Archaeology of Ancient Civilisations BA (Hons)

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: V401
  • Year of entry: 2020
  • Typical offer: A-level : BBB / IB : 33, with no score less than 4 / BTEC : Applications considered
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Module details

Programme Year One

Students are introduced to the basic methods of archaeology and the main periods and areas taught at Liverpool. Students take six core modules plus two optional modules or a minor subject under Honours Select.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Bronze Age Civilizations: Mesopotamia and the Mediterranean (ALGY106)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    This module aims to introduce students to the archaeology and history of the ancient Near East and Aegean from ca. 4,000 to 800 BC;

    To familiarize students with the causes and consequences of the world's earliest examples of urbanization, state-formation, literacy and imperialism and the role that geography, culture and history played in this diversity;

    To introduce students to the possibilities and problems of combining the evidence from ancient texts and archaeological materials to produce interpretations of developments in the past.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students successfully completing the module will achieve a basic understanding of the archaeological record of Mesopotamia and the Aegean from ca. 4,000-800 BC, and a particular appreciation of the important evidence this region supplies for issues of global significance, such as the origins of writing, urbanism, state-formation, and imperialism.

    (LO2) Students successfully completing the module will gain significant experience in absorbing, synthesising, and using unfamiliar archaeological and historical evidence for the purposes of investigating questions of general historical and cultural significance.

    (LO3) Students successfully completing the module will further develop their ability to construct and express effective verbal and written argument.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S6) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S7) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

  • Empires and Citizens: the Classical Mediterranean and the Near East (ALGY131)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce students to the geographical setting, chronological frameworks and general social, cultural, political and economic developments of the Mediterranean world from the sixth century A.D; To familiarize students with key themes and forms of evidence relevant to advanced study of Mediterranean Archaeology in the Classical period; To introduce students to the direct analysis of material culture from the Classical Mediterranean world as well as the role of museum collections in the study of Mediterranean archaeology.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire an introductory knowledge of the geographical setting, chronological frameworks and general social, cultural, political and economic developments of the Mediterranean world from the sixth century B.C. to the sixth century A.D.

    (LO2) Students will be gain a comparative appreciation of key similarities and differences between Classical Greece and Imperial Rome from an archaeological perspective;

    (LO3) Students will be able to analyse a range of material remains and apply core methodological and theoretical perspectives to answer questions about the social and political dynamics of life in the ancient Mediterranean

    (LO4) Students will compare and assess different responses to challenges posed by living in communities and interacting with other communities in the ancient Mediterranean.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S6) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S7) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

    (S8) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

  • Introduction to Ancient Egypt I (ALGY109)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To provide students with an overview of Ancient Egyptian culture from prehistory to AD 395;

    To develop students' understanding of the environment and geography of Ancient Egypt, the fundamentals of the chronology of Ancient Egypt (including the limitations of available evidence); and to provide students with an awareness of how major archaeological sites and other forms of primary evidence fit within this framework.

    The emphasis will be on the use of primary data (archaeological, visual and textual) to gain a better understanding of basic features of the chronological development of Ancient Egypt.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain a broad understanding of Ancient Egyptian history

    (LO2) Students will develop their critical skills in working with primary and secondary sources (including standard textbooks) for the understanding of Ancient Egypt.

    (LO3) Students will develop through study and their written work the critical techniques of evidence-based argument into creation of in creating synthetic contextualised discussions of Ancient Egypt that focus on communicating an independent understanding of the limits of our knowledge.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

  • Introduction to Ancient Egypt II (ALGY116)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    ALGY116 is designed as a year one module which aims to provide students with an overview of Ancient Egyptian culture. In particular it has as its core aim the development of students' understanding of the broader thematic aspects of Egyptian society, such as writing, religion, art and social structure.  The emphasis will be on the use of primary data (written and material culture), and on awareness of how major archaeological sites fit within this framework

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain a broad understanding of Ancient Egyptian culture.

    (LO2) Students will develop their critical skills in primary and secondary sources (including standard textbooks) for the understanding of Ancient Egypt)

    (LO3) Students will develop through study and their written work the critical techniques of evidence-based argument into creation of in creating synthetic contextualised discussions of Ancient Egypt that focus on communicating an independent understanding of the limits of our knowledge

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Information skills - Critical reading

  • Principles of Archaeology (ALGY101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce students to the various theoretical tools, field methods and laboratory techniques that archaeologists use to study and interpret the past; To acquaint students with the types of data archaeologists collect, and how they analyse and interpret these data in order to reconstruct and understand past societies; To develop the student's intellectual skills in terms of knowledge acquisition, research, written and visual communication as well as group work and reflexive evaluation (both self and peer evaluation).

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire essential subject-based knowledge.

    (LO2) Become familiar with scientific equipment, techniques and materials that are used and analysed by applied archaeological science.

    (LO3) Become aware of the relevance of the materials, methods and arguments presented in the module for the study of the past in diverse archaeological contexts.

