Financial Computing BSc (Hons)

Key information


comp-sci-2

Module details

Due to the impact of COVID-19 we are changing how the course is delivered.

Programme Year One

Year One of the programme has been designed as an even split between subjects related to Computing and subjects related to Accounting, Economics, Finance and Management. In Year 1 students will study one of the modules COMP101 (Intro. to Programming) or COMP105 (Programming Language Paradigms). The option deemed most suitable will be determined, typically (although not exclusively) through indications of reasonable prior exposure to programming. For example, students who have obtained a recognised entry qualification in a computing related subject (eg Computer Science A-level) will study COMP105. Students without such background will normally study COMP101, however, may (at the discretion of Programme Director of Studies) be permitted to enrol on COMP105 instead. All other Year 1 modules are required.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Analytic Techniques for Computer Science (COMP116)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To equip students with an awareness of the range of methodologies that have been brought to bear in the treatment of computational issues.
    To provide practical experience in how various formal approaches can be used to address such issues.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will have a basic understanding of the range of techniques used to analyse and reason about computational settings.

    (LO2) Students will have the ability to solve problems involving the outcome of matrix-vector products as might arise in standard transformations.

    (LO3) Students will have the ability to apply basic rules to differentiate and integrate commonly arising functions.

    (LO4) Students will have a basic understanding of manipulating complex numbers and translating between different representations.

    (LO5) Students will have a basic understanding of the role of Linear algebra (including eigenvalues and eigenvectors) in computation problems such as web page ranking.

    (S1) Problem Solving - Numeracy and computational skills

    (S2) Problem Solving – Analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Designing Systems for the Digital Society (COMP107)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide the students with a wide-ranging understanding of the discipline of computing, and to introduce students to concepts of professional ethics as well as social and legal aspects of computing.
    To equip the students with the communication, time and project management, and employability skills required for a computing professional.
    To allow the students to gain an understanding of the importance of appropriate and efficient system design strategies, at the conceptual and logical levels, and how to communicate them effectively to stakeholders.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Identify and appraise professional, ethical, legal and social issues related to the work of a professional within the IT industry with particular regard to the BCS Codes of Conduct and Practice.

    (LO2) Recognise employability and entrepreneurship skills that prepare students to undertake paid work experience during the course of their degree or independently

    (LO3) Identify, describe and discuss economic, historical, organisational, research, ethical, and social aspects of computing as a discipline and computing in practice;

    (LO4) Understand the importance of requirement analysis, and demonstrate the ability to extract, analyse and organise end-user requirements;

    (LO5) Identity and apply principles of system design, including database conceptual design, using ER and UML design methodologies;

    (LO6) Recognise database logical design principles, and issues related to database physical design;

    (S1) Effectively communicate in writing and orally in a variety of styles, including the presentation of coherent and persuasive intellectual accounts/arguments

    (S2) Develop the ability to work effectively in group to design a project from conception to deployment

    (S3) Develop the ability to manage time effectively and to organise own skills

    (S4) Reflect on their own learning and professional development by producing a professional portfolio recording the skills developed in the course, which they can enhance in subsequent modules

  • Introduction to Financial Accounting (ACFI101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To develop knowledge and understanding of the underlying principles and concepts relating to financial accounting and technical proficiency in the use of double entry accounting techniques in recording transactions, adjusting financial records and preparing basic financial statements.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Prepare basic financial statements

    (LO2) Explain the context and purpose of financial reporting

    (LO3) Demonstrate the use of double entry and accounting systems

    (LO4) Record transactions and events

    (LO5) Prepare a trial balance

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Commercial awareness

    (S4) Organisational skills

    (S5) Communication skills

  • Introduction to Management Accounting (ACFI102)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to introduce students to the nature and purpose of management accounting and to establish a sound foundation in its fundamental techniques.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Apply a range of basic techniques to produce information that aids management in planning, control and decision making;

    (LO2) Understand, interpret and analyse management accounting information, and demonstrate an awareness of the importance of non-financial factors;

    (LO3) Evaluate the usefulness of various techniques in different situations and for different purposes.

