Mersey built sailing vessels - pre 1860.

Chris Michael

This is a companion to my listing of Steam vessels and is less complete because of the much greater number of sailing vessels compared to steam. Here ocean-going vessels are recorded. There were also many smaller schooners, sloops, flats, and fishing vessels built on the Mersey.

Information mainly from newspapers, where [] is additional clarifying information. [sic] means that is what was written, but it might be in error, or a typo. Also from Lloyd's register (LR) and Mercantile Navy List (MNL).

Shipbuilder Index.
Year Index.

**** pages still under construction - after 1820 up to 1860 - but so far mostly to 1834 - plus builders who also built steam ships ***

Main Index.

Shipbuilders


Laird, Birkenhead [briefly at Liverpool also]
Seddon, Birkenhead
Russell, Birkenhead
Other Birkenhead built sailing vessels
Runcorn
Warrington built vessels
Dawson & Pearson, Liverpool
Grayson & Leadley, Liverpool
Humble, Hurry, Milcrest, Liverpool
Clarke & Nickson, Liverpool
Mottershead, Hayes, Hutchinson, Liverpool
Caleb & James Smith, Liverpool
Bland & Chaloner, Liverpool
J Rathbone, Liverpool
William & Richard Haselden, Liverpool & Ellesmere Port
Wilson & Gladstone; J Wilson; T Wilson, Liverpool, later Birkenhead
J Steele, Liverpool
Page & Grantham, Liverpool
Davenport, Grindrod & Patrick, Liverpool
Hodgson, Liverpool
Thomas Royden, Liverpool
Thomas Vernon, Liverpool, later Birkenhead
P Cato, Liverpool
W C Miller, Liverpool
Rennie, Johnson & Rankin, Liverpool
Liverpool Steam Tug Co, Queen's Dock, Liverpool
Getty, Josiah Jones, Jones & Quiggin, Liverpool
Other Liverpool shipbuilders:
Built Liverpool/Mersey by unknown shipyard.


List on date order

Named sailing vessels listed by type [wood/iron, Ship, Barque, Brig, Schooner,..] and date (note many full-rigged ships were later converted to barque rig, as it needed less crew):

Wooden sailing vessels.
1820: Rio Packet S; Huskisson S; Mary Catherine S; Duke of Lancaster S; Columbia S; John Heyes S; Sarah S; Bootle Bg; George the Fourth Bg; Kate Bg; Agaphea Bg; John Begg Bg; Baffin whaler;
1821: Constantine S; [Ellen Mar S]; Hector S; Corsair S; Frances S; Pacific Bg; Hardware Bg; Lancashire Witch Bg; Devonshire Bg;
1822: Bolton S; Allerton S; Moro Castle S; Mary Brade Bk; Rapid Bg;
1823: Lalla Rookh S; Marmion S; Boode S; Elizabeth S; Christina S; Wilsons Bg; Rocket Bg; Thomas Dempsey Bg; St George Bg; Thomas Hyde Bn; Ellen Jenkinson Bn;
1824: Mersey S; Regular S; Brazilian S; Cuba S; Murray S; Elizabeth S; Hellespont Bg; Camoens Bg; Smyrna Packet Bg; William Salthouse Bg; Colombian Bg; Porter Bg; Children Bg; Tickler Bg; Zeno Bg; Oporto Bg; Zante Bg; Mary Ann Sr;
1825: Mary Bibby S; Arabian S; Huddersfield S; Hopkinson S; Irlam Bk; Julia Bg; Alecto Bg; Lydia Bg; Warwick Bg; Arab Bg; Inca Bg; Ayacucho Sr;
1826: Grace S; Rachel S; Indian Chief S; Gipsey S; Memnon S; Dyson Bk; Bahamian Bk; Amelia Bg; Bispham Bg; John Ormerod Bg; Richard Bg; Dennett Sr;
1827: Lady Rowena S; Mary S; Chatham Bk; Fanny Connell Bk; Ripley Bg; Nandi Bg; Lusitania Bg;
1828: Isabel S; Sandbach S; Margaret Highfield Bg; Joseph Winter Bg; Cicely Bg; Mary Scott Bg; Lucy Sr/Bg;
1829: Bland S; Royal Saxon S; Miranda S; Laura S; Livingston S; Statesman S; Robert Finnie Bk; Judith Bk; Charles Eyes Bk; Hope Bg; Henry Hoyle Bg;
1830: Theodosia S; Denison S; Parker S; Sir John Beresford S; Cheshire Bk; Eliza Killick Bk; Gratitude Bk; Frances Ann Bg; Llama Sr
1831: Cordelia S; Barbadian Bk; Annie Baldwin Bk; Lady Charlotte Bk; Berbice Bk; John Brooks Sr; Frank Sr; Laura Ann Sr;
1832: Imogen S; Johnstone S; Frances S; Glanmaleire Bk; Arethusa Bk; Mary Worrall Bk; John Souchay Bk; Frederick Huth Bk; William Rushton Bg; Thomas Leech Bg; Reindeer Sr;
1833: Tapley S; Henrietta Bk; Faerie Queen Bk; Georgina Bk; Thomas Worthington Bg; Charles Hamerton Bg; Ellen German Bg; Emma Sr;
1834: Litherland S; Otterspool S; Cora S; Euphrates S; Ann Lockerby S; Ranger Bk; Argentina Bk; John M'Adam Bk; Agnes Bg; Eliza Sanders Sr; Lynx Sr; Little Penn Sr; Young Gipsey Sr;
1835: John O'Gaunt S; Tory S; Mary Somerville S; John Bagshaw S; Lancashire Witch Bk; Isis Bk; Isabella Bk; Susannah Collings Sr;
1836: William Jardine S; John Knox S; Heyes S; Trafalgar S; Mary Hartley S; Orixa S; Tiger S; Earl Powis Bk; Dorothea Bk; Castries Bk; Irlam Bk; Alice Jane Bk; Isabel Bk; Jane Bk; Enterprize Bk; Hermes Bk;
1837:
Emily S; Paragon S; Woodstock Bk;
1838: Jamaica S; John Bull S; Sunda S; Lancaster S; Henrietta S; Helena S Abbots Reading Bk; Mary Imrie Bk; Priscilla Bk; Mary Marsden Bk; Anne Jane Bk; Emma Graham Bg; Dorset Bg; Margaret Bg; Dinah Sr;
1839: Helen Stewart S; Manilla Bk; Mary Ellen Bk; Creamore Bk; Maia Bk; Currency Bk; Pilgrim Bk; Competitor Bk; Robert Whiteway Bk; Providence Bg; Creole Bg; Elizabeth Wood Bg; Columbine Sr; Centaur Sr; Sphynx Sr; Tom Banks Sr;
1840: Urgent S; Livingstone S; Devon S; Seagull Bk; Rosanna Bk; Mysore Bk; Meg of Meldon Bk; Buenos Ayrian Bk; St Vincent Bg; Grace Darling Bg; Governor Bg; Mexican Packet Bg; Martha Ridgway Bg; Harlequin Sr; Will o'the Wisp Sr;
1841: Beethoven S; Syria S; Lydia S; Bangalore S; John M'Vicar S; Dicky Sam Bk; Chimbrazo Bk; James Graham Bn; Samson Bn; Panope Sr; Grimaldi Sr; Sampson Sr;
18: ; ;

Wooden Liverpool pilot vessels, built Liverpool from 1820.
1822: Liver no.9; Happy Return no.4;
1824: Kitty no.2;
1831: Irlam no.6;
1834: Liverpool no.1;
1835: Earl of Liverpool no.3; Town of Liverpool no.10;
1842: Perseverance no.12;
1843: Victoria no.5;
1844: George Canning no.7;
1846: Albert Edward Prince of Wales no.8; Liver no.9;
1847: Mersey no.11;
1849: Auspicious no.4;
1852: Pioneer no.6; The Duke no.3;

Iron sailing vessels.
1838: Ironsides S;
1840: Cayman (Droger).
1841: John Laird Bk; Pronto Sr; John Wilson Patten Bg;
1842: Libya Bg;
1844: Richard Cobden Bk;
18: ; ;
18: ; ; ;

Lightships, built Liverpool/Mersey, More history.
1817: Milo (wood, no build information, in service to 1841)
1820: Comet (wood, no build information)
1835: North Star (wood, ON 24090, 94tons, built Castle Northwich)
1835: Meteor (wood, 142 tons, ON 2379, builder unknown, but at Liverpool)
1840: Albert (wood)
1842: Prince (iron)
1850: Tobin (iron)

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Sketch in 1861 of vessels leaving the Mersey after being windbound by a gale:

[from Illustrated London News - Saturday 30 March 1861]:
A SCENE IN THE MERSEY. Annexed is an Engraving, from a sketch by Mr. W. Woods, of Everton, Liverpool, of the animated appearance which the Mersey presented, a week or two since, on the termination of the late contrary winds. The wind, which had for some time been adverse, for the previous fortnight had been one continued gale, doing considerable damage to shipping in the river. When the first favourable opportunity offered, the whole of the windbound vessels hurried out of the docks, flags flying, &c., with the utmost speed, like so many boys let loose from school. The Mersey presented a gay appearance as the numerous vessels were in hot haste making for sea either by sail or tug-boat.


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Sailing vessels built Seddon, Birkenhead, [see also Steam vessels].
Unknown SV 1832 (probably Frances)
Litherland SV 1834
Lancashire Witch SV 1835
Heyes SV 1836
Mary Imrie SV 1838
Dickey Sam SV 1841


Wooden Unknown. Probably ship Frances.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 30 August 1832]:
On Tuesday last, there was launched from the building yard of Messrs. Seddon and Leadley, a fine ship of about 350 tons burthen, for Andrew Taylor, Esq.


Wooden ship Litherland, built Seddon & Leadley, Birkenhead, 1834, 305 tons, 101.8 x 23.10 ft, owned Heyes & Co, for Barbados trade. Traded from Liverpool to the far east until for sale 1848 - when owned Australia. Rigged as a barque. Wrecked 23 April 1853, off Clarke Island, voyage Newcastle NSW to Hobart.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 20 June 1834]:
To-morrow, (Saturday,) will be launched, at half-past ten o'clock, from the yard of Messrs. Seddon and Leadley, Woodside, Cheshire, a beautiful new ship, intended for the Barbados trade, and owned by Messrs. Heyes, Litherland, and Co.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 11 July 1834]:
Will sail immediately. For BARBADOS, The new Ship LITHERLAND, THOMAS HAWKINS, Master; now on her first voyage, coppered, and in complete order; now loading west side Salthouse Dock. For freight or passage apply to HEYES, LITHERLAND, and Co., Wolstenholme-square.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Friday 24 March 1848]:
THE fine Barque LITHERLAND, 305 tons O.M., built at Birkenhead in 1834, under particular inspection, for private use and for the West India trade, sails very fast, and carries a fair cargo for tonnage, has a flush deck, a bust man figure-head, and an abundant inventory of stores; length, 101 feet 8 inches; breadth, 23 feet 10 inches; depth, 16 feet 10 inches. Lying in the London Dock. For inventories and further particulars apply to THOMAS SCRUTTON, Sworn Broker, 3, Corbet-court, Gracechurch-street.

[from Australian and New Zealand Gazette - Saturday 22 October 1853]:
WRECK OF THE BARQUE LITHERLAND, OF HOBART. We regret to record the total loss of the barque Litherland, 306 tons, Capt. Smith, of this port [Hobart], bound hitherward from Newcastle, New South Wales, with about 400 tons coals, and other merchandise, which happened on the 23rd instant, the vessel having been about eight days out from the above port of departure, at Clark's Island, Bass's Straits. The particulars of the wreck, as reported by the master, are as follows. At eight o'clock on the 23rd, the wind was variable from S. to S.E., ship heading S.W., Clark's Island bearing west, distant about thirty miles. At eleven A. M., bore up for Clark's Island, the wind at S.E., blowing hard, with thick buy weather. At four p. m., got up sixty fathoms of chain cable on the larboard anchor, and thirty-five fathoms of chain cable on the starboard anchor, and got both anchors ready to let go. At five p. m., shortened sail, Clark's Island bearing north, distance about five miles. At half-past five p. m., rounded the west point of Clark's Island, ship close to the wind, under her fore and main topsails and foresail, thinking to bring up in the right harbour, but found the ship surrounded with rocks, there not being room to wear or stay. Let go the anchor. A few seconds after the anchor was gone, the vessel struck on a sunken rock, the ship paid off the rock, and commenced going down head foremost. I ordered the boat to be cut away and all hands to get into her. One minute after we got in the boat she sank. We all left the ship as we stood upright, for we could save nothing. We all proceeded ashore in the boat and hauled her up, all landing safe - the weather being thick and hazy at the time, and heavy showers of rain. The vessel went down so suddenly that the captain's wife, who was on board, had not time to secure a bonnet for herself or for her child of four years old, which was with her. Nothing was saved. There were ten seamen on board, and when down the gallant yard was just perceptible above water. Captain James, of the Scotia, when five days out from Geelong, humanely hove his vessel to and took the captain and crew from the island, and kindly administering to their wants, has brought them on to this port. The Litherland was the property of Mrs. Seal, and was insured in the Derwent and Tamar Assurance Company here for £1,000. The cargo was insured in Sydney for £1,500.


Wooden barque Lancashire Witch, built Seddon & Leadley, Birkenhead, 1835, 195 tons, Captain Grayson, owned Fairfield, for Liverpool - Trieste service. Registered Liverpool. Later sailed to South America and to West Indies. On 18th August 1851, voyage Liverpool to Puerto Rico, wrecked on North side of Barbuda. Captain Eccleston and 6 crew lost, 4 saved. LR 1851 gives owned Shallcross, Liverpool, wrecked.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 20 February 1835]:
Ship Launch. - On Monday, a beautiful barque of about 200 tons was launched from the building yard of Messrs. Seddon and Leadley, at North Birkenhead. She is intended for the Mediterranean trade, and will be commanded by Captain H Grayson. We understand she is a very fine specimen of naval architecture.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 14 May 1840]:
Monte Video, Feb 25th. The Lancashire Witch, Grayson. from Liverpool, arrived here to-day. having been on shore on the English Rank since 19th instant. She had been boarded by several men, and plundered, and was afterwards lightened and assisted off bv H.M.S. Grecian.

[from Northern Whig - Tuesday 30 September 1851]:
The barque Lancashire Witch, Eccleston, which sailed from Liverpool, the 15th June, for Porto Rico, and put into Belfast on the 18th, leaky, after being repaired, sailed on the 10th of July, was lost, during a gale, on the North side of Barbuda, and went to pieces in ten minutes; Captain Eccleston, five men and a boy were drowned; the mate and three men were saved. The Lancashire Witch belonged to a firm in Carrickfergus. [Another report: struck during a hurricane at 9am on the 18th August; hull sold for £15 5s]


Wooden ship Heyes, built Seddon & Leadley, Birkenhead, 1836, 326 tons, owned Heyes, Litherand & Co. for trade to Barbados. Voyage Liverpool to Barbados, Captain Nagle, wrecked 23 December 1836 on Hoyle Bank.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 04 March 1836]:
Launch: To-morrow (Saturday) at half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, a beautiful ship, a splendid specimen of naval architecture, owned by Messrs Heyes, Litherland and Co, will be launched from the yard of Messrs Seddon and Leadley, Woodside, near Birkenhead. Burthen 500 tons. [another report: named Heyes, burthen 326 tons, new register]

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 05 April 1836]:
Will sail immediately. For BARBADOES The beautiful new Ship HEYES, Jeremiah NAGLE, master. Now on her first voyage, copper-fastened and coppered, and has excellent accommodations for passengers; loading south-west corner George's Dock. For freight or passage apply to HEYES, LITHERLAND, and Co.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 11 November 1836]:
WEST INDIES - First Vessel. For BARBADOES, The fast-sailing ship HEYES, Jeremiah Nagle, Master; now loading west side Queen's Dock. For freight and apply to HEYES, LITHERLAND and Co.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 26 December 1836]:
EXTENSIVE DISASTERS ON THE BANKS. It will be seen, by a reference to our Shipping Intelligence, that a fleet of outward-bound put to sea on Friday last [23 Dec], and that several fine vessels were wrecked ere they could get clear of the dangerous Banks at the entrance of the Mersey. There was, it appears, a heavy sea on at the time, with the wind blowing freshly from the N. E.; and, the narrow channel being crowded with vessels of all sizes, several unfortunately got on the Banks, where they were left by the ebbing tide. The wind continued to blow freshly throughout the night: the swell of the sea increased; and the night completed the destruction which the day had commenced. Among the vessels which will prove total wrecks are the Heyes and the Sandbach, two of the finest West Indiamen belonging to the port. We are sorry to state, that two of the Sandbach's crew were drowned. The disasters which took place on Friday and Friday night are, we believe, more numerous than any which ever occurred before, in the same space of time, to the outward-bound on the Banks. Whether they were all the result of accident, or whether some of them were not the consequence of carelessness, remains to be seen. We have heard persons in every way capable of forming an opinion state their belief, that, if more care had been exercised by the people in charge of the vessels, there would have been fewer lost. On Saturday quantities of wreck were washed up on the Cheshire and Welsh coasts adjacent to the Dee.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 27 December 1836]:
Saturday 24 December. The Heyes, Nagle, for Barbados, sunk during the night on East Hoyle. [later report: Wednesday 28 December. Part of the cargo of the Heyes, for Barbadoes, has been washed on shore near Abergele.]


Wooden barque Mary Imrie, built Seddon, Birkenhead, 1838, 314 tons, registered and owned Imrie, Liverpool. LR 1853: 261 tons. Traded to Africa and S America. Voyage Huasco to Swansea, July 1853, leaky and foundered south of Chiloe, crew saved.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 10 September 1838]:
Launch. A fine barque was launched, on Thursday, from the building yard of Mr. Seddon, North Birkenhead. She was christened the "Mary Imrie" by the lady whose name she bears. After the launch, a party partook of a handsome cold collation.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 15 November 1838]:
For CAPE OF GOOD HOPE, ALGOA BAY, and MAURITIUS, The fine A 1 Barque MARY IMRIE, Andrew Boyd, Commander; Liverpool built; now on her first voyage, and expected to sail very fast; will be a found first-rate conveyance for goods or passengers, having superior accommodations. Apply on board, in Prince's Dock; Messrs. James Aikin and Son, or to IMRIE and TOMLINSON.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 26 September 1853]:
VALPARAISO, 29. The Mary Imrie, Lyne, from Huasco for Swansea, foundered at sea; crew arrived here. [Another report foundered south of Chiloe; barque; sprung a leak; before 30th July]


Wooden barque Dicky Sam (also Dickey Sam), built William Seddon, Liverpool, 1841, 274 tons, 101.2 x 24.3 x 16.0 ft, owned John Thompson, Liverpool, for service to Bombay, the Poole, then others at Liverpool. Later owned Cumming, Glasgow, registered Glasgow. ON 14715. [Dicky Sam was a slang word for Liverpudlian - before Scouser came into use in the 1940s].
Voyage Shields to Alexandria with iron rail components, wrecked Shipwash, 7th Sept 1866, captain and 4 crew lost, 8 saved.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 09 February 1841:
LAUNCH. - Yesterday, about half-past twelve, a fine barque, the "Dicky Sam," was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Seddon and Co., Trentham-street. This vessel is of about 360 tons burthen, and was built for Messrs. Hall and Co. She is, in every respect, a crack ship, and was much admired by the connoisseurs who were present. After the launch a number of ladies and gentlemen partook of a sumptuous cold repast in the mould-room.

[from Glasgow Evening Citizen - Tuesday 11 September 1866]:
THE LATE CAPTAIN WILLIAM CUMMING. It will be observed, from a brief notice in another column, that the barque Dicky Sam was wrecked, on the morning of Friday last, on the Shipwash Sand, off the coast of Suffolk, while proceeding with a cargo of railway chairs from Shields to Alexandria, and that her owner, who commanded her, and four of his crew, were drowned. The owner, we are grieved to know, was our old friend Captain William Cumming, well known for many years is connection with the Stranraer and Liverpool steamers,...

[from Suffolk Chronicle - Saturday 15 September 1866]:
HARWICH. The salvage of cargo of iron, the stores and materials of the barque Dicky Sam, of Glasgow, which sank off the Shipwash on a voyage from Shields to Alexandria on the morning of the seventh inst., when the master, Wm. Cumming, and four hands were drowned, has been entrusted to Oliver John Williams Esq., Lloyd's agent, Harwich, who has arranged with divers for the recovery of the property.

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Sailing vessels built Russell & Sons shipyard, Birkenhead, [see also Steam vessels].
Castries SV 1836
8 barges 1836
Woodstock SV 1837
Providence SV 1839
Creole SV 1839
Governor SV 1840
Unknown SV 1840


Wooden barque Castries, built Russell, Birkenhead, 1836, 256 tons, owned Poole for trade to West Indies. Later owned Castries. By 1869, MNL has Castries of St Lucia, ON 1837, 264 tons, registered Castries, St Lucia, to 1868. Last MNL entry 1869 - registered and owned London. Condemned at Colon in August 1869 and sold for $25.

[from Liverpool Albion - Tuesday 26 January 1836]:
Same day a fine new vessel of upwards of 300 tons burthen, called the Castries, was launched from the ship-building yard of Messrs Robert Russell & Sons, patent-slip, north Birkenhead. We understand the vessel has been built for Mr John Mondel merchant and is intended to be a regular trader to the port in the West Indies after which she is named.

[from Liverpool Mail - Tuesday 05 November 1839]:
WEST INDIES. To sail in Fourteen days. For BERBICE, The fine A 1 Barque CASTRIES, Beazeley, Master; 256 tons register; and a desirable conveyance; lying in the Queen's Dock. For freight or passage, apply to Messrs. James Poole and Co.

[from Northern Daily Times - Friday 05 May 1854]:
The Castries, Hind, from St. Luca at this port [Liverpool]. 17th April, in lat 44, lon 29, encountered a violent hurricane, which lasted four days, the sea making a complete breach over the vessel, and carrying away bowsprit and topmast heads. Immediately after the accident the American barque Stella, bore down to render assistance.

[from Liverpool Daily Post - Saturday 16 January 1869]:
The substantial British-built Barque CASTRIES, 253 64-100 tons register, built at Liverpool in 1835, and has had, from time to time, extensive repairs, in 1861 had new decks, part new topsides, new treenails, a thorough overhaul under the inspection of Lloyds surveyors, classed by them A 1 in Red for seven years. She is copper-fastened and diagonally strapped and was sheathed in yellow up to the loading mark in 1867, masts and rigging are nearly new, and she has just come out of dry dock, has been opened fore and aft and found quite sound, and classed for two years A 1.5 in American lloyds. Has been principally employed in the West Indian trade, carries a large cargo, sails well and is abundantly found in stores. Dimensions: Length 93.4ft, Breadth 25.2ft, Depth 16,5ft, now lying in the London Docks...