    (LO4) Become familiar with the main schools of thought and intellectual debates involved in the study, and the critical analysis of specific archaeological subjects, research questions and case-studies.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S6) Working in groups and teams - Time management

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S8) Research skills - All Information skills

  • The Practice of Archaeology (ALGY102)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to introduce students to the issues involved in the design and implementation of archaeological research; To introduce students to the challenges facing modern archaeologists; To introduce students to desk-based archaeological assessments; To introduce students to aspects of archaeological mapping and GIS; To introduce students to aspects of field recording; To introduce students to aspects of archaeological data analysis; To introduce students to issues involved in archaeological project and excavation design; To introduce students to issues involved in the interpretation of archaeological sites and cemeteries; To introduce students to principles of heritage and management of archaeological sites.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To show some understanding of the objectives of archaeological research.

    (LO2) Students should be able to demonstrate an awareness of how archaeology works in both academic and commercial spheres

    (LO3) Students should be able to show critical awareness of the practice of archaeolgical research and research design

    (LO4) Students should be able to show an understanding of how different approaches can lead to different interpretations

    (LO5) Students should be able to show an understanding of desk-based assessment

    (LO6) Students should be able to show an understand some basics of archaeological mapping

    (LO7) Students should be able to show an understanding of basic archaeological data analysis

    (LO8) Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of aspects of archaeological field recording and data collection.

    (LO9) Students should be able to show an understanding of basic issues around management of archaeological sites.

    (LO10) By the end of the module students should be able to show an understanding of excavation strategy. 

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Improving own learning/performance - Record-keeping

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S5) Time and project management - Project planning

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S8) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (word processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S9) Numeracy/computational skills - Confidence/competence in measuring and using numbers

    (S10) Research skills - All Information skills

Year One Optional Modules

  • From VIllage to City: the Origins of Chinese Civilisation (ALGY112)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting20:80
    Aims

    To develop students’ knowledge and understanding of Chinese prehistory and the archaeological record in China 10,000 to 2,000 BC;

    To develop students’ knowledge and understanding of concepts relating to social and political hierarchy, early states, complex economies;

    To develop students’ knowledge and understanding of  archaeological methodologies involved in the appearance of village farming and early urbanism;

    To develop students’ knowledge and understanding of early Chinese social practices and religion.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge of Chinese prehistory and the archaeological record in China 10,000 to 2,000 BC.

    (LO2) Knowledge of concepts relating to social and political hierarchy, early states, complex economies.

    (LO3) Knowledge of archaeological methodologies involved in the appearance of village farming and early urbanism.

    (LO4) Knowledge of early Chinese social practices and religion.

    (S1) Ability to analyze questions

    (S2) Ability to construct a coherent and logical written argument

    (S3) Ability to research a topic in detail and identify key issues

    (S4) Critical reflection on own work in the light of peer review

    (S5) Ability to engage in critical analysis of the arguments of others

    (S6) Ability to contribute to development of oral discussion

  • Using VIsual Culture (CLAH114)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Far from relying upon written texts alone, ancient societies typically employed a wide variety of visual media to communicate shared ideas and beliefs. The aim of this module is to acquaint you with the diverse ways in which ancient cultures (Greek, Roman, and their mediterranean conexts) could express themselves visually – encompassing everything from sculpture, painting, and architecture to the images stamped on coins; To encourage the development of the critical and methodological skills needed to ‘read’ ancient visual culture and interpret it in wider socio-cultural contexts, both ancient and modern.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Upon successful completion of this module, students will be able to analyse examples of ancient visual culture from a range of different perspectives.

    (LO2) They will be able to critically evaluate objects and images in different contexts, ancient and modern, and to understand the continuities and differences between them.

    (LO3) Students will be able to assess the relative contribution and importance of visual culture to the wider picture of the ancient world.

    (LO4) Students will acquire specific skills necessary to talk and write about ancient visual culture, students will also develop a broader skills base, with a particular focus on different kinds of written communication (e.g. book reviews, reflective responses, essays) and library and other research skills.

    (S1) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

Programme Year Two

Students take two core modules and then a further two selected optional modules on each of the two civilisations on which they have chosen to focus (Near East, and/or Greece and Rome, and/or Egypt). Students then take two further selected optional modules.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Working With the Past (ALGY248)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to provide students with practical skills in archaeology and museology, and encourage awareness of excavations and museums as places of work, thereby supporting the development of key workplace skills as exemplified in the heritage sector.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Learn the basic practical skills required for archaeological excavation and recording, and develop a critical understanding of such processes.

    (LO2) Understand the nature and limitations of archaeological evidence derived from excavation, and understand the move from description to analysis and interpretation.

    (LO3) Understand the post-excavation process, providing a developed insight into the heritage sector.

    (LO4) Identify key employability skills including project management, accuracy, teamwork and communication.

