package to process, analyse and plot data. To develop a critical approach to the results of data analysis .

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) 1. Knowledge and Understanding  At the end of the module the student should a) know how to write a program script in MATLAB. b) know how to process and plot ocean and climate data using Matlab

    (LO2) 2. Intellectual Abilities  At the end of the module the student should be able to: a) know how to construct problems and use problem solving skills.b) analyse and interpret signals in environmental data.c) implement programming methods used for simple models and time-series analysis

    (LO3) 3. Subject Based Practical Skills  At the end of the module the student should be able to: a) write a computer program to analyse and plot environmental data. b) interpret a range of forms of plotted data

    (LO4) 4. General Transferable Skills  At the end of the module, the student should have: a) Gained ability in formulating problems and acquiring order of magnitude solutions. b) Gained computing skills and familiarity with computing methods and programming. c) Gained confidence and ability in interpreting data presented in a variety of forms

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

  • Marine Ecophysiology, Ecology and Exploitation (ENVS251)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting55:45
    Aims

    This module aims to provide students with essential background in marine ecology, ecophysiology and resource exploitation required for study at higher levels. Students will also develop the ability to evaluate and critique the scientific literature, as well as the ability to draw in relevant information from multiple topics areas to address this module aims to provide students with essential background in marine ecology, ecophysiology and resource exploitation required for study at higher levels. Students will also develop the ability to evaluate and critique the scientific literature, as well as the ability to draw in relevant information from multiple topics areas to address multi-disciplinary topics.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Be familiar with some key physiological adaptations necessary to survive in the marine environment

    (LO2) Understand the imporance of some key ecological concepts that underpin the stucturing of marine communities

    (LO3) Develop a basic understanding of key human activities that can affect individuals, populations and communities of marine animals

    (LO4) Develop the ability to read and critically evaluate scientific papers

    (LO5) Develop the ability to research, plan and write essay questions that tackle multi-disciplinary issues (using material from across the module as necessary)

    (S1) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S2) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S3) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

    (S4) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S5) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S6) Learning skills online studying and learning effectively in technology-rich environments, formal and informal

    (S7) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

  • Political Economies of Globalisation (ENVS264)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    This module introduces students to the study of globalisation. It will be of interest to those who wish to learn how capitalism is transformed, and what challenges this transformation entails for the functioning of national and local economies, states and societies. Specifically, the course examines the changes globalisation has wrought in political life and how globalisation has been contested. Having acquired a basic knowledge of inequalities in the global economy, students will learn how the adverse consequences of globalisation can be challenged, and what are the possibilities of democratic governance in the age of globalisation. By taking this module students will prepare themselves for a more advanced study of international political economy and development.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of this module, students should: Know and analyse the main paradigms and perspectives on globalisation, mainstream and heterodox Have a basic understanding of the workings of the global political economy Be familiar with and be able to analyse the existing examples of anti-globalisation movements. Understand the contested nature of processes of ‘neoliberalisation.’

    (LO4) Understand the contested nature of processes of ‘neoliberalisation.’

    (S1) Ethical awareness

    (S2) Adaptability

    (S3) Problem solving skills

    (S4) International awareness

    (S5) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

    (S6) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S7) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

  • Population and Societies (ENVS221)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to Provide an understanding and explanation of the main societal and cultural determinants of a wide range of demography and other events, including being born ; leaving home ; moving home ; partnering ; having sex ; having children ; experiencing well-being , falling ill and dying; Describe and account for how these events lead to spatial and temporal variations in population growth rates and structures Examine the relevance of the demographic and epidemiological (health) transitions to developing countries, and, Assess the future global population prospects. The module aims to move far beyond the basic population geography presented in GCSE and A-level syllabuses by providing;
    Greater breadth and depth of coverage.
    Direct exposure to the population-related research of current staff.
    Greater critical engagement with the material covered.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand and explain the main societal and cultural determinants of a wide range of demographic and other events, including being born; leaving home; moving home; partnering; having sex; having children; experiencing well-being, falling ill and dying

    (LO2) Describe and account for how these events lead to  spatial and temporal variations in population growth rates and structures

    (LO3) Critically examine the relevance of the demographic and epidemiological (health) transitions to developing countries.

    (LO4) Critically assess the future global population prospects

  • Rural Geographies (ENVS227)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To develop a critical awareness of the changes taking place in contemporary rural areas.
    To stimulate informed debate about the geographical difference and inequalities in rural areas both in the UK and Europe.
    To draw attention to, and encourage critique of, the empirical studies and conceptual approaches taken by geographers and social scientists to the study of these issues.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of this module, students should be able, at threshold level, to: To critically appraise the studies of geographers and other social scientists to rural issues and the varying conceptual approaches taken to their study.