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Friday 06 August 1869]:
NEW YORK. July 24. ... The Castries barque, arrived at Colon June 8 from Philadelphia, was afterwards condemned and sold by auction for $25; she sailed July 14 for this port.

Wooden barges, built Russell, Birkenhead 1836, 75 tons each. 8 vessels: Birch, Beech, Elm, Pine, Cedar, Maple, Oak and Ash. Owned Liverpool and Manchester Timber Carrying Co. Not found in MNL.

[from Liverpool Albion - Tuesday 25 October 1836]:
VESSELS LAUNCHED WHOLESALE. A novel and interesting spectacle was witnessed on Saturday week, by the launching of six vessels of 75 tons burthen each, from the building-yard of Messrs. Robert Russell and Sons, at Woodside. They are intended for the Liverpool and Manchester Timber Carrying Company, and are allowed to be the best models for inland navigation yet built. As they glided into their future element, they were respectively and appropriately named the Birch, Beech, Elm, Pine, Cedar, and Maple. Two others, we understand, will be launched for the same proprietors at the next springs, to be called the Oak and Ash. The circumstance of six being launched together from one yard, in one day, ought to be recorded in the annals of Liverpool.


Wooden barque Woodstock, built Russell, Birkenhead, 1837, 240 tons, owned Russell, registered Liverpool. Voyage Manzanilla to Cork, lost 4th April 1855, 25 miles east of Isle of Pines [now Isla de la Juventud].

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 18 September 1837]:
Launch. On Saturday last was launched from the shipbuilding-yard of Messrs. Robert Russell and Sons, at North Birkenhead, a very fine vessel, of 300 tons, named, the Woodstock, intended for the West India trade, We understand the frame of this excellent ship has effectually seasoned, having been erected and exposed to the weather since 1833; and that the fastenings include every modern improvement. ...

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Tuesday 24 October 1854]:
THE Barque WOODSTOCK, of Liverpool, 240 tons O.M., and 300 tons N.M.; is copper-fastened, and sheathed with yellow metal; has been generally employed the West India trade, and has just delivered a cargo from Jamaica in excellent condition. Her stores are abundant, and in good condition. Now lying the West India Export Dock (south side). ...

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Wednesday 27 June 1855]:
The British barque Woodstock, from Manzanilla (Cuba) (timber laden) for Cork, was totally lost April 4, 25 miles east of the Isle of Pines, on the Jardines Reef. Captain Walker and four boys were taken to New Orleans in British schooner Lavinia; the remainder of the crew went to Jamaica.


Wooden brig Providence, built Russell, Birkenhead, 1839, 128 tons, owned Wood, Liverpool. LR gives launched Feb 1839. Traded Liverpool to West Indies. Later owned London and then Lyme Regis. ON 30019. Voyage with coal, at anchor off Sidmouth, driven ashore and wrecked on 29th August 1868, crew saved.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 14 February 1839]:
Launch. We understand that fine new Brig will be launched from the building yard of Messrs. Robert Russell and Sons, Woodside, at 12 o'clock on Saturday next. She is intended for the West India trade, and the property of James M. Wood, Esq.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 14 February 1839]:
With quick despatch. For ST. THOMAS, The fine new Liverpool built Brig PROVIDENCE, Robert Shaw, Master; Registers only 135 tons; coppered, and expected to sail very fast. For terms, apply IMRIE and TOMLINSON.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 23 July 1840]:
For ANTIGUA, The fine A 1 Liverpool-built Brig PROVIDENCE, Register 128 tons, coppered and copper fastened, and a first-rate conveyance for fine goods. Now loading in Queen's Dock. For freight or passage apply to Mr. J. M. Wood; to JAMES POOLE and Co. or WILLIAM ROSE and Co.

[from Cheshire Observer - Saturday 05 September 1868]:
The Late Gales. ... At Sidmouth, the brig Providence, of Lyme, which was at anchor off the port, waiting to discharge her cargo of coals, was driven ashore, and immediately broke up. Her crew were rescued by the exertions of the Coast-guard at Sidmouth Station, who effected a communication with the wreck by means of the rocket apparatus. [Saturday 29th August]

Wooden brig Creole, built Russell, Birkenhead, 1839, 254 tons, owned Poole, Liverpool, registered Liverpool. Traded to Buenos Ayres and Montevideo. By 1849, owned Longton and by 1854 owned Rogers. Registered Liverpool. Sailed to Tasmania. Arrived Singapore from Launceston, December 1853, reporting Captain Avery lost overboard. Voyage Launceston to Sydney, reported struck rocks at Whirlpool Reach, in River Tamar, on leaving Launceston, sustained damage, and put back to Launceston, 16 May 1854. Last LR entry 1855.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 14 June 1839]:
LAUNCH. - On Wednesday, a beautiful vessel; called the Creole, was launched from the yard of Messrs. Robert Russell and Sons, North Birkenhead. She is - 300 tons burthen, and is intended by the owners, Messrs. James Poole and Co., for the trade between this and Buenos Ayres.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 01 July 1850]:
For BUENOS AYRES, The superior A 1 Brig CREOLE, Captain J. P. Avery, 254 tons register; Liverpool built, expressly for the trade, and is welt known for delivering her cargoes in order: lying in Prince's Dock. For terms of freight or passage apply to Messrs Rodger, Best & Co. or to JOHN LONGTON & CO.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Friday 28 October 1853]:
Launceston. Sailed Aug 9, Creole, Avery, for Singapore.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Thursday 12 January 1854]:
Singapore. The following is the report of the brig Creole, which arrived here on the 27th ult. from Sydney. Captain Avery jumped overboard at 7 a.m. on the 23rd November....

[from Sun (London) - Tuesday 08 August 1854]:
SYDNEY, N.S.W., May 16. The Creole (brig), from Launceston, V.D.L., to this port, touched on the rocks at Whirlpool Reach, and sustained considerable damage, which compelled her to put back.


Wooden brig Governor, built Russell, Birkenhead, 1840, 150 tons. owned builders, registered Liverpool. Later registered Maldon and then Dundee. ON 25960. Voyage London to Dundee with Jute, sunk after collision with SS John M'Intyre [or M'Kenzie] off Flamborough head, crew of 6 saved, 30 Dec 1864.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 27 January 1840]:
On Monday last was launched. from the building-yard of Messrs. Robert Russell and Sons, a fine vessel, named the Governor, of 150 tons, intended, we understand for the Laguayra [sic, La Guaira, Venezuela] trade.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 07 August 1845]:
For TRINIDAD, The fast sailing A 1 Brig GOVERNOR, Captain Lowther, burthen 145 tons, and coppered. For terms apply to IMRIE and TOMLINSON.

[from Dundee Advertiser - Tuesday 03 January 1865]:
Loss or the Governor of Dundee. A telegram from Yarmouth, dated December 30, has been received, intimating that the brig Governor of Dundee (Captain Isles), had come into with the s.s. John M'Kenzie, off Flamborough Head, and had in consequence sunk. The Governor, which was 143 tons burthen, was loaded with jute for a firm in Dundee. The whole of the crew were saved, and Captain Isles, who is the son of Mr John Isles, the owner, arrived in Dundee on Sunday afternoon.

[from Norfolk News - Saturday 07 January 1865]:
Shipping. On Friday last [30 Dec 1864], the brig "Governor," of and for Dundee, from London, was run into when off Flamborough Head, by the screw steamer "John M'Intyre", and foundered almost immediately. The crew, consisting of six hands, were saved by the steamer, landed here, and were received at the Sailors' Home.


Wooden brig/schooner, built Russell, Birkenhead, 1840. 100 tons, 63.6 x 19 x 11.6 ft. Probably Mexican Packet.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 24 September 1840]:
For SALE. A new VESSEL, Ready for launching, at the building yard of the subscribers, of the following dimensions: Length 63 feet 6 inches; Beam 19 feet; Depth of hold 11 feet 10 inches; And admeasures 100 tons. o.m. Vessel thoroughly copper fastened, may be rigged either as a brig or schooner, calculated to carry a large cargo, and expected to sail fast. ROBERT RUSSELL & SONS. Ship-builders, Patent Slip, North Birkenhead, and Queen's Dock.

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Other Birkenhead built sailing vessels. (Steam vessels).
Unknown SV 1821 Daulby & Highton, Tranmere

Julia SV 1825 Lomax & Wilson, Tranmere, Birkenhead
Ripley SV 1827 Lomax & Wilson, Tranmere, Birkenhead
Un-named SV 1828, 1829 Lomax & Wilson, Tranmere, Birkenhead
Ann Lockerby SV 1834 Lomax & Wison, Tranmere, Birkenhead
Trafalgar SV 1836 Lomax & Wilson, Liverpool or Birkenhead?
Mary Marsden SV 1838 Lomax & Wilson, Tranmere, Birkehaed
Beethoven SV 1841 Lomax & Wilson, Tranmere, Birkenhead

Mexican packet SV 1840 Unknown, Birkenhead

Satirist SV 1842 Hugh williams, Birkenhead

3 wooden vessels SV 1843,4 Adamson, Birkenhead
Equator SV 1845 Adamson, Birkenhead


Vessel built Daulby & Highton, Tranmere, 1821, 60 tons.

[from Lancaster Gazette - Saturday 17 March 1821]:
A vessel was launched on Thursday sen'night, from Messrs. Daulby, Highton and Co.'s yard, Tranmere, built on Annesley's new system; burthen 60 tons. She only drew eight inches of water, and we are informed is remarkably strong.


Wooden brig Julia, built Lomax & Wilson, Tranmere, 1825, for trade to St Domingo. LR1828 gives built Tranmere 1825, 197 tons, owned Opley [sic], London, for trade London - Trinidad. At anchor off St Domingo, loading timber, on 18th August 1827, struck by a hurricane and wrecked, 19 of the 20 crew were lost.

[from British Press - Thursday 18 August 1825]:
This day was launched from the building yard of Messrs. Lomax and Wilson, at Tranmere, in Cheshire, a beautiful vessel, called the Julia, intended for the St. Domingo trade. After the launch, a party of upwards of sixty ladies and gentlemen partook of an elegant cold collation in the mould room, when a number of appropriate toasts were drank with delight. They afterwards resorted to dancing for a few hours, and returned highly pleased with morning's excursion. A steam boat was provided for the accommodation of the friends of the owners of the Julia. [Julia was the name of the wife of Thomas Ripley, of Lancaster and then Liverpool, shipowner]

[from Lancaster Gazette - Saturday 24 November 1827]:
TREMENDOUS HURRICANE AT ST DOMINGO; The following account of the hurricane at St. Domingo, on the 18th of August last, and the loss of the British brigs Julia, Captain Sargeant, and St. Domingo, Captain Duncan, belonging to Messrs. Thomas and Henry Ripley, of this port [Lancaster], is furnished by Captain Duncan, who arrived here a few days ago.
The two brigs were loading within five miles of each other, on the South side of the island, the Julia to the eastward, distant one mile from the shore, and about thirty miles to the leeward of the city, where the line of coast runs nearly East and West. On the morning of the 18th, at daylight, the atmosphere, as usual in that country, was perfectly clear, with a light breeze off the land, and every appearance of a continuance of fine weather. Captain Duncan and Captain Sargeant, with their respective boats and crews, repaired on shore, to bring off wood, with which they returned at eight o'clock, at which time the weather indicated no appearance of an approaching storm. .....
Of the Julia's ill-fated crew. In all twenty, only one man, David Henry, survived to relate the melancholy tale; and his escape was almost miraculous. He stated that the hurricane commenced, as with the St. Domingo, in a moment, the vessel riding with one anchor a-head, which Captain Sargeant slipped as quick as possible; the wind then took the vessel on her broadside, and laid her on her beam ends, drifting off shore, in which situation she continued for some time, before Captain Sargeant's orders to cut away the mainmast, with the intention of getting her before the wind, could be executed, and whilst they were clearing the wreck of the mast, the vessel yet on her beam ends, a tremendous sea rolled over her, and carried every soul off the deck. The man at the helm was caught round the neck by the main sheet, he supposes, and in a half-strangled state regained the ship, which was then scudding before the wind, with not a creature on board but himself. At this time the mainmast went overboard, and in the course of a few minutes she struck the ground about two miles and a half to the westward of the St. Domingo, and three-quarters of a mile from the shore; another sea then carried the man Henry, from the wreck, and although he was a good swimmer, he has no recollection of any thing afterwards, until he found himself on the beach. ...


Wooden brig Ripley, built Lomax & Wilson, Tranmere, 1827, circa 270 tons, owned T & H Ripley, Liverpool. Lengthened 1839. 102.4 x 22.6 x 16.6ft. Armed. Later 316/347 tons in LR. MNL: ON 13764, 347 tons, registered Liverpool 1845, sold foreign 1856.
Note LR lists some Tranmere built vessels as built "Liverpool", possibly because that was the port registration.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 04 January 1827]:
ON SALE. On the stocks in Lomax and Wilson's yard, Tranmere, A very superior BRIG, with a poop deck, of the following dimensions or thereabouts: Length for tonnage, 94 ft. 0 in; Breadth, 24 ft 10 in; Depth 17 ft. Contracted for by the subscribers and built under particular inspection, entirely of English and African Oak, and English Elm, her frame is remarkably well seasoned, the greater part of it having been cut nearly twelve months; she is thoroughly copper-fastened, and her decks copper nailed. Dimensions of her scantling, and further particulars, may known on application to T. and H. RIPLEY.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 19 March 1827]:
On Thursday last was launched from the ship building yard of Messrs. Lomax and Wilson, at Tramnere, a fine brig of about 270 tons, called the Ripleys, having been built for Messrs. Thos. and Henry Ripley, merchants, of this town, She went off in gallant style, and was afterwards towed into the Graving Dock, where she is intended to be coppered.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 28 May 1827]:
Succeeds the William Young. For CALCUTTA, The beautiful new Liverpool-built, and armed Brig RIPLEY, John Hesse, commander, burthen per register 267 tons. This vessel will be found a most eligible conveyance for goods, and passengers, having a considerable part of her cargo engaged, will meet with despatch; carries an experienced Surgeon, and has elegant accommodations for passengers. For freight or passage, apply to Messrs. T. &. H. RIPLEY, Or M'NAIR & BREBNER, Brokers.

[from Northern Daily Times - Saturday 11 February 1854]:
On the 17th Dec., the English brig Ripley, from London, bound for Caldera, anchored in Chili bay. She had been 135 days out, her bulwarks carried away, and otherwise damaged, and her crew ill of the scurvy.

[from Northern Daily Times - Monday 07 August 1854]:
The Fine British-built Brig RIPLEY 316 tons, om., 347 tons, nm., built at Liverpool, and originally classed A 1 at Lloyds for 12 years, restored in 1839, 7 years, and now classed Red Star: had large repairs in 1849 and 1853, when she was re-sheathed with yellow metal; carries a large cargo, and sails fast; now discharging from Valparaiso, in King's Dock. Dimensions: length, 102 feet 4-10ths; breadth, 22 feet 6-10ths; depth, 16 feet 6-10ths; for further particulars apply to TONGE, CURRY, & CO., Brokers.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Monday 28 January 1856]:
THE fine brig RIPLEY; AE 1 Red, 316 tons OM, and 347 tons NM, built Tranmere, in the county of Chester, in 1827, and classed A 1 for ten years sheathed with yellow metal in 1853; was lengthened in 1839, and restored to the A 1 class for seven years, since which she has been constantly kept in good order, and can sent on any voyage at a trifling outlay, sails test, carries a large cargo, has a raised quarterdeck, and woman's bust figure head. Length, 102 4-10 feet, breadth 22 9-10 feet, depth in hold 16 6-10 feet. Lying in the London Docks. ...

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 21 November 1856]:
Ripley, Hoogh, hence at Brevig.


Un-named vessels, built Lomax & Wilson, Tranmere.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 21 April 1828]:
FOR SALE, A round-sterned FLAT; Now in progress of building at Tranmere Dock-yard, calculated either for River or Coasting purposes, and can be launched in about three weeks. Length for admeasurement about 59 feet, breadth of beam 16 feet 9 inches, and depth of hold 7 feet 9 inches. Apply either on the Premises, or, west side of Salthouse Dock, to LOMAX and WILSON.


[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 25 June 1829]:
Ship Launch. Thursday last, at half past eleven o'clock, a fine vessel intended for the Drogheda trade, was launched from Mr. Wilson's yard, Tranmere, amid the deafening shouts of upwards of a thousand persons, who assembled to witness the interesting spectacle.


[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 02 February 1829]:
JOHN LOMAX RESPECTFULLY begs to announce to the Merchants and Ship-owners of Liverpool, that, in consequence of the death of his late Partner, Mr. Wilson, the Partnership hitherto carried on by them, as Ship-builders, at Tranmere and Liverpool, is dissolved. In soliciting a continuance of those favours to the new firm which were so liberally extended to the late one, J. L. begs to state that be has taken into Partnership Mr. Wm. WILSON, son of his late Partner, who has, for several years, been their foreman and draftsman, and who, from his practical knowledge and long experience, will be found well qualified to undertake the mechanical department of the business. Under this arrangement the business will still be carried on under the Firm of Lomax and Wilson; and Mr. W. Wilson, the resident Partner in Liverpool, will be happy to attend to any commands at the Yard, West side, Salthouse Dock.


Wooden Ship Ann Lockerby, built Lomax & Wilson, Tranmere, 1834, 365 tons, 108.7 x 27.2 x 19.0 ft, owned Lockerby, Liverpool, for trade to East Indies. For sale 1849 and 1853. Sailed to Hobart 1855. ON 727, registered London 1855-86. In LR to 1864, then in 1874-88. At least from 1865, owned Clark, Iquique, Peru, barque, 467 tons. Not found reported in newspapers after 1875. In LR 1888 reported MISSING.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 13 October 1834]:
SHIP LAUNCH. On Friday week was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Lomax and Wilson, at Tranmere, the Ann Lockerby, a superb ship of 400 tons. She is owned by Mr. W. Lockerby, and, we understand, is to be employed in the trade to the East Indies.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 23 July 1849]:
FOR SALE, The A 1 Ship ANN LOCKERBY; Burthen per register 466 tons; built at Liverpool [sic], of the best African oak, under the inspection and for the use of her present owner. Length on deck 109 feet; length of keel 105 feet; breadth 27 feet 9 inches: depth of hold 19 feet 1 inch; height between decks 6 feet; has a full poop and topgallant forecastle, with figurehead, solid bulwarks fore and aft, with gunports properly spaced, and fitted with Captain Lehew's patent rudder braces, has been recently dry-docked and sheathed with heavy metal, and had new standing rigging, she is abnadantly found in sails and other stores, and requires provisions only to be sent upon any voyage, lying in Salthouse Dock. For inventory, etc, apply on board; or to Mr. William Lockerby, or to R. F. Wade, 14, London-Street, London.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Wednesday 28 February 1855]:
At Lloyd's CAPTAIN'S ROOM, ROYAL EXCHANGE, On THURSDAY, MARCH 8. 1855, at Half-past Two o'clock. THE fine A 1 Liverpool-built Ship ANN LOCKERBY, 467 tons per register; she was continued November, 1851, A 1 for eight years, after very considerable repairs, is copper-fastened, and sheathed with yellow metal; is well found in stores, sails remarkably fast, and carries a large cargo on a light draught of water, and may be sent to sea with very little expense. Now lying in the West India Export Dock. GEO. BAYLEY and WM. RIDLEY. 2, Cowper's-court, Cornhill.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Tuesday 25 December 1860]:
The Ann Lockerby, Thompson, sailed from Cobija previous to 9th March for this port, and has not since been heard of. [see below]

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Thursday 21 March 1861]:
The Ann Lockerby, Thompson, is reported from Arica as having arrived there 24th Jan. last, from Iquique, and sailed 30th for Coronel. [Mem. The above vessel was previously reported as having sailed from Cobija previous to 9th March, 1860, for Liverpool, and as not having since been beard of.]

[from Shields Daily Gazette - Tuesday 16 March 1869]:
Spoken: The barque Anne Lockerby, from Honolulu for Bremen, Jan. 27, lat. 22 S, long. 27 W.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Tuesday 13 April 1875]:
Spoken. Ann Lockerby, of London, 43N 13W.


Wooden ship Trafalgar, built Lomax & Wilson, Mersey, 1836, 446 tons, owned Johnson, for trade to New Orleans. LR gives built Liverpool 1836. Lomax & Wilson had premises on both sides of the Mersey. In 1838 voyage Liverpool to Sydney, wrecked in Table Bay, 21st February 1839. One passenger lost.

[from Liverpool Mail - Thursday 13 October 1836]:
Intended for a regular trader. For NEW ORLEANS, The new Liverpool-built ship, TRAFALGAR, Wm Jackson, master, Register 480 tons, This splendid ship was built by Lomax and Wilson of the very best materials, coppered, and every respect a first-rate conveyance. Apply to Johnson, Grainger & Co.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 09 November 1838]:
FOR SYDNEY, DIRECT, The splendid first-class Liverpool frigate-built Ship TRAFALGAR, BAXTER, Commander, (who is well acquainted with the Eastern seas); A 1 at Lloyds (being only eighteen months old), 364 tons register and one of the fastest vessels out of tho port. This superb ship has a spacious poop, and lofty 'tween decks, is fitted up with every accommodation for cabin, intermediate, and steerage passengers; is well armed, and carries an experienced surgeon. - For freight or passage apply to Messrs. ASHLEY Brothers; Messrs. W. and J. TYRER, or to HENRY FOX, 2, King-street.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 23 April 1839]:
Cape of Good Hope, Feb. 24. The Trafalgar, Baxter, from Liverpool for Sydney, N.S.W. was totally lost 21st instant, at the entrance of Table Bay; one female passenger drowned. It is feared the cargo will be all lost.

[from Lloyd's List - Monday 22 April 1839]:
Cape of Good Hope, 22nd Feb. The Trafalgar, Baxter, from Liverpool to New South Wales, was totally wrecked on Green Point last night; Crew and Passengers (except one Woman) saved.


Wooden barque Mary Marsden, built Lomax & Co, Birkenhead, 1838, 185 tons, owned Lomax & Co, Liverpool, for trade to Mediterranean.

Probably launch of Mary Marsden.[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 08 October 1838]:
LAUNCHES. - On Thursday last, at eleven o'clock, a fine vessel was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Jackson and Co., Herculaneum Dock; another, from the building-yard of Messrs. Royden and Co. Queen's Dock; and a third, from a yard at Birkenhead, on the Cheshire side of the Mersey. The iron ship, which is completing in the yard of Messrs. Jackson and Co., will be launched in a week or two.


