Sheneez Amara

Postgraduate Research Student

S.Amara@liverpool.ac.uk


Biography

Sheneez was awarded with a BA in Latin American studies from the University of Liverpool. After this she achieved her MRes in Latin American studies from the same university.

Research Interests

Thesis Title

"Unsettling the Norms of Academic Research" 

Sheneez is currently working on a project that critically examines the normative methods of academic research practices and their epistemological and philosophical roots in European colonial and imperial pasts. The aim of Sheneez's research is to question that which we take for granted within our universities as "valid" knowledge and "valid" knowledge production processes. As a student of Latin American Studies from undergraduate through to PhD, Sheneez's work has a particular angle of critiquing, or "unsettling" (Wynter, 2008), the coloniality of Latin American Studies courses in Europe and the coloniality of much of the research on Latin America that is produced here (although Sheneez’s reflections comment upon mainstream academic research cultures in general). Sheneez is particularly interested in Sylvia Wynter's many philosophical contributions and reflections on the "intellectual struggle" and how academics/researchers must direct our work towards "undoing the narratively condemned status" of the world's most oppressed people (Wynter, 1994).”

Research Funding

Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and North West Doctoral Training Centre (NWDTC)

Christina Balaska

Postgraduate Research Student

c.balaska@liverpool.ac.uk


Biography

Christina completed a BA in English Language and Literature at the University of Athens and a Master’s degree in Education Management and Leadership at the University of Roehampton. More recently, Christina has completed an MRes in Italian Studies at the University of Liverpool, conducting a sociolinguistics project entitled: Family Language Policy in Italian Transnational Families in the UK: Parental Ideologies and Language Management Challenges.

Outside academia, Christina has taught English for Academic Purposes in UK universities including UCL Institute of Education, Coventry University London and Liverpool John Moores University.

Research Interests 

Thesis Title

Family Language Policy in Arabic-speaking Immigrant and Refugee Families in Greece: An Exploration of Parental Ideologies and Identity Formation.

In her research, Christina investigates Family Language Policy (FLP) in Arabic-speaking immigrant and refugee families that have arrived in Greece post-2015 as a result of the political unrest in the Middle East. The investigation focuses on how the migratory experiences of the parents have influenced their linguistic practices and the ethnolinguistic identity of their children highlighting the complexities that parents and their children face in transnational spaces. Qualitative research methods will be employed to study the linguistic practices and language ideologies of the participants including sociolinguistic questionnaires, observations, and interviews. This sociolinguistic study aims at expanding the theoretical development of the sociolinguistics of globalisation and transnational approaches to the study of FLP among immigrant families. Christina’s objective is to influence current discourses on migration in Greece and inform policy making.

Christina’s wider research interests include language attitudes and ideologies, language politics, transnationalism, and immigration.

Research Funding

School of Histories, Languages and Cultures scholarship

Manel Boualhia

Postgraduate Research Student

manel.boulahia@liverpool.ac.uk 


Biography

Manel Boulahia is a full-time PhD student, under the supervision of Professor Robert Blackwood and Dr Stefania Tufi.

Completed a Bachelor's Degree in Linguistics, in 2016, at the University of Mouloud Mammeri of Tizi-Ouzou, Algeria.
Completed a Master's Degree in Language and and Communication, in 2018, after having completed a Dissertation entitled: The Use of English in the Algerian Business Sphere: A Sociolinguistic Analysis of Some Names of Algerian Brands and Companies, under the Supervision of Professor Fodil Mohamed Sadek.

Completed a PhD Pre-sessional programme at the Canterbury Christ Church University from January 2019 to June 2019.

Research Interests

Thesis Title 

"Competition Between the English Language and the Tamazight and French Languages in Algeria: A myth or a Reality?"

In my doctoral research, I intend to investigate the impact the visibility of the English language in the Algerian Linguistic Landscape might have on the positions Tamazight (also known as Berber) and French languages. The research adopts a case study at the Algerian capital Algiers.

Research Funding

Funded by the Algerian Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research, via the Algerian Consulate in London.