    (LO2) To articulate how rurality is interconnected with space, economy, politics, society, culture, and nature.

    (LO3) To analyse how rurality shapes and is shaped by political-economic change, social recomposition and cultural meaningfulness.

    (LO4) To critically evaluate the responses by national and local governments, rural communities and other organizations to such changes

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Organisational skills

    (S3) International awareness

    (S4) Communication skills

    (S5) Ethical awareness

  • Social and Cultural Geographies (ENVS275)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    By the end of this module, we aim for you to:
    Have an understanding of the sub-fields of social and cultural geographies;
    Be able to engage with philosophical debates within social and cultural geographies;
    Have developed skills in reading and writing critically;
    Be able to recognise the heterogeneity of social categories;
    Have an understanding of key concepts within the field including social construction, spatial contingency, performance, intersectionality, material cultures and mobilities;
    Be able to link theoretical debates with empirical examples;
    Have an appreciation of the range of methods used in social and cultural geographies.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Have an understanding of the sub-fields of social and cultural geographies;

    (LO2) Be able to engage with philosophical debates within social and cultural geographies;

    (LO3) Have developed skills in reading and writing critically;

    (LO4) Be able to recognise the heterogeneity of social categories;

    (LO5) Have an understanding of key concepts within the field including social construction, spatial contingency, performance, intersectionality, material cultures and mobilities;

    (LO6) Be able to link theoretical debates with empirical (academic) examples.

    (S1) Ethical awareness

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S4) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions

  • Soils, Slopes and the Environment (ENVS238)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To understand the fundamental properties and characteristics of slopes and soils, understand slope and soil forming processes and evolution and to apply this knowledge to a number of pure and applied problems relating to slope and soil stability.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Describe the fundamental physical, chemical and biological properties of soils.

    (LO2) Use your knowledge of the fundamental physical, chemical and biological properties of soils to classify them

    (LO3) Understand the processes of soil formation.

    (LO4) Understand the factors that affect slope and soil stability

    (LO5) Explain the processes of soil erosion, why they vary in time and space, and describe how they shape the landscape.

    (LO6) Explain why landslides/mass movements occur.

    (S1) Teamwork

    (S2) Organisational skills

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) IT skills

    (S5) Problem solving skills

    (S6) Numeracy

    (S7) Leadership

  • Exploring the Social World (ENVS225)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - provide students with the knowledge of the different research methodologies that are available to carry out research in Geography and more widely in the Social Sciences;
    - provide students with the knowledge of the research process in the Social Sciences;
    - enable students to define coherent research questions that can be addressed by different research methods;
    - enable students to recognise the problems and limitations associated with certain research methods, instruments for data collection and techniques for data analysis;
    - enable students to make informed decisions on the most appropriate methodological choices to carry out their own research;
    - prepare students to carry out their own research in the Social Sciences;

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To understand theparadigms deployed by qualitative and quantitative Social Science research

    (LO2) To understand the main methods used in Social Science research

    (LO3) To understand the limitations of existing research methods

    (LO4) To criticallyassess the main types of contemporary Social Science research methods

    (LO5) To select appropriate methods to evaluate empirically assessable research questions

    (LO6) To have basic training in data collection, exploration and analysis methods

    (LO7) To reflect and set attainable objectives, priorities, action plans and schedules of work to achieve objectives (Planning & Organization)

    (LO8) To critically assess a problem and find the best possible data collection, exploration and analysis approach (Problem Solving)

    (S1) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S2) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Minerals, Magmas and Igneous Geochemistry (ENVS247)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    Aims

    To introduce and consolidate understanding of rock forming minerals and their properties;

    To examine mineral occurrence and environments;

    To consider the physical and chemical properties of magmas, how compositions of magmas are changed, and how magma emplacement history is recorded in rock texture;

    To use standard geochemical diagrams to classify igneous rocks and model the evolution of magmatic systems;

    To engage with new and emerging ideas in the mineralogical, igneous petrology and economic geology literature;

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Use the properties of common rock-forming minerals identified using a hand lens and a polarising microscope to classify and interpret common rocks

    (LO2) Be able to observe, record, interpret and present descriptive information on minerals and their properties, and interpret mineral environments, physical and geochemical processes

    (LO3) Be able to infer conditions and processes of emplacement and comment on economic resources through igneous rock texture and plotting/analysing standard geochemical graphs

    (LO4) Use basic laboratory equipment to plan and complete an experiment to collect and analyse high quality data

    (LO5) Work with geochemical data using Microsoft Excel and specialist geochemical plotting software

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Personal action planning

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S4) Numeracy/computational skills - Problem solving

    (S5) Personal attributes and qualities - Self-efficacy (self-belief/intrinsic motivation)

  • Oceanography, Plankton and Climate (ENVS245)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The module will provide a multi-disciplinary view of how ocean physics, microbiology, chemistry and plankton ecology operate in different ocean environments, explain how Earth's climate is affected by the plankton, and show how plankton ecosystems are responding to a changing climate.

