Modern Languages (Triple Subject) BA (Hons)

Key information


Modern-Languages-and-Cultures-3

Module details

Due to the impact of COVID-19 we're changing how the course is delivered.

Programme Year One

Students will take six language modules and two content modules (normally in different languages).

Year One Optional Modules

  • Introduction to French Studies I (FREN114)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with an outline of the major stages in the evolution of the French state and, through the use of a range of historical and literary, to engage students in a critical examination of these;

    To encourage students to engage with a longer text, through which students will be able to examine different aspects of French and Francophone societies;

    To provide students with skills appropriate to a range of areas in French Studies and to assist them in developing generic study skills, including information skills training and anti-plagiarism training.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate knowledge  of key events and issues in the history of the French state.

    (LO2) Demonstrate knowledge of the development of the French language and of the extent of its use throughout the world.

    (LO3) Read critically in both French and English and write  commentaries on materials covered on the module, constructing a coherent argument and using bibliographical conventions appropriately.

    (LO4) Find and use appropriate materials and glean data from secondary works using library and IT resources, and understand the rationale behind the proper and consistent use of bibliographic citation.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

  • Introduction to French Studies II (FREN116)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to provide students with academic writing skills appropriate to a range of areas in French Studies;

    The first half of the module aims to introduce students to the institutions of Francophonie - the community of French speaking nations (fostering critical thinking on those institutions);

    The module further aims to provide students with a comprehensive chronological review of French colonial history, introduces them to the French presence and role of French in North Africa, in Sub-Saharan Africa and in the Low Countries;

    The second half of the module introduces the students to various French narrative forms, from the historical period to the present day, and to provide them with the necessary skills critically to evaluate such forms.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate knowledge of the development of the French language and of the extent of its use throughout the world.

    (LO2) Demonstrate knowledge of representative examples of French narrative forms and be able to deploy the academic terms used to describe key concepts in these areas.

    (LO3) Students will be able to analyse data and read critically both in French and in English. They will be able to select and integrate this secondary material into their essays following the appropriate conventions.

    (LO4) They will have some understanding of the language and conventions of scholarly articles. They will be able to write summaries on appropriate secondary sources and use their knowledge and understanding of these sources to construct their own arguments.

    (S1) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S2) Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the cultures, linguistic contexts, history, politics, geography, and social and economic structures of the societies of the country of the target language and other countries around the world where that language is used.

    (S3) Understand a text of the target language within its broader historical, cultural and social context

    (S4) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

  • Introduction to German Studies I (GRMN127)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to a range of key political events / developments in contemporary German history and to the historical development of the German language;

    To assist students in learning how to engage in the study and critical discussion of a range of primary and secondary historical, political, journalistic and linguistic texts in German and in English;

    To teach students completing a comprehension task and writing commentaries and employing the correct forms of bibliographical citation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module students will have a good overview of political debates in post-1945 Germany, and the development of the German language.

    (LO2) Students will be able to understand and critically discuss a range of primary and secondary materials and deploy the terms used by academics to describe key concepts in the areas studied.

    (LO3) Students will be able to write critical commentaries on the areas/materials studied. To this end, they will have learned to find and use appropriate materials using library and IT resources and glean data from secondary works. They will be able to use the conventional forms of bibliographic citation.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

  • Introduction to German Studies II (GRMN128)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with an understanding of the language and conventions of German short stories, Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis as well as German film;

    To teach students how to engage in the study and critical discussion of German literature and German film as well as related academic secondary sources;

    To teach students writing commentaries, literary reviews, essays and employ the correct forms of bibliographical citation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module students will have developed a detailed understanding of the literary genre of the German short story, of Kafka's The Metamorphosis and of three important German films.

    (LO2) Students will be able to watch critically / read critically both primary literature/films in German at an appropriate level and more extended passages of secondary literature in English. They will be able to critically engage in a discussion of the materials studied in class.

    (LO3) Students will be able to write critical commentaries, essays and literary reviews on the areas/materials studied. To this end, they will further consolidate their knowledge about finding and using appropriate materials from secondary sources. They will further consolidate their knowledge about the conventions of bibliographic citation.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

  • Introduction to Iberian and Latin American Studies I (HISP120)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Identify and evaluate key issues in Luso-Hispanic Studies;

    Apply these issues to your study of the Luso-Hispanic world;

    Locate, organise and evaluate a range of information sources;

    Discuss the issues raised with reference to the texts / topics studied in class;

    Introduce you to key skills of Critical Thinking (analysis and synthesis) and referencing (bibliography and intro to in-text citation);

    Carry out sustained research into a particular topic and express your findings in an appropriate academic form.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Identify and evaluate some of the key issues in Hispanic Studies

    (LO2) Apply these issues to their study of the Luso-Hispanic world

    (LO3) Locate, organize and evaluate a range of information sources

    (LO4) Discuss the issues raised with reference to the texts studied in class

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S6) Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the cultures, linguistic contexts, history, politics, geography, and social and economic structures of the societies of the country of the target language

    (S7) Global citizenship - Relevant economic/political understanding

    (S8) Understand a text of the target language within its broader historical, cultural and social context

    (S9) Successfully apply a close reading to a text of the target language and demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the cultures, linguistic contexts, history, politics, geography, and social and economic structures of the societies of the country of the target language

  • Introduction to Iberian and Latin American Studies II (HISP121)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Identify and evaluate key issues in Luso-Hispanic Studies;

    Apply these issues to your study of the Luso-Hispanic world;

    Locate, organise and evaluate a range of information sources;

    Discuss the issues raised with reference to the texts / topics studied in class;

    Carry out sustained research into a particular topic and express your findings in an appropriate academic form.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of some of the key texts of the Luso-Hispanic world.

    (LO2) Display an understanding of some of the key issues of Hispanic Studies.

    (LO3) Demonstrate the ability to apply a close analysis to texts.

    (LO4) Understand different texts, literary and cinematic genres within their broader social and historical contexts.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S5) Personal attributes and qualities – Independence

  • Introduction to Italian Studies I (ITAL120)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to issues relating to post-unification and fascist Italy and to past and current debates surrounding multilingual, multicultural and multiethnic Italy;

    To develop subject-specific skills appropriate to a range of areas in Italian studies and generic study skills, so that students are prepared for level two modules within the Italian curriculum;

    To enhance critical analysis and independent thinking.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a knowledge of key debates and themes relating to post-unification and fascist Italy and to multiculturalism

    (LO2) Understand a text relating to the target culture within its broad historical and social context

    (LO3) Successfully apply a close reading to a text relating to the target culture

    (S1) Information skills - information accessing

    (S2) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S6) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S7) Research skills - independent analysis

  • Introduction to Italian Studies II (ITAL121)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with skills appropriate to a range of areas in Italian Studies and to assist them in developing generic study skills so that they are prepared for level two modules within the Italian curriculum;

    To involve the students in the discussion of issues surrounding past and current debates on changing values, conflicts and dissension within Italian society.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To acquire a good overview of issues surrounding past and current debates on changing values, conflicts and dissension within Italian society.