Wooden ship Beethoven, built Lomax & Wilson, Tranmere, 1841, 291 tons, for trade to East.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 05 April 1841]:
SHIP LAUNCH. Tomorrow, at eleven o'clock, there will be launched, from the shipyard, at Tranmere, a fine ship, of 330 tons register. to be named the Beethoven. She has been built by and is owned by Messrs. Lomax and Wilson.

Wooden brig/barque Mexican Packet, built Birkenhead, 1840, 144 tons, 80 x 17.4 ft, first owner J Poole, Liverpool [LR 1842 gives owned Rolinson, Liverpool]. MNL: ON 24835, described as built Birkenhead 1840, barque, in MNL to 1887. LR gives barque built Liverpool 1840, though by 1880 gives Brigantine built Birkenhead 1840. Probably the vessel launched by Russell, Birkenhead, 1840. More history.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 22 October 1840]:
For VERA CRUZ, The beautiful new Liverpool built Brig MEXICAN PACKET, John Gilles, Master; Burthen 110 tons, coppered and copper fastened, built expressly for the trade, and expected to sail remarkably fast. Having the principal part of her cargo engaged, and despatch being the owners' object, will not met with any detention. For terms of freight apply to Messrs. Rowlinson and Co. or to JAMES POOLE and Co.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Friday 23 September 1853]:
At Liverpool. The fine A 1 Mersey-built Barque MEXICAN PACKET, 143-115 tons, restored in 1852 for five years, when she was sheathed with yellow metal, and put into first-rate order; from her light draught, and favourable character, would be admirably adapted for the Australian trade; carries a good cargo. For further particulars apply to TONGE, CURRY, and Co., Brokers, Liverpool.

Wooden schooner Satirist, built Hugh Williams, Bikenhead 1842. Not found in LR or MNL under that name.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 20 September 1841]:
LAUNCH OF A SCHOONER. On the same day a beautiful schooner, belonging to Mr. Hugh Williams, jun. was launched from his building-yard, at Birkenhead. The gentleman who performed the baptismal ceremony christened her the "Satirist"; and, at the moment of fulfilling his duty, in consequence of his great anxiety, we were fearful that he himself would have been re-baptized by immersion in the Mersey. A select party of gentlemen and a concourse of spectators were present to wish success to the Satirist.

Wooden ship and brig - not named, ready for launching by Adamson, Birkenhead, 1843.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 12 January 1843]:
For SALE by PRIVATE CONTRACT, A new SHIP, About 340 tons o.m. of good dimensions, copper fastened to the wales, built for the twelve years class, with half poop and forecastle, and may soon be ready for launching.
Also, new BRIG, About 190 tons o.m. of good dimensions, copper fastened to the wales, built for the nine years class, with half poop, and is nearly ready for launching. For particulars apply to W and A ADAMSON, Patent Slip, North Birkenhead.

Wooden barque Great Unknown, built Adamson, Birkenhead, 1844. W and A Adamson were shipowners as well as builders. The name quoted at launch is not found subsequently - so either renamed on registration or sold foreign. Advert in July 1844 appears to be this vessel - now not named: 172 tons.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 08 June 1844]:
Launch at Birkenhead. On Saturday the new and splendid barque, The Great Unknown, was launched from the ship-building yard of Messrs. W. and A. Adamson, Canning-street, Birkenhead. She was christened by the lady of our townsman, Daniel M'Nicol, Esq., and presented a beautiful spectacle as she glided majestically onward to the briny deep. She was immediately afterwards towed over to the Union Dock, to be fitted out, preparatory to sailing for a foreign port.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 11 July 1844]:
For SALE, A superior-built BARQUE, 172 tons register, well adapted for the East India trade, built with a half poop and topgallant forecastle, according to Lloyd's rules, for twelve years and now fitting in the Union Dock. For particulars apply to W. and A. ADAMSON, patent-slip, Woodside, and 129, Norfolk-street, Liverpool


Wooden brig Equator, built Adamson, Woodside, Birkenhead, 1845, 235 tons, ON 32344, initially owned by builders. Voyage Colombo to London, aground Northumberland Reef, South Africa, 7th February, 1856, and wrecked.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 06 October 1845]:
On Thursday last, there was launched from the building-yard of Messrs W and A Adamson, Woodside, a fine clipper brig of 235 tons register, intended for the foreign trade. She was completely rigged and coppered before launching, and glided into her future element in beautiful style. She is, we believe, the property of the builders.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 06 May 1856}:
CAPE OF GOOD HOPE, Feb. 22. Capt. Henderson, commander of the brig Equator, publishes the following particulars relative to the wreck which occurred on the 7th inst., at 9 o'clock p m., she having struck on Northumberland Reef, near Cape Agulhas. She was from Colombo for London, and had been 47 days out:
Having made the Agulhas Light in the evening, a little before 8 o'clock. the captain stood in on the starboard tack, with the wind at south, and very light - the light bearing west and by north half north, and, as far as the captain could judge, distant about 12 miles. The weather was rather hazy, but nothing to speak of; the ship was going off west south west at 9 p.m. The captain supposed himself at least nine miles from the light - a good look-out kept, and just as the lead was about to be cast, the ship struck; no sound of breakers was heard, and no appearances of the proximity of a reef, They soon found any attempt to get the vessel off would be useless. Ordered the boats out immediately, put in water, bread, the compass, ensign, and all they thought necessary, not knowing whether they would find a landing or not on the beach. The vessel struck so heavily, it was impossible to go aloft to put tackles on the yards, so they launched both boats over the gunwale -- after which they were dropped astern and kept ready for use at a moment's notice. A very short time after she struck, there were seven feet water in her hold, and at 12 o'clock, she was nearly full up to the deck, driving the whole time further on the reef. In the meantime, let go an anchor, fearing she might drive into deep water. They remained on board until 1 o'clock a.m., on the 8th, when, finding the seas washed clean over, and the boats were in danger of being stoved, the captain ordered all in the boats. They left her, and anchored about 150 yards from her, and in about an hour she fell over on her beam-ends. They remained the whole night in the boats, and at daylight they were happy to find a house on the shore and at about 6 o'clock all landed at Strys Bay, at Messrs. Barry and Nephews' establishment, where they were kindly received by the manager there.
Captain Henderson adds: I cannot help saying, that I think the Agulhas Light is certainly very inferior - whether it is the fault of the oil, or some other defect, I cannot say, but I certainly think it ought to be taken notice of. I feel a pleasure in stating that throughout the whole, my crew behaved as true British seamen ought to do, and I can safely say that in the height of confusion, discipline remained as perfect as if we were on our voyage under better circumstances. They are all now employed saving the cargo from the the wreck, and the vessel is now within a quarter of a mile of the beach, but is a total wreck.

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Runcorn built sailing vessels (Steam vessels). Here only the large sea-going vessels, schooners etc, are listed. Flats were also built. List from Schooner Port by H F Starkey. Here 1820-60.
1837: James & Sarah Sr 63t ;
1838: Susan Sr; Thomas Sr 97t; Thomas Mason Sr 62t;
1839: Elfleda Sr 116;
1840: John Sr 55t; John & Henry Sr 57t; British Queen Sr 107t;
1841: Princess Royal Sr 97t; Margaret Sr 102t; Doris Sr 137t;
1842: Ellen Sr 69t; Phillip Sr 72t; Mersey Sr 92t; Heir Apparent Sr 132t; Hugh Lupus Sr 64t;
1843: Mary Jane Sr 111t;
1844: Julia Sr 73t;
1845: Fanny Sr 71t;
1846: Sarah Sr 77t; Ino Sr 75t;
1847: Margaret & Martha Sr 66t; The Port Sr 65t; Rosalie Bg 215t;
1848: Empress Sr 68t; Duke Sr 80t;
1849: William Court Sr 56t;
1850: Shamrock Sr 65t; Ellesmere Sr 70t; Emmeline Sr 70t; Sir Robert Sr 68t;
1853: Eva Bg 134t; Anne Cheshyre S 451t; Anne Walker Sr 128t;
1854: Brackley Sr 88t;
1855: Alma Sr 118t; Mary Houghton 71t; Borland Bk 141t;
1856: Dennis Brundrit S 463t; Reviresco Bg 114t;
1857: Ellen Owen Bg 132t; Bertha Sr 87t; Cheshire Lass Sr 85t; Selina Sr 99t;
1859: Lymm Gray Bg 123t; Jessie Roberts Sr 69t; Alice Sr 65t;
1860: Quanita Bg 190t;

Some comments: Rosalie was built for the West Indies trade; the Reviresco and Anne Walker were both reported as having hulls treated for foreign voyages; the largest ship built, Dennis Brundrit, ended up a wreck in the Falklands (More detail). Another large ship (later barque), Anne Cheshyre, was still in use in 1887 when she arrived in Buenos Ayres from Swansea - possibly for use as a coal hulk (last MNL entry 1887, ON 23843).

Some schooners were also built at Frodsham (1821: Isabella 74t; 1831: Frances 95t; 1835: James 84t; 1838: Sarah 68t; 1839: Kendal Castle 85t, Importer 69t, Pearl 66t; 1840: Rigby 72t; 1851: Mary Ann; 1856: Emily Constance 65t; 1858: Mary Bollind 100t), and Sankey Bridges (1829: Clarence 82t).


Wooden schooner Clarence, built Clare, Sankey Bridge, 1829. 82grt, 51 nrt. ON 10632. Registered Beaumaris from 1850. Voyage Caernarfon to Silloth with slates, wrecked off Silloth on 11th June 1897, crew saved.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 22 January 1829]:
For SALE by PRIVATE CONTRACT, A New SCHOONER, Now ready for sea, only launched a few months back and laying in the Graving Dock, Sankey Bridges, near Warrington; she has a round stern, and is built of the very best materials, her planks fastened at the butts with copper bolts, her cordage and sails of the best quality, and complete in every respect. Length of keel 61 feet 10 inches; On deck 66.5ft; Breadth 17 ft 4.5in; Depth in the hold 7ft 1in. For further particulars, the Owner, William Clare, Sankey Bridges, or at his Office, No. 8, Redcross-street, Liverpool.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 24 March 1831]:
ON SALE, Schooner LYON, Williams, 100 tons. Sloop MARY, Hughes, burthen 85 tons. Sloop HOPEWELL. Hope; 95 tons. New Schooner CLARENCE, Haydock, 100 tons. Together with their boats and all tackle now on board. They are particularly strong, having been built under the owners personal inspection, and are now trading from Liverpool to Ireland, Wales, &c,. Apply to the owner, Wm. Clare, Sankey Bridge, near Warrington, or to HUGH CLARE, 7, Redcross-street.

[from Carlisle Patriot - Friday 18 June 1897]:
THE WRECK AT SILLOTH.As we stated in our later edition of last week, the schooner Clarence, of Beaumaris, arrived off the Lea Scaur Lighthouse, Silloth, about six o'clock on Friday morning, and having struck a sandbank, gradually foundered. The crew consisted of three persons, two of whom took to the boat, and the boat's painter breaking, they were unable to reach the vessel again. The captain remained on the vessel, and when it foundered was compelled to take to the masthead. Here the sea broke over him, and had he not been rescued by a boat manned by two of the crew of the brigantine Scotsman, of Londonderry, now laying in the dock, and the harbour master (Captain Wood), he would soon have perished, the position being most dangerous, The vessel lies sunk in about six fathoms of water in mid-channel, half a mile or so west of Silloth. The schooner was bound for Silloth with a cargo of slates from Carnarvon.

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Dawson & Pearson, Liverpool. [Steam vessels]
Bolton SV 1822


John Dawson, junior, shipbuilder, Liverpool
Laura Ann SV 1831
Georgina SV 1833
Emma Graham SV 1838
Robert Whiteway SV 1839
Samson SV 1841
Ann Powell SV 1847
Margaret SV 1848
Kate SV 1856
Dreadnought SV 1859

Wooden ship, built Dawson & Pearson, Liverpol, 1820, 546 tons, 125.7 x 31 x 24 ft. Possibly Constantine

[from Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser - Tuesday 04 April 1820]:
A New SHIP on the Stocks, in Messrs. Dawson and Pearson's Yard, ready for launching, built of the best materials, and finished in the completest manner; calculated for the East India Trade, has three decks, and her dimensions are as follow: length keel for tonnage 125 feet 7 inches, breadth 31 feet, depth 24 feet, and admeasures 546 tons. For further Particulars apply to the Builders, Messrs. Dawson and Pearson; J. BOLTON, or T. and J. LITTLEDALE, Brokers, Liverpool.

Wooden Ship Bolton, built Dawson & Pearson, Liverpool, 1822, 518 tons, owned J Bolton, Liverpool. Later chartered to HEIC. Broken up 1855. More history. Bolton, Brown, arrived Falmouth from London 5 Oct 1854, for Sydney, then arrived Callao from Sydney, 14 Sep 1855, damaged.

[from Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser - Saturday 17 June 1826]:
THE Ship BOLTON, just arrived from Demerara and lying in the Prince's Dock, Liverpool; burthen per register 518 tons; built at Liverpool, for the present Owner; fitted and completed for sea in June, 1822; was new coppered with heavy copper over patent felt last voyage; copper fastened, has three tier of beams, and is flush decked ; has two elegant and spacious cabins, with ten state rooms; stows large cargo at an easy draught of water, and sails fast; is abundantly found in stores, and may sent sea immediately at small expense. For Particulars apply to John Bolton, Esq. Liverpool; or to ROBERT DOUGLAS, 4, Church-row, Fenchurch-street.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Monday 19 November 1855]:
Callao. Sep 14 1855, Bolton, Brown, arrived from Sydney, much strained and damaged having encountered a heavy gale during the latter half of the passage.


Wooden schooner Laura Ann, built Dawson, Liverpool, 1831, 145 tons, owned Vianna & Jones, for trade to Mediterranean. In LR to 1848. Voyaged to Oporto and back in early 1846. With master Thomas, Laura Ann sailed to Valparaiso Sept 1846. Possibly same vessel reported as arrivng San Francisco from Manilla Nov 23 1848.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 07 July 1831]:
On Saturday next, will be launched from the building yard of John Dawson & Co, a beautiful schooner of 130 tons, to be called the Laura Ann, intended for the Mediterranean trade.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 07 July 1831]:
For MESSINA and PALERMO, beautiful new Schooner LAURA ANN, J Wilson, Master; Stands A 1 at Lloyds, Liverpool built expressly for this trade, and is expected to sail very fast. For freight or passage, apply VIANNA and JONES.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 19 March 1846]:
LINE PACKETS FOR LISBON, Sailing on the 1st, 11th and 21st of every month. To sail on the 21st instant. The well-known trader LAURA ANN; A 1 at Lloyds, and coppered; 145 tons. For terms of freight, etc. apply to VIANNA, JONES and CO. [latest report, arriving June 1846 from Oporto, captain Preston]


Wooden barque Georgina, built Dawson, Liverpool, 1833, 227 tons, owned Worrall, Liverpool, for trade to Valparaiso. Voyage Liverpool to Valparaiso, driven onto Blackwater Bank and wrecked, 17 March 1844, with only 2 survivors from crew of 14.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 11 November 1833]:
SHIP LAUNCH. To-morrow will be launched, from the building-yard of John Dawson and Co., Brunswick Dock, a beautiful new barque, intended for the South American trade.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 30 January 1834]:
To sail immediately... For VALPARAISO, an Intermediate Port, and LIMA. The fine new Liverpool-built Barque GEORGINA, Captain Edward Woolley; A 1; 200 tons per register; coppered and copper-fastened; built under particular inspection, entirely for this trade ; expected to sail remarkably fast. For terms of freight or passage, having superior accommodations, apply on board, west side George's Dock; to Mr. Worrall, or to W. and J. TYRER. Succeeds the above, the well-known Liverpool-built Schooner JOHN BROOKS, Captain Adams.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 18 November 1839]:
Valparaiso Ship News. Mem. The master of the Margaret saw the barque Georgina, bound for Callao, off the islands of Diego Ramirez, with loss of bowsprit and other damage.

[from Freeman's Journal - Friday 22 March 1844]:
DREADFUL STORM AND LOSS OF LIFE. One of the most dreadful gales with which we were visited for years past, commenced here on Friday, varying from E to E S E and E N E, and continued without intermission until Monday morning, when it moderated. The following are among the disasters reported to us:- On Sunday morning, about four a.m., the barque Georgina, of Liverpool, for Valparaiso, Wilson master, general cargo, struck on the Blackwater Bank, when she lost her rudder and became leaky and unmanageable, the wind blowing a strong gale from the east into shore. After remaining on the bank a short time, she was drifted off by the violence of the storm; and it appears that the captain was ignorant of his position, for he dropped anchor, which was carried away in a few moments, the vessel drifting fast to shore. He immediately let go the second anchor, which succeeded in holding her till day light, when they discovered her position, being then not more than a quarter of a mile from land, and used every exertion to unshackle and cut the clain, but wore unable to accomplish it. Had they succeeded in so doing, she would have drifted high and dry on the shore, it being then high water, and the melancholy catastrophe which followed would have been spared. Finding the vessel rapidly filling, they adopted the dernier resort of taking to the boats, in which they succeeded in coming within a few yards of the shore, when the sea took them abaft, unshipping the whole of the crew, fourteen in number, twelve of whom, we deeply regret to state, perished, and the remaining two (the chief mate and one of the hands) were washed ashore, completely insensible, but through the humane exertions of the inhabitants of the district, who crowded the shore, in order to render all the assistance in their power, they were speedily restored, and are now perfectly recovered. A few minutes after the boat left, the unfortunate vessel went down in seven fathoms water, leaving a few feet of the main mast over water, to mark her fate. Only one of the bodies has been washed ashore, up to the present moment, and that at Roslare. a distance of eight miles from the wreck. The letter bag, which, according to the superscriptions, contained several important letters on state business, a chronometer, a gold watch, writing desk, and several other articles, have also been washed ashore in the same place, which were voluntarily given up by the finder. This vessel, if we are to judge from the bills of lading, contained a most valuable cargo, one bill alone amounting to upwards of ten thousand pounds.


Wooden brig Emma Graham, built Dawson, Liverpool, 1838, 204 tons, owned Yeord, Liverpool, for service to Oporto.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 23 July 1838]:
To-morrow, about noon, will be launched, from the building-yard of John Dawson and Co., Baffin-street, a beautiful brig, of 200 tons register, intended for the Oporto trade.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 20 August 1838]:
For OPORTO, The new Liverpool-built Brig EMMA GRAHAM, James Ferguson, Master; A 1 at Lloyd's; 200 tons per register, it is expected she will sail fast. Shippers may depend upon her being despatched as above. For freight or passage apply to VIANNA & JONES.


Wooden barque Robert Whiteway, built Dawson, Liverpool, 1839, 267 tons, owned Bartlett, for service to Valparaiso.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 14 May 1839]:
SHIP LAUNCH. This day, (Tuesday,) there will be launched from the building-yard of John Dawson and Co., Queen's Dock, a splendid new barque of 300 tons burthen, intended for the Cape Horn trade.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 06 June 1839]:
For VALPARAISO. The fine A 1 Liverpool-built Barque MARY MARSDEN, Captain Williams.
Will be succeeded by the fine new Liverpool-built Barque ROBERT WHITEWAY, Captain Bartlett, late of the Mary and Ann. ...


Wooden brigantine Samson, built Dawson, Liverpool, 1841.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 24 May 1841]:
ANOTHER LAUNCH.. On Saturday was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. John Dawson and Co. a beautiful brigantine, the property of our enterprising townsman G. H. Thompson, Esq., and others, intended for the Mediterranean trade, and to be commanded by Captain Butcher, late master of the Trinity Yacht. The day was not particularly fine, yet it was no drawback against the exciting interest of the scene as the vessel glided, in the fulness of strength and beauty, into the willing embrace of old Father Mersey. In compliment to her superior strength, she is named the Samson.


Wooden schooner Ann Powell, built Dawson, Liverpool, 1847, ON 18405, More history. 14/02/1861 sank after striking the Scarweathers in the Bristol Channel, on passage for Bristol.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 05 January 1847]:
LAUNCH. - On Saturday last, a fine schooner, of about 180 tons burthen, was launched from the yard of Messrs. John Dawson and Co. She is built expressly for the conveyance of machinery, her spacious hatches and accommodation for any freight of this kind being superior to anything we have seen, and her whole appearance reflects much credit on the gentlemen by whom she was built. She went off the stocks in admirable style, and was christened by the lady of the owner the "Ann Powell". After the launch, the owners and a few friends dined at the American Hotel, where an excellent dinner was served up in Mr. Wilde's best style.


Wooden schooner Margaret, built Dawson, liverpool, 1848.>

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 15 January 1848]:
Launch. On Saturday, there was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. J. Dawson a full-rigged schooner, of 226 tons burden, named the Margaret, and intended for the Mediterranean trade. Ihe ceremony of naming her was performed by Captain Daniels, who is part owner. Although the day was very unfavourable, there assembled on the platform a crowd of well-dressed spectators, and on board were Mrs. J. Dawson, and large party of lady friends. She glided majestically into her destined element, and afterwards went into the Queen's Dock. The friends and owners then adjourned, and partook of a substantial repast in one of the rooms of the establishment.


Iron ship Kate, built Dawson, Liverpool, 1856,

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 07 April 1856]:
LAUNCH OF THE KATE. On Saturday forenoon was launched, from the building yard of Mr. John Dawson, at the Duke's Dock Quay, a handsomely modelled clipper-brig, of the following dimensions : Length over all, 95 feet; beam, 21 feet 8 inches; depth, 12 feet; and 250 tons burthen. She was launched fully rigged and coppered, and decked out with an unusual number of flags. She was christened "The Kate," by Mrs. Gardner, wife of one of the owners, who are Messrs. Gardner and Broomhall, of Redcross-street. The Kate is as strong a vessel as wood can make her; she is copper-fastened, and classes A 1 at Lloyd's for twelve years. She will be under the command of Captain R. R. Leggett, and her owners intend her for the Liverpool and Vera Cruz trade. After being launched she was taken into the Coburg Dock, and placed beside the Peveril of the Peak, launched by Messrs. Chaloner and Son.


Wooden schooner Dreadnought, built Dawson, Liverpool, 1859, 99 tons, ON 27606, registered and owned Aberystwyth from 1859, register closed 1902.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 17 May 1859]:
Launch. Mr. John Dawson launched, yesterday from his building yard, Dukes Dock, a beautiful model schooner of ahout 200 tons, and of first class build. She was christened the Dreadnought, and bears the appropriate figure-head of a British warrior. She is intended for the Mediterranean trade.