    The aim is then to use this multi-disciplinary framework to develop skills in setting sensible hypotheses, numeracy, problem-solving and written communication. Throughout the module material will connect to the research currently being carried out by staff, using research results and research tools to illustrate key concepts and formulate methods to test hypotheses.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain a broad understanding of how different plankton communities arise in different oceanic regimes, and how that ultimately structures food chains to larger marine animals and effects Earth's climate.

    (LO2) Students will be able to compare quantitatively the scales of different processes, and critically assess their relative importance for life in the ocean.

    (LO3) Students will strengthen, and acquire new, skills in quantifying physical-biological drivers of ecosystems.

    (LO4) Students will learn the importance of a multi-disciplinary approach to marine biology and gain experience in solving novel problems.

    (LO5) Students will acquire knowledge of key concepts in physical and biological oceanography.

    (LO6) Students will learn the importance of understanding the assumptions behind key theories in oceanography.

    (LO7) Students will learn how to frame and test hypotheses using appropriate data and methods.

    (LO8) Students will develop skills in written communication of science.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S4) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Volcanology and Geohazards (ENVS284)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To examine fundamentally contrasting magmatic systems and consider in each case the nature and origin of the volcanic activity;
    To consider the scientific basis for anticipation of geohazards and impact of volcanism on climate;
    To consider the objectives of risk mitigation strategies and their problems of implementation;
    To examine the problems of dealing with uncertainties on a range of time-scales, including geological time-scales, and to review statistical methods for semi-quantitative analysis;
    To consider the problems associated with volcanic risk mitigation and evaluate the role of the scientist in specific cases;
    To evaluate the media handling of geohazards and climate change, from the perspectives both of quality of science, ethics and moral issues.

    Learning Outcomes

    (L5-1) Explain key volcanological processes and concepts and critically assess their associated hazards.

    (L5-2) Integrate diverse primary evidence to construct and evaluate conceptual models of volcanic processes.

    (L5-3) Evaluate strategies for effective communication of scientific ideas and concepts with stakeholders, and critically assess the role of the media.

    (L5-4) Plan a laboratory experiment and use basic laboratory equipment to complete an experiment which tests scientific hypotheses.

    (L5-5) Demonstrate understanding of the nature, origins and possible outcomes of natural hazards and be able to evaluate risk mitigation strategies.

    (L5-6) Use numerical methods for risk quantification and dealing with uncertainty.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Personal action planning

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S4) Numeracy/computational skills - Problem solving Skills

    (S5) Ethical awareness

    (S6) Organisational skills

Programme Year Three

Students will select compulsory dissertation or work-based dissertation modules (30 credits) in addition to six (four if taking the optional field class module) of the optional modules detailed below.

One optional (30 Credit) field class module:

  • Europe (Portugal or Iceland) or Santa Cruz (California)

Year Three Compulsory Modules

  • Geography Dissertation (ENVS321)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with the opportunity to apply theorectical concepts to real-life situations.
    To alow students to identify a research question, devise a research methodology and conduct a research project on a topic of their choice.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of how to use independent research to address a specific research question, including understanding the diversity of techniques and approaches involved in collecting geographical information

    (LO2) An understanding of how to design and undertake a research project to answer that question, including understanding issues involved in research design andexecution

    (LO3) The ability to produce  an independent reviewof academic literature relating to a specific research question

    (LO4) The ability to collect, synthesise and analyse primary and secondary geographical data

    (LO5) The ability to write-up a research project using an appropriate academic style and structure, including the techniques and approaches required to present geographical data

    (LO6) The development of time- and project-management skills, including the ability to coordinate and complete a project independent of close supervision (i.e. managea project independently)

    (S1) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S2) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S3) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S4) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

    (S5) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S6) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

    (S7) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

  • Geography Work-based Dissertation (ENVS323)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims;
    To provide students with the opportunity to apply theoretical concepts to real-life situations.
    To allow students to identify a research question, devise a research methodology and conduct a research project on a topic of their choice.
    To give students the opportunity to develop transferable skills in a workplace context.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of how to use independent research to address a specific research question, including understanding the diversity of techniques and approaches involved in collecting geographical information

    (LO2) An understanding of how to design and undertake a research project to answer that question, including understanding issues involved in research design and execution

    (LO3) An understanding of how to design and undertake a research project to answer that question, including understanding issues involved in research design and execution

    (LO4) The ability to collect,synthesise and analyse primary and secondary geographical data