    (LO2) To read critically both short and more extended passages in English and further their understanding of the language and conventions of journalistic and cinematic texts.

    (LO3) To be familiar with the conventional forms of academic terminology and writing and be able to draw on a range of data to describe key concepts in these areas and construct in their own words an argument in the form of an extended essay.

    (LO4) To be familiar with and be able to use the conventional forms of bibliographic citation.

    (LO5) To gain further experience in teamwork and group discussion.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

    (S4) Global citizenship - cultural awareness

    (S5) Personal attributes and qualities - independence

    (S6) Research skills - independent analysis

    (S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - media analysis

  • Introduction to Chinese Studies I (CHIN120)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To familiarize students with key knowledge and debates about China, its history, culture, politics and economy from late imperial times to the mid-20th century;

    To help students learn key vocabulary and concepts in Chinese language pertaining to the discussed subject matters;

    To help students gain confidence in discussing relevant issues relating to modern and contemporary China;

    To promote students’ global citizenship by enabling them to discuss the role of China in its global context and to apply gained knowledge in a China-related workplace;

    To enable students to undertake independent research on China-related subject matters to construct coherent, persuasive and well-supported arguments in writing;

    To enhance students’ digital fluency through interactive e-learning on the VLE platform; the use of digital translation tools, blogs, China-specific internet searches, the use of Chinese streaming websites etc.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a knowledge of key debates and themes relating to premodern, modern and 20th-century China

    (LO2) Understand a text relating to Chinese culture within its broad historical, political, economic and social context

    (LO3) Successfully apply a close reading to a text relating to Chinese culture and society

    (S1) Information skills - information accessing and critical reading

    (S2) Research skills - independent analysis, critical thinking and problem solving

    (S3) Communication skills (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing and class presentation

    (S4) Confidence

    (S5) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S6) Digital fluency

  • Introduction to Chinese Studies II (CHIN121)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To familiarize students with key knowledge and debates about China, its history, culture, politics and economy from late imperial times to the mid-20th century;

    To help students learn key vocabulary and concepts in Chinese language pertaining to the discussed subject matters;

    To help students gain confidence in discussing relevant issues relating to modern and contemporary China;

    To promote students’ global citizenship by enabling them to discuss the role of China in its global context and to apply gained knowledge in a China-related workplace;

    To enable students to undertake independent research on China-related subject matters to construct coherent, persuasive and well-supported arguments in writing;

    To enhance students’ digital fluency through interactive e-learning on the VLE platform; the use of digital translation tools, blogs, China-specific internet searches, the use of Chinese streaming websites etc.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a knowledge of key debates and themes relating to 20th century China and beyond

    (LO2) Understand a text relating to Chinese culture within its broad historical, political, economic and social context

    (LO3) Successfully apply a close reading to a text relating to Chinese culture and society

    (S1) Information skills - information accessing and critical reading

    (S2) Research skills - independent analysis, critical thinking and problem solving

    (S3) Communication skills (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing and class presentation

    (S4) Confidence

    (S5) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S6) Digital fluency

Programme Year Two

Students will take six language modules and two content modules (normally in different languages).

Year Two Optional Modules

  • An Introduction to French Linguistics (FREN238)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to key theoretical and conceptual debates within linguistics, namely sociolinguistics, phonetics, morphology, semantics, etymology, and syntax;

    To develop students' abilities to apply theoretical and conceptual debates to the production of French in contemporary France;

    To enhance students' skills of critical analysis and independent thinking;

    To encourage a greater understanding of the French language which will, in turn, enhance students' capacity to learn and use the language.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will have a greater understanding of the French language as a tool for communication, and as a system with its own rules and history.

    (LO2) Students will learn how to produce phonetic transcriptions, enabling them to produce sounds in an internationally recognised form.

    (LO3) Students will explore issues surrounding the creation of French, thereby enabling them to evaluate the developments of languages in general.

    (LO4) Students will be able to trace the major themes within the study of meaning, covering any gaps in the study of their first language and equipping them to produce better, idiomatic French through the perspective of the semantics of a language.

    (LO5) Students will gain an appreciation of the roles played by society, communities, speakers and governments in the development, use and abuse of language systems. They should also have a greater understanding of the part played by culture in all its guises in the life of a language, complementing their studies of literature, film and other related fields.

    (LO6) Students will be able to understand the construction of languages within utterances, sentences and discourse, not only reaffirming the rules of French syntax but refreshing their comprehension of their first language with regards to acceptable sentence structure.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing (including referencing skills).

    (S2) Global citizenship - cultural awareness.

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis.

    (S4) Personal attributes and qualities – independence.

  • Weimar Film and Literature: the City and Modernity (GRMN218)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to a range of cultural artefacts from the Weimar Republic. Students are enabled to situate the texts and films in historical context, paying particular attention to two major developments in the twentieth century: the growth of the modern metropolis (especially Berlin) and changing concepts of gender - masculinity and femininity - in the wake of the First World War;

    To introduce students to concepts of literary and film analysis as well as critical theory relevant to the themes of the texts (the city, class and gender identity);

    To develop students' critical writing skills in two different tasks - commentaries and an essay.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate an awareness of the cultural output and historical and political context of Weimar Republic-era Germany, with particular focus on the theme of the city and on notions of class and gender.

    (LO2) Students will further develop critical and analytical skills enabling them to situate texts and concepts in their historical context.

    (LO3) Students will be able to evaluate a range of textual and critical evidence, to assess their relative merits and to construct in verbal and written form clearly reasoned arguments on the basis of such evidence.

    (LO4) Through close readings of selected primary material, students will develop their awareness of language and literary strategies, and an awareness of historical film techniques and the form of critical film analysis.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S6) Global citizenship - foreign language skills

    (S7) Research skills - independent analysis

  • "does the Nation Matter?" the Basques' Will to Persist in the Global Culture (HISP218)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    To introduce students to a number of aspects of contemporary Basque society and culture, especially the most characteristic and peculiar ones;

    To provide students with an understanding of the conflict of identities that characterizes the contemporary Basque Country from a cultural, historical, and anthropological perspective;

    To offer students a taste of contemporary Basque arts and the identity play between the local and the global in which they are inscribed;

    To reflect about the concept of national identity, both its importance to all of us and its striking fragility, and the way all that is linked to the student's own experience of nationality.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire, through the study of cultural texts and contexts, a broad knowledge and a critical understanding of a number of aspects of Basque culture and society

    (LO2) Acquire a critical understanding of the conflict of identities that characterizes the contemporary Basque Country

    (LO3) Acquire a broad knowledge of a number of contemporary Basque cultural productions, and the identity play between the local and the global in which they are inscribed

    (LO4) Acquire a critical understanding of the importance of the concept of national identity in Western countries and the extent to which nationality is also key to the student's own experience of the world

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S6) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

  • German Cinema From the Expressionism to the Present (GRMN225)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the history of German national cinema from its origins to the present day with a special focus on Weimar Cinema, the Third Reich, post-war film, the New German Cinema of the 1960s and 1970s;

    To introduce students to the work of key German directors including F. W. Murnau, Fritz Lang, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Werner Herzog and Wim Wender;

    To sensitise students to films as historical texts which emerge from and engage with the context of their production;

    To sensitise students to film as an aesthetic artefact determined on the one hand by particular conditions of production (i.e. the studio system/‘Autorenkino’) and produced on the other according to cinematic conventions of film language, genre etc.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will understand the emergence and development of German national cinema from its origins until the present.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate a critical awareness of academic debates about major periods or movements in German film – Weimar film and ‘Expressionism’, the Third Reich, post-war cinema, the New German Cinema and post-unification cinema – and of current academic debates about them.