Michelle Buras-Stubbs

Postgraduate Research Student

M.Buras-Stubbs@liverpool.ac.uk


Biography

Michele’s first degree was in Medieval and Modern Languages from the University of Oxford in 1983. She then completed a Post Graduate Certificate for Education, again at the University of Oxford. She subsequently spent most of her working life in secondary education culminating in the roles of Secondary Headteacher, Ofsted Inspector and Education Consultant. In 1994, while working full time, she obtained a MBA Distinction from the University of Keele. In 2017 she returned to academia and completed a MRes in Modern Languages and Cultures (French Studies) at the University of Liverpool for which she obtained a Distinction. Her dissertation explored the representations of Saracen warriors from a chivalric perspective in two late-medieval French texts from the Library of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy: the account of the battle of Nicopolis in Book IV of Froissart’s Chroniques, and the anonymous mise en proseSaladin.

Following the successful completion of her MRes, Michele started her PhD at the University of Liverpool in April 2019.

Research Interests

Thesis Title

An exploration of the reflexive and determining nature of the interrelationship between crusader and Saracen identities as represented in French texts acquired or commissioned by Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, and members of his court.

Michele’s research examines the reciprocal nature of the identities of Saracen and crusader as represented in works from the libraries of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, and members of his court.  

Late-medieval representations of Saracen warriors have at their heart a deep ambiguity. The existence of a threatening or oppressive Saracen – militarily, politically, theologically - is a pre-requisite for crusade; the nature of the medieval Christian crusader’s perception of his Saracen opponent helps determine both the shape and legitimacy of the crusader’s own identity. The very secular qualities, however, which underpin the chivalric and courtly aspirations of the crusader as applied to himself, provide an uncomfortable dislocation from a dogmatically deviant image, when applied to a cultured, and economically and militarily successful, infidel opponent.  

The court of Philip the Good provides a nexus for the exploration of the reflexive and determining nature of the interrelationship between crusader and Saracen identities. The concept of crusade preoccupied Philip both practically and ideologically throughout his adult life. He sought to position himself politically as a powerful leader willing to lead Christendom into a battle against the infidels, whilst seeking to underpin his actions with an intellectual rationale. As a cultured bibliophile, he acquired and commissioned an extensive collection of manuscripts. The crusade-related texts within his library, and those of members of his court, offer a key to the interplay between contemporary perceptions of Saracen opponents and their impact on the self-perceptions of members of the Burgundian court as crusaders.

Michele’s research offers a fresh perspective to existing scholarship on late medieval French crusading literature; it also has great relevance within the current global climate of tension between Western and Islamic politics and ideologies. It seeks to provide both a realignment of focus on representations of the past (albeit themselves presented through the prism of literary interpretation) and to offer a model for comparison with contemporary post-colonial twenty-first-century ambiguities and tensions within Western and Islamic relationships.

Martina Delfino 

Postgraduate Research Student

martina.delfino@liverpool.ac.uk 


Thesis Title

Portuguese Language Spread: an analysis of the relationships among policies of Portuguese language promotion 

Biography

After achieving a bachelor’s degree with Honours at the University of Turin (Italy) with the dissertation Antonio Tabucchi: postmodern kaleidoscope. The last three days of Fernando Pessoa, I completed a master’s degree with Honours at the University of Bologna (Italy) with the dissertation Portuguese Language in Brazilian language policies supervised by Dr Roberto Mulinacci and Dr Carlos Alberto Faraco (University of Paraná, Brazil). 

During the studies, I participated in competitive exchange programs and I achieved the opportunity to study at the Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Lisbon, Portugal) for one year and at the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Florianópolis, Brazil) for six months where I contributed to the organization of the VII International Meeting of Language policy researchers. 

I am currently a member of the Associação Internacional de Lusitanistas and the Society for Latin American Studies. 

Outside academia, I have been passionately involved in language teaching as Portuguese and Italian language Tutor for public and private institutions.

Research Interests

The research project positions itself in the interdisciplinary field of language policy studies. It will be originally aiming at gaining a deep understanding of the policies of international promotion of the Portuguese language formulated by Portugal, Brazil, and the Community of Portuguese Language Countries (CPLP).  

The starting point of this research is a strong personal interest in the Portuguese language and in the postcolonial political relationships existing among the nine official Portuguese-speaking countries around the world. The research will benefit from a transdisciplinary analysis and data will be collected through a mix of qualitative methods. 