    (LO5) The ability to write-up a research project using an appropriate academic style and structure, including the techniques and approaches required to present geographical data

    (LO6) The development of time- and project-management skills, including the ability to coordinate and complete a project independent of close supervision (i.e. manage a project independently)

    (LO7) Experience of working alongside a workplace partner to address aresearch question of relevance to that workplace

    (LO8) The ability to write up research findings for a non-academic audience in the form of a report

    (S1) Business and customer awareness basic understanding of the key drivers for business success – including the importance of innovation and taking calculated risks – and the need to provide customer satisfaction and build customer loyalty

    (S2) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S3) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S4) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S5) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

    (S6) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S7) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

    (S8) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Climate Change - A Critical Review (ENVS389)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    The module aims to provide students with the knowledge to evaluate likely outcomes climate change and climate variability over the next 10 to 50 years by understanding current climate variablity and the data and models available. To understand policy decisions at different levels, to obtain a critical understanding of climate predictions, and to understand the importance of reference to past (last 100 years) and present climates.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Evaluate a range of future climate change projections .

    (LO2) Recognise the likely impacts of climate change to a range of sectors.

    (LO3) Learn how to engage with stakeholder communities with regard to climate change. 

    (LO4) Produce effectively targeted report writing and visual communication.

    (LO5) Consider the multiple sector impact of climate change on societies

    (S1) Learning and studying, Developing autonomous learning and metacognition  decision making and prioritising tasks

    (S2) Communication in formats appropriate to the audience

    (S3) Awareness of responsibility as a local, national and international citizen with a global perspective

    (S4) Taking responsibility for learning and reflection upon that learning

  • Coastal Environments: Spatial and Temporal Change (ENVS376)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This module aims to consider the response of physical processes and coastal environments to changes in sea-level and climate. Attention is given to the geomorphology of coastal environments, its response to external agents, as well as to possible coastal management strategies. The module aims at proving students with knowledge and understanding of the physical processes acting along coastal areas, and to promote students capability to critically understand pros and cons of different management techniques in relation to future climate change.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge and understanding of physical aspects of coastal environments

    (LO2) Knowledge and understanding of the concept of spatial and temporal variation: physical processes and landforms, and the importance of spatial and temporal scales

    (LO3) Knowledge and understanding of environments as a result of process and form interaction

    (LO4) Knowledge and understanding of methodologies of analysis and interpretation

    (LO5) Development of an informed concern for the Earth and its people

    (LO6) Capability to critically analyze real case studies in the context of previously acquired knowledge

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) Organisational skills

  • Bodies, Space and Power (ENVS344)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to give students a sustained and critical understanding of the relationship between bodies, space and power, with a particular focus on Foucauldian approaches to critical public health. Building on ENVS275 Social and Cultural Geographies, the module will provide students with an in-depth engagement with critical theory (particularly feminist and poststructural theory) as applied to contemporary and historical examples surrounding public health.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Have an understanding of critical geographic approaches to bodies, spaces and power in relation to public health

    (LO2) Have a basic understanding of key concepts in Foucault's work, including biopolitics, governmentality and surveillance.

    (LO3) Understand how power relations in relation to gender, race, class, sexuality, disability and body size play out in relation to public health

    (LO4) Have an understanding of the ways in which moral ideologies inform medical and public health knowledge and practice.

    (LO5) Be able to apply theoretical debates to empirical (academic) examples

    (LO6) Have developed skills in reading and writing critically

    (LO7) Be able to provide critical commentary on the importance of politics and governance in relation to bodies and public health

    (S1) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

    (S2) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S3) Ethical awareness

    (S4) Communication skills

  • Fluvial Environments (ENVS372)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To develop understanding of functioning and stability/instability characteristics of fluvial geomorphic systems - in both humid and arid regions over timescales from the Pleistocene to the present day

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, a student should be able to:-1. Describe and analyse the functioning of fluvial systems and apply major concepts (Assessed by exam)

    (LO2) 2. Explain the different temporal and spatial scales on which variations occur (Assessed by exam and essay)

    (LO3) 3. Analyse and evaluate the likely factors influencing fluvial responses (Assessed by essay and exam)

    (LO4) 4. Analyse and use field evidence of fluvial processes and landforms (Assessed by use of field experience in exam and essay)

    (LO5) 5. Critically evaluate and synthesise published literature (Assessed by essay)

    (S1) Lifelong learning skills

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

  • Geographic Data Science (ENVS363)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module provides students with core competences in Geographic Data Science (GDS). Thisincludes the following: Advancing their statistical and numerical literacy. Introducing basic principles of programming and state-of-the-art computational tools for GDS. Presenting a comprehensive overview of the main methodologies available to the Geographic Data Scientist, as well as their intuition as to how and when they can be applied. Focusing on real world applications of these techniques in a geographical and applied context.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate advanced GIS/GDS concepts and be able to use the tools programmaticallyto import, manipulate and analyse data in different formats.