    (LO3) Students will develop critical and analytical skills enabling them to evaluate a variety of film materials from a range of different periods and styles.

    (LO4) Students will be able to evaluate a range of other varieties of textual and historical evidence, to assess its relative merits and to construct in verbal and written form clearly reasoned arguments on the basis of such evidence.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S6) Research skills - All Information skills

  • Globalisation and Development in Latin America (LATI209)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to key questions in the study of the politics of globalisation and development;

    To offer an analysis of the major developments in Latin American in the twentieth century including import-substitution, state-led development, economic and financial crisis, neo-liberal reforms, social and political implications, and international relations;

    To provide an understanding of the challenges that Latin American governments have confronted over time and the continued tensions between economic and political demands;

    To introduce the students to the study of comparative and international political economy.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To be able to read and synthesise material form a range of academic sources

    (LO2) To discuss cogently in small groups and synthesise discussions in presentations

    (LO3) To be able to present arguments in writing using a number of sources that are correctly referenced

    (LO4) To understand the main economic and political challenges facing twentieth century Latin American governments.

    (LO5) To be able to sustain an argument about political developments in the region both verbally and in writing.

    (LO6) To be able to identify differences and similarities in political processes across the region using a comparative methodology.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S5) Global citizenship - Relevant economic/political understanding

  • Introduction to French Cinema (FREN236)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the basic language of film analysis;

    To introduce students to the rich cultural field which the cinema has represented in France through study of selected films from particularly significant periods, giving them a background of reference points and an understanding of how cinema has developed in France;

    To cultivate habits of close visual analysis and careful structuring of such analysis;

    To increase confidence in class discussion and presentation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to give an intelligent and informed account of how any film (from whatever culture) is put together, the ways in which it engages its audience and the messages it conveys.

    (LO2) Students will develop thorough and perceptive powers of observation and interpretation of the elements of a cinematic text both visual and aural

    (LO3) Students will be able to explain their observations in a structured way, in written analyses and also orally in front of a class, in the latter case using visual aids when appropriate.

    (LO4) Students will be able to insert their detailed observations into a thematic or historical context in order to show how a particular film deals with larger issues, and to construct a well-written essay to explain their ideas.

    (LO5) Students should have a basic overview of major directors and trends in the history of the cinema in France, which will enable them to see other French films in their historical and artistic context.

    (S1) Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the cultures, linguistic contexts, history, politics, geography, and social and economic structures of the societies of the country of the target language

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S6) Successfully apply a close reading to a text of the target language

    (S7) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S8) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills

    (S9) Personal attributes and qualities - Willingness to take responsibility

    (S10) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

  • Decolonial Perspectives On Italy, Africa and the Mediterranean (ITAL225)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To give students an understanding of the transnational, interconnected histories of Italy, Europe and Africa from the age of the Empires to the present;

    To introduce students to major contemporary debates on the meaning of history and memory in culture, notably their impact on contemporary processes of identification in a globalised and mobile world;

    To develop student’s critical understanding of transcultural contacts in the Mediterranean, by featuring language-sensitive approach to the reading of history and cultures of the Mediterranean;

    To increase student’s analytical tools with respect to debates on migration, memory, language and citizenship in the Mediterranean context;

    To develop student’s skills for research, presentation, analysis and debate;

    To develop student’s ability and confidence in multilingual learning processes (i.e. collaborative learning processes where the multiple languages involved in their study are not entirely familiar to them).

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) A broad knowledge of the history of migration and colonialism across Italy, Africa and Mediterranean from the 19th century to the present.

    (LO2) Awareness of the historical backdrop and transcultural tensions in which contemporary issues of citizenship and migration in the Mediterranean are embedded.

    (LO3) An ability to read critically history and memory narratives of the 21st century.

    (LO4) Confidence in raising questions and challenging mainstream representations of Italy, Africa and Mediterranean.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) – Presentation skills – Oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) – Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving – Critical analysis

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) – Media analysis

    (S5) Global citizenship – Cultural awareness

    (S6) Personal attributes and qualities – Independence

    (S7) Research Skills – independent analysis

  • Language Teaching: Theory and Practice (MODL200)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to key theoretical and conceptual debates within second language learning and teaching studies;

    To develop students' ability to apply theoretical and conceptual debates to a variety of second language learning and teaching contexts;

    To enhance students' skills of critical analysis and independent thinking.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate an understanding of key aspects of second language teaching theories,

    (LO2) Identify the connection between academic and / or theoretical knowledge and its practical application in a modern foreign language classroom,

    (LO3) Demonstrate an ability to develop materials and teaching activities according to a given specification and requirement,

    (LO4) Reflect on and evaluate the efficacy of the materials and teaching activities developed,

    (LO5) Identify, reflect and report on a range of personal / employability skills.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S3) Communication (oral written and visual) - Presentation skills

    (S4) Time and project management - Project management

    (S5) Personal attributes and qualities - Willingness to take responsibility

  • Latin America in Its Literature (LATI203)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to Latin American literature through the study of a selection of major works;

    To deepen students understanding of Latin American social reality through an examination of its portrayal in literature;

    To train students in the reading of literary texts and to encourage them to develop an ability to analyse for themselves.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire an understanding of Latin American literature in its broader historical, cultural and socio-political context.

    (LO2) Students will deepen their understanding of Latin American socio-political reality and of its portrayal in the region's literature.

    (LO3) Students will develop their ability to do a close critical reading of literary texts and also improve their analytical skills generally.