Research Funding

School of Histories, Languages and Culture scholarship 

 

Holly Dempster-Edwards

Postgraduate Research Student

h.dempster-edwards@liverpool.ac.uk 


Thesis Title

Gender, Race, Emotions and Text-Image Relations in Fifteenth-Century Burgundian Prose Epics and Chronicles

Biography

In 2019, I graduated with a First-Class BA (Hons) in French and Spanish from St Hilda's College at the University of Oxford, before spending a year teaching these languages at an international boarding school. 

I then undertook an MA Medieval Studies at the University of Leeds, graduating with a Distinction. Under the supervision of Professor Rosalind Brown-Grant, I wrote a dissertation entitled 'Emotions and Gender in Berte as grans piés and L’Histoire de la Reine Berthe et du Roy Pepin’.

I arrived at Liverpool in October 2021, and am carrying out a PhD in French under the supervision of Dr Rebecca Dixon and Dr Pollie Bromilow.

Research Interests

My current research is in the field of the History of Emotions, in particular in the later prose texts produced at the court of Philip the Good of Burgundy (r. 1419-1467). These are versions of verse texts from earlier centuries, reworked for a fifteenth-century Burgundian audience, which often took the form of lavishly illuminated manuscripts, so my research also focuses on text/image relations. I am interested in French epics and chronicles from across the Middle Ages, especially texts that deal with the themes of crusading, cross-cultural relations, and the identity categories of gender, race and religion. 

Research Funding

My PhD is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) via the North West Consortium Doctoral Training Partnership (NWCDTP).

 

Erika Drummond

Postgraduate Research Student

E.Drummond@liverpool.ac.uk


Biography

Erika achieved her BA in Latin American studies during her time at the University of Liverpool. She then recieved an ESRC scholarship to commence her MRes and PhD relating to her interests in Mexico and Guatemala.

Outside of her studies, Erika has spent a lot of time researching in Guatemala and interacting with local communities there.

Research Interests

Thesis Title

"Maternal mortality, reproductive risk, and obstetric violence: the pregnancy and childbirth experiences of the ‘otherised’ women in Guatemala"

Erika's research focuses on how Guatemalan women’s maternal health and child-birthing experiences reflect deep rooted processes of socio-cultural discrimination and gender based violence, which undermine their health and wellbeing. Previously, her research has emphasised the ways in which maternal mortality in Guatemala has made the conversation around childbirth incredibly emotive and politically charged in ways which have ‘otherised’ women and midwives, and reinvigorated social hierarchies within the health care setting. However, since beginning fieldwork in August 2017, rather than emphasising the ‘marginality’ of midwives, Erika's focus has been on highlighting the crucially political role that they play in their communities. This aspect of her work thus seeks to explore the very relevant position that midwives occupy in present day Guatemala, and how their work provides invaluable emotional and physical support for impoverished women, in ways which are culturally empowering to themselves, their patients and their communities.

Research Funding

Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)

Sarah Ellis

Postgraduate Research Student

S.L.Ellis@liverpool.ac.uk


Biography

I am a Postgraduate Researcher and Graduate Teaching Assistant at the University of Liverpool, who fuses together a Spanish Golden Age literary phenomenon known as the picaresque, with modern-day Spanish national identity in times of political and socioeconomic crisis and corruption through exploring the shift in the lexical metamorphism of the term "picaresque" throughout key transitional moments past and present.

As of July 2022, I successfully passed my 30,000-word thesis and viva voce exam to be awarded a Master of Arts (MA) by Research in Spanish Literature through the University of Leeds. Prior to this, I graduated from the University of Exeter in 2017 with a BA (Hons) in Spanish and Italian with proficiency in Portuguese after also having completed a year abroad split between Salamanca, Spain and Venice, Italy.

I actively look for opportunities where I can disseminate my research, having presented at several conferences including Oxford University’s CLSG 2021 conference; with a subsequent publication in CLSG’s The Glass Academic Journal to follow, Leeds’ LCS Postgraduate Conference, Durham Castle’s 2021 conference and the 2021 CELPYC virtual conference.

Research Interests 

Thesis Title

‘Lexical Metamorphism of the Picaresque: Mapping Crisis, Criminality and the Catalan Question through its Evolving Identity’

Spanish literature in the XVI and XVII centuries, the picaresque, the Spanish Golden Age, Lazarillo de Tormes, the neopicaresque, Spanish national identity, regionalism in Spain, the transition from Francoist Spain to democracy, modern-day Spain, Spanish politics.