  • Artefacts and Technology (ALGY250)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module provides an introduction to some of the types of information that can be gained from the study of archaeological artefacts; This module focuses on the artefacts - the materials used, their properties, how far it is possible to determine the origins of raw materials, how materials were processed and how the final artefacts were made and used. A complimentary module, Analytical Methods (ALGY397), is available in year three which is concerned specifically with the techniques used and how they work.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students who take this module should gain an appreciation of artefacts as material entities and an understanding the types of information that can be obtained via scientific examination.

    (LO2) Students will gain knowledge about the raw materials used to make artefacts in past, where they came from and how they were then processed into the finished objects. 

    (LO3) Students will gain a basic knowledge of the scientific methods used by professional archaeologists to investigate archaeological artefacts.

    (LO4) Students will acquire skills in the correct handling and investigation of archaeological artefacts.

    (S1) Students will draw down and apply appropriate scholarly, theoretical and scientific principles and concepts to archaeological problems.

    (S2) Students will be equipped to practise core laboratory techniques of recording, measurement and interpretation of archaeological artefacts.

Year Two Optional Modules

  • Akkadian Language and Literature (ALGY213)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To teach students the basic grammar and cuneiform writing system of Akkadian; To instill awareness of the basic principles of reading a variety of Akkadian cuneiform inscriptions within their cultural contexts.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, successful students will be able to transliterate and translate into English different types of cuneiform inscriptions written in the Akkadian language (Old Babylonian).

    (LO2) Students successfully completing the module will be familiar with the main points of the cuneiform writing system as well as the Akkadian grammar, will already have read a few Akkadian texts, and will be ready to move on to additional Old Babylonian texts and to begin the study of Standard Babylonian texts.

    (LO3) Students succesfully completing the module will be able to analyze the material grammatically and contextualize all of the assigned texts in their cultural and historical contexts.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Improving own learning/performance - Personal action planning

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S4) Personal attributes and qualities - Resilience

  • Ancient Warfare (ALGY210)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    Students will acquire an understanding of the six identified cross-cultural themes that form the core of the module and which relate to key aspects of ancient civilisation. They will apply these themes to three case-study cultures (Archaic and Classical Greece, Iron Age Europe and the ancient Near East );

    This module’s wide-ranging examination of key themes in the archaeology and history of the ancient world provides students with a foundation for other year two and three modules, including the dissertation. Through the study of this module students will also develop a critical appreciation of the three case-study societies and the effects and consequences of warfare upon them;

    This module develops skills of critical thought, debate, and academic writing skills by the application of these to the body of primary and secondary literature;

    This module also develops the essential employability skills of research, presentation (written and verbal) and use of argument.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire an understanding of ancient warfare and the specific case study cultures covered by the module.

    (LO2) Acquire a critical understanding of the nature of ancient archaeological and historical source materials.

    (LO3) Develop research skills.

    (LO4) Develop skills in the use of argument and oral and written presentation.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

    (S4) Global citizenship - Ethical awareness

    (S5) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S7) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills

    (S8) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

    (S9) Numeracy/computational skills - Confidence/competence in measuring and using numbers

  • Animals in Archaeology (ALGY260)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to develop students' awareness that faunal studies are a fundamental and integral part of archaeological studies for all periods and cultures, and that they can be utilised to investigate a variety of archaeological topics such as: Site formation processes, taphonomy, environmental conditions, economics and social and religious practices; D evelop students' appreciation of the potentials and limitations of methods of recovery, analysis, interpretation and presentation of primary and secondary data, and the relevance of these factors to theoretical perspectives; Provide a supportive but stimulating environment for students to improve their abilities to communicate ideas and data to an interested 'lay' audience; Develop students' powers of observation and accurate descriptions of archaeological primary materials.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Select, synthesise and evaluate data relating to a chosen topic and communicate its significance or controversial nature to an intersted but lay audience, in a brief (10 minute) powerpoint presentation

    (LO2) Manipulate and interpret numerical primary data relating to archaeological animal bones, using case studies that include early prehistoric hunted remains and later period remains of domesticated animals.

    (LO3) Critically review the theoretical models used to manipulate and interpret those data and consider alternative methods and complementary types of evidence

    (LO4) Reach a basic level of identification skills for common types of archaeological animal bone remains and demonstrate the ability to accurately describe previously unseen material through original observations and descriptions

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S8) Information skills - Evaluation

    (S9) Numeracy/computational skills - Confidence/competence in measuring and using numbers

    (S10) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

  • Death in Ancient Egypt: Image, Text and Archaeology (ALGY270)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    In addition to the specific subject matter, the aim is to develop key skills in the understanding and application of theoretical analysis and interpretation of the Egyptian culture, such as currently applied in the field of Egyptology.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will develop an awareness and broad understanding of some key theoretical issues and concepts central to the interpretation of Egyptian culture (principles of Egyptian art, cultural conventions, anthropological theories).

    (LO2) Students  will build up their critical skills of both primary sources and secondary literature, and experiment with basic research methodological issues

    (LO3) Small group discussion of case studies will contribute to the development of the students' skills in comparative analysis of significantly different sets of sources.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S4) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

  • Egyptian Religion (ALGY257)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To develop critical and communicative skills through focus on the analysis of original primary sources (archaeological, iconographic and textual) relevant to a reconstruction of the religion of pharaonic Egypt.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The student will acquire a substantive knowledge of the gods and religious practices of ancient Egypt.