    (LO2) Understand the motivation and inner workings of the main methodological approaches ofGDS, both analytical and visual.

    (LO3) Critically evaluate the suitability of a specific technique, what it can offer and how it canhelp answer questions of interest.

    (LO4) Apply a number of spatial analysis techniques and how to interpret the results, in theprocess of turning data into information.

    (LO5) When faced with a new data-set, work independently using GIS/GDS tools programmatically.

    (S1) Numeracy

    (S2) Organisational skills

    (S3) Problem solving skills

    (S4) IT skills

    (S5) Ethical awareness

    (S6) Communication skills

  • Building Better Worlds (ENVS387)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To examine understandings of how the world and social relations are reproduced and co-created by people who understand what is wrong and what needs to be changed, and that everyone, including students themselves, have the capacity to make or inhibit change in their everyday and work lives.

    To consider that politics are not solely what happens in elections – but are part and parcel of everyday life.

    To consider how people in different places have struggled for justice, including global examples over the past 500 years.

    To develop an understanding of how people and communities have agency and the ability to shape their future.

    To examine the socially constructed nature of the world, as well as how people organize to co-create the realities and cultures they would like to be a part of and live in.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand the array of differing knowledges, ethics, and practices that are found within and across differing social movements

    (LO2) Analyse contemporary social movements and notions of living with dignity using a wide array of varying theoretical frameworks

    (LO3) Understand the range of tactics and strategies available to social movements with respect to both engaging in resistance and constructing alternatives

    (LO4) Understand the differing ways in which structural and historical challenges are defined by theorists and communities, as well as how social movements respond to them

    (LO5) Analyse the development of a specific social movement using theory and conceptualisations of resistance, alternatives, and transformation

    (LO6) Understand the range of responses open to opponents of social movements that enable them to support or hinder their aims

    (LO7) Analyse how protest and mobilisation both from grassroots and elite groups has accelerated and limited the possibilities for progress towards social change

    (S1) Ethical awareness

    (S2) International awareness

    (S3) IT skills

    (S4) Communication skills

    (S5) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S6) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

    (S7) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

    (S8) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Global Carbon Cycle (ENVS335)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To provide students with a view of the ocean carbon cycle as a dynamic system;
    To give students an appreciation of the importance of chemical and biological processes in controlling the distribution of carbon in the ocean;
    To provide students with an in depth understanding of the carbon cycle from the surface ocean, to the deep ocean and sediments, and the impact environmental change may have on it.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will learn how physical, chemical and biological process control the transfer of carbon between the atmosphere, ocean and land, and the distribution of carbon species between these environments

    (LO2) Students will understand the role and significance that the ocean plays in the global cycling of carbon

    (LO3) Students will understand the pathways involved in cycling of inorganic and organic carbon between land and the ocean and the surface and deep ocean, with emphasis on the solubility, carbonate and biological pumps

    (LO4) Students will understand how stable isotopes can be used to study the carbon cycle and how it has varied in Earth's history

    (LO5) Students will understand how environmental change is perturbing the global carbon cycle in the present day. Topics covered will include ocean acidification and changes in the surface temperature

    (S1) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S2) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S3) Communication, listening and questioning, respecting others, contributing to discussions, influencing, presentations

  • Human-environmental Interactions (ENVS315)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to distil existing knowledge of complex human-environmental interactions into a format that can be taken on board by policy and decision makers.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Learning outcomes are: a knowledge of appropriate theory about human-environmental interactions

    (LO2) a deeper understanding of interactions between human activities and natural and built environments in space and time

    (LO3) a critical view of the assumptions on which management decisions are based

    (S1) Communication skills

    (S2) Teamwork

    (S3) Organisational skills

  • Ireland: Political, Social and Cultural Geographies (ENVS399)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Students will develop their knowledge of Irish cultural geography from human settlement until the present. Students will gain insight into the impact of human activity on the Irish landscape. The module seeks to foster an undertanding of contemporary Irish identity,culture, society and politics. The module aims to develop students' skills of interdisciplinary study relating Ireland and it's past.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will obtain an overview of Irish cultural geography from human settlement until the present.

    (LO2) Students will gain insight into the impact of human activity on the Irish landscape.

    (LO3) Students will develop knowlege of contemporary Irish identity

    (LO4) Students will develop interdisciplinary study skills.