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Grayson & Leadley, Liverpool. [Steam vessels]

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Humble, Hurry, Milcrest, Liverpool. [Steam vessels]
Ellen Mar 1821 (Constantine?)
Un-named 1823, 1828
Henrietta 1833
Little Penn 1834
Young Gipsey 1834
Susannah Collings 1835
Alice Jane SV 1836
William Jardine 1836
Martha Ridgway 1840
Will-o'-the-Wisp 1840
John M'Vicar 1841
Harriet Humble 1845

Wooden ship Ellen Mar (possibly renamed Constantine), built Humble & Hurry, Liverpool, 1821, 516 tons burthen. 117 x 31.3 x 24.10 ft. Advertised for sale, unnamed.
Not in LR 1824 or LR 1830 and not found BNA as Ellen Mar. But Constantine is in LR, as built Liverpool 1821 and of similar size.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 04 May 1821]:
On Wednesday last, a beautiful ship, burthen 516 tons (called the Ellen Mar), was launched from the building-yard. of Messrs. Humble and Hurry. The surrounding multitudes were highly gratified at the manner in which she rushed into her native element.

[from Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser - Tuesday 12 June 1821]:
At LIVERPOOL, A SHIP, just launched, about 500 tons per register, peculiarly suited for the Private Trade to India; she has four inch bottom, three tier of beams, flush upper deck, gun deck laid, and iron staple knees fore and aft in her 'twixt decks; she is thoroughly seasoned, and the greatest attention has been paid to her fastenings. Length of keel 108 feet; for tonnage 117 feet; breadth 31 feet 3 inches; depth from skin to skin 24 feet 10 inches. Apply to HUMBLE and HURRY, ...


[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 18 September 1823]:
ON SALE, a remarkably strong little VESSEL, just launched; built of English Oak, and copper-fastened, of the following dimensions: length on deck 39 feet 9 inches, breadth of beam 13 feet 4 inches, depth in the hold 7 feet 5 inches, and admeasures 30 tons, she has Mast, Spars, Standing Rigging and two Anchors, would make an excellent Drogher or capital little Coaster for the Welsh Ports, and may be seen every day on the bank to the westward of Messrs Humble and Hurry's yard, Trentham-street, to whom apply for price or other particulars, or to H. MERCER, Broker.


[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 12 September 1828]:
FOR SALE, And could be launched in a month or six weeks, in the Building Yard of Messrs Humble and Hurry, Liverpool, A NEW VESSEL, of the following dimensions: Length by admeasurement 98 ft; Breadth 25 ft 8 in; Depth of Hold 17 ft; And will register about 282 tons. She has a topgallant Forecastle and a Half-poop, of 30 feet in length; the Frame is entirely of English and African Oak, and, having been cut about two years, is well-seasoned and free from sap. She is entirely copper-fastened to the lower deck binding. This Vessel will bear the minutest inspection, and her planks are left out in different parts for that purpose. For further particulars apply to HUMBLE and HURRY, Trentham-street.
  [possibly brig Joseph Winter]


Wooden barque Henrietta, built Humble & Milcrest, Liverpool, 1833, 200 tons, owned Tayleur & Co, Liverpool. For sale 1851 and also 1853, sailed to Melbourne and registered there 1854-9. ON 24689. Later registered London 1860-1, then Cowes 1862-3, owned Winther. Voyage Swansea to New York, with slates, on 20 October 1862, abandoned off Azores, crew of 9 saved, owned G W H Warder [from RCUS].

[Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 19 September 1833]:
Launches. On Monday last, at the time of high water, two fine vessels were launched from the yard of Messrs Humble, Hurry & Co, Trentham-street. The first was a barque called the Henrietta, of 200 tons burthen, belonging to Messrs C Tayleur & Co, ....

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 21 October 1833]:
A regular Trader, and warranted first Vessel. For LIMA, Direct. The very fast-sailing Barque MATILDA, Captain Powditch, Burthen 200 tons, A 1, British-built, and coppered; intended to be despatched on 1st November, For freight or passage, Apply to AIKIN & HUGHES. Will be succceded by the very fine new Liverpool-built Barque HENRIETTA, built expressly for the trade, and for fast sailing.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 01 December 1851]:
For SALE, The Barque HENRIETTA; 199 tons; A 1 in red; built at Liverpool, in 1833 to class for twelve years, had new decks in 1847; repaired and sheathed with heavy metal; continued for four yeas from 1849; in all respects, well found, and may be sent to sea as she now lies in the Price's Dock. For further particulars, apply to JONES, TAYLOR & CO. Chapel-street. [also for sale 1853; then advertised as sailing to Melbourne]

[from Lloyd's List - Wednesday 29 October 1862]:
Hamburg 27th Oct. The HENRIETTA (barque), of Cowes, bound to New York, was spoken Oct. 9th, off the Azores, very leaky, by the Jenny, Sonderburg, arrived here from Porto; the master considered he would be obliged to throw part of her cargo overboard. [The Henrietta, of Cowes, Stamp, sailed from Swansea for New York 16th Sept.]

[from Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury - Saturday 22 November 1862]:
Scarborough, Nov. 15. The Henrietta, Stamp, of Cowes, from Swansea for New York, which was spoken off the Azores, leaky, October 9, was abandoned in a sinking state on the 21st; crew picked up by Spanish vessel and taken to Antwerp.


Wooden schooner Little Penn, built Humble & Milcrest, Liverpool, 1834, 98 tons, owned Tobin, Liverpool, registered Liverpool. Voyage Lisbon to Tabascos, Central America, ashore July 1837 and wrecked on Alacrane reef off Campeche, Mexico.

Liverpool Albion - Monday 15 September 1834
LAUNCHES EXTRAORDINARY. - On Saturday last two schooners were launched from the ship-building-yard of Messrs. Humble and Milcrest, for our most enterprising merchant, Sir J. Tobin. These beautiful vessels were both built on the same stocks, and glided off in fine style, the "Little Penn" leading, closely followed by the "Young Gipsey," with masts and rigging all standing, and elegantly bedecked with colours. It was a memorable day for Sir John, for not only is it the first instance of two vessels being launched on the same day from the same platform, but he had the high and well-deserved compliment paid him of the new North Dock being thrown open on the occasion, that his vessels might be the first to enter it. [intended for Waterford trade]

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 05 August 1836}:
COASTWISE. For DARTMOUTH, The YOUNG GIPSEY, Captain GRAY. For PORTSMOUTH, The LITTLE PENN, Captain WILLIAMS. Will sail in a few days, and have room for a few tons of goods - Apply to JOHN TOBIN.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 15 May 1837]. Spoken: Little Penn, Pugh, hence for the Gulf of Mexico, and Louisa, hence for St John's, N B, off St David's Head.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 12 September 1837]:
Little Penn, Pugh, hence at Tobasco, was totally wrecked on the Alacrane previous to the 17th July.

[from True Sun - Saturday 21 October 1837]:
TEXAS. We find the following in a letter from Havannah, of the 7th ult.:
The Texan corsairs are bringing a bad reputation upon their newly founded republic. An English schooner, Little Penn, from Lisbon for Tabascos, was lost not long ago on a reef off Campeachy. The English Consul at that port sent out two American schooners to fetch off the remains of the wreck, but on the 31st of July two Texan vessels appeared off the reef, took possession of the schooners, and sent them with what they had got out of the wreck to Galveston; then they came to the mainland near Campeachy, and landed the crews. On another occasion they fell in with a schooner from Liverpool for Sisal, which they captured and sent into Texas. It is said that the English vessela of war out here consider these to be acts of piracy, since Texas is not a recognized State, and intend to treat the vessels sailing under that flag as pirates.

Wooden schooner Young Gipsey, built Humble & Milcrest, Liverpool, 1834, 99tons, owned Tobin, Liverpool, ON 9264. Registered Newport from 1837. Aground Hoyle Bank 11 November 1861. Crew saved by Point of Ayr Lifeboat

Launch: see Little Penn above.


Wooden schooner Susannah Collings, built Humble & Milcrest, Liverpool, 1835, 197 tons, owned Crabb, Liverpool, for trade to Mediterranean. Voyage Alexandria to Beirut, ashore north of Latakia and wrecked, 17 May 1849, crew saved.

[Liverpool Mercury - Friday 06 February 1835]:

On Saturday, a schooner. burthen 190 tons register, named the Susannah Collings, was launched from the building yard of Messrs. Humble and Milcrest. The command of this vessel will be given to Capt. John Crabb. This fine and substantially built schooner is remarkable for her construction as a fast sailer, combining with this quality the important advantage of being able to stow an unusually large cargo for so small a registry. She is considered to be a perfect model, and is now lying in No. 5 Graving Dock.

Loading, Liverpool: March 2 1835. Susannah, Crabb, 197 tons, for Syra and Cnstantinople.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 25 June 1849]:
Alexandria. June 9. The Susannah Collings, Croscombe, from Beirout for this port, ran on shore, 17th inst., about 9 miles north of Latakia, with about 500 bales of manufactured goods on board, and has become so embedded in the sand that she cannot be got off; crew saved.


Wooden barque Alice Jane, built Humble & Milcrest, Liverpool, 1836, 227 tons, owned Charles Tayleur & Co, for service to West coast of S America.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 21 July 1836]:
LINE of PACKETS for the WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA. For VALPARAISO, Intermedios, and LIMA, The MARY SCOTT, Captain W. Scott, 248 tons, now loading, will sail on the first of August. .... The JANE, Captain Strachan, 265 tons, will be the succeeding packet. ..... The new Barque ALICE JANE will succeed.
For Arica, ISLAY and LIMA. The MAYPO, W Cragg, Master, - tons. .... Jane Prowse, 190 tons ... Southampton, 200 tons,....
The above vessels are all British built ... Committee of Management of the West Coast Association: GIBBS, BRIGHT and Co.; W. J. MYERS and Co.; G. F. DICKSON and Co.; G. and R. YOUNG and Co.; TODD NAYLOR and Co.; C. TAYLEUR, SONS and Co.; JOSEPH GREEN and Co.; LEECH and HARRISON; R. SWAYNE and Co.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 05 August 1847]:
For SALE, The fine Liverpool-built barque, ALICE JANE; 237 tons OM, 239 tons NM, coppered and copper-fastened; built for the owners, under inspection, by Messrs. Humble and Milcrest, and Launched in September 1836, For further particulars apply to Messrs C. Tayleur, Son and Co. or to Hughes, Jordan & Co.


Wooden ship William Jardine, built Humble & Milcrest, Liverpool, 1838

Liverpool Albion - Tuesday 03 May 1836
LAUNCH. This forenoon, at half-past eleven, will be launched from the yard of Messrs. Humble and Milcrest, in Trentham-street, west side of the Salthouse Dock, a splendid new ship of about 700 tons burthen, to be called the William Jardine. She belongs to Sir John Tobin, and is intended for the East India trade.


Wooden ship Martha Ridgway, built Humble & Milcrest, Liverpool, 1840

[Liverpool Albion - Monday 16 March 1840]:
SHIP LAUNCH. On Thursday next, at eleven o'clock, will be launched from the yard of Messrs. Humble and Milcrest, in Trentham-street, west side of Salthouse-dock, a splendid ship of 600 tons burthen, to be called the "Martha Ridgway." She belongs to John Ridgway, Esq., of this town, and is intended for the East India trade. She has been built under the inspection of Captain Finlay Cooke, and for beauty of model and workmanship cannot be surpassed. We would recommend an early visit to her by those who wish to see a handsome ship.


Wooden schooner yacht Will-o'-the-Wisp, built Humble & Milcrest, 1840.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 18 December 1840]:
LAUNCH. - On Saturday, at eleven o'clock, there was launched, from the yard of Messrs. Humble and Milcrest, Trentham-street, west side of Salthouse Dock, a beautiful yacht schooner, called the Will-o'-the-Wisp. From her model and build, we have no doubt her sailing qualities will equal, if not surpass, those of any other vessel in this port.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 09 February 1841]:
"THE WILL-O'-THE-WISP." There is now, at the west side of the Salthouse Dock, a beautiful schooner of this name, built by Messrs. Humble and Milcrest, and owned by Captain Highat (now retired), formerly commander of the ship "William Jardine," the "Gipsey," and the "Elizabeth." She has the appearance, and will, we doubt not, show the sailing qualities of a first-rate yacht. Her equipments are superb; and we should say she will eclipse most, if not all of her competitors, as a fore-and-aft rigged vessel. She is, we learn, bound for Algiers on a private mercantile speculation, with a full and valuable cargo. She is of about 101 tons burthen (new measurement), and will take with her considerably over that weight of fine goods. The top timbers of the "Will-o'-the-Wisp" are of mahogany, and she is in every respect a credit to her owner and to the port. The figure-head, representing "Will," is a regular puzzler.


Wooden ship John M'Vicar, built Humble & Milcrest, Liverpool, 1841. Owned Bold & Starkie, Liverpool, for trade to East Indies.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 20 September 1841]:
LAUNCH OF AN EAST INDIAMAN. Also, on the same day, at high water, a beautiful ship, intended for the East India trade, and of about 700 tons burthen, was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Humble and Milcrest, Trentham-street. Her length of keel is 130 feet, breadth of beam 32 feet, and depth of hold 20 feet 4 inches. She is built of the very best English oak, and quite equal, in strength of frame and finish, to any vessel that has ever been turned out of this port, or, in other words, is a vessel of the first class. She is fastened in a superior manner, having 7 inch stringers above and below her deck beams, together with iron T places bolted through the beam ends and clenched, and also clenched through the sides. For better ventilation, she has three tiers of iron grating between docks, on a new and improved principle; her upper ceiling is entirely of mahogany, varnished; and her decks are all finely planed. She is called "The John Macvicar", after the celebrated Manchester merchant and exporter, a representation of whom, at full length, she bears as a figure head, and was built for Messrs. Bold and Starkie, of this port. She has a poop and topgallant forecastle, and a splendid cabin, with numerous sleeping apartments. Practical men have pronounced her to be of beautiful model, and she will, we trust, become an additional honour to the mercantile marine of our port. The launch was beautiful, and gave great delight to many hundreds in the yard. The ladies and gentlemen were admitted by ticket to a spacious loft or gallery, where they could view the proceedings with ease and satisfaction. This noble vessel is now in the Canning Dock, preparatory to her being rigged and coppered.


Wooden ship Harriet Humble, built Humble & Milcrest, Liverpool, 1845

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 10 February 1845]:
Launch. About half-past eleven o'clock on Saturday a fine new ship, of 468 tons register, was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Humble, Milchrest, and Co , at the north end of the town. The ceremony of christening was performed by Miss Harriet Humble, daughter of Michael Humble, Esq., the sole owner of the vessel, which is intended for the China trade, and will be commanded by Captain E. Davies, of this port. The lady called the gallant ship after herself, the Harriet Humble. The launch was an excellent one, and was witnessed by a large concourse of persons. The length of the ship, per measurement, is 119 feet; her breadth is 29 feet 6 inches; and her depth 19 feet 6 inches.

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Clarke (also Clark) & Nickson (also Nixon), Liverpool; later Clarke, Liverpool. All wooden.
Druid 1823
St Patrick 1825

Sailing vessels built by them:
Pacific SV 1821
Liver (Pilot V) 1822
Grace SV 1826?
Isabel SV 1828
Theodosia SV 1830
Denison SV 1830
Mary Hartley SV 1836
Jamaica SV 1838
Manilla SV 1839
Urgent SV 1840
Lydia SV 1841
Winifred SV 1842
Jaeger SV 1843
Bellairs SV 1845
Shand SV 1851
Liverpool 1852 Powder Barge.
Deva 1854


Wooden brig Pacific, built Clarke & Nickson, Liverpool, 1821, 175 tons, owned Smith, for Liverpool - Brazil trade. Registered Liverpool. Reported trading to Cape of Good Hope and to Leghorn. For sale 1837, owned Blythe, coasting, in LR to 1841. Seems to have taken coal to N French ports from Blyth. Sank by collision 24 October 1854 off Tynemouth, crew saved.

[Liverpool Mercury 3 May 1821]:
On Wednesday last, a beautiful ship, burthen 516 tons (called the Ellen Mar), was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Humble and Hurry. The surrounding multitudes were highly gratified at the manner in which she rushed into her native element. Yesterday, two fine brigs were also launched: one (the Pacific) intended for the South-sea trade, from the yard of Messrs. Clarke and Dixon[sic], south shore, the other (the Hardware) from Mr. James's yard, adjoining, for the Brazil trade. Both went off in fine style one of them some minutes after the other, which gave the numerous spectators, and among whom were many elegant females, an opportunity of gratifying their curiosity at the interesting spectacle.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 03 June 1830]:
For MONTREAL. The fine A 1 British-built Brig PACIFIC, Captain Samuel Neale, l67 tons, coppered, and sails very fast; lying in King's Dock, and will have despatch. For freight or passage, apply HUGH MATTHIE & SON.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 10 August 1837]:
For SALE, The fine fast-sailing Brig PACIFIC, burthen 175 tons, old measurement; Liverpool-built, in 1821, copper-fastened and coppered 12 months back; shifts without ballast; well found in stores. For inventory and further particulars. Apply on board, in Queen's Dock, or to R. SINGLEHURST and Co.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Monday 30 October 1854]:
BLYTH Oct 25. The brig Pacific, Tate, of Blyth, from Shoreham (in ballast) was run down off Tynemouth bar last night, about 6 o'clock, by the Chanticleer (s), just proceeding from the Tyne; crew saved, with loss of all their effects, except as they stood.


Wooden pilot vessel Liver, built Clarke & Nickson, Liverpool, 1822, 59grt, 49.10 x 15.10 x 8.6 feet, Pilot Boat no. 9,

Image, from paintng by Walters & Son, circa 1830, of Liverpool Pilot Vessel, No 9, off the South Stack. [from MMM]



Wooden ship Grace, owned Shand, in LR reported as built Liverpool 1826, 344 tons, traded to West Indies for Shand until 1847, then owned Cotesworth, Wynne & Lyne, advertised as sailing to Madras (now Chennai) 1848. Clarke built several ships for Shand - so is a plausible candidate for shipbuilder. Reported ashore, 28th June 1848, at Coverlong (now Kovalam), 30 miles south of Chennai. One drowning, from on board, was reported in Liverpool newspapers, named William Morrison.

[from Liverpool Saturday's Advertiser - Saturday 11 November 1826]:
Ships Loading. Demerara, Grace, Davies, Shand.

[from Liverpool Saturday's Advertiser - Saturday 13 November 1830]:
Guiana. For Demerara, Ship Grace, John Davies, master, ... Apply Shand.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 27 September 1845]:
For DEMERARA, The superior Liverpool-built Ship GRACE, John Ryrie, Master; per register 344 tons, loading in Prince's Dock, and from her arrangements will not be detained. For freight or passage apply to Messrs. C.W. and F. Shand, or to JAMES POOLE and Co.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 20 December 1847]:
For MADRAS. The fine Liverpool built ship GRACE, J. Woof, Commander; A 1; 344 tons; coppered; ... Apply to C.W. & F.Shand ..

[from Lloyd's List - Monday 25 September 1848]:
Madras, 15th Aug. The cargo of the Grace, Woof, from Liverpool to this port, which was wrecked near Covelong 28th June, has been saved, but the greater part in a damaged condition. [stranded, bilged and filled]


Wooden ship Isabel, built Liverpool 1828 [info from LR 1829]. 352 tons, owned Shand, master Griffiths. Registered Liverpool. By 1854 master Lapworth, still owned Shand and trading to Antigua.
Builder presumably Clarke & Nickson, since matches report of launch.
Voyage Haiti to Liverpool, leaky and abandoned off Cuba, crew saved, 18 Dec 1854.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 18 January 1828]:
To-morrow (Saturday) a fine ship will be launched from the ship building yard of Messrs. Clark and Nixon, south end of Queen's Dock. She is built for Messrs. C. W., and F. Shand. and intended for the West Indies.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 24 January 1828]:
For ANTIGUA, With permission to call at Demerara, the new British Ship ISABEL, W. Griffith, Master. For freight or passage, apply to C. W. and F. SHAND.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Wednesday 07 February 1855]:
ST. JAGO DE CUBA. Jan 2. The Isabel, Lapworth, from St Domingo to Queenstown, was abandoned in a sinking state 18th Dec., off Cuba. Crew saved in the long-boat, which was towed by the Spanish steamer Jyaba, 130 miles into Manzanilla [sic, Manzanillo, Cuba?] . The steamer, being full of slaves, refused to take the men on board. [Isabel sailed from Aux Cayes (S coast of Haiti) for Cork 12 Dec 1854]


Wooden Sailing vessel Theodosia, built Clarke & Nickson, Liverpool, 1830, 299 tons, ON 16869, registered Liverpool, sold foreign 1857, in MNL to 1857 only. Owned T Holt in 1847. Sold in Colombia.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 21 May 1830]:
Ship Launch. - Tomorrow, (Saturday) about eleven o'clock. a fine vessel, about 300 tons burthen, will be launched from Clarke and Nickson's yard, Trentham-street, built for Mr. Thos. Holt.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 28 May 1830]:
Ship Launch. - On Saturday last, a fine vessel, of 300 tons burthen, was launched from the building-yard of Messrs Clarke and Nickson, Trentham-street. She was named the Theodosia. and went off in gallant style, a number of ladies gracing the deck with their presence. She is intended for the Jamaica trade, and will be commanded by Capt. B. Simpson, late of the Eclipse.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 25 January 1855]:
Line of packets for Ceylon, the well known fine Liverpool-built barque Theodosia, A 1 at Lloyd's, 300 tons register,...Cotesworth, Wynne and Lyne.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Wednesday 10 September 1856]:
Vessels Sailed, Sept 9. Theodosia, 299, Murphy, Imrie & Co, Santa Martha. [sic, Santa Marta, a city in Colombia]

[from Northern Daily Times - Monday 23 February 1857]:
Carthagena, Jan. 25. The Theodosia, Murphy, hence to Savanilla, has been sold, and her cargo shipped for Savanilla by the British brig Ceres. [Savanilla was port at mouth of river Magdalena, Colombia]


Wooden ship Denison, built Clarke & Nickson, Liverpool, 1830, 320 tons. Owned Shand, Liverpool. for service to Antigua. Not found MNL. On 25th December 1852, on voyage Liverpool to Antigua, driven ashore near Fleetwood, 2 lost, vessel for sale "as it lies".