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Numeracy

    (S4) Commercial awareness

    (S5) Organisational skills

    (S6) Communication skills

    (S7) IT skills

    (S8) Lifelong learning skills

  • Introduction to Finance (ACFI103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    This module aims:
    to introduce the students to finance.
    to provide a firm foundation for the students to build on later on in the second and third years of their programmes, by covering basic logical and rational analytical tools that underpin financial decisions  

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand the goals and governance of the firm, how financial markets work and appreciate the importance of finance.

    (LO2) Understand the time value of money.

    (LO3) Understand the determinants of bond yields.

    (LO4) Recognize how stock prices depend on future dividends and value stock prices.

    (LO5) Understand net present value rule and other criteria used to make investment decisions.

    (LO6) Understand risk, return and the opportunity cost of capital.

    (LO7) Understand the risk-return tradeoff, and know the various ways in which capital can be raised and determine a firm's overall cost of capital.

    (LO8) Know different types of options, and understand how options are priced.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Commercial awareness

    (S4) Teamwork

    (S5) Organisational skills

    (S6) Communication skills

    (S7) IT skills

    (S8) International awareness

    (S9) Lifelong learning skills

    (S10) Ethical awareness

  • Object-oriented Programming (COMP122)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop understanding of object-oriented software methodology, in theory and practice.
    To further develop sound principles in software design and software development.
    To understand basic concepts of software testing principles and software version control systems. 

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Describe object hierarchy structure and how to design such a hierarchy of related classes.

    (LO2) Describe the concept of object polymorphism in theory and demonstrate this concept in practice.

    (LO3) Design and code iterators for collection-based data management.

    (LO4) Design simple unit tests using appropriate software tools.

    (LO5) Demonstrate concepts of event-driven programming and be able to design simple GUI to demonstrate this understanding.

    (LO6) Identify and describe the task and issues involved in the process of developing interactive products for people, and the techniques used to perform these tasks.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report Writing

    (S2) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem-solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Numeracy/computational skills - Reason with numbers/mathematical concepts

  • Principles of Microeconomics (ECON121)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This module aims to provide students with a clear foundation of the purpose, scope and topics of microeconomic analysis. Students will develop their ability to think critically and analytically, and understand how to frame real world problems in an economic model. This module forms the starting point for all future courses in Microeconomics.  
    This module also emphasizes the role of mathematics in economics.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will have the ability to understand, explain, analyse and solve core problems in microeconomics.

    (LO2) Students will be able to practice and develop their mathematical techniques and understand the role of mathematical analysis in microeconomics.

    (LO3) Students will be able to familiarise themselves with the principles of using an 'economic model' and how to model individual decision-making for both consumers and producers.

    (LO4) Students will be able to apply their understanding of economic decision-making, optimisation and equilibrium to real world situations.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) IT skills

Year One Optional Modules

  • Introduction to Programming (COMP101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce concepts and principles of problem solving by computer, and the construction of appropriate algorithms for the solution of problems. To demonstrate the principles underlying the design of high level programming languages. To give students experience and confidence in the use of a high level programming language to implement algorithms.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Be able to implement, compile, test and run programmes, to address a particular software problem.

    (LO2) Understand how to include arithmetic operators and constants in a program.

    (LO3) Be able to make use of libraries.

    (LO4) Demonstrate the ability to employ various types of selection constructs in a program.

    (LO5) Demonstrate the ability to employ repetition constructs in a program.

    (LO6) Be able to employ a hierarchy of libraries/modules to provide a solution to a given set of requirements.

    (LO7) Demonstrate the ability to use simple data structures like arrays in a program.

    (LO8) Specific learning outcomes are listed above. General learning outcomes: An understanding of the principles and practice of program analysis and design in the construction of robust, maintainable programs which satisfy their requirements; A competence to design, write, compile, test and execute straightforward programs using a high level language; An appreciation of the principles of procedural programming; An awareness of the need for a professional approach to design and the importance of good documentation to the finished programs.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S2) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Numeracy/computational skills - Reason with numbers/mathematical concepts

  • Programming Language Paradigms (COMP105)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce the functional programming paradigm, and to compare and contrastit with the imperative programming paradigm.
    To explore the common techniques that are employed to solve problems in a functional way.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Describe the imperative and functional programming paradigms including the differences between them.

    (LO2) Apply recursion to solve algorithmic tasks.

    (LO3) Apply common functional programming idioms such as map, filter and fold.

    (LO4) Write programs using a functional programming language.