    (LO2) The student will gain an understanding of the processes of building a coherent and critical use of sources towards building an independent, evidence-based understanding of ancient religion.

    (LO3) The student will be able to communicate that independence of understanding in a coherent form.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

  • Human Osteoarchaeology (ALGY266)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To understand the use of human skeletal assemblages as archaeology and material culture. Specifically, students will develop rudimentary skills in handling, identification and develop a deep understanding of the key topics in human osteoarchaeology such as task-related indicators on the skeleton and ancient genetics.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) At the end of this module students should be able to describe the principles of handling and identification of human material remains.

    (LO2) Students will be familiar with a number of the main debates such as different approaches to reconstructing diet and DNA analysis.

    (LO3) At the end of this module students should be able to appraise the archaeological implications concerning the regulations for the retention of human materials.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Research skills - Ethical awareness

    (S3) Research skills - All Information skills

  • Making Heritage Happen (HLAC205)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    T o develop an awareness of the social, commercial and political context of the heritage industry; To gain a critical knowledge of the role of heritage professionals in development control and conservation, in national and international contexts ; To engage with the issues involved in managing collections and sites or monuments; To develop an awareness of the variety of documentation and reporting required within the heritage industry.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will understand the history of and issues concerned with the legal frameworks underlying the heritage industry.

    (LO2) Students will have an appreciation of the policy documentation necessary to implement heritage management policies concerning collections, sites and monuments and in relation to other interests such as developers and planners.

    (LO3) Students will have an understanding of the nature and effects of mechanisms to protect heritage, and the varied viewpoints regarding heritage balanced against other factors such as economics and changing cultural perspectiveshave an understanding of the nature and effects of mechanisms to protect heritage, and the varied viewpoints regarding heritage balanced against other factors such as economics and changing cultural perspectives

    (LO4) Students will be aware of the format of professional documentation necessary for heritage management.

    (LO5) Students will be developing an ability to present argument and evidence in written and oral format within a professional context.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S5) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S7) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S8) Commercial awareness - Relevant understanding of organisations

    (S9) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

  • Museums and Monuments (HLAC206)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop an awareness of the social, commercial and political context of heritage interpretation; To gain a critical knowledge of the theoretical and methodological basis of heritage interpretation, in national and international contexts; To engage with the issues involved in interpreting collections and sites or monuments to different audiences; To develop an awareness of the variety of documentation and reporting required for heritage interpretation, and the diverse language and vocabulary required for professional and public presentation purposes.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will understand the history of and cultural issues concerned with heritage interpretation.

    (LO2) Students will appreciate the policy documentation necessary to implement heritage interpretation policies concerning collections, sites and monuments and in relation to diverse audiences.

    (LO3) Students will understand the theoretical underpinning of heritage interpretation, and the varied viewpoints regarding the role of heritage in society.

    (LO4) Students will gain an awareness of the explicit and implicit cultural and political biases in heritage interpretation.

    (LO5) Students will develop an ability to present argument and evidence in written and oral format within a professional context.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience

    (S5) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S6) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S7) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S8) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S9) Commercial awareness - Relevant understanding of organisations

    (S10) Personal attributes and qualities - Willingness to take responsibility

  • Old Worlds and Work Futures: Placements in Ace (CLAH222)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop materials and / or undertake tasks within a practical or vocational context;

    To apply within that context pedagogical and other theoretical or practical knowledge relevant to the development and delivery of those materials and / or tasks;

    To apply academic and / or theoretical knowledge within a practical context and to reflect and report on the relationship between the two;

    To develop and identify a range of personal / employability skills and to reflect and report on this.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to demonstrate an ability to develop materials and / or undertake tasks, according to a given specification and requirement, within a practical or vocational context

    (LO2) Students should be able to reflect on and evaluate the efficacy of the materials developed and / or the tasks undertaken.

    (LO3) Students should be able to identify the connection between academic and / or theoretical knowledge and its practical or vocational application.

    (LO4) Students should be able to identify, reflect and report on a range of personal / employability skills.

    (S1) Improving own learning / performance - reflective practice.

    (S7) Commercial awareness - relevant understanding of organisations.

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - report writing.

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills – oral.

    (S4) Time and project management - project management.

    (S5) Information skills - networking skills.

    (S6) Personal attributes and qualities - willingness to take responsibility.

  • Plants and People in the Past: An Introduction to Archaeobotany (ALGY220)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the aims, methods and applications of archaeobotany;

    To introduce students to the wider archaeological and palaeoecological questions and issues addressed by archaeobotanical research;

    To familiarise students with the methodologies involved in archaeobotanical  s ampling, identification and data analysis;

    To develop student understanding and appreciation of archaeobotanical science applications in contemporary archaeological practice.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students successfully completing this module will be able to recognise and identify the different types of archaeobotanical remains found in archaeological contexts.