Research Funding 

Sponsored internally by the Newton Bequest Graduate Teaching Assistant Scholarship in Iberian and Latin American Studies.

Louise Evans

Postgraduate Research Student

hslevan6@liverpool.ac.uk  


Biography

Louise earned both her BA in English & Hispanic Studies, and her MRes in Hispanic Studies, at University of Liverpool. Her MRes focused on the ways in which Spanish Instagram poetry (Instapoesía) is changing the face of contemporary literature through certain linguistic and visual changes afforded by the digital medium. Through analysis of a shorter, more concise style and the permeation of ‘el lenguaje informático,’ her research examined the ways in which contemporary digital poetry is changing not only the role of the reader, but the ‘acto de observar’ itself (Vilariño Picos: 2013).

Outside of her studies, Louise works as a Spanish Advisor for the University’s Language Lounge, assisting students by providing grammatical and conversational sessions. She is also learning French through the University’s Continuing Education department. She often writes about poetry published through social media (albeit in the Anglophone context) for monthly Brizo Magazine.

Research Interests

Thesis Title 

" ‘Tu cuerpo en verso:’ the representation of sexuality, (modern) relationships and the female body in Spanish Instagram poetry."

Not only to advertise but to publish their own poetry, a new generation of Spanish poets is transforming the art form by claiming digital media as its writing space. During his Peers Annual Lecture at the University of Liverpool in 2017, the great poeta de la experiencia Luis García Montero contemplated how Spanish lyricists are beginning to write with great entity, searching for ‘their own space.’ This ‘new space’ is allowing this phenomenon to become the most accessible form of literature in contemporary Hispanic consciousness, something which is making Maher ‘excited about [the trend’s] new capacity for poets to build something… toward larger change’ (2018).

This multi-faceted, virtual environment becomes a useful site to project societal concerns, rather than an online environment whose purpose is confined solely to the field of self-expression. Employing post-feminist and digital media critical theory (Kinnahan, 2005, Dobson, 2015 & Jackson, 2018) Louise’s research will aim to articulate the complexities of a feminine subject position in a Spanish, digital society.

Ultimately, acknowledging this genre of poetry as a valid part of literary culture in a broad sense, is beneficial as it ‘develop[s] an understanding of the literary that is adequate to the digital age because it takes into account the multiplicities and convergences of contemporary media culture’ (Schaefer, 2015: 179). The linguistic and visual representations of modern relationships and the female body through digital poetry address contemporary identity issues, whilst reworking or reclaiming traditional and historical poetic styles. Particularly salient to the research group ‘Media Histories: from Manuscript to Digital,’ at University of Liverpool, Louise’s project will charter a literary trajectory that is socially, culturally and intellectually relevant to the academic discourse of today.

Research Funding

E. Allison Peers Scholarship

Athanasia Francis

Postgraduate Research Student

athanasia.francis@liverpool.ac.uk

Biography

Athanasia (Nancy) was awarded with a BA (Hons) in English Language and Literature and a Master’s degree in European Studies. She holds a second Master’s degree in Social Anthropology and History focusing on gender and sexuality, and has worked as a field ethnographer in Greece. Nancy also holds a PGCert in History and Archaeology from the University of Leicester, focusing on phenomenological approaches and women’s history. She was awarded a European scholarship in 2004-5 for studies at the University of Cologne, and has attained First Class Honours awards across all degrees.

Outside academia, Nancy is a qualified teacher in the UK, has worked in education for over a decade, and has co-ordinated European student projects (Comenius- eTwinning). She has also worked in the heritage sector in audience engagement and learning programmes for several London museums, parallel to her work in refugee support services as a caseworker for refugee women seeking asylum in the UK. Nancy is a (trans)feminist activist involved in migrant women and non-binary people activist initiatives, and an advocate for campaign groups in support of European citizens in the UK post-Referendum. 