    (S1) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem-solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Numeracy/computational skills - Reason with numbers/mathematical concepts

Programme Year Two

In Year Two you continue with a mix of modules related to Computing, Accounting, Economics, Finance and Management but also have the opportunity to specialise in certain subject areas of your choice. You will take all the compulsory modules listed, and select modules from the optional module list.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Computer-based Trading in Financial Markets (COMP226)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To develop an understanding of financial markets at the level of individual trades. To provide an overview of the range of different computer-based trading applications and techniques. To introduce the key issues with using historical high-frequency financial data for developing computer-based trading strategies. To provide an overview of statistical and computational methods for the design of trading strategies and their risk management. To develop a practical understanding of the design, implementation, evaluation, and deployment of trading strategies.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Have an understanding of market microstructure and its impact on trading.

    (LO2) Understand the spectrum of computer-based trading applications and techniques, from profit-seeking trading strategies to execution algorithms.

    (LO3) Be able to design trading strategies and evaluate critically their historical performance and robustness.

    (LO4) Understand the common pitfalls in developing trading strategies with historical data.

    (LO5) Understand the benchmarks used to evaluate execution algorithms.

    (LO6) Understand methods for measuring risk and diversification at the portfolio level.

    (S1) Self-management (Readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning.)

    (S2) Application of numeracy (Manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae).)

    (S3) Problem solving (Analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.)

    (S4) Application of information technology (Basic IT skills, including familiarity with word processing, spreadsheets, file management and use of internet search engines.)

    (S5) Computer Science principles

    (S6) Computer Science practice

  • Corporate Financial Management for Non-specialist Students (ACFI213)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting90:10
    Aims

    The aim of the module is to provide an introduction to financial markets and to contextualise the application of mathematical techniques.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be equipped with the tools and techniques of financial management

    (LO2) Students will be able to interpret and critically examine financial management issues and controversies.

    (LO3) Students will attain the necessary knowledge to underpin the more advanced material on  Quantitative Business Finance.

    (S1) Commercial awareness

    (S2) Organisational skills

    (S3) Problem solving skills

    (S4) IT skills

    (S5) International awareness

    (S6) Numeracy

  • Database Development (COMP207)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To introduce students to
    - the problems arising from databases, including concurrency in databases, information security considerations and how they are solved;
    - the problems arising from the integration of heterogeneous sources of information and the use of semi-structured data;
    - non-relational databases and the economic factors involved in their selection;
    - techniques for analysing large amounts of data, the security issues and commercial factors involved with them.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate an understanding of basic and advanced SQL topics;

    (LO2) At the end of this module the student will be able to identify and apply the principles underpinning transaction management within DBMS and the main security issues involved in securing transaction;

    (LO3) Illustrate the issues related to Web technologies as a semi-structured data representation formalism;

    (LO4) Interpret the main concepts and security aspects in data warehousing, and the concepts of data mining and commercial considerations involved in adopting the paradigm.

    (S1) Problem Solving - Numeracy and computational skills

    (S2) Problem solving – Analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Group Software Project (COMP208)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Students will work in small groups to produce a working software system.
    The deliverables and working methods will be prescribed. The aims of the module are:
    1. to provide experience of group working;
    2. to provide experience of all aspects of the development of a moderately sized software system;
    3. to prepare students for their individual projects in the third year;
    4. to consolidate material from the first semester of the second year, in particular COMP201 and COMP207.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Show an awareness of the issues involved in working as part of a team.

    (LO2) Demonstrate improved personal, interpersonal and communication skills.

    (LO3) Demonstrate a more in depth understanding of the software development process.

    (LO4) An ability to specify the requirements of a software system.

    (LO5) Demonstrate some experience in the design of a software system.

    (LO6) Demonstrate practical experience in the implementation and testing of a moderately sized software system.

    (LO7) Show an awareness of the typical project management issues.

    (LO8) Understanding of the process and role of software documentation.

    (LO9) Experience in the writing of a sizeable report on a software project.

    (S1) Better interpersonal skills

    (S2) Awareness of the benefits of structuring the development process

    (S3) Better knowledge of the main design techniques

  • Financial Reporting 1 (ACFI201)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To enable candidates to prepare single entity financial statements, and extracts from those financial statements, covering a wide range of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).
    Candidates will also be expected to explain accounting and reporting concepts and ethical issues, and the application of specified IFRS to specified single entity.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to draw up a set of financial statements which comply with the major provisions of IAS1 and other key International Accounting Standards;

    (LO2) Students will be able to understand and apply key international accounting standard regulations with respect to presentation, disclosure, recognition and measurement for individual company financial statements;

    (LO3) Students will be able to assess the concepts underlying financial reporting through a knowledge of the IASBs Conceptual Framework.