    (LO2) Students will achieve a rounded understanding of the different pathways through which archaeobotanical remains enter the archaeological record, and their different preservation conditions.

    (LO3) Students will become familiar with the key research themes and debates in archaeobotany, regarding diet, subsistence, ancient economies, vegetation change and people-environment interactions.

    (LO4) Students will develop a range of data management, quantitative and numerical skills, professional skills (including time management, health and safety procedures), research skills and other transferable skills applicable to academic and non-academic work environments including critical thinking, independent study and research, effective reporting (verbal and written expression) and awareness of controversy in research literature and debate.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Improving own learning/performance - Record-keeping

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S6) Working in groups and teams - Time management

    (S7) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (word processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S8) Numeracy/computational skills - Numerical methods

    (S9) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S10) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S11) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S12) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S13) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S14) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S15) Analytical observational skills - Scientific laboratory practices

    (S16) Skills in using technology - Information accessing

    (S17) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S18) Personal attributes and qualities - Resilience

    (S19) Personal attributes and qualities - Integrity

    (S20) Awareness of professional practices (health and safety rules for working in a laboratory environment)

  • Politics & the Architecture of Power in 5th Century Bc Athens (CLAH220)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to approach fifth-century Athenian history and archaeology by investigating contemporary or near-contemporary monuments, public spaces and literary representations in Athens of cultural and political life during a period of democratic imperialism that characterised the city between the Persian Wars and the fall of the Empire in 403 BC. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the possible relationships and issues in exploring political power, wealth, and the development of culture;

    To provide an appreciation of the built environment of Athenian fifth century political life: the role of finance in the state, the use of public writing;

    In the final third of the module you will investigate the influence of the ancient world on the development of later political systems and the infrastructure of democracies, including the construction of contemporary democratic spaces. You will also learn about the principal forms of Greek architecture and art along with their stylistic development and socio-political context;

    To improve students' critical analysis of primary sources, their writing of critical and analytical essays, and their presentation skills; and their engagement with spatial data.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will possess an improved idea of the ‘narrative’ of imperial Athens;

    (LO2) Students should be familiar with key episodes and with written and visual evidence that reflects interaction between the political environment (discrete events and political ideologies) and culture.

    (LO3) Students should be able to read and evaluate written and visual documents produced in Athens and be aware of the problems they may present as sources.

    (LO4) Students will be able to write coherent and well - argued essays, and prepare presentations, making use of documentary evidence and modern studies.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S4) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills

    (S5) Information skills - Critical reading

  • The Archaeology of Roman Britain (ALGY234)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    One of the two primary aims of this module is to introduce and to familiarise students with the range and quality of the primary evidence for the study of Roman Britain, including archaeological, literary, epigraphic, or numismatic. The second objective is to explore some of the areas in which the 'new' Roman archaeology is making a distinctive contribution to our understanding of the archaeology of Roman north-west Europe. Towards this end, a number of themes which will be explored include the transition from Iron Age Britain to a Roman province, urbanisation, aspects of the relationship between military and civilian structures, religion (including mortuary practices and the rise of Christianity), and the economy as well as the implications of these themes on the debate concerning the degree of the 'Romanisation' of Britain.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will continue to develop and deepen the areas of knowledge for which ALGY131 provided a basic foundation.

    (LO2) Students will gain a critical understanding of the nature of the discipline which will be based on the work of recent decades and will focus more on research strategies and theory than narrative descriptions.

    (LO3) Their appreciation of the range of influences on the subject will lead to a better understanding of archaeology as a whole and of the cross-disciplinary nature of scholarly research in general.

    (LO4) In particular students will learn to use Roman archaeology as a vehicle for studying processes which have a great deal of modern relevance, including the relationship of literary and sub-literary texts to archaeological evdience as well as what is 'acculturation', the relationship between town and country along with the ways that archaeology can illustrate and explain both common and disparate cultural traditions in north-west Europe.

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S2) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S3) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

Programme Year Three

Students take the core modules including the dissertation (equivalent to two modules), which is a subject of the student’s choice researched in depth. Students choose two optional modules in Semester One and three optional modules in Semester Two. At least two of the selected optional modules chosen should be related to the dissertation topic.

Students then choose two modules relating to each of the two civilisations studied at Year Two (Near East, and/or Greece and Rome, and/or Egypt).