    (S1) Organisational skills

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) International awareness

    (S4) Adaptability

  • Marine Ecology: Theory and Applications (ENVS383)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop the connections between ecological theory and the management of marine communities and ecosystems. The theory covered will mostly be concerned with the dynamics and diversity of communities and ecosystems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) evaluate the major ecological theories underlying the dynamics and diversity of marine communities and ecosystems.

    (LO2) relate problems in marine conservation and resource exploitation to these ecological concepts.

    (LO3) use appropriate methods to assess the consequences of environmental change and management for marine communities and ecosystems.

    (LO4) recognize the importance of ecological theory in underpinning scientific advice to management.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

  • Natural Hazards and Society (ENVS319)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce contextual perspectives on a variety of natural hazards, the different levels of impact on human societies and the mitigation/adaptation strategies adopted before, during and after an extreme natural event.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the physical and societal definitions of a natural hazard

    (LO2) An understanding of the processes leading to geophysical, hydrological, meteorological and climatological hazards

    (LO3) An awareness of the vulnerability of societies

    (LO4) An appreciation of the costs on these extremes events on societies

    (LO5) Acquire a sound knowledge on mitigation and adaptation strategies for each type of natural hazard

    (S1) Communication skills

    (S2) Teamwork

    (S3) IT skills

    (S4) Organisational skills

    (S5) International awareness

  • Ocean Dynamics (ENVS332)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To gain a high level understanding of ocean and atmospheric dynamics:

    To understand the background state of the atmosphere and ocean;

    To address how tracers spread;

    To understand the effects of rotation and how jets and eddies form on a rotating planet;

    To understand how waves influence and interact with the ocean circulation;

    To understand why there are western boundary currents and gyres in ocean basins;

    To understand how topography shapes the deep ocean circulation over the globe.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire knowledge of key concepts in ocean and atmosphere dynamics.

    (LO2) Students will learn to appreciate the approximate nature of theoretical ideas, and the strengths and weaknesses of such ideas as explanations of observed phenomena.

    (LO3) Students will develop mathematical skills in scale analysis of differential equations to isolate the essential phenomena.

    (LO4) Students will acquire experience in combining quantitative and qualitative understanding of dynamics to give clear explanations of observed phenomena in the ocean and atmosphere.

    (LO5) Students will develop an understanding of the factors controllng fluid flows on a range of rotating planets.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

  • Postcolonial Geographies (ENVS334)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This level three module aims to explore the relevance of postcolonial ideas to understanding the contemporary world.

    The module applies theoretical ideas to a number of case studies. The first section introduces these theoritcal ideas to students to provide knowledge and awareness of core debates in the literature. This section will allow students to critically understand the reading that they are doing for the module, and to begin applying these ideas to the world around them.
    The second section develops this theoretical base by applying the ideas from section one to a number of case studies. These case studies are drawn from both different regions and areas of the world, but also different cultural texts, such as films, book and museums.

    This overall approach gives students a solid foundation to use postcolonial ideas to interrogate the world around them.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of this module, students will understand the historical origins of global interdependence and inequality;

    (LO2) An understanding of how postcolonial theory has challenged 'Western' schools of thought (such as 'development', or the idea of 'Orientalism')

    (LO3) An understanding of the 'real-world' consequences of imperialism and colonialism in the present (for example, the effects of 'multiculturalism' in different countries).

    (LO4) Students will understand the interlinked relationships between peoples (e.g. ethnicities, cultures) and places (e.g. nations, regions);

    (LO5) By the end of the module, students will have the ability to apply postcolonial theories to contemporary case studies

    (LO6) Through the module assessment, students will develop skills in the analysis of cultural products (e.g. film, television, museum exhibits)

    (S1) Organisational skills

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) International awareness

    (S4) Ethical awareness

  • Science Communication (ENVS393)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Provide key transferable skills to undergraduates, including: communication, presentation, practical classroom skills and team working.

    Provide classoom based experience for undergraduates who are considering teaching as a potential career

    Encourage a new generation of STEM teachers.

    Provide role models for pupils within schools located in areas of high deprivation.

    Increase University of Liverpool widening participation activites within merseyside.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Have an understanding of the UK educational system and relevant teaching and learning styles.

    (LO2) Have an understanding of the Widening Participation Agenda

    (LO3) Have an understanding of relevant STEM subjects and activities that would link into the National Curriculum

    (LO4) Develop appropriate STEM activities for KS2 and KS3 school groups that link with the National Curriculum

    (LO5) Reflect on and evaluate the effectiveness of the outreach acivities and their delivery

    (LO6) Be able to apply the relevant protocols and safeguarding practice when delivering within a school setting

    (LO7) Be able to apply practical knowledge of effective delivery styles when engaging with primary or secondary aged pupils

    (LO8) Have experience of planning the delivery of a project

    (LO9) Have experience of team working

    (LO10) Have experience of science communication in a variety of situations

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – envisioning

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S6) Time and project management - Project planning

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S8) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S9) Global citizenship - Understanding of equality and diversity

    (S10) Personal attributes and qualities - Willingness to take responsibility

  • Surviving the Marine Environment: Adaptation, Behaviour and Conservation (ENVS310)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to foster a broad understanding of contemporary theory in behavioural ecology, evolutionary biology and ecophysiology, with special reference to the marine environment. We will consider processes that operate at scales from individuals to populations and consider implications of these processes for the conservation of marine species and ecosystems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Appreciate the diversity of behavioural, life-history, genetic and phenotypic adaptations that are adopted by a variety of marine organisms.