    (LO4) Students will have learned to apply theoretical approaches and secondary literature to the analysis of literary texts.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S3) Global citizenship - cultural awareness

    (S4) Improving own learning / performance - personal action planning

  • Living the Global Eighteenth Century (HLAC200)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To offer students an introduction to some key aspects of European culture and society in the eighteenth century;

    To make students who come from a range of major subject areas aware of the ways in which study of that period is approached by and can enrich a range of disciplines.;

    To help students to grasp and reflect on the historical dimensions of their own shared and contested culture(s) and the contemporary political and global order;

    To develop students' capacity for asking questions (curiosity) as well as for answering them (research skills) by engaging them in active and interactive learning.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) A sound knowledge of key aspects of European culture, society and politics in the eighteenth century and insight into the historical dimensions of European and global modernity

    (LO2) An understanding of the ways in which study of the eighteenth century is approached by scholars in a range of disciplines and in working with people from disciplinary backgrounds different from their own

    (LO3) Ability to analyse and respond to primary texts critically in terms of their historical and geographical context

    (LO4) Ability to devise and carry out an independent research project, deploying both data and imagination

    (LO5) A sound knowledge of aspects of material culture of the eighteenth century and ability to analyse artefacts of material culture critically and in their geographical historical context

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S6) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S7) Personal attributes and qualities - independence

  • Manger! Food and French Culture (FREN230)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Recognised by UNESCO in 2010 as part of humanity's intangible cultural heritage, the French 'gastronomic meal' has been one of the gifts the French feel they have given the world. This is the first module in French Studies globally that aims to give students both a historically grounded understanding of the discourses of food in France and a critical understanding of how French cuisine functions as a national myth;

    The wider context for this module's aims is the opportunity to offer our students content and teaching and learning unique in UK French Studies. The module capitalizes on the research expertise of 90% of members of staff at Liverpool;

    This module aims to familiarize students with authentic documents written in French from different time periods from the Middle Ages onwards;

    This module aims to encourage students to apply the theoretical concepts, historical understanding and specialist French vocabulary that they have learnt to the understanding and analysis of real-life situations;

    This module aims to encourage students to make learning and assessment choices which play to their strengths as independent learners.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completion of this module, students will have an understanding of the development of the significance of food for French society from the Middle Ages to the end of the twentieth century.

    (LO2) On completion of this module, students will have acquired and internalized the core vocabulary in French for describing French food and its modes of presentation on the table and in a menu.

    (LO3) On completion of this module, students will understand the role played by the absence and presence of food at specific moments in the history of France. 

    (LO4) Students will know the names of the principal individuals who have shaped French culinary tradition and understand the importance of food in terms of the relation between Paris and the provinces of France and between France and the UK

    (S1) Global citizenship - cultural awareness

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S3) Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the cultures, linguistic contexts, history, politics, geography, and social and economic structures of the societies of the country of the target language

    (S4) Apply theoretical approaches or critical secondary literature to the analysis of real-world situations.

  • Multilingual Liverpool: Reading the City (MODL234)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to core theoretical topics in sociolinguistics;

    To encourage critical awareness of multilingualism and language practices;

    To apply decoding approaches to texts publicly available in Liverpool.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Read critically public texts, both in English and in the target language.

    (LO2) Decode signs into the target language, bearing in mind the principles of semiotics, audience, design and other linguistic landscape theories.

    (LO3) Develop an understanding of multilingualism.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S6) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

  • Paris: Capital Cultures? (FREN223)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce students to Paris as a diverse, global city from a historical and theoretical perspective;

    To develop students' ability to apply theoretical approaches or critical secondary literature to the study of cities in general, and to Paris, its arrondissements and banlieues in particular;

    To enhance students' skills of critical analysis and independent thinking and research.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand the diversity of Paris and its culture as a capital city both across time and at individual periods in its history.

    (LO2) Apply theoretical approaches or critical secondary literature to the analysis of a range of sources in different textual forms and visual media, and from diverse periods in French history, both individually and comparatively.

    (LO3) Show an awareness of concepts and debates relating to the study of the city in general as a cultural, multilingual, and historically marked space.

    (LO4) Successfully carry out a piece of individual research.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S5) Personal attributes and qualities - independence

  • Propaganda and Censorship (FILM202)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with an insight into the interaction of film and political authority, the structures which the authorities use or have used in order to exert control on the cinema and the ways in which cinema’s power over its audience has been harnessed, manipulated or occasionally feared to the point of suppression;

    To examine specific films, scenes from them and the controversies around them as case studies of the interaction of film and political and /or other authority;

    To introduce students to theoretical debates about propaganda and censorship in Film Studies.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain a differentiated understanding of the way in which political and other authorities have sought to control, harness and curb the power of film in different historical situations.

    (LO2) Students will gain an awareness of film’s position in national institutional structures and the effect of these onthe finished product and a historical perspective on the perceived purpose of and limits on film production in Europe.

    (LO3) Students will develop an alertness to the ways in which film may seek to manipulate the viewer and a critical attitude to the theories that have been constructed regarding the effects of film on its audience.

    (LO4) Students will develop an ability to use different kinds of textual evidence to present a balanced and sophisticated argument about complex issues of representation and control and to reach a reasoned conclusion recognising the power of social attitudes and desires in the formulation and conduct of debates in these fields.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Research skills - All Information skills

  • Spain is Not Spain: Nationalisms & Identities in Spanish Literature (HISP216)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The principal aim of this module is to provide students with a detailed introduction to the nationalism(s) of Spain. Special emphasis will be placed on the emergence of historical nationalisms in Galicia, the Basque country and Catalonia in the late 19th century as well as their re-emergence after Francisco Franco's dictatorship. The module will enable students to acquire a broad understanding of the different nationalist identities in Spain looking at different literary texts (fiction, poetry and short stories, in Spanish). The module will also enable students to acquire wide-ranging skills in literary analysis. The module will enable students to gain a solid understanding of key social, political and cultural concerns in Spain.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Upon successful completion of the module, students will be able to explain and illustrate the key issues that are driving contemporary debates in Spain regarding nationalisms and they will also have acquired a clear understanding of the historical, cultural, institutional and constitutional framework in which Spanish state nationalism is pitted against competing nationalisms.

    (LO2) Students will be able to critically interpret and contextualise a wide range of contemporary texts.

    (LO3) Students will be able to apply theoretical approaches or critical secondary literature to the analysis of primary texts.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

  • Spanish and Latin American Cinemas: An Introduction (HISP229)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the cinematic dimension of Spanish and Latin American cultures;

    To create an awareness of the economic forces which frame the film industry in Spain and Latin America in specific areas of contemporary political and cultural life;

    To develop students' skills in close textual analysis of a range of film texts;  

    To explore the relationship between film, society and politics across various national contexts within Spain and Latin America;

    To use film festivals as a mode of analysis, to better understand Spanish and Latin American film.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a knowledge of the cinematic practices and cultures of Spain and Latin America.

    (LO2) Show an understanding of the ways in which Spanish and Latin American film are shaped by wider economic and cultural forces.