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 31 December 1830]:
Tomorrow, (Saturday) will be launched from the building yard of Messrs Clarke and Nickson, Trentham-street. a ship of 320 tons, to be called the Denison, for Messrs. C. W. and F. Shand, and intended for the West India trade.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 25 February 1834]:
To sail the 5th March. For ANTIGUA, the Ship DENISON, HENRY T. POOLE, Master: For freight or passage apply to C.W. and F. SHAND

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 04 January 1853]:
WRECK OF THE DENISON. In consequence of some unintentional errors which occurred last week in our report of the wreck of the ship Denison, we subjoin the following particulars, with which we have been furnished by Mr. James Wood, the mate of that unfortunate vessel.
"The Denison left this port for Antigua 24th Dec., at 3.15 p.m.; discharged pilot and steamboat, and stood to N.W.; wind at W.S.W. At 4 p.m. the Ormshead bore W.S.W. At midnight veered ship to S., having previously missed stays. On the 25th, at 2 a.m., the wind suddenly increased from W.S.W. to a terrific gale, with torrents of rain; and while endeavouring to take canvas off the ship, the fore and main yards broke in the slings, and the sails were rent in pieces. About 6 a.m. the gale began to abate, when we got the remnants of the sails fast, and reached to the southward under what sail we could set. At 11, being close down upon the banks off Lytham, took the sail in and let go the small bower anchor, veering away the chain to the end, which parted; let go the best bower immediately, again veering away the chain to the end, which brought her up in six fathoms water; Lytham lighthouse bearing S.E. by E. At 2 p.m. the Lytham lifeboat came off, and put a pilot on board. Attempted to get under weigh, but declined it, finding she would not cast the right way. About 7 p.m. the other chain parted; slipped it, and made all sail we could possibly set towards Fleetwood. At 10.30 came to with the stream anchor and cable, at the entrance of the Weir[sic Wyre] eastward of the Pile lighthouse. Sent the boat and four hands on shore with the pilot, to bring a steamboat out. At 2 a.m., on the 26th, the ship took the ground. At 2.30 the pilot returned with the steamtug Nile and a Fleetwood pilot. The ship being aground sent the Nile away, with orders to bring another steamer, with twelve more men, to assist the ship off the following tide; but previous to her floating, another gale came on from the W.S.W., with a heavy sea, which, as the tide flowed, caused the ship to beat heavily on the sands, and soon bilged her, when she filled. The main and mizen masts were then cut away, and the whole crew, nineteen in number, with the two pilots, and three men left on board by the steamboat, took to the foremast, having previously made the end of a warp fast to the longboat. The longboat was now washed off the deck, when, the master, mate, two pilots, eleven of the crew, and the three men from the shore, with great difficulty succeeded in getting into her, and proceeded before the wind and sea, steering her with a piece of deck plank, until she came to the ground, and all were safely landed. Three men and one boy were afterwards taken out of the rigging; and two boys were unfortunately lost. On our landing we were most kindly treated by a poor woman, whose house was near; and on our arrival at Fleetwood, Elliotson, Esq., entertained us most hospitably at his own house, for which we beg to return him and his good lady our sincere and grateful thanks. The crew lost all their clothes. The ship will be a total wreck, and very little of the cargo is expected to be saved."

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 17 January 1853]:
... This DAY, the 17th instant, at half-past two o'clock, at Fleetwood, The Wreck of the Ship DENISON, as it now lies on the Sands, near Fleetwood, With such portion of the CARGO as may be remaining in the Vessel. Also, at the same time, Such part of the CARGO, STORES, and SHIP'S MATERIALS, as are or may have been saved. Apply to Captain KING, at the Euston Hotel; Mr. BURRIDGE, Agent for Lloyd's at Fleetwood ; Messrs. C. and W. and F. Shand, Merchants, or to WILLIAM HUSON, Broker for the Underwriters.


Wooden ship Mary Hartley, built Clarke and Nixon. Liverpool, 1836, 400 tons. Reported in MNL 1852 as Liverpool - registered, trading to Callao and Valparaiso, master Branthwaite. Voyage Peru to Liverpool, on 13 February 1856, foundered in a storm, crew took to boats and landed near Demerara. Owned Clarke, ship-builders.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 16 September 1836]:
On Wednesday last .... On the same day very fine ship the Mary Hartley of 400 tons burthen intended for the India trade under the command of Captain Priestman was launched from building yard of Messrs Clarke and Nixon

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 24 December 1855]:
Mary Hartley, Bartlett. from Iquique, at Arica, and sailed for Islay, 24th Oct.

[from Preston Chronicle - Saturday 29 March 1856]:
TOTAL LOSS OF A LIVERPOOL SHIP AND SUFFERINGS OF THE CREW. - Our Liverpool correspondent has received an account of the total loss of the Mary Hartley, Captain Bartlett, a barque of 700 tons, with a cargo worth £50,000 to £60,000 on board, whilst on her voyage, from Arica, on the Peruvian coast, to Liverpool. The vessel sprang a leak during a furious gale, which took place on the 13th of February, and so rapidly did the water gain upon her, that she sank in a few minutes afterwards; the crew having barely time to escape in two boats. This was in lat. 8 N. and long. 45 W. and about 600 miles from land. Thus situated (says the account) without a sail in sight, and deficient both in food and clothing, the ill-fated crew, in two open boats, 600 miles from land, with the storm raging as violently as before, were exposed to the violence of the ocean. One day during this perilous position, the captain, who was in the long-boat in company with the boys, whilst the crew were in another boat, perceived that the boat in which the crew were placed could not live out the violence of the storm, and consequently he succeeded, but with great difficulty, in getting the crew transferred to the long-boat. Not three minutes elapsed after their getting into the long-boat before a tremendous sea struck the one they had left and dashed her to pieces. For several days the crew were tossed about in this manner, and at length, after having been exposed to the fury of the storm for six days and nights, they eventually saw land, and got ashore near Demerara, half dead with hunger and exhaustion; what few provisions they had been able to secure having been nearly all lost in the second boat. Captain Bartlett quitted Demerara by the West India mail steamer, and arrived at Southampton on Friday. The Bellona, with the crew, is shortly expected in Liverpool. [Mary Hartley reported to have put in to Pernambuco and sailed from there on 1st February]


Wooden barque Manilla, built Clark & Nickson, Liverpool, 1839, 360 tons. Not found MNL. Last newspaper report 1854 - when for sale at Liverpool.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 04 January 1839]:
Launch. - On Tuesday a fine vessel of 360 tons burthen called the Manilla, to be rigged as a barque, was launched from the yard of Messrs. Clark and Nickson, by whom she was built for Mr. T. Hatton. A large concourse of spectators, including many ladies and gentlemen, were present on the occasion.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 01 April 1841]:
For SALE, The Barque MANILLA, Now lying in the St. Katherine's Dock, London; 313 tons, old measure, launched in the year 1839; has made one voyage to China, stands A 1 twelve years. For further particulars apply to ROBERT CLARKE and SONS, Ship-builders, Trentham-street.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 19 August 1852]:
For SALE, The Liverpool-built Barque MANILLA; 313 tons o. m. and 353 tons n.m., built at Liverpool in 1839. for the present owners, and classed A 1 twelve years; length 97 feet 6-10ths, breadth 23 feet 7-10ths, depth 17 feet 8-10ths, copper fastened, and sheathed with yellow metal; carries a large cargo, and sails fast: lying Salthouse Dock. ... John Worrall Esq ... [also for sale to February 1854 at Liverpool, having delivered guano]

[from Southern Reporter and Cork Commercial Courier - Thursday 13 April 1854]:
Cork shipping. On the 10th, the barque Manilla, off Cape Clear, outward bound. [for St Thomas]

Possibly same vessel [from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Thursday 23 January 1868]:
Manilla (barque) at Castro [Chile presumably], dismasted, and part of cargo thrown overboard.


Wooden ship Jamaica, built Clarke, Liverpool, 1838, 361 tons, ON 24241, registered Liverpool. By 1872, barque, owned Wooldridge (master). In MNL to 1875. Last newspaper report is when she went aground in the Baltic on a voyage from Swinemunde to Paysandu (Uraguay) with sleepers on 24 October 1873, and needed repairs.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 05 January 1838]:
Launch. - There was launched, on Saturday, from the yard of Messrs. Clarke and Sons, a fine ship, of 400 tons register, intended for the Jamaica trade, and called the Jamaica. She is to be commanded by Capt. T. A. Farrall and is the property of Joseph Brooks Yates, Esq. A cold collation was provided on board, which gave great satisfaction to a numerous party.

[from Lloyd's List - Tuesday 28 October 1873]:
Swinemunde sailed Oct 22 Jamaica Wooldridge Paysandu [Paysandu is in Uraguay]

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Monday 27 October 1873]:
Jamaica. telegram of 24th inst, from Copenhagen, states that the barque Jamaica, from Stettin for Pandula (?) (sleepers), got aground and became leaky, and is repairing in harbour.


Wooden ship Urgent, built Clarke, Liverpool, 1840, 355 tons, for T Hutton, Liverpool, for Calcutta service. ON 25738. Last MNL listing 1867, owned Haughton, Dublin, registered Liverpool, 411 tons. LR 1856 - 1858 give barque, Master Stooke, owner Ford, Liverpool, plying from Leith to Aden, restored 1853. Ashore at Métis, NE of Quebec, before 4 July 1863, on voyage Quebec to Caernarfon, condemned and sold. In LR to 1868, latterly Clyde - West Indies service. Driven ashore and wrecked at Buenos Ayres, 29 October 1866. Reported to MNL as condemned 1867.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 13 March 1840]:
LAUNCHES. - On Friday was launched, from the building yard of Messrs. Robert Clarke and Sons, a fine, handsome ship, burthen 410 tons. for L. J. Hutton, Esq,, of this town, and intended for the East India trade, for which she is admirably adapted. She is to be commanded by Captain Gibb.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 06 April 1840]:
For CALCUTTA. The splendid new Liverpool Ship URGENT, H. W. Gibb, Commander; A 1; 408 tons register; copper fastened and coppered; is expected to sail fast, and having good accommodations, is a most eligible conveyance for goods or passengers. Apply to Mr. T. J. Hutton, or to COTESWORTH & WYNNE.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Thursday 13 September 1860]:
FOR SALE. The fine A 1 British-built Barque URGENT; 355 tons om, 411 tons register. Length 105 feet, breadth 23 feet 6-10ths. depth 18 feet 3-10ths. Built at Liverpool in 1840, and classed A 1 twelve years at Lloyd's; was restored in 1853 for eight years, and is now in first-rate order; is copper fastened and sheathed with yellow metal. This vessel is a large carrier. and is well known for the fine order in which she delivers her cargoes. Is well found in stores, and could be sent to sea at little expense: lying in Salthouse Dock, Liverpool. Apply to the owners, WILLIAM FORD & SON. 5, Ansdell-street.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Saturday 18 July 1863]:
QUEBEC - July 4 ... The Urgent, Williams, is on shore at Metis [NE of Quebec]

[from London Evening Standard - Saturday 15 August 1863]:
QUEBEC, August 13. The Urgent, hence Caernarvon, stranded near Metis previous to the 5th of July, has been condemned. [later report: wreck sold for $940; in LR until 1868]

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Friday 30 November 1866]:
THE BRAZIL MAIL SOUTHAMPTON, Nov. 29. The Royal Mail Co.'s steamship Rhone, from the Brazils, has arrived here. .... A severe gale prevailed at Buenos Ayres on the 29th ult., doing great damage. Several vessels were wrecked and driven ashore, and many lives lost. The British barque Urgent became a total wreck.


Wooden ship Lydia, built Clarke, Liverpool, 1841, in LR 1845 as 425 tons, owned Shand, Liverpool, trading to Antigua. ON 4301, registered Liverpool 1841, 477 tons, later 433 tons. Stranded 28 November 1860, on coast north of Wexford, 3 men (out of 19 crew and 3 passengers) lost.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 09 January 1841]:
LAUNCH OF THE SHIP LYDIA. Yesterday a select company of ladies and gentlemen assembled in the building-yard of Messrs. Clarke & Sons, Trentham-street, to witness the launch of a new and very handsome ship, belonging to Messrs C. W. and F. Shand, and built under the immediate superintendence of Mr Clarke. .. named "Lydia".. by Miss Sarah Shand. ... The vessel is announced to sail on the 10th February. .. 477 tons burthen ...

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 30 November 1860]:
Wexford, Nov. 28. - The ship Lydia, from Liverpool for Monte Video, is on shore 13 miles north of Wexford, and likely to go to pieces if the weather does not moderate. Three men lost.

[from Wexford People - Saturday 01 December 1860]:
SHIPWRECK NEAR BLACK WATER. This dangerous part of our coast has been the scene of another shipwreck, attended, we regret to say, with loss of life. The full-rigged ship Lydia, registered 433 tons, sailed from Liverpool on yesterday week, with a general cargo bound for Monte Video (South America). The vessel belonged to Messrs. C. W. and F. Shand, Liverpool, and the cargo was estimated in value £40,000. The crew consisted of nineteen hands, including the Captain, Mr. William Booker. There was also on board a gentleman passenger, and two stowaways. At daylight on Sunday morning she was discovered at anchor a mile outside Rusk Bank, off Morris Castle, the wind being then blowing a whole gale from S.S.E., which made her position most critical. She continued so up to noon on Monday when she burst one of her anchors. The others were then slipt, and sail made, but not being able to get an offing, she was driven ashore at three o'clock, p.m., at Ballinamona [sic, also Ballynamona] - about four miles north of the Blackwater Head. Immediately afterwards the sea broke over her in a tremendous manner. The foremast and mainmast were then cut away. The second mate and two others of the crew next got into one of the boats, as we understand for the purpose of getting a line on shore, but owing to the terrible sea, the poor fellows were not able to master the surf, the boat capsized, and the waters closed over their human prey. On the ship being stranded a messenger was dispatched to Wexford, when William Coghlan, Esq., (Collector of Customs), and Francis Harper, Esq., (Lloyd's Agent), proceeded to the place, where they found all the officers of the Coast Guards of Curracloe and Morris Castle stations in attendance. This was at seven o'clock in the evening. The rocket apparatus was then got ready, and three rockets thrown on Board, but the crew being in an exhausted state could not avail themselves of the assistance thus afforded them. During all this time those on shore could see no appearance of any person in the vessel, and fears were entertained that all had perished. At half-past eight o'clock the hearts of those on the beach were cheered by hearing the ship's bell toll, which was responded to by them, which signal was kept up during the night. Seeing no possibility of getting the men on shore by means of the rocket apparatus, Mr. Coghlan dispatched a messenger for the Cahore Life Boat. During the night the crew were obliged to take shelter in the topgallant forecastle, being up to their waists in water, as the bulk-head was torn away by the sea. At daylight on Tuesday morning two rockets were fired on board, the second taking effect. The almost doomed mariners cheered, which was heartily echoed by those who felt such a deep interest in rescuing them from their perilous position. A hawser was then sent on board by means of the line, the life-buoy and breeches attached. and at twelve o'clock noon, nineteen individuals were providentially saved. Previous to this, Mr. Coghlan, with his usual promptitude, had provided cars, and as the poor fellows came on shore, administered a small portion of brandy to each, had them quickly conveyed to the house of a respectable farmer, Mr. John Bryan, where every attention was paid to their immediate necessities. With reference to the energetic and valuable exertions made by Mr. Coghlan, it is needless for us to add one word, as his worth on this and all other occasions, where his presence was required, have been amply tested to the benefit of those concerned. We have also much pleasure in stating that Captain Balfour, Inspecting Commander of the Arklow Coast Guards, Captain Partridge, and the Coast Guards in general, as also Isaac Bryan, Esq., J.P., (Upton, Kilmuckridge) rendered most useful assistance - particularly the latter gentleman, who, on the evening of Tuesday, provided ample provisions for the crew. And, though last, not least, the inhabitants of the district are entitled to the utmost praise for their voluntary and valuable services on the occasion - many of them remaining on the shore till dawn of morn. Hopes are entertained that if the weather remains fine, the cargo will be saved, but it will take two days to clear away the wreck of the two masts that were cut away, before any boat can get alongside. The mizenmast will be taken down to-day. Some of the cargo has been washed ashore, and portion of the head deck has been broken away by the sea. The vessel is a complete wreck.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 10 December 1860]:
On the 26th ult., drowned, near Wexford, by the upsetting of a boat, while attempting to convey a rope from the wreck of the ship Lydia to the shore, Mr. DANIEL ANDERSON, second officer; JAMES GREY, apprentice; and ROBERT SIMPKINS, seaman; highly respected and deeply regretted by their employers and friends.


Wooden ship Winifred, built Liverpool 1842 and owned Clarke - so presumably built by Clarke. 501 tons, ON 14778, registered Liverpool. Later owned Company of African Merchants, Liverpool, from 1865 or earlier. In MNL to 1879.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 20 March 1843]:
For CALCUTTA, The very fine Liverpool built Ship WINIFRED, James Webb, Commander; A 1; 563 tons per register; coppered and copper fastened, and is in excellent order. Shippers will find this a superior conveyance... Messrs Peel & Co.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 25 January 1855]:
For Madras and Coringa, the well known fine Liverpool-built ship, WINIFRED, Captain Sands, A1 at Lloyd's, 565 tons, sails fast and is well known in the East India trade for delivering her cargoes in good order....

[from Liverpool Albion - Saturday 25 May 1872]:
The Elizabeth, Winifred, Athenian, and other vessels are reported to have sustained damage to skylights, windows, etc., through the explosion of the gunpowder in the stores of the Company of African Merchants at Old Calabar April 14.


Wooden ship Jaeger, built Clarke, Liverpool, 1843. In LR 1844, 433 tons, 132 x 33 ft, owned Clarke & Co, for Liv.Calcutta service. Not found in MNL. Voyage Calcutta to Liverpool, caught fire and abandoned on 24 July 1851, crew saved by passing ships.

[from London Evening Standard - Tuesday 19 September 1848]:
Ship Launch. On Saturday a fine-built ship, intended for the East India trade, was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Clarke and Sons, on the south side of the Queen's Dock. She is, we believe, one of the largest merchant vessels which has yet been built in Liverpool, being 132 feet keel, 141 feet above decks, 33 feet beam, 21 feet 6 inches depth of hold, and 760 tons burthen, new measurement. The builders are her owners, and the gentleman under whose command she will sail is Capt. Bartlett, late of the Mary Hartley, of this port, a man highly valued for his nautical skill and knowledge. The virgin ship, to befit her to meet her briny spouse, had been gaily bedecked, and a joyous throng crowded her decks to give her welcome. In front of her bows a platform had been erected for the select guests, which was thronged by some of the principal gentlemen connected with the shipping of the port, his worship the mayor, T. B. Horsfall, Esq., and his lady being amongst the company. At high water, one o'clock, all preparations having been completed, the words "Down daggers" were given, upon which the lady who performed the ceremony of christening (Mrs. Francis Shand) threw forward the bottle of wine suspended from the vessel's bow, and exclaimed "Success to the Jaegar;" but owing to some slight mistake the vessel remained stationary. Another bottle of wine was supplied, and after some little exertions on the part of the workmen, the massive ship began to move, and she gradually slid from the cradle into the water, amidst the acclamations of the assembled spectators. She was subsequently taken into No. 4 graving dock, in order to be coppered and to undergo all processes necessary to render her fit for sea.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 04 August 1843]:
Launch. - On Saturday last a fine new ship, called the Jagger[sic, Jaeger], was launched from the building yard of Messrs. Robert Clarke and son, Aetna-street. A large number of people assembled to witness the spectacle, and the ceremony of christening was performed by Mr Walford Shand. A cold collation was served up after the launch, in the model-room, and about one hundred ladies and gentlemen partook of it. The following are the dimensions of the vessel: - new tonnage, 504.5 21/100; old ditto, 433 10/94; measurement, - length 115 feet; breadth 28 feet 10.5 inches.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 25 August 1851]:
A LIVERPOOL SHIP BURNT AT SEA. The ship Jaeger, Captain Bartlett, the property of Messrs. Clarke and Son, of this town, was burnt at sea on the 24th of July last, while on her voyage from Calcutta for this port, with a cargo of saltpetre, sugar, rice, &c. On the 24th July, at seven o'clock in the morning, in lon. 40 W, lat. 26 N., spontaneous combustion commenced in the after hold, between decks, and, although all hands endeavoured to extinguish it by throwing down water with buckets, by keeping the two pumps pouring upon the flames, and by cutting up the decks, their efforts were unsuccessful. The fire raged for six hours and a half, when the mainmast went over the side. The crew, twenty-eight in number, were providentially rescued by the Dutch ship, Europea, which hove in sight shortly after the fire. From her the Swedish brig Pylad took eight: namely, William Rankin. third mate. Thomas Gratnell, Adam Bruce, Andrew Mackintosh. A. M'Cluckie, T. Richards, Henry smith, and John Whitfill, seamen, and landed them safe at Portsmouth, on Monday.



Wooden ship Bellairs, built Clarke, Liverpool, 1845, ON 40097, registered Liverpool 1854, 609 tons. Later registered Hull from 1862. Abandoned 4 December 1863, on Dudgeon Shoal, off the Wash, returning from Alexandria to Hull.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 14 March 1845]:
The Bellairs, another fine ship, intended for the trade to the east, was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Clarke and Sons, Etna slip, Baffin-street. She was christened by Miss Bellairs, the daughter of one of the firm of Peel, Bellairs, and Co. of Manchester. Her length on deck is 119 feet 6-10th, her breadth amidships 27 feet, her depth amidships 20 feet, and her tonnage 609 5-10 tons. Her breadth of beam is 30 feet 3 inches, and she contains 55,327 cubic feet of space. She will be commanded by Capt. Webb, late of the Winifred, who is part owner.

