About

Our research activities span a range of areas in materials chemistry including porous materials, polymer synthesis, emulsions, nanoparticles, gas clathrates and supercritical fluids. Recently, we have also applied atomistic simulations to understand structure and properties in porous solids and other materials. Our overarching, long-term goal is to produce structures with functions that cannot be obtained in known classes of materials.

Our group is particularly interested in functional materials such as nanoporous polymers and clathrates, conjugated microporous polymers (CMPs) [1] (including their use in CO2capture [2]), porous organic cages [3], organic and metal nanoparticles [4], ‘dry water’ [5], and macroporous materials; for example in the delivery of active substances [6]. We also develop ‘high throughput’ methodologies to accelerate the materials discovery process.

The group is a large and diverse group composed of Ph.D. students and Postdoctoral Researchers from a broad range of countries. We offer an interdisciplinary environment where it is possible for researchers to learn about areas outside of their immediate interests and to apply these concepts to their own research. Likewise, we have researchers working at a broad range of length scales ranging from materials which are structured at the atomic level up to meso- and macrostructures where the characteristic length scales are on the order of nanometers or microns. We are always interested in hearing from ambitious and highly motivated researchers - further details of specific areas can be found on our web pages and the publications listed there.

Our research is supported by a number of bodies including EPSRC, TSB and industry.

The Liverpool Materials Chemistry Group

Our group is part of the Liverpool Material Chemistry Group which includes as members John Claridge, Steve RannardMatt Rosseinsky and Haifei Zhang. We are also affiliated with the Stephenson Institute for Renewable Energy. We collaborate with academic and industrial colleagues in areas such as computation, specific physical characterization techniques, and the development of materials in end-use applications.