Year Three Compulsory Modules

  • Archaeology and Heritage in Contemporary Society: Ethical and Political Issues (ALGY399)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To develop an awareness of the political and ethical issues related to aspects of heritage management; 
 To learn to identify competing conflicts of interest related to human rights, national and group identity, professional and commercial development and claims to authority; To explore the ramifications of following particular courses of action in relation to specific real-world case studies.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the ethical problems of heritage management

    (LO2) An understanding of the political problems of heritage management

    (LO3) An appreciation of conflicts of interest in heritage management

    (LO4) An understanding of the nature of the legal framework for the protection of heritage assets in the UK and abroad

    (S1) An understanding of the ethics and politics related to the protection of heritage

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) – Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Global citizenship – Cultural awareness

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving – Critical analysis

    (S5) Commercial awareness – an understanding of the competing commercial interests in heritage management

    (S6) Global citizenship – Ethical awareness

  • Dissertation (ALGY450)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The purpose of the dissertation is to demonstrate that the student can identify a research-related issue or problem;

    Students will work independently to design and conduct a scheme of work to explore their chosen research question;

    Students will assemble and analyse both academic literature (references) and primary evidence (sources) to explore their chosen research question;

    Students will present a coherent set of data and arguments in order to analyse and interpret the data.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module students will be able to use appropriate research tools and techniques.

    (LO2) By the end of the module, students will be able to present information and interpretations clearly and systematically, and produce a text written and presented to a professional standard.

    (LO3) By the end of the module, students will be able to cite sources and use appropriate academic conventions for referencing them.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S4) Time and project management - Personal organisation

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Analytical Methods in Archaeology (ALGY397)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This module is designed to provide an introduction to the scientific techniques, other than dating methods, currently used in archaeological research. The main emphasis is on the application of these techniques, their potential and limitations and the forms of data produced.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain an understanding of how and when it is appropriate to use the different analytical methods available.

    (LO2) Students will learn how different analytical techniques are employed within archaeology

    (LO3) Students will acquire knowledge of the basic scientific principles involved in analysis, sufficient to be able to appreciate the potential of future developments in techniques.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Information skills - Critical reading

  • Ancient Greek Colonisation and British Imperial Thought (ALGY336)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    This module provides an overview of the expansion of Greek culture into all areas of the Mediterranean and Black Sea areas as a result of colonial expansion in the archaic period (8th to 6th centuries BC) and the thematic study of the general methods, processes and outcomes of the colonisation movement; Students will also acquire a considerable subject-specific knowledge of the history and archaeology of the subject and will develop a critical awareness of the broader issues in the study of classical archaeology and thematic issues connected with migration in all periods; This module develops skills of critical thought, debate, and academic writing skills by the application of these to the body of primary and secondary literature surrounding Archaic Greek colonisation and British scholarship of that process in the Twentieth Century; This module also develops the essential employability skills of presentation (written, verbal, visual), team-working and use of ITC.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire an understanding of the Greek colonial movement in the archaic period (8th to 6th centuries BC) and become familiar with its chronological, geographical and cultural framework, including key archaeological sites and historical sources.

    (LO2) Acquire a critical understanding of British imperial thought in the Twentieth Century, how this has affected scholarship of Greek colonisation in the West, and what this tells us about the construction of archaeological and historical knowledge about the ancient past.

    (LO3) Develop skills in the critical application of both archaeological and historical source materials in answering questions about the ancient world and to practice critical thought and discussion.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience

    (S6) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S7) Working in groups and teams - Time management

    (S8) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S9) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S10) Research skills - All Information skills

  • Economic Archaeology and Anthropology (ALGY362)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the history of economic thought from ancient times to the present day;

    To introduce students to key issues and concepts in the field of economic anthropology;

    To introduce students to the theory and applications of economic archaeology through case studies drawn from various periods of the human past, focusing on the comparative analysis of past economies;

    To enable students to achieve a theoretically and empirically grounded understanding of key anthropological and archaeological concepts in the study of human economics;

    To enhance student appreciation of key intellectual and methodological issues arising from evaluating different theoretical approaches and sources of evidence as pathways for understanding human economic behaviours past and present;

    To foster the development of student critical thinking and analytical approach to evidence and the combined use of different sources of evidence;

    To promote the development of student ability to construct and express effective verbal and written argument.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Achieve an understanding of how an anthropologically-informed understanding of human economic systems can increase our understanding of the diversity, function and historical context of past economies, and the evolution of human economic behaviours through time, from prehistory to the present. This will be achieved through the exploration of relevant bodies of anthropological and economic theory complemented by the study of relevant archaeological case studies from different time periods and world regions.

    (LO2) Appreciate some of the analytical and methodological issues arising from the use of theoretical approaches in conjunction with appropriate anthropological, historical and archaeological evidence, as sources for understanding human socioeconomics.

    (LO3) Understand the nature of, and intellectual challenges presented by, integrated anthropological and archaeological approaches to the comparative analysis of past economic systems.

    (LO4) Develop transferable skills, applicable to academic and non-academic environments, such as independent reading and research, critical evaluation of contrasting arguments and sources of evidence; effective and concise verbal and written expression; critical thinking; awareness of controversy in literature and debate; time-management.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Working in groups and teams - Time management

  • Geoarchaeology (ENVS392)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    To provide an understanding the principles and methods of the application of the earth sciences in archaeological investigations.

    To develop an appreciation of the value of a multidisciplinary scientific approach to understanding landscape evolution during archaeological investigations

    To provide an understanding of the principles and methods of archaeological sciences in archaeological investigations.

    To develop an understanding of the techniques used in archaeological sciences during investigation of artefacts and their geological significance .