[from Hull Packet - Friday 01 January 1864]:
Vessels lost 1863: fine first-class barque Bellairs from Alexandria

[from Sun (London) - Monday 07 December 1863]:
The late gale. ... The bark Bellairs, Bullford master, from Alexandria, of and for Hull, with beans, was abandoned about 2 a.m. on Friday, near the Dudgeon, where she went on her beam ends. The crew, 17 in number, took to their boat, and were picked up by the schooner Isabella, of Folkestone, which landed them at Lowestoft on Saturday morning in a destitute condition. They will be forwarded to their homes by Mr. Cole, the honorary local agent of the Shipwrecked Mariners' Society . [Dudgeon Shoal - off shore of Wash]


Wooden ship Shand, built Clarke, Liverpool, 1851, 836 tons, ON 6195, in MNL to 1887. Latterly 978 tons, owed Jacob, Liverpool, then Brodie, London. Registered Liverpool. Voyage New York to London, 23rd May 1877, abandoned in mid-ocean, crew of 21 all saved.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 23 January 1851]:
On Saturday two beautifully-built ships, for the East India trade, were launched from the building-yards in Baffin-street, on the west side of the Queen's Dock. Eleven o'clock was high tide, and at that hour, a vast assemblage of persons, including many ladies, had collected in the building-yards and within view of the scene of the launches, desirous to obtain a sight of the interesting ceremony. The weather proved most propitious for the occasion, being bright as a May morn, whilst not a ripple ruffled the surface of the magnificent river which was to receive the two noble ships.
The first launch, which took place from the yard of Messrs. P. Chaloner and Sons, was a ship of 776 tons burthen, new measurement. She has been built, we understand, for Messrs. Brown and Harrisons, and Messrs James Browne and Co.
The second launch, of a still larger ship, took place in about quarter of an hour afterwards from the building-yard of Mr. Clarke. She was christened the Shand, the baptismal honours being performed by Mrs. Francis Shand. Shortly after the launches, the vessels were floated into dock, preparatory to receiving their fittings.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 18 January 1851]:
Adds: extreme length, 150 ft 2 in; breadth, 34 ft; and depth 22 ft 2in. .. for the East India trade. P>[from Liverpool Daily Post - Saturday 07 April 1877]:
LOSS OF A LONDON SHIP. RESCUE OF THE CREW. The Spanish steamer Mayaguez arrived at Liverpool on Thursday, having on board the whole of the crew (21 hands) of the London ship Shand. The Shand, while on a voyage from New York to London, was sighted by the steamer about the 23rd ult, flying signals of distress, and with a barrel of hemp burning as an additional signal, The steamer at once bore down upon the vessel and found that she had sprung a leak, and that the water had gained to the extent that it was considered desirable, for the safety of life, to abandon her. A boat was at once lowered from the ship. There was a heavy sea on at the time, and the greatest difficulty was experienced in reaching the steamer. Four trips of the boat were necessary before all the crew were rescued. On one of the journeys the occupants of the boat had scarcely landed when it was smashed to pieces by being driven against the side of the steamer, and another boat had to be launched from the Mayaguez to complete the rescue, The Shand had a general cargo, and encountered very heavy weather almost from the time she left New York. She was ship of 978 tons register, owned by Mr. J. Brodie, of London, and was built at Liverpool in 1851. The crew were taken to the Sailors Home. They lost all their effects. The greatest kindness was shown to the unfortunate seamen by the Spanish captain.



Wooden gun-powder barges Liverpool and Mersey. Both similar: 112 x 36.8 ft, 500-600 tons.
Liverpool built Clarke, Liverpool, 1852; ON 6039, register closed 1906. More history
Mersey built Royden, Liverpool, 1852; yard no.55, ON 6038, register closed 1909. More history
Intended to store gun-powder in the Mersey, safely.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 05 June 1852]:
Launch of the new powder ships. On Tuesday two new ships built for the lessees of the notorious powder magazines, were launched from the yards of Messrs. Royden and Clark, Baffin Street. The vessels are perfectly alike, being built on the same mould; they are of equal tonnage, and all respects duplicates of each other, with the exception of Mr. Royden's vessel being a little sharper than her sister ship. Mr. Royden's is called the Mersey. She is 112 feet 6 inches long, 36 feet 8 inches beam, and 14 feet 4 inches deep. She is of 609 tons, measurement. Mr. Clarke's vessel is called the Liverpool, and the foregoing remarks apply to her, only that she is about two feet shorter than Mr. Royden's ship. The vessels are framed of English oak. The bottoms are planted with American elm, and the remaining planks are of pitch pine. The vessels are bound with American oak; the fastenings are entirely of copper, and not an iron nail is in any part of the vessels. The draught of water, when launched, was 5 feet, and the load line will be about 7 feet 6 inches. These vessels are to be furnished with Man's lightning conductor, and every care will be taken to give security to their explosive contents, amongst the most important of which is the introduction of syphons, by which the vessels can be flooded with water instantaneously.


Wooden ship Deva, built Clarke, Liverpool, 1854. ON 12543, 1039 tons, registered Liverpool, wrecked 9 May 1860, owned Shand, 31 crew.

[from Northern Daily Times - Monday 17 April 1854]:
LAUNCHES OF THE SHIPS DEVA AND JOSEPH STEEL. One of the most interesting sights which have taken place for some time on the banks of the Mersey was occasioned by launching of two merchantmen on Saturday last, from the ship-building yards of Mr. Thomas Clark and Mr. Joseph Steele, jun., Baffin-street. The day being beautifully fine a large concourse of persons assembled to witness the ceremony. The ship-building yards adjoin each other, and the vessels being gaily dressed with flags and streamers, presented an animated appearance. Shortly before one o'clock, the final preparations for the launching of the Deva were proceeded with, and all being completed, it was found that the vessel would not move. The excitement of the multitude became great as every effort was being made to drive her down the launchways. After ten minutes suspense, the vessel yielded to the labours of a number of the machinists and a joyous shout greeted the first movement of the vessel. Mrs. Clarke, jun., performed the ceremony of baptism. The Deva is 200 feet long, over all. Her breadth is 34 feet 10 inches, and she has 22 feet 6 inches depth of hold. She is 1038 tons new measurement, and it is expected to carry upwards of 1600 tons of cargo, and is classed for 14 years. The Deva has a beautifully executed figure head of the Queen, by Allan, and her stern is richly ornamented. The vessel will be commanded by Capt. Gifford, late of the Euphrates.
Shortly after the Deva, the Joseph Steele was launched and christened by Mrs. Steele jun. This ship has much finer lines than the Deva with a sharper rise of flooring. Both vessels are good specimens of naval architecture though not so sharp fore and aft as the clipper ships of the present day. The object of the builders has been strength combined with good carrying capacity. The length of the Joseph Steele is: 172 feet between perpendiculars; 32 feet beam; 22 feet depth of hold; and she is 900 tons register. Her bow is ornamented with a figure of Mr. Steele, and the likeness is striking. Both vessels are intended for the East India trade. They were ultimately taken into the Canning Dock, and during Saturday and yesterday were visited by a large number of persons. Some interest was shown in the Deva, as she has been built as a gunship, with ports and every convenience for ammunition.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 05 June 1860]:
CALCUTTA The Deva, was wrecked off False Point 9th May; crew saved. [Mem. - The Deva, sailed from Liverpool for Calcutta, 6th January.]
[Another report: June 2, The wreck of the Deva has been sold]

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Caleb & James Smith, Liverpool. Sailing Vessels (see List). See History of Smith family shipbuilders. After 1830, the builder was named James Smith.
Quite a few of their vessels were owned by Bibby Line. [Steam vessels].
Hector SV 1821
Ellen Jenkinson SV 1823 Bibby
Christina SV 1823
Wilsons SV 1823
Regular SV 1824
Betty & Jane SV 1824
Mary Bibby SV 1825 Bibby
Hopkinson SV 1825
Lydia SV 1825 Bibby
Amelia SV 1826 Bibby
Bispham SV 1826 Bibby
John Ormerod SV 1826
Fanny Connell SV 1827 Bibby
Margaret Highfield SV 1828 Bibby
Henry Hoyle SV 1829 Bibby

Brig SV 1830;
Barbadian SV 1831
Arethusa SV 1832

Wooden ship Hector, built Caleb & James Smith, Liverpool, 1821, 392 tons, owned Sandbank [sic, Sandbach], Liverpool. Later owned Close and rigged as a barque. Traded to Demerara, Africa and India. Voyage Calcutta to Liverpool, became leaky and anchored off Terceira, where she foundered on 17th February 1841, with the loss of Captain John Johnson, the mate and steward.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 30 December 1833]:
For New Orleans, The British-built ship, HECTOR, Burthen 392 tons, coppered; Apply to Messrs. W. A. & G. MAXWELL, or to AIKIN & HUGHES.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 15 March 1841]:
MELANCHOLY LOSS OF THE BARQUE HECTOR. We deeply regret to state, that intelligence was on Thursday received, by the schooner Flora, Captain Warren, from Terceira, of the total loss of the barque Hector, East Indiaman, of this port, off that island, on the 17th of Feb., and of the captain, the mate, and another man. The Hector recently underwent a thorough repair here, and was considered equal to a new ship. On her homeward voyage from Calcutta, with a cargo of sugar, she touched at the island of St. Helena, and afterwards encountered a gale of wind, which induced the captain, as she had become leaky, to make for the island of Terceira, in the Azores. She came to anchor off the island on the 15th February. The gale continued violent, and, as the leak increased, the crew abandoned the vessel next day, in the long-boat, leaving on board the captain and the mate, and, it is supposed, the steward, both of whom were much attached to him, and resolved to remain with him to the last. The leak at length defied all their exertions, and the ship became in a sinking state. They did not, however, leave her until the water had reached the deck, and there was no longer a hope of saving her. They then took to the remaining small boat, and the vessel went down in fifty fathoms of water, at her anchors. The distance to the shore was but short, but the gale was still severe, and the sea running high, and, lamentable to relate; the boat swamped, and the three faithful fellows found a watery grave together.
Captain John Johnson was a man highly respected by all who knew him, and much beloved by his friends and intimate acquaintance, for his manly disposition and general good qualities. He was but 38 years of age, born in England, and was an admirable and fearless man. His father is an interpreter of this town, a respectable old man; and his distress on learning the melancholy fate of his son, as may well be conceived, was most poignant. He has left four sisters, two of whom kept his house here, and two others are resident in Danzig, the birthplace of his father. His memory will long be affectionately cherished by a large circle of friends, who were strongly attached to him as an excellent man and a cheerful and engaging companion.
The Hector was a vessel of 365 tons burthen, the property of Mr. Close, of Nottingham, whose agent here is Mr. James Aikin. We have not been enabled to ascertain the names of the mate and steward, who perished with their gallant commander.


Wooden brigantine Ellen Jenkinson, built Caleb & James Smith, Liverpool, 1823, owned Bibby for trade to Lisbon, etc. 158 tons. Sold 1844 to Hatton, Liverpool. ON 7011. In MNL to 1865. Registered Liverpool. Voyage Liverpool to Ostend, 16 May 1865, master Spooner, foundered 15 miles north of Bardsey.

Advert for Bibby vessels 1823.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Wednesday 17 May 1865]:
Holyhead: May 16. The brigantine Ellen Jenkinson of Maldon [sic] from Liverpool for Ostend, foundered 10 30am, 15 Miles north of Bardsey; crew saved and landed here.


Wooden ship Christina, built Caleb & James Smith, Liverpool, 1823, 296 tons. Owned Lucas, Liverpool. Mainly traded to Demerara. By 1840 owned Ward, London, and voyaged to Tasmania, Sydney, China, rigged as a barque. Voyage Macao to Bombay, struck West London Shoal, coast of Palawan, 1 July 1842, and wrecked. 18 lives lost. Said to be carrying much silver - as payment for her inbound cargo.

Image from painting by Samuel Walters of Christina off the South Stack [from Samuel Walters - A S Davidson]

[from Manchester Mercury - Tuesday 21 October 1823]:
On Tuesday se'ennight, a ship of 300 tons burthen, called the Christina, was launched from the building yard of Messrs C & J Smith, at Liverpool, the property of Messrs Lucas & Cook, and intended for the West India trade.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 12 May 1828]:
To sail 14th May instant. - For DEMERARA, The Ship CHRISTINA, John Hogarth, Master; A 1; 300 tons; has superior accommodations for Passengers. Bedding found, and carries a Milch Cow. Apply to captain Hogarth, King's Dock, to Lucas and Cook, or JOHN WINDER.

[from Morning Advertiser - Saturday 24 June 1837]:
Liverpool shipping: Thurs 22 June. Arrived Christina, Hogarth, Demerara.

[from Lloyd's List - Tuesday 06 December 1842]:
Bombay, 31 st Oct. The Christina, Birkett, from Macao to this Port, struck on the West London Shoal (in about lat. 9. N. lon. 112. E.) on the night of 1st July, and became a total wreck.

[from here]:
On the 8 June 1842, the British barque, Christina, left Macau with a large quantity of treasure bound for Bombay, the payment for her inward cargo of opium. On 1 July she was lost on West London Shoal. The ship broke up almost immediately. The crew could not save the log book or anything else as the waves were breaking over the vessel.
A Spanish treasure seeker found a considerable amount of silver on East London Shoal in 1844 - considered to be from the wreck of the Christina.


Wooden brig Wilsons (also Wilson), built Caleb & James Smith, Liverpool, 1823, 245 tons, owned Jones & Co, Liverpool. Later managed by Thomas & Henry Murray. Traded mainly to Demerara, from Liverpool and also, later, from Bristol. In LR 1847 as owned Murray of Liverpool, trading to Dublin. By 1849, LR reports owned Cork and still trading to Demerara.
Voyage Demerara to Liverpool, Captain Donoghue, driven ashore and wrecked. north of Wicklow, 15th January 1851. Captain and 4 crew lost.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 13 March 1823]:
Entered for loading. West Indies. ... Wilsons, Campbell, 245, Demerara, Jones, Murray & Co.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 27 May 1834]:
For DEMERARA, the Brig WILSONS; H. WILLIAMS, master. For freight or Passage apply to Thos. and Henry Murray, Rumford-street.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 10 May 1842]:
For DEMERARA, The Brig WILSON, THOMAS CAMPBELL, Master. For freight or passage apply to the Master, or THOS. and H. MURRAY.

[from Bristol Mercury - Saturday 25 December 1847]:
Came in: The Wilsons, Campbell, from Demerara.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Friday 14 September 1849]:
Liverpool. Ships Loading. Demerara. Aug 31, Wilson, Davies, G Loxdale.

[from Freeman's Journal - Monday 20 January 1851]:
The brig Wilsons, of Cork, James Donohue master, from Demerara bound to Liverpool with a cargo of rum, was driven on shore at Six-mile Point [sic, some reports quote Five-mile Point] on the morning of the 16th inst., and immediately became a total wreck. The captain and four of the crew were drowned; 78 casks of rum, part of the cargo, have been saved, and were stored at Wicklow.


Wooden ship Regular (also Regulator), built C & J Smith, Liverpool, 1824, 388 tons, owned by her master, J Bond, Liverpool. For trade Liverpool to Berbice, Guyana. By 1839 owned Job & Co. Service to China and to Bombay. Voyage London to Bombay, leaky and abandoned off Mauritius, 13 May 1843, captain Carter, with a valuable cargo. Crew and passengers saved.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 12 August 1825]:
Regulator, Bond, hence at Berbice.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 29 December 1828]:
For BERBICE, The Ship REGULAR, John Bond, Master; Burthen per register 388 tons. For freight or passage, apply to SALISBURY, TURNER & EARLE, Brokers.

[from Sun (London) - Tuesday 26 February 1839]:
Liverpool Feb 25, Arrived ... Regulator, Bond, Berbice,...

[from Hull Advertiser - Friday 25 November 1842]:
Regulator, Budd, from Canton, arrived Falmouth

[from Lloyd's List - Saturday 28 January 1843]:
Entered Outwards, London: Bombay: Regular, Budd, Lindsay, 550, Jan 12.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Saturday 16 September 1843]:
THE SHIP REGULAR. (From the Cape Shipping List). The ship Regular, Carter, 560 tons, left London 22d February last, bound to Bombay and China, with a valuable cargo of specie, iron, steel, copper, &c. The passage was an ordinary one until the 8th May, when during a heavy gale from the N. W., off the Cape of Good Hope, she sprang a leak, which in spite of the continued exertions of the crew for the four subsequent days and nights, gained upon them; on the second day the water hourly gained upon both pumps three inches. The gale continuing with unabating violence, and tremendous sea running, it was deemed expedient to lighten the ship, and about 80 tons of cargo were thrown overboard, but without any good resulting. The crew were then divided into parties, and the pumps assisted by baling at the fore hatchway. For the two subsequent days the weather continued nearly the same. There was no alternative but to scud before the blast, which was done under her foresail and close-reefed maintopsail. On the 13th the crew became completely exhausted, the pumps never having been left during four days and nights. The ship was then in lat. 37 38 S., long. 36 30E. The immense quantity of water in the hold rushing backwards and forwards now affected her steering. The vessel now being full to her lower beams, and the crew despairing to keep her afloat, they were obliged to take to the boats at 8 p.m.
In the launch were eighteen persons, including the chief and second officers and two female passengers; in the pinnace were the third officer and ten persons; in the gig Captain Carter and four persons; several days' provisions and water were placed in each boat. They were now 900 miles from the nearest land, scudding before a furious Cape gale directly from the land; about ten the boats shipped a tremendous sea; from the large boat everything was obliged to be hove overboard, water, food, compass, clothes, &c.; everything was washed out of the gig, which then pulled towards the launch and reached her at twelve. The crew then removed from her to the launch, which now became too crowded for any one to move in her; they had now lost sight of the pinnace. Thus in despair, they drove the whole night through, without chart or compass, the sea birds hovering close to them if only awaiting the moment when their frail boat should be engulphed.
At dawn, to their unexpressibe relief, two vessels were descried directly to windward, running immediately towards them. A signal of distress was made by hoisting a shawl, belonging to one of the lady passengers, on the end of oar, which was providentially not unobserved. The vessels proved to be the French frigate La Cleopatre, Captain Roy, and Alemene, corvette, proceeding from Rio de Janeiro to China by way of Bourbon. The commodore, on being made acquainted with the discovery of the signal, gave orders for the ship to be steered in the direction of the boat, and at eight, those in the launch were received on board the Cleopatre. The sailors, after having been taken board, instantly requested the commodore to go in search of their shipmates; their request was immediately complied with, and after few tacks the missing parties were discovered, and the poor wrecked were all reunited on board the vessel, thanking heartily, and with tears in their eyes, the French officers, who, through the means of God, had saved them.
The appearance of these vessels, on that day, seemed the more providential, as for forty-two days previously they had not sighted a single sail, nor did they fall in with any in the passage afterwards to the Mauritius. It was also afterwards learnt, that on the previous day the commodore had determined to alter his course, but had not eventually done so.
The preparations made for recovering the unfortunate sufferers from the boat on board the frigate could never be surpassed, it displayed the skill of seaman, and at the same time showed also that every head and heart on board the La Cleopatre seconded the exertions of the excellent commodore; and when these had been safely taken on board, found that every arrangement had been made for their reception, which either humanity or medical skill could dictate, and from that moment till the frigate's arrival at the Mauritius, the crew of the Regular received such generous kindness from their deliverers, as will never be effaced from their memory. The whole of the crew and passengers of the Regular were saved, and the captain and officers are proceeding to England in H.M.S. Belleisle, part of the crew having previously been disposed of at the Mauritius.

[from Leeds Intelligencer - Saturday 16 September 1843]:
It is said that the Regular, Budd [sic], from London to Bombay, which foundered off the Mauritius on the 13th of May last, had on board 10,000 sovereigns, 5,000 dollars, £10,000 worth of copper, and £1,000 worth of steel.


Wooden schooner Betty & Jane, built Liverpool 1824, reported as 65 tons, bringing cargo from Runcorn 1825. Not found in LR. However, reported as missing on voyage Preston to Bardsea with coal, December 1825. More history, including builder Caleb & James Smith.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 11 April 1825}:
Betty & Jane, J Russell, from Ulverstone, 65 tons, Runcorn, with 30 qtrs malt, to order.

[from Cumberland Pacquet, and Ware's Whitehaven Advertiser - Tuesday 27 December 1825]:
The Betty and Jane, Russell, of Duddon, sailed from Preston, with coals, upwards of three weeks ago, for Mr. Robinson, Bardsea, near Ulverston, and has not been heard of since. It is feared that the vessel has foundered at sea, and all on board perished. Cant. Russell was married and had a family.


Wooden ship Mary Bibby, built Liverpool, 1825, C and J Smith, Liverpool, 299 tons, owned Bibby, Liverpool. She was sold to Maryport in 1841. ON 25898, registered Liverpool, Voyage Honduras to Liverpool with timber, stranded Matanilla Reef [north of Bahamas], 31 June 1860, 15 crew all saved, owned R Crick.

Image from painting by Joseph Heard of Mary Bibby arriving in the Mersey.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 04 February 1825]:
On Monday next will be launched from the building-yard of Messrs. C. and J. Smith, west side Queen's Dock, a fine new ship, of 320 tons; for Messrs. John Bibby & Co

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 21 March 1825]:
For RIO DE JANEIRO, The remarkably fast-sailing Brig Albion. F. A. Pattison, master, 203 tons per register, A 1, coppered and copper-fastened; lies north side of the Old Dock. For terms of freight or passage, apply to Thomas F. Dyson, Esq. or W & J. Tyrer.
Succeeds the above, The fine new Liverpool-built Ship, MARY BIBBY, particularly constructed for fast sailing. For sale 1840.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Thursday 16 August 1860]:
The Mary Bibby, Redmond, from Liverpool for Honduras, which was on shore on Matanilla Reel 21st June, split open, and all the wood went adrift. [some reports: from Honduras for Liverpool]


Wooden ship Hopkinson, built C & J Smith, Liverpool, 1825, 396 tons, owned Hopkinson, Liverpool, for trade to Demerara. Later barque rigged, owned Wilson, Liverpool. Voyage Miramichi to Liverpool, 13 November 1846, ashore at Point Escuminac, New Brunswick, condemned and sold.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 14 May 1844]:
The well-known Liverpool-built Barque, HOPKINSON; Burthen 396 tons, old measurement; lying in the Prince's Dock. Was thoroughly repaired in 1838, having new topsides, new decks, and part new bends, and re-fastened throughout; was coppered last voyage, and received considerable repairs, with additional iron knees; is well found with sails and stores of the best description, and could be got ready for sea at a light expense. For inventory and further particulars apply to NICHOLAS WATERHOUSE and SONS.

[from Saint James's Chronicle - Thursday 03 December 1846]:
MIRAMICHI, Nov. 13. The barque Hopkinson, hence to Liverpool, is reported to be on shore on Point Escuminac. [other reports: master Grebow, 8 feet water in hold, rudder unshipped, condemned and sold with her cargo]


Wooden brig Lydia, built C & J Smith, Liverpool, 1825, 277 tons, owned Nicholson, Liverpool, for trade to Jamaica. Armed. Later owned by her master, Captain Petrie, and traded to Australia. Voyage Sydney to London, via Port Fairy, ran aground 2nd February 1847 and wrecked on coast of S Australia, Captain Petrie.

[from Royal Gazette of Jamaica - Saturday 15 October 1825]:
For Liverpool. The armed Brig, LYDIA, WILLIAM PROCTOR, Master, of 277 Tons; now on her first voyage, sails remarkably fast, has one half of her cargo now on board, will positively be the first Vessel for Liverpool, and will be an eligible conveyance for light Freight, with which she will now fill up; she is in every respect a superior Vessel, and will be found a comfortable conveyance to Passengers. For further particulars please apply to the Captain on board, or to THOMAS FISHER & Co.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 17 July 1828]:
ON SALE, the fine Brig LYDIA, burthen per register 2SO tons, launched at Liverpool in July, 1825; built of the very best materials, under the particular inspection of her present owner, purposely for the Jamaica trade; she sails remarkably fast; is now being coppered with heavy copper, in No. 4. Graving Dock, and will be made completely ready for any voyage. Apply to Joseph c. Nicholson, Cooper's-row.