    (LO2) Understand the costs and benefits of these behavioural and life-history strategies of different marine species.

    (LO3) Understand the various processes that drive evolution in the marine environment.

    (LO4) Have experience of the relevance of evolutionary processes to contemporary marine science and biological conservation.

  • Teaching Geography (ENVS308)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Provide key transferable skills including: communication; presentation; practical classroom skills and team working;
    Provide training and teaching experience for undergraduates who are considering teaching as a potential career;
    Encourage a new generation of geography teachers;
    Provide role models for pupils within schools located in areas of high deprivation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the UK educational system and relevant teaching and learning styles

    (LO2) An understanding of Geography learning activites that link to the National Curriculum

    (LO3) The ability to mentor A-level Geography students

    (LO4) The ability to deliver and reflect on a learnnig activity targetted at secondary school pupils

    (LO5) Understanding of the relevant protocols and safeguarding practice relevant to working with school children

    (S1) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S2) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

    (S3) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S4) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

  • Field Class (algarve, Portugal) (ENVS380)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop an understanding of the physical and biological landscape of the Algarve and its modification by human action; to get to know the basic geomorphic evolution of the Algarve area in the light of climate change; to comprehend the interplay of processes acting at different spatial and temporal scales in the present day landscape; to realize the importance that the physiographic setting has for natural resources, landuse and natural hazards in a Mediterranean landscape, and how human landuse has transformed the landscape; applied in a climatic context not found in the UK; to learn how water, landscape and vegetation resources are managed.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) After completing the module students should be able to evaluate the field evidence: (a) for understanding the role of climate in landform evolution (applied in an environmental context not encountered in the UK)

    (LO2) b) for interpreting the temporal and spatial relationships between climate change and human impact on landscapes and environments,

    (LO3) (c) for deducing the importance of lithology and landscape evolution for present day soils, land use and natural hazards.

    (LO4) (d) for inferring human impact on the landscape

    (S1) Teamwork

    (S2) Organisational skills

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) International awareness

  • Field Class (santa Cruz) (ENVS352)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with experience in:

    Application of theory to practical field research.

    General fieldwork skills (Critical observation, data collection and management, continual re-evaluation of progress, etc.).

    Team work.

    Synthesis, interpretation, and presentation of data obtained through independent research.

    Group report writing.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Identification of research questions from current research literature

    (LO2) Formulation of a research proposal with appropriate scope for a short field study

    (LO3) Implementation of a field research project

    (LO4) Analysis and interpretation of findings

    (LO5) Formal presentation of research findings in academic journal format

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Teamwork

    (S4) Communication skills

  • Introduction to Quaternary Micropalaeontology (ENVS342)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module seeks to provide an appreciation and understanding of the methods and techniques used in micropalaeontology that will enable students to have an insight in a research field that is highly relevant for environmental sciences as well as geosciences, including palaeoclimatology, palaeoecology and palaeoceanography.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Have a strong understanding of biological proxies that are used to reconstruct Quaternary environments

    (LO2) Be able to identify at a generic level marine and terrestrial key microfossils

    (LO3) Understand principles of uniformitarianism and palaeoecology

    (LO4) Understandand apply principles of quantitative reconstructions of past conditions

    (LO5) Understand limitations of the proxies

    (S1) Numeracy

    (S2) Research skills

    (S3) Laboratory procedures

    (S4) Communication skills

    (S5) Problem solving skills

  • Carbon, Nutrients and Climate Change Mitigation (ENVS381)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to provide students with a quantitative understanding to examine the interlinkages between carbon, nutrients, water and climate change mitigation. The module aims to develop and demonstrate core knowledge and skills in this specialised area of climate change. The module will provide students with the skills to apply this knowledge quantitatively, critically evaluate scientific positions on topics of debate regarding climate change, and provide opportunities to develop skills in scientific communication and outreach to the scientific and general public. The module is built around the University’s core values of Active Learning, Research-Connected Learning, Authentic Assessment and Digital Fluency.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge of theory regarding carbon, nutrients and climate change mitigation strategies.