    (LO3) Show an ability to apply close readings to film texts

    (LO4) Display an understanding of the relationship between film, society and politics across various national contexts with Spain and Latin America.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

  • The Cinematic City (FILM201)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To explore ways in which global cinema has made use of the urban space (cinema having been described as an urban art-form par excellence ); Through a wide range of films from different European countries, to introduce students both to issues relating to the imaginary conception of cities, and to concepts in film theory regarding the construction of space, the position of the observer, and the nature and purpose of representation and of narrative construction;

    To introduce students to relatively complex theoretical constructions, in an immediate and approachable way, which will give them confidence in their ability to handle concepts in critical theory and to apply them successfully;

    To develop their capacities in expressing their ideas, both in discussion and in written work, with regard to more advanced material than they were required to study in the first-year module;

    To alert them to the conceptual links which film studies has with other theoretical fields; To introduce students in a simple way to the practical problems of audiovisual representation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Awareness of issues of urban theory, of the spatial implications of cinematic expression, and of the interaction of these;

    (LO2) Awareness of the ways in which cinema has been used to articulate the self-construction of urban societies

    (LO3) Global citizenship: Alertness to the ways in which the modern world is constructed through representations

    (LO4) Ability to handle theoretical concepts confidently in written and oral modes, to carry on a discussion and sustain an argument by applying those concepts.

    (LO5) Authentic assessment: Awareness of some of the practical issues involved in creating an audiovisual piece.

    (LO6) Confidence: Ability to plan the translation of experience of the city into audiovisual form.

    (S1) Confidence: Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Confidence: Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S3) Active Learning: Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S5) Confidence: Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience

    (S6) Peer-led learning: Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

    (S7) Confidence: Handling audiovisual material

  • The German Democratic Republic: Politics, Culture, Memory (GRMN220)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To offer students of German as well as students not studying the German language an in-depth understanding of the social, cultural and political history of the German Democratic Republic;

    To develop students' skills in studying German and English primary and secondary sources about the German Democratic Republic and in critically discussing these materials in the seminar sessions;

    To actively support students in developing independent research skills and the ability to construct complex arguments in relation the often contradictory political role of culture of the German Democratic Republic.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students will have a good understanding of the history and cultural politics of the GDR, its official ideologies, and the memory of the GDR since 1990, as well as of a range of specific examples of official and non-official culture.

    (LO2) Students will be able to engage in a critical discussion about a wide range of primary and secondary materials and deploy the concepts and terms used by academics to describe the cultural politics and artistic practice of the GDR.

    (LO3) Students will be able to present a critical and nuanced discussion about specific topics/themes in written and oral form and will be able reflect explicitly on their learning.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Oral presentation skills

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

  • The Italian Cinema (ITAL223)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the major periods and some of the major films of one of the most significant of European National cinemas, through a selection of films which are available in sub-titled versions in this country;

    To give students an understanding of the range of Italian cinema, its influence on Europe as a whole, and its very particular nature (with a particular consideration to the strong division between the internationally influential ‘art-film’ production of the 1950s and 1960s, and the generic popular films which brought in the domestic audience and have recently begun to attract notice abroad);

    To broaden students’ perceptions of ‘European’ cinema, to give them a basis for comparison which they can use in their other modules on this course;

    To increase students’ analytical tools and vocabulary with respect to different types of cultural production;

    To increase students’ awareness of the social function of film (and cultural production in general) and the role it plays both for its audience and (to some extent) in the intellectual life of a culture in general;

    To make students aware of possible aspects of film culture which they may wish to explore further in their final year or during their year in Europe;

    To increase students’ confidence in written and oral analysis and debate.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) A broad knowledge of the history of Italian cinema so that students will be able both to compare it with other European cinemas and to assess current Italian films and issues in Italian cinema in a historical context.

    (LO2) An awareness of the different roles and functions of ‘auteur’ and popular cinema, of the issues for film studies which these different types of production imply, and of some possibly fruitful avenues for further study.

    (LO3) An ability to discuss both orally and in written form concepts relating both to formal innovation (where authorial intent must be taken into account) and to generic norms and issues of spectatorship (applying theoretical concepts to popular cultural forms)

    (LO4) Confidence in dealing with film texts where (it must be assumed) the principal language is not one they are familiar with, and an ability to make allowances for this and to come to the appropriate terms with their own position in relation to the culture they are studying.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S5) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S6) Personal attributes and qualities - Independence

    (S7) Research skills - independent analysis

  • Between the Lines: Translating Modern and Contemporary China (CHIN201)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To enable students to translate key historical and contemporary texts from Chinese into English;

    To familiarize students with key events and discourses of modern and contemporary China in terms of politics, culture, society and economy;

    To learn key vocabulary and concepts in Chinese and English relating to the above mentioned topics and themes;

    To gain confidence in discussing relevant issues relating to modern and contemporary China.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the basic structures of the Chinese language.

    (LO2) Global citizenship – cultural awareness.

    (LO3) Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of Chinese culture and society.

    (S1) Communication skills: beginner’s and intermediate level reading and writing.

    (S2) Global citizenship – cultural awareness.

    (S3) Improving own learning / performance – self-awareness / self-analysis.

Programme Year Three

Year abroad

You will complete assessment tasks appropriate to your Year Abroad placement, either producing one or more pieces of work in the target language or completing modules at your host university.

Programme Year Four

Students will take six language modules and two content modules (normally in different languages).

Year Four Optional Modules

  • Cinema and Narratives of French Society (FREN337)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module will study the ways in which French cinema has approached, and occasionally helped to construct, the history of the twentieth century. We will look at the options available to film-makers faced with the task of recording and representing their own society, including ways in which the construction of such narratives has been questioned, with a view to assessing cinema’s role in the never-ending process of construction of French cultural identity;

    The module aims to raise students’ awareness of the ways in which Frenchness has been represented;

    The module will introduce them to theories of cinematic representation and to the ways in which these impinge on the world-view of the spectator;

    Students will gain awareness of the role which cinema plays in society (French society especially);

    Students will gain experience in close analysis of the implications of key texts, through their formal choices as well as their content.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Awareness of the changing representation of French history and French society in a popular national medium.

    (LO2) Familiarity with key concepts in film theory and ability to handle them with relation to specific texts

    (LO3) Ability to express ideas succinctly and to carry out extended independent textual (visual) analysis.

    (LO4) Ability to undertake critical analysis of cultural representations and to relate them appropriately to their context.

    (S1) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Information skills - Evaluation

    (S6) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S8) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S9) Global citizenship - Understanding of equality and diversity

    (S10) Time and project management - Personal organisation

  • Classical Chinese Philosophy (PHIL367)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To investigate what is distinctive about classical Chinese approaches to questions of ontology, social harmony, personal morality and soteriology. To examine the ways in which philosophy in Classical Chinese civilisation develops in the Hundred Schools period, with particular attention to the dialogue between Confucians and Daoists.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to engage in informed discussions about the concepts and categories in which philosophical discussions were conducted in ancient China.

    (LO2) Students will develop abilities in developing and contextualising new information about other worldviews.

    (LO3) Students will be enabled to assimilate alternative cultural perspectives from which to view their own traditions.