Research Interests

Thesis Title 

"Ahizpatasuna, Sororidad, Sisterhood: Embodied Entanglements of Iberian Feminisms and Transnational Socio-Political Claims in the Redefinition of Contemporary Political Agency- An Ethnography of Resistance, Othering and Belonging"

In this comparative approach, the researcher will follow the newly added and resurfaced initiatives in contemporary Basque/Iberian feminist activism, particularly as expressed after women’s general strike on 8th March 2018. This unprecedented coming together of the 8M Huelga/Greba, shortly followed by equally impressive demonstrations against the judiciary treatment of the Pamplona rape case of the male group calling themselves ‘La Manada’ in April 2018, suggested a new era in political reconfigurations. This paradigm shift was put forward by women and non-binary people in every major town in Spain and in the Basque Country, but also transnationally, including Latin America as well as the UK. In both cases, the enormous mobilisation brought together women and non-binary people from different backgrounds and political identifications under a unified feminist banner against systemic oppression and gender-based violence, redefining the political and its priorities in public discourse through the lens of their feminism and beyond national boundaries. Feminist activists in local and international groups aligned their specific interests to wider agendas, through solidarity against violence, illegal abortions, exploitation under neoliberal capitalism, and the rise of fascist, xenophobic discourse. Through the lens of a phenomenological paradigm, with its emphasis on corporeal and subjective lived experiences, combined with the multimodality of visual and digital anthropology, and applying sensuous ethnography, this project will trace the identifications and creative operations of feminist activists in initiatives that transform the notion of the ‘political’ and its resistance potential as advocated in these feminisms.

Research Funding

E. Allison Peers Scholarship 

 

Thomas Lockwood

Postgraduate Research Student

T.Lockwood@liverpool.ac.uk 


Biography

Tom graduated from the University of Bangor with a BA (MArts) History and Archaeology in 2016 and went on to complete a Documentary Filmmaking MA at John Moore’s University in 2018.

Research Interests

Thesis Title

"Sinistro o spettacolo: A re-evaluation of the critical response to poliziotteschi."

In his research, Tom aims to analyse and re-evaluate the critical reaction to poliziotteschi films by analysing reviews and articles in Italian newspapers, magazines, fanzines and journals during the initial release of the films in the 1970s to now. This re-evaluation will allow for a deeper understanding of the critic response to these films than currently understood in modern discourse, in which discussions of the critic reaction to this filone are often over-simplified due to a lack of current research on this topic.

 

Joanna Morley

Postgraduate Research Student

Joanna.Morley@liverpool.ac.uk

researchgate.net/profile/Joanna_Morley3

 


Biography

After careers in marketing and book publishing, I completed an MA in Understanding and Securing Human Rights at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies (School of Advanced Study, University of London) in 2015, during which time I also interned as a research assistant at the Human Rights Consortium. I completed an MRes in Social Research at University of Liverpool in September 2018 as part of the ESRC funded NWSSDTC 1+3 research pathway, moving on to begin my PhD research in October 2018. I was also Vice President of the Postgraduates in Latin American Studies (PILAS) Committee 2017/18 responsible for delivering the PILAS Annual Conference at University of Liverpool in June 2018. I live and work in London. 

Research Interests

I research and deliver guest lectures to both BA and MA students on the subject of Sustainable Development in Latin America and my particular research focus is in the area of natural resource governance, socio-environmental conflicts and the green energy transition. I have published articles on environmental governance in Brazil and the Amazon fires as ecocide (2020), environmental governance, sustainable development and oil in Ecuador (2017), as well as on Nicaragua's Grand Canal Project (2018).

Thesis Title 

"Social Understandings of the ‘Ecological Transition’ and the contested politics of Renewable Energy and Natural Resource Exploitation in Ecuador"

This research will explore attempts to diversify Ecuador’s energy matrix away from traditional fossil fuels, focusing specifically on the promotion of renewable energy projects in the country. The research is interview-based and will be conducted initially online from the UK, and also during a fieldwork trip to Ecuador, to allow for empirical data collected from local communities and people connected to energy projects, including NGO, industry, company and government representatives at the national and local level), as well as commentators on the energy transition in Ecuador and Latin America

The research aims to understand how renewable projects redefine the political landscapes and social understandings of sustainable energy development at the national and local level, and what this reveals about the localisation of debates surrounding natural resource exploitation and governance within global sustainable development and climate mitigation policies. It aims to bring a discussion of renewable energy projects to the academic debates surrounding socio-environmental conflicts and natural resource governance in Latin America, within the context of international governance agendas of sustainable development in the context of the post pandemic green recovery, negotiated within varied power dynamics at the international, national and local level.