    (S1) Adaptibility

    (S2) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S7) International awareness

    (S8) Lifelong learning skills

    (S9) Ethical awareness

    (S10) Numeracy/computational skills - Problem solving

    (S11) Numeracy/computational skills - Numerical methods

    (S12) Global citizenship - Ethical awareness

    (S13) Commercial awareness - Relevant understanding of organisations

    (S14) Personal attributes and qualities - Integrity

  • Securities Markets (ECON241)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    This module seeks to provide an understanding of:
    the role of securities markets in the economy;
    their basic mechanics and technical features;
    the valuation of financial assets;
    the operational and allocative efficiency of the market.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Appreciate the central role of securities markets in the economy

    (LO2) Understand and apply appropriate economic theory to market organisation

    (LO3) Display an understanding of the usefulness of portfolio theory and the approaches to the valuation of financial assets

    (LO4) Read the financial press and appreciate issues relating to the study of the securities markets

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Numeracy

    (S4) Commercial awareness

    (S5) Teamwork

    (S6) Organisational skills

    (S7) Communication skills

    (S8) IT skills

    (S9) International awareness

    (S10) Lifelong Learning Skills

    (S11) Ethical Awareness

  • Software Engineering I (COMP201)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    The module is intended to develop an understanding of the problems associated with the development of significant computing systems (that is, systems that are too large to be designed and developed by a single person, and are designed to be used by many users) and to appreciate the techniques and tools necessary to develop such systems efficiently, in a cost-effective manner.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Realise the problems in designing and building significant computer systems;

    (LO2) Understand the need to design systems that fully meet the requirements of the intended users including functional and non functional elements;

    (LO3) Appreciate the need to ensure that the implementation of a design is adequately tested to ensure that the completed system meets the specifications;

    (LO4) Be fully aware of the principles and practice of an O-O approach to the design and development of computer systems;

    (LO5) Be able to apply these principles in practice;

    (LO6) Produce O-O requirements and design documentation in UML which demonstrates the features of good design such as loose coupling and high cohesion;

    (LO7) Be able to demonstrate how to effectively  implent an O-O design in an O-O languuge such as Java or Python;

    (S1) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

    (S2) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal action planning

Year Two Optional Modules

  • Accounting Theory (ACFI202)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
    Aims

    This module aims to increase students' knowledge of financial accounting theory and its relevance to accounting practice.
    The module further develops students’ knowledge of year one accounting modules and complements material covered in the second year module, Financial Reporting. In addition, some of the theoretical material covered in Accounting Theory will provide links to modules in Management Accounting.  
    More specifically, the aim of Accounting Theory is to examine the market for accounting information; processes and effects of regulating financial reporting; the incentives which drive managers’ choices of alternative accounting policies; unregulated financial reporting, capital markets’ response to accounting information, and to explore the critical perspectives of accounting.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Should possess knowledge about the role and importance of theory and its link to accounting practice.

    (LO2) Should possess knowledge of a range of theoretical models which are useful in understanding and explaining current accounting practices and regulation.

    (LO3) Should be aware of the literature relating to theoretical models in accounting and be able to use theory to understand and evaluate the regulatory institutions of financial reporting in the UK and other countries.

    (LO4) Should be able to understand the regulations applied to financial reporting in the UK and other countries.

    (LO5) Should be to able understand the incentives driving managers in their choice of accounting policies within accounting regulations.

    (LO6) Should be able to make links between financial reporting and other aspects of accounting.

    (LO7) Should be able to understand capital markets' reaction to accounting information.

    (LO8) Should be able to understand and explore the critical perspectives of accounting.

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Commercial awareness

    (S4) Teamwork

    (S5) Organisational skills

    (S6) Communication skills

    (S7) International awareness

    (S8) Lifelong learning skills

    (S9) Ethical awareness

  • Business in the Global Economy (MKIB225)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aims of the module are:

    •The production of basic knowledge of how businesses operate internationally and their changing context. An understanding of transnational production in a holistic sense is key, including questions of power and ethics.