    (LO4) Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories propounded in the classical period of Chinese thought.

    (LO5) Students will be able to discuss the problem of cultural relativism informed by an understanding of a particular alien pattern of thinking.

    (LO6) Students will be able to relate classical Chinese thought to European philosophical interests.

    (S1) Students will develop abilities to read and understand ancient texts in English translation.

    (S2) Students will improve their ability to identify the issues that underlie debates.

    (S3) Students will develop the confidence to consider previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches.

    (S4) Students will develop their ability to identify presuppositions and to reflect critically upon them.

    (S5) Students will develop a facility to compare and evaluate categories of thought from different cultures.

    (S6) Students will enhance their written and communication skills.

    (S7) Students will develop their ability to work independently.

    (S8) Students will develop an ability to write in a manner that accords with professional standards and expectations.

  • Comics and Graphic Novels: Memory and Transcultural Mobility (MODL326)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To broaden students’ perception of comics exploring different contexts of development of comics industries and their transnational connections since the 20th century;

    To introduce students to scholarship that reads contemporary changes in the cultural practices and media structures through the comic medium;

    To make students aware of the breadth and potential of graphic narratives by examining different genres, such as autobiography, testimony and reportage, as well as the different forms (printed and digital) in which they emerge and circulate;

    To give students an understanding of how graphic narratives of transcultural experiences visualize the relationship between mobility (understood as both spatial and cultural) and memory;

    To develop student’s ability and confidence in multilingual learning processes (i.e. collaborative learning processes where the multiple languages involved in their study are not entirely familiar to them).

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) A broad knowledge of the development of comics as a medium since the 20th century, across multiple linguistic and cultural contexts of the development of comics industries.

    (LO2) An ability to engage with recent scholarly debates on comics and contemporary media structures.

    (LO3) An awareness of the multiple genres of graphic narratives and their development across linguistic and mnemonic formations.

    (LO4) An ability to read cultural mobility in the 21st century through the expanding medium of comics.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) – presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) – academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving – critical analysis

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) – media analysis

    (S5) Global citizenship – cultural awareness

    (S6) Personal attributes and qualities – independence

    (S7) Research Skills – independent analysis

  • Digital Cultures in the Americas (HISP348)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to key conceptual debates on the production and context of mainstream and non-mainstream moving and still images;  

    To develop students ability to apply key theoretical debates to the study of digital cultures, platforms, and online content from across the Americas';

    To encourage students to examine the use, reuse, curation and distribution by professionals and amateurs of materials online and in film;

    To enhance students' skills of critical analysis and independent thinking.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Show an awareness of the key theoretical and conceptual debates on the creation and distribution of non mainstream moving and still images.

    (LO2) Demonstrate an applied knowledge of the wider historical context in which non mainstream moving and still images circulate.

    (LO3) Apply theoretical approaches or critical secondary literature to the analysis of non mainstream moving and still images.

    (LO4) Successfully apply close textual analysis of a range of material produced by non mainstream creators.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S9) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S10) Skills in using technology - Online communications skills

  • Dissertation (MODL307)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To give students the opportunity to carry out independent research at an advanced level, with appropriate support, into a cultural, literary or linguistic topic of interest to them;

    To draw on and extend the skills and knowledge of relevant cultural, literary or linguistic issues and theoretical debates students have acquired in their taught modules;

    To produce a piece of individual research which presents an argument developed over 10,000 words, usually divided into Introduction, three chapters, and Conclusion.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Utilise a variety of bibliographical tools to locate a range of primary and secondary sources on which to base a research project.

    (LO2) Construct, focus and structure an independent project, in discussion with a personal supervisor working in that subject area.

    (LO3) Analyse source materials, and develop coherent and original arguments on the basis of research.

    (LO4) Engage critically with relevant cultural, literary or linguistic and / or theoretical debates on the topic.

    (LO5) Manage time effectively and efficiently and plan a long-term process of research, reading and writing.

    (LO6) Present a confident and coherent argument in clear written prose, following scholarly conventions of referencing and bibliography.

    (S1) Personal attributes and qualities - initiative

    (S2) Information skills - information accessing: locating relevant information. Identifying and evaluating information sources

    (S3) Information skills - critical reading

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - influencing skills – argumentation

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S6) Time and project management - personal organisation

    (S7) Time and project management - project planning

    (S8) Time and project management - project management

    (S9) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

    (S10) Research skills - all information skills

  • Fairytales and Fear: the Fantastic in Literature (GRMN316)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module seeks to introduce students to the genre of the fantastic in German literature, focusing on two areas: fairytales in the Grimm’s Märchen and contemporary Romanticism (Tieck, Hoffmann), and poetic as well as psychological realism (Schnitzler, Storm, von Droste-Hulshoff);

    It will familiarise students with key theories of the genre, with a particular emphasis on Todorov’s theory of the fantastic, and Freud’s reading of Der Sandmann and develop students’ skills in textual interpretation through close reading.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate an understanding of the literary genre of the fantastic and the psychological notion of the uncanny.

    (LO2) Students will have enhanced their critical reading skills of narrative prose from a range of historical periods, and of theoretical texts and secondary literature.

    (LO3) Students will be able to apply theoretical concepts to literary texts and assess the merits of competing interpretations.

    (S1) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S2) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S3) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S4) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

    (S5) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

  • From Sheepskin to E-reader: Books and Publishing in France (FREN331)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with a good understanding of the main developments of the history of the book in France from the medieval period and the Ancien Régime;

    To introduce students to the study and description of old printed and hand-written books;

    To encourage students to reflect on the interaction between text and non-textual elements (illustrations, layout, typography);

    To develop an understanding of the importance of the printing press for shaping of popular culture.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) After having completed this module students will have a good understanding of the main developments of the history of the book in France from the medieval period to the present day.

    (LO2) Students will have been introduced to the study and description of old printed and hand-written books and will be able to use the appropriate technical vocabulary to describe and analyse features of layout, typography and physical appearance.

    (LO3) They will have reflected on the interaction between text and non-textual elements (illustrations, layout, typography) and have developed an understanding of the importance of the printing press for shaping of popular culture.

    (LO4) Through the project they will have learned to identify suitable research topics, formulate research questions in relation to these topics, collect relevant primary and secondary sources and report on their findings in oral and written form.

    (S1) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S2) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting and using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

    (S3) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S4) Adaptability

  • Italian Crime Stories: From Noir Fiction to Mafia Films (ITAL321)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce and broaden the students’ perceptions of Italian crime and Mafia fiction and film;

    To introduce a variety of theoretical and critical approaches and considers how the different sources can relate to each other and to society;

    To explore and analyse a variety of sources (including novels, films and TV series);

    To make students aware of relevant aspects of Italian crime and Mafia fiction and film which they may wish to explore further in postgraduate research programmes.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An ability to understand and discuss literary texts, films and other artefacts and to place these sources in its broader historical, cultural and social context.