Research Funding

Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)

NWSSDTC 1+3 pathway

Research Centre Membership

  • Society for Latin American Studies (SLAS)
  • Latin American Studies Association (LASA)
  • Human Rights Researcher’s Network (HRRN)
  • ENCA (Environmental Network of Central America)

Professional Experience

Research

  • Apr - Nov 2021 - Research Assistant to Dr. Jewellord Nem Singh 
    Editing and preparation of a monograph intended for use as a course reader, to be sent to publishers. Book title: Business of the State - Why State Ownership Matters for Resource Governance
  • Jan 2020 - October 2020 - Research Assistant to Professor Julian Burger
    Various research briefs, including for Professor Burger’s contributions to:
    Burger (2020) Amazon: challenges for environmental and indigenous rights (European Parliament, June 2020) 
    UNESCO (2021) Report on Endangered Languages [working title]
  • Jan - Mar 2015 - Research Intern, Human Rights Consortium (HRC), London
    Internship at the HRC at the University of London during my MA and worked with the Director to finalise a paper calling for a human rights impact assessment for fracking projects in the UK (see below) and a research grant application. 

Teaching

Associate Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (Dec 21)

    Guest Lectures:

  • Mar 2021 - Lecture, seminars and delivery of course material for week 6 ‘Natural Resources and Sustainable Development in Latin America’ on LATI209 Globalisation and Development in Latin America’, module University of Liverpool (UK)
  • Oct 2020 - virtual webinar ‘Sustainable Development in Latin America’, International Development MA, Aalborg University (Denmark)
  • Oct 2019 - ‘Sustainable Development’, International Relations BA, Aalborg University (Denmark)
  • Oct 2019 - ‘Green Energy Transition and Sustainable Development’, International Development MA, Aalborg University (Denmark)
  • Oct 2019 - 'Sustainable Development in Latin America’, International Development MA, Aalborg University (Denmark)
  • Nov 2018 - ‘Natural Resource Exploitation in Latin America: Buen Vivir and Sustainable Development in Ecuador’, Presentation for undergraduate module ‘Globalisation and Development in Latin America’, University of Liverpool (UK)

Publications

  • Co-authored Article: Raftopoulos, R and Morley, J (2020) ‘Ecocide in the Amazon: The Contested Politics of Environmental Rights in Brazil’ The International Journal of Human Rights (24) 10
  • Book chapter (2017) ‘Human rights and socio-environmental conflict in Nicaragua’s Grand Canal project’. Natural Resource Development and Human Rights in Latin America: State and Non-state Actors in the promotion and opposition to extractivism activities.University of London 2017.
  • Article (2017) ‘ ... Beggars sitting on a sack of gold’: Oil exploration in the Ecuadorian Amazon as buen vivir and sustainable development.International Journal of Human Rights: Special Issue: Social-Environmental Conflicts, Extractivism and Human Rights in Latin America. Volume 21 issue 4, 2017
  • Article (2015) Extreme energy, ‘fracking’ and human rights: a new field for human rights impact assessments?International Journal of Human Rights. Volume19 issue 6, 2015

Luodeng Ouyang 

Postgraduate Research Student

Luodeng.Ouyang@liverpool.ac.uk  


Thesis Title

The evolving Chinese ethnic minorities film genreA case study of Tibetan themed films

Biography

Luodeng was awarded a BA in Radio and Television Directing (2013) and then awarded an MA in Film and Television Production from the University of Bristol (2016). 

Outside academia, Luodeng is a director and cinematographer for several years. He has also worked in the media company as the vice president and the Director of the video department. 

Research Interests

Contemporary Chinese Ethnic Minorities Films / Tibetan Cinema /  Digital Cinematography  

Jemima Paine

Postgraduate Research Student


Biography

Jemima Paine is a first-year PhD candidate in French working under the supervision of Prof Charles Forsdick and Dr Lisa Shaw.

Before starting at Liverpool, I completed a Bachelor degree in English and French and a Master of Studies in French at the University of Oxford. For the latter, I completed a dissertation entitled ‘Poet’s Corner: Black verse in the periodicals of Paris and Harlem, 1917-1934’ under the supervision of Profs Jane Hiddleston and Lloyd Pratt. This MSt study forms the basis of my current doctoral project.

Research Interests

My doctoral research centres on the poetry published in US and Francophone periodicals during the early twentieth century. Periodicals provided a unique locus for black verse during the New Negro Renaissance and Négritude movement, placing poetry in dialogue with editorials, articles and alternative art forms.