    •Key trends and issues shaping the (current) international economic order, that is the current and future context of business activity.

    •The relationship between transnational corporations and international organisations, states, labour, social movements, etc

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to think analytically in the production of knowledge of how businesses operate internationally.

    (LO2) Students will be able to analytically read a wide range of texts, assessing the strengths and weaknesses of different arguments on key themes and trends. This is to enable the development of an analytical understanding of key approaches, both mainstream and critical, on these themes and trends.

    (LO3) Students will be able to undertake independent scholarly work, albeit in an assisted manner.

    (LO4) Students will be able to communicate knowledge, ideas and analysis clearly and concisely in both written and oral form.

    (LO5) Students will be able to work autonomously and demonstrate initiative, self-organisation and time management, to plan and evaluate independent learning and performance, and to apply learning strategies to improve performance.

    (LO6) Students will be able to function effectively and cooperatively in group work

    (LO7) Students will be able to develop a basic understanding of the (current) international economic order, that is the international context of business activity.

    (LO8) Students will be able to develop a basic understanding of the relationship between transnational corporations and international organisations, states, labour, social movements etc.

    (LO9) Students will be able to develop a basic understanding of power and ethics in the world economy.

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Commercial awareness

    (S4) Teamwork

    (S5) Organisational skills

    (S6) Communication skills

    (S7) IT skills

    (S8) International awareness

    (S9) Lifelong learning skills

    (S10) Ethical awareness

  • Computer Aided Software Development (COMP285)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to a range of techniques and tools used in modern, large-scale industrial software development. To describe how the development and deployment of high quality, robust products is supported through software develpment tools.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Perform software development tasks using the techniques of Automated Testing, Continuous Integration and Test Driven Programming

    (LO2) Use Ant, JUnit and Eclipse both individually and jointly as tools for Automated Testing, Continuous Integration and Test Driven Programming

    (S1) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

    (S2) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal action planning

  • Scripting Languages (COMP284)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with an understanding of the nature and role of scripting languages.
    To introduce students to some popular scripting languages and their applications.
    To enable students to write simple scripts using these languages for a variety of applications.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Develop server-side web-based applications using an appropriate scripting language, with emphasis on concurrent use of such applications.

    (LO2) Develop computer-based or client-side web-based applications using an appropriate scripting language.

    (S1) Effective information retrieval skills (including use of the WWW and the evaluation of information retrieved from such sources).

    (S2) The ability to use general IT facilities effectively.

    (S3) The ability to manage their own learning and development, and time management and organisational skills.

Programme Year Three

A major part of your studies in Year Three will be the Honours Year Automated Trading Project (COMP396) that you take part in as a member of a team. This project allows you to demonstrate practical competence in both research and development of computer-based trading strategies.

In addition, you take all the compulsory modules listed, and you will also choose modules from the selected optional modules list.

Year Three Compulsory Modules

  • Financial Risk Management (ACFI342)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The module builds on the foundations of the existing finance modules and aims to give students a solid grounding in terms of understanding the recent global financial crisis and a wide range of risk management tools available to financial managers. Particular emphasis is placed on the issue of risk measurement. The following types of risk will be analysed extensively: Interest rate risk, FX risk, Market risk, Credit risk, Liquidity risk and Capital adequacy. The class is run as a discussion based forum.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to understand how risk management contributes to value creation

    (LO2) Students will be able to understand how the foreign exchange market operates, the risk it poses and related hedging methods

    (LO3) Students will be able to explain the causes of the recent global credit crisis

    (LO4) Students will be able to overview the risks facing a modern corporation

    (LO5) Students will be able to analyse the effects of interest rate volatility on risk exposure

    (LO6) Students will be able to examine market risk, which results when companies actively trade bonds, equities and other securities

    (LO7) Students will be able to examine how credit risk adversely impacts a financial institution’s profits

    (LO8) Students will be able to analyse the problems created by liquidity risk

    (LO9) Students will be able to become familiar with the concept of capital adequacy and also with the Basel Accords

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Problem solving skills

    (S4) Teamwork

    (S5) Organisational skills

    (S6) Communication skills

    (S7) IT skills

    (S8) International awareness

    (S9) Lifelong learning skills

    (S10) Ethical awareness

  • Honours Year Automated Trading Project (COMP396)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To give students the opportunity to work in a team to explore in depth the problem of automated trading from a practical perspective.