    (LO2) An ability to apply theoretical approaches or critical secondary literature to the analysis of written and audio-visual sources.  

    (LO3) Ability to demonstrate confidence in written analysis and debate

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Oral skills

    (S3) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S5) Personal attributes and qualities - Independence

    (S6) Research skills - Independent analysis

  • Language & Society (GRMN313)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To familiarise students with key concepts in sociolinguistics;

    To enable students to apply key concepts in the analysis of samples of the German language and in the discussion of the social relevance of language variations;

    To develop an understanding of the link between language and (national) identity and the role of German in Germany, Austria and Switzerland;

    To develop an understanding of the importance of the German language and its variations for the identity of individual speakers;

    To develop an understanding of recent language changes and their causes and perceptions in society.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand sociolinguistic concepts such as dialect or sociolect and their significance as social markers in society.

    (LO2) Recognise features of certain variations of the language.

    (LO3) Understand the role that language plays for individual, group and national identity.

    (LO4) Demonstrate a critical understanding of EU language policies and their effects.

    (LO5) Understand how language works to change or maintain power relations.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Global citizenship - Understanding of equality and diversity

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

  • Resistance and Collaboration: the French Legacy (FREN343)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To introduce students to a range of key post-1945 French responses to the issues of resistance and collaboration during the wartime Occupation of France (printed, film and video);

    To explore the different ways in which those materials engage with the complex issues of history, memory and responsibility;

    To develop students’ ability to read materials critically, and to draw conclusions across these by comparing and contrasting;

    To encourage reflection and discussion on the ongoing questions surrounding France’s engagement with her past;

    To support students’ ability to produce coherent and focussed writing on the module themes.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) As a result of the module, students should have improved their ability to: read/view unfamiliar and challenging literary, historical and cinematic materials, showing specific knowledge about the contexts in which those texts were produced

    (LO2) Appreciate the diversity of historical, literary and cinematic material available on the topic, by considering a variety of differing approaches to common themes, in order to evaluate representations of the Occupation years

    (LO3) Understand the society and historical context from which the prescribed materials emerge and to which their authors belong

    (LO4) Contribute to seminar discussion, analysing materials with regard to their broad themes, significant detail, and socio-cultural, historical and ideological context; and detecting affinities between the prescribed materials by analysing common themes whilst making cross comparisons between authors and contexts

    (LO5) Demonstrate an awareness of the intercultural sensitivity required for a successful understanding of the material and themes under consideration

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S4) Personal attributes and qualities: ability to work independently

  • Resistance and Renewal: Spanish Poetry From the Folk Songs of the Frontier to the Slam Sessions of Madrid (HISP327)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to introduce students to poetry written in Spanish, from medieval and early modern times to Golden Age cultural production and the latest movements in performance poetry, slams and jam sessions, including some Chilean folk literature. In summary, the module aims to cover some of the major movements and trends in poetry in Spanish up to the present day.

    The module seeks to explore different attempts to assert resistance and the ways in which the poetic art can exert renewal (of the literary field, of ideas, of identities, of political movements...) through some of its best-known literature.

    The module aims to approach issues on the political and historical frameworks that surround this poetry, and the creation and establishment of the official literary canon.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Upon completion of the module, students will be able to understand and analyse poetry in Spanish within the specific historical and socio-cultural context in which these different bodies of work were composed and originally disseminated.

    (LO2) Upon completion of the module, students will be able to substantiate their written work with critical theory relevant to the literature studied and participate in class discussion concerning the role of the poetry in question.

    (LO3) Upon completion of the module, students will be able to conduct detailed analyses of the literature in question and will have developed competence in completing systematic readings of a given text and its historical and cultural context.

    (LO4) Upon completion of the module, students will have a nuanced understanding of the environment from which this poetry emerged, the different responses it encountered and the challenges it posed for the future of Spanish poetry.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S5) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

  • Screening Spain: Contemporary Spanish Film and Television (HISP344)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To analyse television, film (documentary and narrative) from Spain in the context of Spanish culture and wider theories of media and cultural studies;

    To examine a number of Spanish films and television productions with their broader sociohistorical, political and industrial contexts;

    To explore the ways in which Spanish film and television respond to and intervene in contemporary social and political debates;

    To enhance students' skills of critical analysis and independent thinking through active learning and research led teaching.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate an advanced understanding and knowledge of theories of film and television.

    (LO2) Be able to show how the texts studied on the course intervene in debates surrounding contemporary social and / or political issues.

    (LO3) Apply theoretical approaches or secondary literature to the analysis of film and television.

    (LO4) Successfully consider issues of representation in film and television in terms of Spanish cultural studies and media studies.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S5) Personal attributes and qualities - Independence

  • Terror Remembered: Representing Traumatic Histories in Latin America, Europe and China (MODL304)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to approaches to memory and to a body of textual, visual, material representation of terror that has become a key focus for critical analysis in recent cultural studies;

    To provide a context in which students can engage in systematic comparisons between European, Latin American and East Asian experiences and representations of social and political trauma;

    To provoke students to reflect systematically on the political and ethical implications of literary, material and cinematic representation of traumatic histories.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) A basic knowledge of the circumstances and character of the Holocaust in Europe, the experiences of dictatorship and civil war in Latin America, and, where relevant, the Japanese occupation of China and the Chinese Cultural Revolution.

    (LO2) A detailed understanding of the ways in which traumatic experiences of state terror and civil conflict have been represented in Latin American, European or Chinese cultural discourse.

    (LO3) Familiarity with the terms and methods used in the critical analysis of literary, visual and heritage practice and in particular with the terms of critical debate about the ethics and aesthetics of representing political violence and genocide

    (LO4) The ability to apply comparative analysis to the understanding of local and individual events, texts and artefacts

    (LO5) For students of a modern foreign language: enhanced ability to use their skills for reading and analysing a range of complex texts in the target language.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills – oral and poster design

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

    (S3) Research skills - all information skills

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S5) Global citizenship - cultural awareness

    (S6) Personal attributes and qualities - independence

  • The German Cinema Since 1990 (GRMN330)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with a detailed knowledge of the German cinema since 1990 and its social and institutional context;

    To sensitise students to debates about the return of popular-genre and star-led cinema in the German film industry since 1990 and the rise of so-called 'heritage' cinema;          
    To sensitise students to films as historical texts which emerge from and engage with the context of their production;

    To sensitise students to film as an aesthetic artefact determined on the one hand by particular conditions of production (i.e. the studio system) and produced on the other according to cinematic conventions of film language, genre etc.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain an understanding of the ongoing development of film within the social, institutional and commercial context of the German film industry of the 1990s.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate a good understanding of the critical debates surrounding the return of genre cinema and popular film-making in the German film industry in the 1990s and they will be able to relate these to debates about German film-making before 1990.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate a critical understanding of the work of some of the most important film directors to have emerged in since 1990 and the relation of their work to traditions of German film-making and international trends

    (LO4) Students will demonstrate a critical grasp of a range of visual, textual and other historical material, an ability to extract and synthesise information and to express arguments cogently in writing.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Research skills - All Information skills

  • Language, Society and Identity in Contemporary Spain (HISP329)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To deepen students’ understanding of core theoretical concepts in sociolinguistics;

    To explore the particularities of the sociolinguistic context of Spain; To introduce students to sociolinguistic research methodologies;

    To enable students to manipulate and apply SL theory and practice.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To understand key topics in sociolinguistics

    (LO2) To read and critique academic texts such as journal articles, book chapters etc.