For this project, I aim to stage an internal reading of the poetry whilst paying close attention to how material properties of the periodical and its transnational circulation altered perceptions of the notions of black identity expressed therein.

Research Funding

Funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) via the North West Consortium Doctoral Training Partnership (NMCDTP).

Andrew Robertson

Postgraduate Research Student

Andrew.robertson@liverpool.ac.uk


Thesis Title

“Creating the Collective”: An exploration of the methodology used to represent a united community within 20th century Andean testimonio sindicalista."

Biography

After leaving school, I completed my undergraduate studies at the University of Reading, graduating with First Class Honours in Spanish and History in the Summer of 2020. During this period, I spent a year in Spain working at a Valencian secondary school as an English Language Assistant. Following my undergraduate studies, I completed a Master of Research degree in Latin American Studies at the University of Liverpool, graduating in Winter, 2021. Immediately after the completion of my Master’s, I began a PhD in the same discipline, focusing on Latin American testimonial literature and, specifically, the representation of Andean organised labour within these sources.

Research Interests

Latin American testimonial literature, Andean ethnography, 20th century Latin American rural organised labour movements, Syncretistic religion. 

Research Funding

E. Allison Peers Doctoral Studentship.

 

Naiara Unzurrunzaga

Postgraduate Research Student

N.Unzurrunzaga-Martinez@liverpool.ac.uk


Thesis Title

“Imagining 'another' education: re-humanising education with a critical decolonial horizon."

Biography

I have a BA in Translating and Interpreting from the Universidad del País Vasco, where I am originally from. I moved to Liverpool in 2008 where I became interested in education and became a Modern Languages teacher after gaining a PGCE in Secondary at Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU). 

I have taught Spanish and French both at primary and secondary level first in the UK and then abroad for 10 years. When returning to the UK, I decided to go back to university and gained an MA in Education, Globalisation and Social Change at LJMU.

This was a turning point in my career as I then moved on to University of Liverpool to pursue further postgraduate studies in the area of Latin American Studies, from where I have now gained an MRes in Latin American studies.

Research Interests

I am interested in imagining another type of education that is radically human (Fanon, 1961: Wynter, 2003; 2015).

Inspired by Sylvia Wynter's theory of the human and her conception of historical discourse organised by a series of epistemic breaks (2000;2003), my project aims to interrogate the validity of Western philosophical thought, humanism and knowledge as universal and investigate the implication of this in knowledge production, education institutions and the epistemologies they uphold. This intends to provide a deeper understanding of how the dehumanisation in perpetuated by educational processes and institutions. 

In addition, my project also has an action research approach as it aims to explore existing alternative educational experiences (specifically in Latin America, but not necessarily limited to the region) that are unsettling the de-humanising effects of hegemonic Western epistemologies and knowledge production and the education system that uphold them. Engaging with existing alternative educational experiences will encourage critical reflection on the conditions of possibility and constraints on radically re-humanising education provisions and how to potentially create collective spaces to imagine ‘others’ anew.

The starting point of this research project is inspired by my own frustrated experience as a teacher as I was witness to what I consider to be a crisis in education. I believe it is critical for educators to continue engaging in and thinking new ways to re-humanise education. My main argument is that although it is undeniable that education has had and continues to have a key role in the dehumanisation of humanity, it is also exactly because of the powerful nature of this, that educational spaces hold a huge potential in which teaching can be done to transgress (hooks, 1994) in order to unsettle the coloniality of knowledge and power (Wynter, 2003).   This is where I position myself. My intention is for my research journey to be a contribution to the type of scholarship that imagines, rethinks, and seeks another type of education.

Research Funding

Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) - NWSSDTC 1+3 pathway

Tatiana Wells 

Postgraduate Research Student

t.wells@liverpool.ac.uk 


Thesis Title

Digitofagia SubXamânica: immersions in 20 years of tactical archives and practices in Brazil 

Biography

Tatiana is a journalist with a Masters in Hipermedia Studies and a great experience in collaborations with Brazilian Arts and Media collectives, producing festivals, workshops, publications and art works. Some of these works can be found here Arquivos Táticos https://midiatatica.desarquivo.org/ and https://midiatatica.info She is now a PhD candidate at University of Liverpool.  

Research Interests

Free software, tactical media, intersectional feminism, decolonial media appropriations, archives, Brazil and Latin American technological imaginaries