Ancient Worlds

Choose from a range of blended learning courses. For further information on blended learning click 'What you need to know' in the left hand navigation. 

Ancient Egypt on Film (Course Cancelled)

Ancient Egypt on Film (Course Cancelled)

From Liz Taylor’s Cleopatra to Christian Bale’s Moses, Ancient Egyptian movies are among the most popular no matter how questionable their representation of history is! This course will examine the use of Ancient Egypt in horror, comedy, animation, and epic films. We will look at the ways in which directors have chosen to represent religion, history, iconography, and values in motion pictures. In this lively course, we will watch clips, discuss themes, and examine the impact of the various directorial decisions.10 meetings from Saturday 9 October with Dr Dawn Power.

The Imperial Roman Army: From Augustus to Septimius Severus

The Imperial Roman Army: From Augustus to Septimius Severus

This course provides an overview of the Roman Army from the reforms of Augustus to the end of the C2nd AD in the reign of Septimius Severus. Using archaeological and historical evidence, we will explore the structure of the Roman army and its role in times of war and peace, providing participants with a detailed understanding of the operation and impact of this ancient military force. 5 meetings from Tuesday 19 October with Dr Joanne Ball.

A History of Greek archaeology and archaeologists I

A History of Greek archaeology and archaeologists

Discover the story of archaeology in the Prehistoric Aegean and Ancient Greece through a review of significant figures and the sites they excavated. This part of the course (Autumn 2021) provides the opportunity for students to evaluate key themes and controversies such as the limitations of pioneer excavations, the role of early collectors and the motivation for the foundation of overseas schools and institutes of archaeology in Greece. 3 meetings from Wednesday 6 October with Dr Gina Muskett.

Latin I

Latin I

Latin I provides students with the basic key elements of Latin grammar and helps students gain an understanding of some important features of Roman culture and society. Students will be prompted to learn Latin vocabulary and to find English derivatives, an exercise which will also improve their English speaking and writing skills. 8 meetings from Wednesday 6 October with Guendalina Taietti.

Greek I

Greek I

Greek I provides students with knowledge of the basic key elements of Classical Greek grammar. The course enables students to understand how the Greek ancient language is structured and why it is structured that way, thus developing students’ linguistic skills and critical thinking in English. Students will be reading adapted texts from Classical authors, and will get acquainted with some important features of Greek culture and society. 8 meetings from Thursday 7 October with Taietti Guendalina.

After Rome

After Rome

In 410 Rome was sacked by the Goths and though it recovered initially it was sacked again in 455 and the last Roman emperor was deposed in 476. Why did this happen? What was to replace the Roman Empire in the west as groups of Visigoths, Ostrogoths, Vandals, Franks and Anglo Saxons established themselves in the period from 400-800? This course will examine the reality of the post Roman world. 10 meetings from Monday 27 September with Michael Tunnicliffe.

The Gospel of Luke

The Gospel of Luke

This course aims to provide participants with a close reading of the Gospel of Luke. While it contains much material found also in Matthew and Mark it has a series of distinctive narratives including Nativity and Resurrection accounts as well as parables such as the Good Samaritan and Prodigal Son found only in this Gospel. What are the circumstances that produced this work and what is its distinctive contribution to our picture of Jesus? 10 meetings from Monday 27 September with Michael Tunnicliffe.