    (LO3) To formulate arguments based on academic literature

    (LO4) To develop academic writing style

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S6) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S7) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

  • The Sociolinguistics of Contemporary Italy (ITAL320)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To outline the linguistic situation of contemporary Italy;

    To develop the students’ critical awareness of issues relating to language in society, with specific reference to the Italian context;

    To introduce theoretical and methodological aspects of sociolinguistic research.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understanding of the main factors at play in evaluating the Italian linguistic situation

    (LO2) Ability to assess Italian linguistic behaviour on the basis of individual and social variables

    (LO3) Ability to apply the main sociolinguistic concepts and categories confidently

    (LO4) Ability to critically evaluate relevant literature in Italian sociolinguistics

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S6) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S7) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

  • The Sociolinguistics of Modern French (FREN333)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Deepen students’ understanding of language policy in general, and French language policy in particular (from the reign of François I to François Hollande );

    Explore the social situation in France with regard to the use of language;

    Consider aspects of variation in language across France (both European and overseas territories);

    Introduce students to the methodology of research in sociolinguistics.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand the ways in which language is appropriate for social purposes.

    (LO2) Read and use unfamiliar texts, including journal articles

    (LO3) Evaluate critical approaches to sociolinguistic issues in France

    (LO4) Contribute to seminar discussion, exploiting their own increased understanding of the issues at play

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

  • Translation Project (MODL312)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To give students the opportunity to translate an extended piece of work to a high level of proficiency, with appropriate support;

    To conduct a close analysis of source material, paying particular attention to questions of style and register and rendering these appropriately in the target text;

    To give students the opportunity to carry out independent research at an advanced level, with appropriate support, into a topic of interest to them;

    To develop students' self-reflective skills, encouraging them to think critically about and justify translation choices.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrateawareness of theoretical issues and stylistic choices involved in translatingat a high level.

    (LO2) Abilityto convey source text in target language in an appropriate manner and to a highlevel.

    (LO3) Construct, focus and structure an independent project, in discussion with a personal supervisor working in that subject area.

    (LO4) Analyse source materials, and develop coherent and original arguments on the basis of research.

    (LO5) Manage time effectively and efficiently and plan a process of research, reading and writing.

    (LO6) Present a confident and coherent justification of translation strategy in clear written prose, following scholarly conventions of referencing and bibliography.

    (S1) Improving own learning / performance - reflective practice

    (S2) Improving own learning / performance - self-awareness / self-analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills - written

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - influencing skills – argumentation

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S6) Time and project management - personal organisation

    (S7) Time and project management - project planning

    (S8) Time and project management - project management

    (S9) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

    (S10) Critical thinking and problem solving - creative thinking

    (S11) Information skills - critical reading

    (S12) Research skills - all information skills

    (S13) Research skills - awareness of / commitment to academic integrity

    (S14) Personal attributes and qualities - initiative

  • Translation Theory and Practice (MODL311)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop an understanding of theoretical issues of translation and to apply these in analysing existing texts as well as in making translation choices;

    To gain insight into the professional practice of translation;

    To further develop advanced language skills in both English and the target language(s);

    To be able to identify aspects of register, style and complex linguistic structures and to render these appropriately into English;

    To be able to translate a range of texts at a high level of proficiency and to select a suitable text for translation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate an awareness of the theoretical issues and stylistic choices involved in translating at a high level.

    (LO2) Students will be able to translate a range of texts into appropriate English.

    (LO3) Students will have acquired the comprehension and linguistic skills to understand and analyse complex texts in both their target language(s) and English.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S2) Improving own learning / performance - reflective practice.

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - creative thinking.

    (S4) Global citizenship - cultural awareness.

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis.

    (S6) Advanced language skills in both the target language(s) and English

  • From Kung Fu to Anime: Innovations in Asian Cinema (CHIN320)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To understand key periods in Asian cinema;

    To understand key trends in cinematic innovations;

    To understand digital and physical sites of exhibition as well as distribution of films;

    To analyse the relationship of technology and genre;

    To understand the cultural contexts within which these films circulate and the ways in which they create cultural meanings;

    To enhance students' skills of critical analysis and independent thinking.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To introduce students to key conceptual debates on the production and context of Asian cinema.

    (LO2) To develop students ability to apply knowledge about technology to the study of Asian film.

    (LO3) To encourage students to undertake independent research projects and to work collaboratively.

    (LO4) To enhance students' skills of critical analysis and independent thinking.

    (S1) Show familiarity with key conceptual debates revolving around the production and context of Asian cinema.

    (S2) Demonstrate an applied knowledge of the wider historical context in which cinema evolved in Asia.

    (S3) Ability to undertake independent research projects that are informed by an understanding of key theoretical concepts.

    (S4) To be able to undertake a close textual analysis of filmic texts of different historical time periods.

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

You will be taught in a mixture of formal lectures, seminars and small group tutorials where a friendly environment prevails and great attention is paid to giving feedback on assessed work.

In language classes, we make every effort to ensure that we have a small number of students compared to competitor institutions, which means that academic staff are able to support students to achieve their full potential. All language modules involve continuous assessment such as oral presentations, listening tests and grammar tests as well as exams. Tuition takes place in small groups with first-language speakers playing a prominent part and includes a range of skills such as listening, writing, speaking, interpreting and translation.

Students are also expected to make regular use of our fully-refurbished Language Lounge to enhance their own study. We encourage our students to become independent learners, and support them through our dedicated library resources in the Sydney Jones Library which is open 24-hour in term time. We also make extensive use of our virtual learning environment VITAL where students can complete structured tasks outside the classroom.


Assessment

Performance throughout the year is carefully monitored and used to supplement examinations. For language, such a programme of continuous assessment involves evaluating performance in a variety of written and oral exercises. Other modules have a mix of essay and exam assessment. Our aim is always to assess by methods of evaluation appropriate to the skills being developed and to allow students to gain credit for good work done during the year.

Exams take place at two points in the academic year: at the end of Semester One in January and at the end of the session in May, so that the workload is evenly distributed. As regards the final degree result, for language programmes, the second year’s work counts for 20%, the work done during the Year Abroad (foreign exams or extended essay or portfolio) counts for another 10%, and the final year’s work counts for 70%.