    (LO2) Ability to critically and quantitatively determine the importance of carbon and nutrient cycling to ecosystems.

    (LO3) Ability to communicate the theory and skills developed in this module in scientific and public forums.

    (S1) Quantitative assessment of ecosystem carbon and nutrient cycling.

    (S2) Science communication in public and scientific forums.

    (S3) Ability to work individually and in a group.

  • Glaciology Past, Present and Future (ENVS330)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with experience in:
    The application of glaciological theory within current research;
    In-depth knowledge reflecting most up to date understanding of glaciers and ice sheets;
    Analysis of data, and how to interpret and present this as a piece of academic research;
    Develop ability to critically apply glaciological knowledge to novel scenarios as part of concisely written summary assessments on each topic.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Engaging with the latest glaciological research

    (LO2) Ability to critically apply glaciological theory to given scenarios

    (LO3) Understanding of the wider applicability of glaciology to society and the climate system

    (S1) Numeracy

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Organisational skills

    (S4) Communication skills

    (S5) IT skills

    (S6) Critical skills

  • Contemporary Population Dynamics (ENVS311)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This course focuses on long-term European population trends.  The fertility, mortality and migration dynamics of a representative cross-section of European countries are examined and competing explanations for demographic changes are discussed. The specific challenges that current population changes pose to public policy are also discussed.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Compare and contrast trends in fertility, migration and mortality across selected European countries;

    (LO2) Critically evaluate competing explanations for population change;

    (LO3) Critically discuss the implications of different political; economic and social contexts for population dynamics;

    (LO4) Propose and evaluate policy-responses addressing challenges associated with population change.

    (S1) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

    (S2) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S3) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S4) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

  • Social and Spatial Inequalities (ENVS357)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    · Gain an understanding of several core areas of social and spatial inequalities and how these inter-relate, and to engage with academic debates about these issues;
    Explore evidence for, and interpretations of, social and spatial inequalities, eg labour market, ethnic, spatial aspects of poverty;
    Gain an understanding of the geographies of social inequalities, including why inequalities are not equal between places, and what the implications of this unevenness are for individuals and communities;
    Consider how and why social inequalities have persisted and/or changed over time, with reference to allied theories and empirical evidence;
    Gain acritical understanding of the meaning and measurement of inequalities, poverty and deprivation;
    Identify and review the types of data sources that can be used to explore social and spatial inequalities ;
    Explore the wider UK context for the development of social and spatial inequalities, including economic restructuring and welfare reform;
    Consider representations of inequalities in the media, policy and political debate;
    Consider a number of policy developments/responses to problems of social and spatial inequalities, and to highlight their impact.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Develop anunderstanding of social and spatial inequalities, how these inter-relate, andhow the terms have been (mis-)used in academic, political, policy and public discourses

    (LO2) Develop anunderstanding of how and why social and spatial inequalities might havepersisted over time, and review the empirical evidence for this

    (LO3) Understand how and why social inequalities havespecific geographies and can be concentrated in particular areas orneighbourhoods

    (LO4) Understand the difficulties in defining andmeasuring social and spatial inequalities, and how such definitions may relateto broader theories, perspectives or frameworks of relevance

    (LO5) Gain insightinto a range of government responses that have been developed to combat socialinequalities and related issues in the UK, at the regional and sub-regionallevel

    (S1) Organisational skills

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) International awareness

    (S4) Lifelong learning skills

    (S5) Ethical awareness

    (S6) Problem solving skills

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

To help you meet the intellectual and practical challenges of studying Geography, our programmes are taught using a student centred approach, involving a range of learning experiences. These include:

  • Small tutor groups (typically eight students) through all years
  • High levels of field-based learning within the UK and abroad
  • An emphasis on active, problem-based learning (‘learning by doing’)
  • Hands-on experience of cutting-edge laboratory technologies in physical geography
  • Innovative GIS, statistical and qualitative research methodologies and community consultation in human geography
  • Supervised independent and group project work, including (for Single Honours degrees) a final year independent research-based dissertation supervised by a dedicated expert in the field.

A number of the School’s degree programmes involve laboratory and fieldwork. The fieldwork is carried out in various locations, ranging from inner city to coastal and mountainous environments. We consider applications from prospective students with disabilities on the same basis as all other students, and reasonable adjustments will be considered to address barriers to access.


Assessment

Assessments are designed around developing skills and styles of communication that will be relevant to future employers. So, in addition to exams and essays, you will also undertake assessments that include computer-based exercises, oral presentations, policy briefs, field projects, and research reports. Single Honours Geography students complete a compulsory 10,000-word dissertation in their final year on a topic of their choice. This is your opportunity to develop skills as an independent academic researcher, supported on a one-to-one basis by an expert in the field.