    To provide experience of all aspects of solving a substantial problem, including the production of a final report.

    To provide experience of all aspects of solving a substantial problem, including the production of a final report.

    To enhance communication skills, both oral and written.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) At the end of this module students should be able to work effectively and cooperatively as part of a team while taking on a range of different roles within the team.

    (LO2) At the end of this module students should be able to plan, manage, and execute the project as a group within the time available while managing their individual time effectively so as to carry out the group's plan.

    (LO3) At the end of this module students should be able to design and implement trading strategies and evaluate critically their performance and robustness.

    (LO4) At the end of this module students should be able to locate and make use of information relevant to their project.

    (LO5) At the end of this module students should be able to prepare and deliver a formal presentation showing practical competence and demonstrating aspects of the project.

    (LO6) At the end of this module students should be able to document the work conducted in the project in a final report.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S4) Time and project management - Project management

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S7) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S8) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S9) Numeracy/computational skills - Reason with numbers/mathematical concepts

  • Introduction to Computational Game Theory (COMP323)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To introduce the student to the notion of a game, its solutions, concepts, and other basic notions and tools of game theory, and the main applications for which they are appropriate, including electricity trading markets.

    To formalize the notion of strategic thinking and rational choice by using the tools of game theory, and to provide insights into using game theory in modeling applications.

    To draw the connections between game theory, computer science, and economics, especially emphasizing the computational issues.

    To introduce contemporary topics in the intersection of game theory, computer science, and economics.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) A student will understand the notion of a strategic game and equilibria, and understand the characteristics of main applications of these concepts;

    (LO2) Given a real world situation a student should be able to identify its key strategic aspects and based on these be able to connect them to appropriate game theoretic concepts;

    (LO3) A student will understand the key connections and interactions between game theory, computer science and economics;

    (LO4) A student will understand the impact of game theory on its contemporary applications, and be able to identify the key such application areas;

    (S1) Numeracy/computational skills - Problem solving

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S3) Numeracy/computational skills - Reason with numbers/mathematical concepts

  • Business Finance (ACFI304)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    To provide students with a fundamental understanding of the core theoretical and empirical aspects involved in corporate finance. The course aims to build transferrable skills of students by concentrating on the fundamental theoretical and empirical principles.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand the principles of bonds and stocks valuation.

    (LO2) Assessment of the term structure of interest rates

    (LO3) Develop understanding of emperical and theoretical aspects of capital budgeting under uncertainty, market efficiency

    (LO4) Understand portfolio theory, asset pricing models (CAPM,APT), and portfolio management.

    (LO5) Develop understanding of issues involved in Capital Structure and Dividend policy .

    (LO6) Understand the principles and practices involved in leasing, mergers and acquisitions

    (LO7) Understand the functions and valuation principle of options, futures, warrants and convertibles.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Commercial Awareness

    (S4) Communication skills

  • Technologies for E-commerce (COMP315)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To introduce the environment in which e-commerce takes place, the main technologies for supporting e-commerce, and how these technologies fit together.

    To introduce security as a major issue in secure e-commerce, and to provide an overview of security issues.

    To introduce encryption as a means of ensuring security, and to describe how secure encryption can be delivered.

    To introduce issues relating to privacy.

    To introduce auction protocols and negotiation mechanisms as emerging e-commerce technologies.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand the main technologies behind e-commerce systems and how these technologies interact;

    (LO2) Understand the security issues which relate to e-commerce;

    (LO3) Understand how encryption can be provided and how it can be used to ensure secure commercial transactions;

    (LO4) Understand implementation aspects of e-commerce and cryptographic systems;

    (LO5) Have an appreciation of privacy issues;

    (LO6) Understand auction protocols and interaction mechanisms.

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Computational Game Theory and Mechanism Design (COMP326)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To provide an understanding of the inefficiency arising from uncontrolled, decentralized resource allocation.

    To provide a foundation for modelling various mechanism design problems together with their algorithmic aspects.

    To provide the tools and paradigms for the design and analysis of efficient algorithms/mechanisms that are robust in environments that involve interactions of selfish agents.

    To review the links and interconnections between algorithms and computational issues with selfish agents.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Have a systematic understanding of current problems and important concepts in the field of computational game theory.

