"slavery" blog posts

After Edward Colston: The Bristol Library Society and the Slave Trade

Posted on: 10 June 2020 | Category: 2020 posts

The statue of Edward Colston

The toppling of the statue of the slave trader Edward Colston (1636-1721) in Bristol on 7 June 2020 has reminded a whole country – and many other parts of the world – of the city’s historical involvement in the slave trade. In the eighteenth century, Bristol prided itself as the second city of the British Empire and the traffic in human beings played a seminal role in creating the city’s wealth. In the second half of the century, the city used its increased prosperity to found cultural institutions, and one of the most notable ones was the Bristol Library Society, established in 1772-73. As a postdoctoral member of Professor Mark Towsey’s AHRC project on ‘Libraries, Reading Communities and Cultural Formation in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic’, I conduct research on this institution and recently signed a contract with Bristol Record Society to publish an edition of its eighteenth-century committee minutes in book form.


Exploring perceptions of Liverpool’s International Slavery Museum

Posted on: 15 December 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Newspaper article about the International Slavery Museum

Third year history student, Tiria Barnes, explores perceptions of Liverpool’s International Slavery Museum using articles from Gale Primary Sources.


Statues of medical racist who experimented on enslaved people should also be taken down

Posted on: 23 August 2017 | Category: 2017 posts

Black and white portrait of James Sims

Stephen Kenny blogs about how statues of a medical racist who experimented on enslaved people should be removed.