[from Glasgow Courier - Thursday 03 June 1847]:
The Lydia, Petrie, was wrecked at Portland Bay, N.S.W., [sic, now Victoria] on the Feb. [Portland Bay is west of Melbourne, east of Port Fairy]


Wooden brig Amelia, built C & J Smith, Liverpool, 1826, 199 tons, owned Bibby, for Liverpool Oporto trade. In 1840 sold to Jameson, Kirkaldy. Voyage Cronstadt to Britain, got ashore at Stava Ness, Nesting, and was wrecked, 19th December 1847. This is on Shetland, main island, north east of Lerwick.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Monday 17 January 1848]:
The brig Amelia, Douglas, of Kirkcaldy, from Cronstadt, with a cargo of flax and hemp, struck a reef off Stava Ness, Nesting, at 2 p.m. on the 19th ult., and still remains, the cargo is discharging and vessel dismantling; should the weather continue fine, it is probable she may be got off. [Elsinore, 11 Dec, 1847, Amelia, Douglas, from Petersburg for England]

Wooden brig Bispham, built C & J Smith, Liverpool, 1826, 215 tons, owned Bibby, registered Liverpool. Traded to Mediterranean. Voyage Leith [also reported as Trieste] to Liverpool driven on shore 11 August 1838, and wrecked, crew saved.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 14 August 1838]:
Bispham, Lister, from Trieste, is on shore near Holyhead and likely to become a complete wreck - crew saved. [Liv 11 aug]

[from Lloyd's List - Monday 13 August 1838]:
Liverpool, 11 th Aug. The Bispham, Lister, from Leith to this port, is on shore near Holyhead; Crew saved. 12th. The hull of the Bispham has opened, and most of the cargo washed out along the beach; a great number of the oil casks are staved.

Wooden brig John Ormerod (also Ormrod), built C & J Smith, Liverpool, 1826, 187 tons, owned Holliwell, Liverpool, for Oporto trade. Delay trading to Oporto in 1833, because of a seige. Later sailed to Mediterranean, Grenada, Australia, San Francisco, ... Seems to have been registered at London and at Dartmouth. Registered Sydney 1854, ON 31569, as John Ormerod. Wrecked 24 October 1861, on voyage Adelaide to Sydney.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 06 May 1830]:
Line of packets for Oporto. To sail on the 12th of May. The JOHN ORMEROD, W. H. Chapman, Commander; The undersigned have, at the request of the shippers, formed a Line of Packets to sail every three weeks. The vessels are all of the first class, and have good accommodations for passengers, viz. Lusitania, Henry Hoyle, John Ormerod, Oporto, and Camoens. The appointed days of sailing will be strictly adhered to, wind and weather permitting. For terms of freight or passage apply to Messrs. O. Heyworth and Co.; Messrs. Charles Humberston and Co. or GEO. HIGHFIELD, Broker.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Tuesday 03 August 1852]:
PORT PHILIP direct. Will have quick dispatch, the fine fast-sailing Brig JOHN ORMEROD; burthen 320 tons; A. G. Hartley. Commander; lying in the West India Docks; presents an excellent opportunity for a limited number of cabin passengers. For further particulars apply to J. F. CAMPBELL and Co., 2, St. Peter's-alley, Cornhill. b

Wooden schooner/barque Fanny Connell, built Caleb & James Smith, Liverpool, 1827, 170 tons, owned Bibby, Liverpool, for service to Mediterranean. For sale 1840, described as a barque. Later traded to Sierra Leone. Voyage Sierra Leone to London, master, Kenny, 11 October 1848, stranded in Bay of Authie [French coast, Chenal d'Authie], crew saved.

[from Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser - Wednesday 14 February 1827]:
LINE of PACKETS for GENOA and LEGHORN, ... New Schooners FANNY CONNELL, and ANN PALEY, nearly ready for launching ... John Bibby. [May 1827, sailed Fanny Connell, Joy, for Leghorn]

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Tuesday 08 December 1840]:
LIVERPOOL THE following well-known, Liverpool- built vessels:
The Ship MARY BIBBY, burthen per register 200 89-94 tons (O.M.); Length 104 feet; breadth 25 feet 10 inches; depth 16 feel 0 inches. Lying in Union Dock.
The barque FANNY CONNELL, burthen per register 171 70-94 tons (O.M.); Length 83 feet 10 inches; breadth 21 feet 10 inches; depth 14 feet 2 inches. Lying in Union Dock.
The Brig ANN PALEY, burthen per register 166 90-94 tons (O.M.); Length 79 feet 7-10ths; breadth 19 feet 3-10ths; depth 13 feet 7-10ths. Lying in Union Dock.
The Brig HARDWARE, burthen per register 152 10-94 tons (O.M.); Length 77 feet; breadth 21 feet 9 inches; depth, 13 feet 8 inches. Lying in King's Dock.
The above vessels are all coppered and copper-fastened, faithfully built of the best selected English and African oak; in first-rate condition, and abundantly found in sails, rigging, and stores of every useful description. For Inventories or further particulars, apply to BOYES, BURRELL, and Co., 2, Revenue Chambers, Canning-place.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Friday 11 June 1847]:
For SIERRA LEONE direct. Under engagement to her Majesty's government, and will sail immediately, THE fine first-class Barque FANNY CONNELL, 172 tons per register, newly coppered and copper-fastened; W. H. Froud, Commander; lying in the St. Katharine Docks. Has excellent accommodations for passengers. [Also loading for Sierra Leone February 1848]

[from Lloyd's List - Friday 13 October 1848]:
The Fanny Connell, Kenny, from Sierra Leone to London, was stranded in the Bay of Authie, between St Valery and Etaples, 11th inst., crew saved.

Wooden brig Margaret Highfield, built Caleb & James Smith, Liverpool, 1828, 178 tons, owned Bibby, Liverpool, for service to Mediterranean. Voyage St Jago de Cuba to Swansea, abandoned south of Bahamas, 12th September 1840, and sank.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 19 May 1828]:
To sail on 10th June. For LEGHORN, Direct, The Brig MARGARET HIGHFIELD. Apply to JOHN BIBBY & CO.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 13 November 1840]:
NASSAU, Sept.29, The Margaret Highfield, from St. Jago de Cuba to Swansea, was abandoned by the crew to the southward of this island; the master and mate previously died on board. The vessel was seen from this port 12th instant, and several wreckers went off to bring her in, but could not discover her, and it is feared she has foundered. [also reported: deaths due to yellow fever, and 3 feet water in hold]

Wooden brig Henry Hoyle, built Caleb & James Smith, Liverpool, 1829, 207 tons, owned Bibby, Liverpool, for service to Oporto. For sale 1840, described as a brig, later owned London. Voyage, master Griffiths, Algoa Bay to Cape of Good Hope, driven ashore, 9 September 1842, and wrecked.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 23 March 1829]:
To sail on the 1st April, for Genoa & Leghorn, The Henry Hoyle, William Holmes, master, A 1, Liverpool-built, 207 tons register,... John Bibby & Co.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Thursday 29 October 1840]:
Sale ... Brig HENRY HOYLE, 207 tons register (O.M.); Length 88 feet 2 inches; breadth 22 feet 10 inches; depth 15 feet 6 inches. Lying In George's Dock. ... John Bibby & Son. [See also].

[from Morning Herald (London) - Monday 26 September 1842]:
Arrivals in Algoa Bay. Henry Hoyle, Griffiths, 14th July, from Table Bay....

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 14 November 1842]:
CAPE OF GOOD HOPE, SEPTEMBER 10th. It blew a gale at N.W. 28th ult., and on the 8th instant it blew very fresh from the N.W., with a heavy swell rolling into the bay, which increased on the morning of the 9th, during which the following vessels were driven on shore, and not expected to be got off: The John Bagshaw, Bedlington, from Calcutta to London; the Henry Hoyle, Griffiths, from Algoa Bay, (with the crew and passengers saved from the Sabina, from Manilla to Cadiz, wrecked on Cape Recief [sic, Recife],) crew saved. The Hamilton, Ross, from Fernando, also got on shore.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 19 November 1842]:
In addition to wrecks of the convict ship Waterloo and the Abercrombie Robinson, the following vessels met with a similar fate during the same storm: The John Bagshaw, crew all saved; the American packet-ship Fairfield, valued at £20,000, crew saved; the Spanish schooner Sabina, with a cargo worth £18000 at Algoa Bay; the brig Henry Hoyle, of London; the Reform (a brig), the Ghika and Albatross, schooners, all on the same coast, and within a few miles of each other. Twenty one persons perished with the Sabina. The extent of loss of the above vessels, including the Abercrombie Robinson and Waterloo, is estimated at £300,000 to £400,000.

Wooden brig, built James Smith, Liverpool, 1830.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 01 April 1830]:
SALE; On the Stocks, in Mr. James Smith's yard, Baffln-street, A very superior BRIG, (May be launched in three weeks), with a poop-deck, of the following dimensions, or thereabouts: Length for tonnage 89 feet 0 inches; Breadth 23 feet 4 inches; Depth 15 feet 10 inches. Particular attention has been paid in the selection of the timber, and also in the workmanship, she is thoroughly copper-fastened, and her decks copper-nailed. Dimensions of her scantling and further particulars may be had on application to JAMES SMITH.

Wooden barque Barbadian, built James Smith, Liverpool, 1831, 245 tons, for Heyes, Litherland & Co, Liverpool. ON 13747. Registered Belfast 1851, London 1857, Stockton 1862, in MNL to 1866. Voyage Hartlepool to Cronstadt, with coal, captain Lawn, wrecked 11 May 1866 on Roscar, crew saved.

[from Liverpool Albion - Tuesday 14 October 1834]:
EXTRAORDINARY QUICK VOYAGES. The barque Barbadian, Captain Jeremiah Nagle, belonging to Messrs. Heyes, Litherland, and Co., was launched on the 22d December, 1831, sailed for Barbados 15th of February, 1832, with a full cargo, and, after having crossed the Atlantic sixteen times, she has completed her eighth voyage in two years and seven months, to a day! - despatch without a parallel.

[from Greenock Advertiser - Tuesday 04 April 1854]:
FOR SALE, The A 1, coppered and coppered-fastened Liverpool built Barque BARBADIAN, 245 Tons Old, and about 280 Tons New Measurement, now discharging a cargo of Guano at Leith, from Callao. The lowest price asked is £2000, and should this sum not be obtained within a few days, the Vessel will be sent on another voyage by her present owners. Apply to the owners, Messrs W. C. Heron & Co., Belfast.

[from Shields Daily News - Saturday 13 January 1866]:
Lowestoft. The barque Barbadian, Lawn, from Dieppe for Hartlepool, with loss of anchor and chain, and assisted in by harbour tug.

[from Morning Herald (London) - Monday 14 May 1866]:
WIBORG, May 11. The Barbadian, Lawn, from Hartlepool to Cronstadt with coals, has been wrecked on Roscar; crew and ship's materials saved. [now Vyborg]

Wooden barque Arethusa, built James Smith, Liverpool, 1832, 214 tons, for Heyes, Litherland & Co, Liverpool. Trade to Canada. For sale 1844 and owned Seymour, Maryport, and registered there 1844. Voyage Quebec to Plymouth with timber, 6 December 1845, abandoned 30 miles NW of Magdalen islands, crew landed on Ile Brion, uninhabited, but a shipwrecked crew were there which enabled them to survive.

[rom Liverpool Saturday's Advertiser - Saturday 29 September 1832]:
Launch. On Thursday, a fine barque called the Arethusa, built for Messrs Heyes, Litherland & Co and intended for the Barbados trade, was launched from the building of Mr James Smith, Baffin-street

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 08 October 1832]:
For BARBADOES. The new Liverpool-built Barque ARETHUSA, DAVID HUTCHINSON, Master, Coppered, and now on her first voyage. For freight or passage, apply to HEYES, LITHERLAND & CO.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Tuesday 26 March 1844]:
THE remarkably fine Barque ARETHUSA, 215 tons register O.M., coppered and copper-fastened now lying in the St. Katharine Docks. This vessel was built Liverpool, in 1832, under particular inspection, and is classed in Lloyd's Register as A 1 for eleven years. She sails remarkably well, and has always been considered an admirable model. For inventories and further particulars apply to Mr. D. Tongue, Liverpool; or to SUART and SIMPSON, 13, Birchin-lanc, London.

[from Greenock Advertiser - Tuesday 17 February 1846]:
Magdalen Islands, 9 Dec 1845. The ship Steadfast, John Adams, master, belonging to Poole, England, from Quebec, bound to Bristol, timber laden, was cast away on Brier Island (one of the Magdalen Islands [now Ile Brion]), on the morning of the 8th December. The vessel and cargo will be a total loss. The captain and part [5] of the crew remain there for the winter, [to save the materials] but I am afraid their effort will be productive of little good.
I have also to report the loss of the barque Arethusa, of Maryport, W. Lister, master, from Montreal, bound to Plymouth; wheat and flour laden, abandoned by her crew in the long boat, the evening of the 6th Dec when about 30 miles N.W. of the Magdalen Islands. They likewise landed on Brier Island the following evening.
I have also further to acquaint you that Brier Island is not inhabited, and from the exhausted state in which the crow landed, and being unable to save their boat, and without provisions, every soul must have perished had they not fortunately fallen in with the former crew. [They were severely frozen and will have to remain there during the winter]

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Sailing vessels built at Liverpool by Mottershead & Hutchinson and by Mottershead & Hayes (also written Heyes). [Steam vessels]
Baffin SV 1820, whaler.
Huskisson SV 1820
Boode SV 1823
Arabian SV 1825
Huddersfield SV 1825
Gipsey SV 1826
Sandbach SV 1828
Irlam (Pilot V) 1831;
Johnstone SV 1832
Glanmaleire SV 1832
Otterspool SV 1834
Cora SV 1834
Earl Powis SV 1838


Wooden ship (whaler) Baffin, built Mottershead & Hayes, Liverpool, 1820, to specifications by William Scoresby, her owner and master. LR 1824 has ship Baffin, 321 tons, built Liverpool 1820, owned Hurry & Co.
William Scoresby wrote a book: Journal of a Voyage to the Northern Whale-fishery: Including Researches and Discoveries on the Eastern Coast of West Greenland, about his experiences and discoveries around Greenland.
By 1820, Liverpool had few whalers - the James and the Lady Forbes - besides the Baffin, and by 1823, Baffin sailed alone. She was later based at Leith.
There was a big loss to the whaling fleet in 1830, and Baffin was lost in the Davis Strait.

[from Chester Chronicle - Friday 18 February 1820]:
On Tuesday last, a beautiful vessel for the Greenland Trade, was launched from the yard of Messrs. Mottershead & Hayes; the only one built at Liverpool during the last thirty years.

[from Lancaster Gazette - Saturday 28 September 1822]:
The ship Baffin, Capt. Scoresby, jun. arrived at Liverpool on Thursday week, from Greenland, with 195 tons blubber, the produce of nine whales. During the intervals of the fishery, Capt S. employed himself in making observations on the geography and natural history of the long lost eastern coast of Greenland, which was within sight for three months. The result, we understand, is a survey of the eastern coast of that almost unknown country, from lat. 75. N. to 69. comprising an extent of coast, reckoning its numerous Indentations, of about 800 miles. Capt. S. discovered some extensive inlets, from the number of which he is induced to consider the whole country a large assemblage of islands. He landed on various parts of the coast, and on each visit to the shore discovered recent traces of inhabitants, and obtained fragments of their implements. It is important to geography to know that the form of this land surveyed by Capt. S. is extremely unlike what it is represented in our best charts, and that the error in longitude, in most cases, was not less than 15 degrees. We understand that he has made large collections of plants and minerals, particularly of geological specimens. The Baffin left the coast of Greenland on the 27th Aug. soon after encountering a tremendous storm, in which the Dundee, of London, was dismasted. This vessel (the Dundee) was afterwards towed out of the land ice by the Fame, Captain Scoresby, sen. and attended by her until well equipped with jurymasts, and put into a state considered fully capable of performing the passage to Liverpool.

[from London Packet and New Lloyd's Evening Post - Monday 11 October 1830]:
DISTRESSING NEWS FROM THE DAVIS' STRAITS FISHERY. (From the Bull Rockingham.) It is our painful duty this day to record the loss of 18 ships employed in this fishery, six of which belong to Hull. We do not remember having ever witnessed a more melancholy sight than that which our streets this morning presented. Hundreds of persons, particularly females, were assembled in groups, anxiously impairing of each other the news from the fishery, as a report was fast gaining ground that some casualties had occurred, though no one could possibly form a correct idea of their extent. This was about 9 in the morning, at which hour, or a little after, the steamer arrived, amply confirming the previous rumours. We have seen Capt. Dannatt, of the Progress, who has favoured us with the following particulars. He left Cape Searle on the 21st Sept. and states, as a reason for the want of success, that the ships were compelled to remain much too long in Melville Bay, as the wind blew a strong gale from the south, and thus blocked up the entrance to the bay. Here they were detained twelve weeks, and when they at length were able to effect their departure and steer to the west, they could discover neither fish nor ice. Capt. D. informs us that many individuals have been deprived of life by excessive fatigue. We regret this extremely; and while we lament the property thus destroyed, our warmest sympathies are excited in behalf of those who have lost their friends and relatives. Capt. D. has suffered much and bears about him evident marks of what he has endured. He and others were forced to travel a great distance over the ice, in order to effect their escape. The Abram is coming up the Humber, but we do not imagine that any additional information of consequence can be had from her arrival, as Capt. D. was a passenger.
The following is a list of the lost ships, and of the number of fish obtained by those that have been more fortunate. We need not add that the fishery has proved a complete failure; and the distress it will occasion in Hull, where numbers have no other dependance, is almost without a precedent.
HULL Alfred, Brass, 3 fish; Abram, Jackson, 3 fish; Brunswick, Blyth, 1 fish; Ellison, Jackion, 2 fish; Everthorpe, Johnston, 3 fish; Gilder, M'Kenzie, lost; Jane, Maddison, 5 fish; Kiere, Martin, 3 fish, 20 tons; Kirkella, Carlill, 2 fish; Laurel, Manger, lost; Lee, Lee. 5 fish; Lord Wellington, Harrison, 1 fish; North Briton, Story, lost ; Oxenhope, M'Intosh, lost; Progress, Damian, lost ; Venerable, Bennett, 3 fish ; Volunteer, Markham, 1 fish ; William, North, lost (master dead); William Torr, Dannatt, 5 fish; Zephyr, Ash, 5 fish; Eagle, Wright, 1 fish.
WHITBY Phoenix, Hallilee, 2 fish; William and Ann, Terry, lost.
NEWCASTLE Cove, Palmer, 3 fish; Grenville Bay, Warhain, 2 fish; Lady Jane, Fleming, 2 fish.
BERWICK NorfoIk, Harrison, 1 fish
KIRKALDY Caledonia, Todd, 7 fish, 90 tons; Egginton, 3 fish.
LEITH Baffin, Marr, lost; North Pole, Liston, 1 fish; Rattler, Stodart, lost; Prince Orange, 1 fish; Ulverstone, 2 fish.
DUNDEE Achilles, Valentine, lost; Fairy, Welch, 3 fish; Horn, Jeffers, 1 fish; Thomas, Thorns, 1 fish; Three Brothers, Stiven, lost.
MONTROSE Eliza Swann, Fulton, 2 fish; Monarch, Davidson, 3 fish; Spencer, Robertson, lost.
ABERDEEN Alexander, Allan, lost; Laetitia, Clark, lost; Middleton, Mills, lost; Neptune, Ayton, 2 fish; Princess of Wales, White, lost; St. Andrew, Reed, 1 fish.
PETERHEAD Eclipse, Penny, 2 fish;. Gleaner, Shand, 5 fish; Hope, Volum, lost; Resolution, Philip, lost; Superior, Manson, 4 fish; Traveller, Simpson, 5 fish, 100 tons; Resolution, Hogg, 2 fish.


Wooden ship Huskisson, built Mottershead & Hayes, 1820, 388 tons, for Sir John Tobin. Traded Liverpool to Africa. Voyage Bonny to Liverpool, with palm oil, ashore at Pembrey, Camarthen Bay, and wrecked, 6th April 1853.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 21 January 1820]:
Three remarkably fine vessels were launched in this port on Monday and Tuesday last, viz. the Huskisson, of 388 tons, from the yard of Messrs. Mottershead and Hayes, for the house of Messrs. Tobins and Co; ...

[from Morning Advertiser - Friday 08 April 1853]:
Within a short distance of Pembrey, a large barque, called the Huskisson, Mr. Bose[sic], commander, laden with palm oil, from Bonny, on the coast of Africa, went ashore with all her masts gone, and is reported to have become a wreck. This will prove very severe loss. The crew, after great difficulty, contrived to reach the beach, but one of them in doing so, got seriously hurt. The Huskisson was bound to Liverpool, and was about 700 or 800 tons.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 26 April 1853]:
PEMRBEY[sic Pembrey] April 22. The wreck of the barque Huskisson, Ross, from Bonny, with palm oil, has now broken up into pieces; but R. Dunkin, Esq., the active agent to Lloyd's, lost not a moment in getting every assistance in the neighbourhood, and also from Swansea and Carmarthen, and by working night and day, he has been successful in saving every cask of palm oil from the wild quicksands, just a few minutes before the springtides reached the place they were deposited at first, and has now got the whole into security. The last cask was heaved up into a cart, three hearty cheers were given by the men employed, and the next wave sent them all flying off the beach for security.

Wooden ship Boode, built Mottershead & Hayes, Liverpool, 1823, 418 tons, owned Sandbach, Tinne & Co for West Indies service. Arrived Demerara, captain Gray, 21st July 1830, but posted missing on return voyage to Liverpool.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 12 September 1823]:
A fine vessel, called the Boode, of 400 tons burthen, was launched on Saturday last, from the yard of Messrs. Mottershead and Heyes. She belongs to Messrs. Sandbach, Tinne and Co. and is intended for the West India trade.

[from Lloyd's List - Friday 27 August 1830]:
Boode, Gray, from Liverpool, at Demerara [21st July]

[from Albion and the Star - Friday 10 December 1830]:
A missing vessel, the Boode, from Demerara for Liverpool, has put into Bermuda, dismasted. [see below]

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 17 December 1830]:
The Boode, Gray, was not at Bermuda, as reported by the second mate of the Agnes of Belfast.