    To gain experience in the use of multiple data sets from different scientific disciplines used in archaeological analyses.

    To develop experience in communicating between multiple disciplines and both scientifically literate specialist and non-specialist audiences.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand the different aspects of geoarchaeology and scientific archaeology

    (LO2) Know the range of different practical analyses that can be used in geoarchaeological and archaeometric investigations

    (LO3) Understand how and where to apply multiple datasets in geoarchaeological and archaeometric investigations

    (LO4) Critically evaluate competing theories of landscape and palaeoenvironmental development

    (LO5) Critically evaluate the benefits of different techniques and be able to assess the appropriate scientific techniques to answer archaeological questions

    (LO6) Assess and communicate the level of certainty in predictions from imperfect datasets

    (LO7) Use different microscopy techniques to recognise important minerals and alteration products

    (LO8) Use data from a range of scientific methods to interpret landscape and palaeoenvironmental influences, source materials and chronology

    (LO9) Use and correlate stratigraphic data from archaeological sites

    (LO10) Presentation skills for written and oral work and communication of scientific data to different audiences

    (LO11) Working collaboratively to summarise and share information effectively during development of an online resource

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S5) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S6) Numeracy/computational skills - Problem solving

    (S7) Skills in using technology - Online communications skills

  • International Relations in the Ancient World (ALGY364)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To f acilitate students developing a clear understanding of international relations between Egypt and the Near East during the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), with a particular emphasis on the structures and processes of those relations; To h elp students gain a critical appreciation of common approaches to International Relations Theory by their application to Late Bronze Age contexts; To help students develop an understanding of the critical use of sources towards building an independent, evidence-based understanding of ancient society, and communicating that independence of understanding in a coherent form.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students successfully completing this module will gain a good understanding of the history and archaeology of Egypt and the Near East in the Late Bronze Age with a particular focus on international relations.

    (LO2) Students successfully completing this module will gain a basic understanding of the principal schools of thought in International Relations, their distinguishing characteristics and their relative strengths and weaknesses.

    (LO3) Students successfully completing this module will gain considerable experience in critically reflecting on the problem of applying interpretive frames of reference developed in modern Western contexts to pre-modern and/or non-Western contexts.

    (LO4) Students successfully completing this module will gain a good understanding of how to read and interpret ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern texts in translation and to use these texts critically in the construction of socio-political and historical arguments.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

  • Iron Age Europe: Beyond the Celts (ALGY358)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The aims of the module are to provide a detailed understanding of Later European Prehistory, the types of archaeological evidence encountered, and how to employ critical method in approaching this material.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the primary archaeological evidence, and an understanding of the different types of social organisation that characterise the Iron Age in Britain and beyond.

    (LO2) Demonstrate advanced study skills, such as the ability to undertake a course of relevant reading, prepare for tutorial sessions with their supervisor, and lead seminar discussions.

    (LO3) Present their own arguments in seminars and essays, supported by relevant case studies and original analysis, and show a critical awareness of how these develop current debates in the field.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

  • Past, Present and Future: Global Questions, Answers From Antiquity and the Value of the Past (ALGY383)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to prepare students for life after graduation by providing a place in which they can bring together the various subjects that they have learned about and also reflect upon the relevance of knowledge about the past for wider debates about the present and future of humanity;

    To provide additional intellectual training in how to use knowledge and understanding of episodes in human history to inform debate about issues of global importance;

    To enhance employability by preparing students to be able to draw on their knowledge and skills to examine and present crucial issues of wide concern to employers including business, the heritage sector, education, NGO's, local and national governments, policy groups;

    Provide students with the intellectual context to reflect on their academic experiences and bring their expertise to classroom discussion;

    Inspire and enable them to be thoughtful and articulate ambassadors for the ancient world / the value of learning from the past / the value of the ancient world.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Articulate how our disciplines can inform debate surrounding several major issues facing humanity.

    (LO2) Critically discuss the potential and limitations of making inferences from specific historic examples to contemporary context.

    (LO3) Communicate clearly a detailed understanding of one particular global question/societal question to a non-specialist audience.

    (LO4) Reflect upon and illustrate how the knowledge acquired during the course of their degree enables them to evaluate and discuss these issues.

    (S1) Develop resilience and time management for self-directed research

    (S2) Share knowledge effectively in digital format and show ability to acquire new skills with technology

    (S3) Identify problems and evaluate answers and solutions

    (S4) Communicate information more effectively in written and visual form to a non-specialist audience

    (S5) Collaborate and work with others

  • Settlement Archaeology in Egypt (ALGY376)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To develop critical and communicative skills through focusing on the analysis of original primary sources (archaeological and textual) relevant to a reconstruction of the nature and organisation of settlement in ancient Egypt; To develop an understanding of the critical use of sources towards building an independent, evidence-based understanding of ancient society, and communicating that independence of understanding in a coherent form. These skills are the primary basis for structuring research thinking and the construction of research projects.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module students will have improved their skills in critical reading and in the assessment/analysis of specific detail to be found in the primary sources of all types, in the light of the more general discussions about theoretical approaches to the study of urbanisation and the nature of ancient settlements and society.