    (LO2) Ability to quantify the inefficiency of equilibria.

    (LO3) The ability to formulate mechanism design models or network games for the purpose of modeling particular applications.

    (LO4) The ability to use, describe and explain appropriate algorithmic paradigms and techniques in context of a particular game-theoretic or mechanism design problem.

    (S1) Critical Thinking and Problem Solving - Critical Analysis

    (S2) Information Skills - Critical Reading

    (S3) Numeracy - Computational Skills - Problem Solving

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S5) Numeracy/computational skills - Reason with numbers/mathematical concepts

  • Corporate Reporting and Analysis (ACFI302)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    This module aims to develop students understanding of financial reporting to an advanced level by building upon the knowledge and skills gained in earlier financial reporting modules.  Complex IFRS on topics such as share based payments and deferred tax will be looked at.
    This module also aims to develop students consolidated accounting skills by looking at complex business combinations.
    This module also aims to develop an understanding of financial statement analysis using financial reporting and business strategy skills developed in this and earlier modules.
    This module aims to give students an appreciation of the ethical and professional issues an accountant may face in practice and develop an understanding of how to deal with those issues.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to prepare and evaluate single company financial statements, or extracts thereof, in accordance with IFRS for complex transactions.

    (LO2) Students will be able to account for complex business combinations in accordance with International Accounting Standards.

    (LO3) Students will be able to analyse and interpret financial statements and other financial information and draw appropriate conclusions.

    (LO4) Students will learn to appraise ethical, CSR and professional issues for an accountant undertaking work in corporate reporting and recommend courses of action.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Commercial awareness

    (S4) Organisational skills

    (S5) Communication skills

    (S6) International awareness

    (S7) Lifelong learning skills

    (S8) Ethical awareness

  • The Digital Business (EBUS301)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide an introduction to the appraisal and formulation of e-business strategy and contemporary e-business models.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To understand the basics of business strategy;

    (LO2) To understand the capabilities and therefore business capabilities and therefore business strategies enabled by the Internet;

    (LO3) To be able to analyse, understand and constructively criticise an existing e-business strategy;

    (LO4) To be able to formulate an e-business strategy to help in addressing the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats faced by a business;

    (LO5) To have well founded views on the future development of e-business models.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Commercial awareness

    (S3) Organisational skills

    (S4) Communication skills

    (S5) Lifelong learning skills

  • Financial Reporting 2 (ACFI309)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    This module is designed to build upon the knowledge and skills gained in earlier financial reporting modules by covering the preparation of group financial statements including associates and joint ventures.  It will also develop an understanding of group accounting principles and issues arising from group accounting including fair values, intangibles and impairment.

    The module also addresses other key accounting standards including those relating to leases, borrowing costs and related parties.

    The module should enable students to prepare complete single entity and consolidated financial statements, and extracts from those financial statements, covering a wide range of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

    Students will also be required to explain accounting and reporting concepts and ethical issues, and the application of IFRS to specified single entity or group scenarios

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to explain the contribution and inherent limitations of financial statements, apply the International Accounting Standards Board’s (IASB) conceptual framework for financial reporting and identify and explain key ethical issues.

    (LO2) Students will be able to prepare and present financial statements from accounting data for single entities, whether organised in corporate or in other forms, in conformity with IFRS and explain the application of IFRS to specified single entity scenarios.

    (LO3) Students will be able to identify the circumstances in which entities are required to present consolidated financial statements, prepare and present them in conformity with IFRS and explain the application of IFRS to specified group scenarios.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

    (S2) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S6) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S7) Time and project management - Personal action planning

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S9) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S10) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

    (S11) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S12) Skills in using technology - Information accessing

    (S13) Skills in using technology - Online communications skills

    (S14) Numeracy/computational skills - Reason with numbers/mathematical concepts

    (S15) Numeracy/computational skills - Confidence/competence in measuring and using numbers

    (S16) Numeracy/computational skills - Problem solving

    (S17) Global citizenship - Relevant economic/political understanding

    (S18) Global citizenship - Ethical awareness

    (S19) Commercial awareness - Relevant understanding of organisations

    (S20) Personal attributes and qualities - Resilience

    (S21) Personal attributes and qualities - Flexibility/Adaptability

    (S22) Personal attributes and qualities - Integrity

  • Global Strategic Management (MKIB351)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide conceptual frameworks within which to formulate and analyse global strategy;