    (LO2) By the end of the module students will have improved their skills in critical reading and in the assessment/analysis of specific detail to be found in the primary sources of all types, in the light of the more general discussions about theoretical approaches to the study of urbanisation and the nature of ancient settlements and society.

    (LO3) By the end of the module students will have improved their skills in critical reading and in the assessment/analysis of specific detail to be found in the primary sources of all types, in the light of the more general discussions about theoretical approaches to the study of urbanisation and the nature of ancient settlements and society.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

  • Social Life in Egypt (ALGY377)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To deepen knowledge of the primary record from pharaonic Egypt;

    To develop analytical skills;

    To develop communicative writing based on personal understanding;

    To broaden understanding of the differences of cultural and behavioural norms of different societies, ancient and modern.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The student will be able to show a broad knowledge of a broad range of data from pharaonic Egypt

    (LO2) The student will demonstate the integration of detail derived from a wide range of primary data into a narrative or argument, both oral and written, and display a clear understanding of the limitations of specific data and the conclusions drawn from it.

    (LO3) The student will demonstrate a problem-solving approach in communicating knowledge of data and understanding of methodology in writing.

    (LO4) The student will develop an evidence-based picture of the realities of life - physical and social - in pharaonic Egypt, within a wider anthropological and sociological picture of the cultural norms of non-western and ancient socities

    (LO5) The student will develop an explicit awareness of the nature of evidence-based research for description and generalisation about pharaonic Egypt

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

  • Sumerian Language and Literature (ALGY386)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    This module aims to teach students the basic grammar and cuneiform writing system of Sumerian;

    To foster awareness of the basic principles of reading a variety of Sumerian cuneiform inscriptions within their cultural contexts.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the course, successful students will be able to transliterate and translate different types of cuneiform inscriptions written in Sumerian.

    (LO2) Students successfully completing the module will be able to analyze the material grammatically.

    (LO3) Students will be able to contextualize all of the assigned texts in their cultural and historical contexts.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Improving own learning/performance - Personal action planning

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S4) Personal attributes and qualities - Resilience

  • The Origins of Agriculture and Sedentism in the Near East (ALGY356)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To examine the development of agriculture, pastoralism and sedentism, all features fundamental to the development of complex and modern society;

    To understand the nature of Neolithic societies in the Near East and thus the social context for and response to the development of agriculture;

    To question when these phenomena appeared, why they might have appeared and how human societies responded to their new opportunities and pressures;

    To develop an understanding of the problems and potential of archaeological methodologies in gaining an understanding of these changes and knowledge of ancillary disciplines relating to palaeoenvironmental studies, archaeobotany and palaeozoology;

    To develop students' critical and analytical approaches to evidence and the combined use of different sources of evidence;

    To develop student's ability to construct and express effective verbal and written argument;

    To provide opportunities for students to reflect on verbal and written feedback;

    To promote identification, recall and deployment of material relevant to a particular question;

    To promote awareness of controversy in technical literature;

    To promote succinct written exposition.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain knowledge of the development of the first sedentary and agricultural societies, the transition from Palaeolithic foragers to Neolithic farmers,and critical skills relating to the handling of evidence relevant to these issues and to much of the interpretation of prehistoric archaeology.

    (LO2) Students will develop knowledge of archaeological methodologies applied in the study of agricultural origins, including palaeoenvironmental studies, archaeozoology, archaeobotany, human osteoarchaeology.

    (LO3) Students will develop an understanding of developments in archaeological theory, through an understanding of how those dveelopment has affected interpretations of origins of agriculture.

    (LO4) Students will develop their critical and analytical skills in handling evidence, evaluating the arguments of others and integrating diverse evidence sets.

    (LO5) Students will develop their abilityto construct and express effective and succinct verbal and written argument

    (LO6) Students will develop their ability to reflect on verbal feedback on their work and deploy it to improve their work

    (LO7) Students will develop their ability to identify, recall and deploy material relevant to a particular question

    (LO8) Students will develop their ability to identify and evaluate controversy in archaeological and other literature

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S7) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S8) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S9) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S10) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S11) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S12) Information skills - Critical reading

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

Your learning will flourish through lectures, seminar discussions, practical classes, oral presentations and tutorial sessions, encompassing both individual study and group work. You’ll be working with a wide range of evidence including ancient texts in translation and physical remains. Students on archaeological programmes may have the opportunity to take placements in the Garstang Museum of Archaeology or National Museums Liverpool. Single Honours and Joint Honours students can develop an individual piece of research on a topic of your own by undertaking a dissertation in the final year. An academic adviser will help you focus on and hone the topic, and meet with you regularly to discuss progress and direction.

Students will have the opportunity to develop practical skills in archaeology and/or museology. With staff currently engaged at excavations in Greece, Turkey, Jordan, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Zambia (to name a few), many of our students have been able to gain their experience further afield.