    To provide practical experience of formulating strategy;

    To analyse theory and evidence regarding the configuration and governance of international operations;

    To analyse conceptual frameworks within which to frame ethical conduct in international business.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to explain resource-based and institutional approaches to international strategy

    (LO2) Students will be able to explain generic forms of growth and diversification

    (LO3) Students will be able to explain the principal forms of internal organisation and governance of multinational enterprises

    (LO4) Students will be able to explain the main forms of international entry and growth and when each is likely to be the preferred approach

    (LO5) Students will be able to explain how the nature of global production, logistics and distribution have changed and why and how firms can evaluate their preferred configuration

    (LO6) Students will be able to explain how competition evolves in international business and how multinational enterprises can maintain and upgrade their competitive strengths

    (LO7) Students will be able to explain the nature and form of strategic alliances and when these will be preferred to international mergers and acquisitions

    (LO8) Students will be able to explain the key ethical issues facing international businesses and apply appropriate frameworks for framing ethical behaviour.

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Problem-solving skills

    (S3) Numeracy

    (S4) Commercial awareness

    (S5) Teamwork

    (S6) Organisational skills

    (S7) Communication skills

    (S8) IT skills

    (S9) International awareness

    (S10) Lifelong learning skills

    (S11) Ethical awareness

  • Multi-agent Systems (COMP310)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To introduce the student to the concept of an agent and multi-agent systems, and the main applications for which they are appropriate.

    To introduce the main issues surrounding the design of intelligent agents.

    To introduce the main issues surrounding the design of a multi-agent society.

    To introduce a contemporary platform for implementing agents and multi-agent systems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand the notion of an agent, how agents are distinct from other software paradigms (eg objects) and understand the characteristics of applications that lend themselves to an agent-oriented solution;

    (LO2) Understand the key issues associated with constructing agents capable of intelligent autonomous action, and the main approaches taken to developing such agents;

    (LO3) Understand the key issues in designing societies of agents that can effectively cooperate in order to solve problems, including an understanding of the key types of multi-agent interactions possible in such systems;

    (LO4) Understand the main application areas of agent-based solutions, and be able to develop a meaningful agent-based system using a contemporary agent development platform.

  • Optimisation (COMP331)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To provide a foundation for modelling various continuous and discrete optimisation problems.
    To provide the tools and paradigms for the design and analysis of algorithms for continuous and discrete optimisation problems.
    Apply these tools to real-world problems.
    To review the links and interconnections between optimisation and computational complexity theory.   
    To provide an in-depth, systematic and critical understanding of selected significant topics at the intersection of optimisation, algorithms and (to a lesser extent) complexity theory, together with the related research issues. 

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) A conceptual understanding of current problems and techniques in the field of optimisation.

    (LO2) The ability to formulate optimisation models for the purpose of modelling particular applications.

    (LO3) The ability to use appropriate algorithmic paradigms and techniques in context of a particular optimisation model. 

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

  • Software Engineering II (COMP319)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The overall aim of this module is to introduce students to a range of advanced, near-research level topics in contemporary software engineering. The actual choice of topics will depend upon the interests of the lecturer and the topics current in the software engineering research literature at that time. The course will introduce issues from a problem (user-driven) perspective and a technology-driven perspective – where users have new categories of software problems that they need to be solved, and where technology producers create technologies that present new opportunities for software products. It will be expected that students will read articles in the software engineering research literature, and will discuss these articles in a seminar-style forum.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) At the end of the module, the student will: Understand the key problems driving research and development in contemporary software engineering (eg the need to develop software for embedded systems).

    (LO2) Be conversant with approaches to these problems, as well as their advantages, disadvantages, and future research directions.

    (LO3) Understand the key technological drivers behind contemporary software engineering research (eg the increased use of the Internet leading to the need to engineer systems on and for the web).

    (LO4) Be able to present, analyse, and give a reasoned critique of articles in the software engineering research literature.

    (LO5) Be able to read and understand articles in the research literature of software engineering.

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

Teaching is by a mix of formal lectures, small group tutorials and supervised laboratory-based practical sessions. Students also undertake individual and group projects. Key problem solving skills and employability skills, like presentation and teamwork skills, are developed throughout the programme.