[from Lancaster Gazette - Saturday 18 December 1830]:
Liverpool Dec 9. Waterloo, Cornish, from Pernambuco to Liverpool, reports: On 14th November in lat 40 N long 43 W, picked up a water cask, marked Boode.
The Boode, Gray, from Demerara to Liverpool, had not arrived at Bermuda, prior to the sailing of the Intrepid, just arrived, from thence.

Wooden ship Arabian, built Mottershead & Hayes, Liverpool, 1825, 391 tons, owned J & R Mather. Service to Calcutta. Armed. Later owned Acraman, Bristol. Sailed to Tasmania. In LR until 1860, barque, 391 tons. Last advertised voyage with master, Couch, was October 1857, Clyde to Demerara. In MNL, ON 25981, 581 tons, [?] until 1860, described as of Liverpool,

[from Sun (London) - Friday 22 July 1825]:
On the same day, a fine vessel, called the Arabian, of 400 tons burthen, belonging to Messrs. John and Robert Mather, was launched from the yard of Messrs. Mottershead and Heyes.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 15 October 1827]:
For CALCUTTA, - The fine Liverpool-built Ship, ARABIAN, H. S. Thompson, commander; A 1 at Lloyd's, burthen 420 tons, she is a most superior conveyance for goods and passengers, and carries a surgeon, Apply on board, Prince's Dock, or to F. ASHLEY.

[from Worcester Journal - Thursday 16 August 1838]:
For LAUNCESTON, VAN DIEMAN'S LAND, with liberty to call at Hobart'a Town, or Sydney. The armed first-class Passenger Ship ARABIAN, 400 Tons Register O. M., J. H. Brown, Commander. To Sail from Bristol the first week in September. The above Vessel is newly coppered, has the greater part of her cargo engaged, and carries a Surgeon. For Freight or Passage, apply D. E. & A. ACRAMAN, Bristol; or to BRIGGS, THURBURN, ACRAMAN, & Co., London.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Friday 05 March 1852]:
THE Barque ARABIAN, 391 tons O.M.; built Liverpool, of the best materials, and is classed on the Red Star; is copper-fastened, felted, wood-sheathed, and yellow metalled; has had a new deck, topsides, and other large repairs, and is well found in stores; has a poop, with excellent heights 'tween decks for passengers, sails fast, carries a good cargo, and shifts with little ballast. Lying in the St. Katharine's Dock. For farther particulars apply to LACHLANS and MACLEOD, Sworn Brokers, 62, Cornhill.

Wooden ship Huddersfield, built Mottershead & Hayes, Liverpool, 1825, 346 tons, owned Horsfall, Liverpool. Traded mainly to Africa. Rescued survivors of PS William Huskisson in Irish Sea on 12 January 1840, Captain Glegg was awarded a gold medal [link has image]. In LR to 1842. Also in LR 1850-2, as a barque. Last newspaper report, Huddersfield, Cockcroft, departed from Fernando Po for Liverpool Nov 1851.

[from Manchester Courier - Saturday 19 November 1825]:
On the 11th inst. was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Mottershead and Hayes, in Trentham-street, a fine ship belonging to Charles Horsfall, Esq., intended for the Jamaica trade, and to be commanded by Captain Corser.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 12 December 1825]:
For the North Side of JAMAICA, with liberty to call at Cork. The new Ship HUDDERSFIELD, Captain Corser, 340 tons; will deliver goods at Port Antonio, Annatto Bay, Port Maria, Rio Novo, and St. Ann's Bay, and the adjoining Ports. For freight or passage, apply to Captain Corser, or CHAS. HORSFALL & CO.

[from Dublin Evening Mail - Wednesday 16 January 1850]:
Kingstown, Jan 15. Ship News. Put into Kingstown the barque Huddersfield, Cockcroft master, from Bonny and Cameroons, Africa, bound to Liverpool. When off Tusker, blowing a gale, she took from the Isabella of Cork, Drury master, coal laden, and then sinking, the crew consisting of four persons. The vessel almost immediately sank.

[from Lloyd's List - Thursday 23 January 1851]:
Off Fernando Po, arrived, Nov 6. the Huddersfield, Cockroft, from Old Calabar. [Reported sailed 7th November for Liverpool]


Wooden ship Gipsey, built Mottershead & Heyes, Liverpool 1826, 397 tons, owned Tobin, Liverpool, for service to India. Later voyaged to S America, owned Moon. Voyage Rio de Janeiro to northern ports, master Mitchell, ashore at Coroa Grande [possibly Sao Jose de Coroa Grande], and arrived Maranham [now Maranhao], 18 March 1852, very leaky - and condemned there.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 13 July 1826]:
Launch at Midnight. On Saturday preparations had been made for launching, from the building yard of Messrs. Mottershead and Heyes, situated on the west side of the Salthouse Dock, a fine new ship named the Gipsey, belonging to Sir John Tobin. Owing to some defect in the ways, the vessel stuck fast when about one-third of her length had got into the water. Two of the large and powerful steamers belonging to the City of Dublin Steam Packet Company were immediately sent to endeavour to draw her off; but, although they were assisted by third steamer, they failed in the attempt, after persevering in it for some time, and breaking two hawsers. The attempt was now given up as hopeless, at least for Saturday's tide, and preparations were recommenced to ensure its success during the next tide. As the water rose in the river, the stern of the Gipsey floated; this caused the bows to press on the ways, and, half-past eleven o'clock, which was nearly two hours before high water, the ship went spontaneously off in fine style, to the no small surprise of the shipwrights, who, not expecting her to go off so soon, and least of all without their aid, were comfortably regaling themselves. So sudden and unexpected, indeed, was the launch, that not more than four or five men were on board the vessel the moment when she plunged into the river. Boats immediately put off to her assistance, and she was soon brought safely into Dock.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 28 August 1826]:
For BOMBAY, The new Ship GIPSEY, WILLIAM QUIRK, Commander, Burthen 400 tons, Liverpool-built, coppered and copper-fastened, and intended to sail 1st September. This vessel is an excellent conveyance for dry goods, and her accommodations for passengers are elegant and commodious. For freight or passage apply to the Muter, on board, Princes Dock; Mr. GEO. QUAYLE, 1, Exchange-buildings, or JAS. AIKIN, Broker.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 01 February 1841]:
For RIO DE JANEIRO, The fine Ship GIPSEY, F. F. Creswell, Master; Burthen per register 378 tons; coppered and copper fastened, and sails fast. For freight, &c apply to Messrss. Moon Brothers, or to RICHARD TANTON.

{from Liverpool Albion - Monday 11 February 1850]:
LISBON, JAN.30. The Gipsey, Mitchell, from Liverpool for Maranham, put in here, 27th instant, with loss of topmasts and topsails, and much strained.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 08 June 1852]:
MARANHAM, April 10. The Gipsey, Mitchell, which arrived 18th March from Rio Janeiro, very leaky, having been ashore on the Coroa Grande, has been surveyed and condemned.

Wooden ship Sandbach (also Sandbatch), built Mottershead & Heyes, Liverpool, 1828, 435 tons, ON 39757, owner Sandbach, Tinne & Co, Liverpool, until 1874. Ashore on Jordan's Bank, then on Mockbeggar, two crew lost, but refloated on 3 January 1837, repaired, and put back in service. In MNL to 1878, from 1875, owned Parker Liverpool. Appears to have been broken up late 1874.

Image, from a painting by Samuel Walters, of Sandbach picking up a pilot off Great Orme from Pilot Boat no.10, Town of Liverpool.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 29 August 1828]:
On Tuesday a fine vessel, of about 430 tons burthen, was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Mottershead and Heyes. The day was brilliant, and the sight attracted a number of spectators, amongst whom were many elegantly dressed ladies. The vessel is built for Messrs. Sandbach, Tinne, and Co., and in its graceful transit from the cradle to its new element, received the name of "Sandbach." She is, we understand, intended for the Demerara trade.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Monday 16 February 1874]:
The well-known Liverpool-built Ship, SANDBACH, 435 tons register. Built for the present owners, under the most particular inspection, in 1828, of the very best materials. Is entirely copper fastened. sheathed with yellow metal, and partially doubled. This vessel has always been most expensively taken care of, and is favourably known in the West India trade, for which she was specially built. Dimensions: Length, 114.8 feet; breadth, 29 feet ; depth, 19.5 feet Lying in the Prince's Dock. ...

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Tuesday 22 September 1874]:
Sandbach. The Hull of the ship Sandbach .. will be sold as it now lies, in the West Float, Birkenhead,..... [Not subsequently found in newspapers]


Wooden pilot vessel Irlam, built Mottershead & Heyes. Liverpool, 1831, 53grt, 49.3 x 16.3 x 8.3 feet, Pilot Boat no. 6, sold 1852. Driven ashore and wrecked at Lee Stone Point, E of Kilkeel, on 12 November 1852, crew saved.

Image, from a painting by Samuel Walters, of Pilot Boat no.6, Irlam.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 16 November 1852]:
WARRENPOINT Nov 13. .... The late Liverpool pilot-boat Irlam, No. 6, was driven on shore last night, at Lee Stone Point; crew saved. [Lee Stone Point is ENE of Kilkeel; Sea Stone Point in some reports]


Wooden ship Johnstone, built Mottershead, Heyes & Son, Liverpool, 1832, 434 tons, owned Sandbach, Tinne & Co, for service to Demerara. ON 24234, in MNL 436 tons, to 1867. Voyage Demerara to Liverpool, 4 Feb 1867, ashore at Ballyteige and wrecked, crew saved.

[from Liverpool Saturday's Advertiser - Saturday 30 June 1832]:
On Thursday a fine new ship of 434 tons belonging to Messrs Sandbach, Tinne and Co and intended for the Demerara trade, was launched from building-yard of Messrs Mottershead, Heyes and Son, Trentham-street. A crowd of visitors enlivened the scene. Mr Tinne, jun, performed the ceremony of naming the vessel "The Johnstone", and she went off in gallant style,

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 24 January 1834]:
To sail on the 11th February next. For DEMERARA, the Ship JOHNSTONE, M'Pherson, Master; lying in the Prince's Dock. For freight or passage apply to SANDBACH, TINNE, and, Co.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Wednesday 06 February 1867]:
The Johnstone, homeward bound from Demerara to this port, with a full cargo of rum, before reported ashore at Ballytiegue[sic], near Wexford, has become a total wreck. The crew were saved, and it is expected that the greater portion of the cargo will be saved. The Johnstone was built at this port in 1832, and, therefore, had done good service before she came to grief. She was owned by Messrs. Sandbach. Tinne, and Co., of this port.

[from Wexford Independent - Saturday 09 February 1867]:
TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION, (For account of whom it may concern), TUESDAY, 12th FEBRUARY, 1867. ON THE BURROW OF BALLYTEIGUE, (County of Wexford), Portions of the Hull of the Ship Johnstone, of Liverpool, 436 tons Register, Copper Fastened, and Sheathed with Yellow Metal, lately wrecked on her voyage from Demerara. Also, Spars, Sails, Blocks, two Hawsers, Ropes, Long Boat, Rigging, quantity of Copper and Yellow Metal, Empty Casks, &c., &c. Terms - Cash. Sale at Twelve o'clock. WALSH & SON, Auctioneers. Wexford.


Wooden barque Glanmaleire (Glanmoleire in LR, also Glanmaliere or Glanmalier in newspapers), built Mottershead & Son, Liverpool, 1832, 199 tons, owned Dempsey, Liverpool, for trade to S America. In LR until 1841, named Glanmoleire, barque, 199 tons, master Brown, owned Dempsey, Liverpool. Voyage Liverpool - Hobart - Valparaiso, ashore near San Antonio, 13 July 1841, and wrecked.

Image from painting by Samuel Walters of Glanmaleire off the Great Orme [from Samuel Walters - A S Davidson]

[Liverpool Albion - Monday 24 September 1832]:
Launch. This forenoon, about ten o'clock, a fine vessel will be launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Mottershead and Son, in Trentham-street, the property of Messrs. Dempsey and Co.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 24 July 1834]:
For VALPARAISO. The fine Liverpool-built Barque GLANMALEIRE, Brown, commander; 192 tons register; coppered and copper-fastened, sails fast, and will have immediate despatch, the principal part her cargo being ready to ship. For freight or passage, apply Messrs. Baring Brothers and Co. Merchants, or to GEORGE HIGHFIELD, Broker, Oldhall-street.

[from Morning Herald (London) - Thursday 17 September 1840]:
Liverpool. Ships entered for loading: Glanmaliere, Brown, Hobart Town and Sydney. [having arrived August 1840 from Valparaiso, W Brown, 122tons, 22 men, Cotesworth & Wynne, with 31 tons bar copper, 50 tons regulus,...]

[from Colonial Times (Hobart] - Tuesday 30 March 1841] March 26 1841, arrived the barque Glanmaliere 192 tons, Domfrey, master, from Liverpool, 26th November, with pork and sundries, Passenger - J Formby Esq. [Later: April 27 1841, Sailed the barque Glanmaliere 192 tons, Wheeler, master, for Sydney, with sundries.] [May 22 1841, cleared Sydney for Valparaiso]

[from Morning Herald (London) - Friday 10 December 1841]:
Valparaiso, Aug 4. The Glanmalier [sic], Wheeler, from Sydney to this port, on shore near San Antonio, July 13, has been surveyed and is advertised to be sold by auction, there being no possibility of getting her off.


Wooden ship Otterspool, built Mottershead & Heyes, Liverpool, 1834, 402 tons, first owner Taylor, Potter & Co, Liverpool. Initial service to Calcutta. Voyage Montreal to Liverpool, gales, 1st Dec 1854, driven ashore at Red Island, Newfoundland, and wrecked.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 07 July 1834]:
Launch. To-morrow will be launched from the yard of Messrs. Mottershead, Heyes, & Sons, in Trentham-street, a ship 400 burthen, belonging to Messrs. Taylor, Potter & Co. to be called the Otterspool, intended for the East India trade; the launch will place at half past eleven o'clock.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 02 January 1854]:
Quebec Dec 1. The ship Otterspool is on shore on Red island [Newfoundland] and part of her cargo is discharging. [Voyage Montreal to Liverpool]


Wooden barque Cora, built Mottershead & Son, Liverpool, 1834, Second voyage Liverpool to Buenos Ayres, wrecked on English bank (off coast of Uruguay) on 18th September 1835. Not found in LR.

[Liverpool Albion - Monday 11 August 1834]:

On the same day a fine new barque was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Mottershead, Heyes, and Son, Trentham-street. She is intended for the River Plate trade, for Captain Whitley.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 31 October 1834]:
Tuesday Oct 28. Sailed. Cora, Whitley, Monte Video.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 21 December 1835]:
Monte Video, Sept 26. Cora, Whitley, from Liverpool to Buenos Ayres, was wrecked on the English bank on the 18th inst [Sept]. Crew and about 250 packages (loose) saved.


Wooden barque Earl Powis, built Mottershead, Liverpool, 1836. 274 tons, 99.6 x 21.3 x 15.3 ft, ON 17524, initially owned Dutchman, Liverpool, for service to Calcutta. Later owned and registered at Dundee from 1847. In MNL to 1870, when sold foreign - to Riga.

[from Liverpool Telegraph - Wednesday 12 October 1836]:
SHIP LAUNCH. A fine barque, of 350 tons burthen, was launched from the building yard of Mr. John Mottershead, in Trentham-street, on Tuesday morning, at half past eleven o'clock.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 27 October 1836]:
For CALCUTTA, The fine new Liverpool-built Barque, Earl Powis, David Spittle, Commander; Burthen 300 tons; coppered; has superior accommodation for passengers, and is all respects most desirable conveyance. For terms of freight or passage, apply to ASHLEY BROTHERS.

[from Dundee Courier - Friday 07 January 1870]:
Sale of a Barque. The barque Earl Powis, of Dundee, has been sold, by private bargain, to a gentleman from Riga. The Earl Powis is 279 tons register, and was built in 1847 [sic].

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Thomas Bland & Peter Chaloner, Liverpool. After 1830, when Bland retired, known as Peter Chaloner, Sons & Co; then as Peter Chaloner, Sons, & Cato. In 1838, Peter Cato left to set up independently, so named Peter Chaloner, Son & Co again. They also built a number of sailing vessels. All wooden.
Royal Mail 1822
Shamrock 1824
Thunderer 1841
Sailing vessels built by them:
Un-named SVs; Lalla Rookh or Marmion SV 1823; Smyrna Packet SV 1824;
Children SV 1824; Rachel SV 1826?;
Nandi SV 1827; Mary SV 1827; Bland SV 1829;
Frank SV 1831; Reindeer SV 1832;
Isis SV 1835; Dorothea SV 1836; Isabel SV 1836; Elizabeth Wood SV 1839;
Mary Ellen SV 1839; St Vincent SV 1840;
Albert (Lightship) 1840; Panope SV 1841;
Achilles SV 1844; Favourite SV 1845;
Georgina SV 1846; Endymion SV 1847;
Empress SV 1847; Monarchy SV 1851;
Eclipse SV 1851; Lancashire SV 1853; West Derby SV 1855; Peveril of the Peak SV 1856;


Lalla Rookh and Marmion [from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 01 August 1823]:
We understand that two fine new vessels, to sail regularly in conjunction with the Corsair to and from Charleston, will be launched, the one from the building-yard of Bland and Chaloner, on Thursday next, the 7th instant, and the other from the yard of Wilson and Gladstone, on the 9th instant. These vessels are of superior construction, combining the qualities of fast sailers with convenience of stowage, and are elegantly fitted up for passengers.

Wooden ship Lalla Rookh, built Liverpool 1823, 369 tons, for Liverpool - Charleston service. Built either by Bland & Chaloner, or by Wilson & Gladstone. Aground off Pondicherry, and wrecked, on 6 March 1828. More history.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 07 August 1823]:
(To succeed the Corsair) For CHARLESTON, The fine new Ship LALLA ROOKH, Burthen 380 tons. constructed and intended for regular trader, is particularly adapted for dry goods, and has excellent accommodation for passengers, and will sail on the 1st of September. Application to be made to Capt Hugh Stewart or to Bagott & Parr. PARR.

[from Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser - Wednesday 04 July 1827]:
Immediately for PENANG, SINGAPORE and MANILLA, THE beautiful Ship LALLA ROOKH, Regular Trader. Burthen 400 tons. Hugh Stewart, Commander. Lying in the West India Export Dock. The extraordinary sailing qualities of this Ship (having performed her last voyage from London to Madras and Penang, against the N.E. Monsoon, thence to Singapore, and back to Penang and London in 10 months, four of which she was in India), combined with her elegant accommodations, offer to a limited number of Passengers, a most desirable opportunity of proceeding with dispatch to the above places. For Freight or Passage apply to Messrs. DOUGLAS, ANDERSON, and Co. Broad-street; to J. H. ARNOLD and WOOLLETT, 1, Clements-lane, Lombard-street; to WM. REDHEAD, jun. Riches'-court, Lime-street.

[from Globe - Thursday 11 September 1828]:
We regret much to hear of the total loss of the ship Lalla Rookh, Capt. M'Cullum, off Pondicherry, at which port she touched to take in a few bales on her way to Penang. From what we can collect, we learn the Captain went on shore, leaving orders for the ship to stand on and off the land; that having approached too near the surf, in endeavouring to tack, she missed stays, got aground, and, being fir-built, soon went to pieces. We hear considerable property has been lost, but that the passengers and crew are all safe.

Wooden ship Marmion, built Liverpool 1823, 380 tons, for Liverpool - Charleston service. Built either by Bland & Chaloner, or by Wilson & Gladstone. Voyage Liverpool to Calcutta, abandoned 15 February 1827, crew and passengers saved.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 04 September 1823]:
(To succeed the Lalla Rookh and to sail positively on the 25th inst.) For CHARLESTON. The beautiful new ship, the MARMION, Peter Petrie, Commander; 380 tons, has been built expressly for the Charleston trade, to combine the qualities of comfort with quick sailing; the cabin is handsomely fitted up so as to afford every convenience to passengers. For terms of freight or passage, apply to Captain Petrie, on board, or to BAGOTT and

[from Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser - Thursday 04 January 1827]:
For CALCUTTA, THE well-known, fast-sailing, Liverpool- built, armed Ship MARMION, A 1, 360 tons register, Peter Petrie, R. N. Commander. This Vessel, being built after the same Model as the Lalla Rookh, Stewart, and the Corsair, Petrie, which Ships are acknowledged to be the fastest sailers out of the United Kingdom; she will be found a most eligible conveyance for goods, and has elegant accommodation for Passengers, to whose comfort every attention will be paid; carries a Surgeon. For terms apply to Messrs. T. and R. PETRIE, Union-court, Liverpool; or to Messrs. DOUGLAS, ANDERSON, and Co. London.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 05 March 1827]:
The Marmion, Petrie, hence for Calcutta, was abandoned on the 15th instant [February], lat. 42 0, long. 11 0, having started a butt. The captain, crew, and passengers were saved by the Garland [Capt Wright], of this port, and arrived here in the Zante [Capt Radgley], from Smyrna.

[from Liverpool Saturday's Advertiser - Saturday 10 March 1827]:
Extract the log book of the Cecilia states: 16th Feb, at half-past eight pm, Fell in with 3 boxes and, shortly after, with 23 bales, which he took on board, also discovered part of the stern of a ship but could not make out her name. [This is supposed to be the Marmion hence for Calcutta the loss of which vessel we last week].


Wooden brig Smyrna Packet, built Bland and Chaloner, Liverpool, 1824, 169 tons, owned Captain Dale & Co. By 1833, owned Whittle, London. Traded to Brazil, left Maranham for Liverpool, master Haddon, on 25th August 1833, and posted missing.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 07 May 1824]:
Ship Launches. - On Saturday last, two fine vessels were launched from adjoining shipyards, west side of the Queen's Dock, one called the William Salthouse, built by Messrs Fisher; the other called the Smyrna Packet, built by Messrs. Bland and Chaloner.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 24 June 1833]:
To have immediate despatch. For MARANHAM & PARA, The fine Liverpool-built Brig, SMYRNA PACKET, Captain H Haddon, A 1 at Lloyd's, registers 169 tons, coppered and copper-fastened, and well known as one of the swiftest vessels out of the port, having made her last passage to Maranham in twenty nine, and home from Para in twenty-six days. For terms of freight, &c. apply to Messrs., Jas. Haddon & Co.; W. Ker. Imrie & Co. or JOHN HOLLIWELL, 70, Castle-street.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 13 January 1834]:
Smyrna Packet, Haddon, sailed from Maranham, for this port, 25th August, and has not since been heard of.


Wooden brig Children (also Childrens), built Bland, Liverpol, 1824, 254 tons, Voyaged to Jamaica, New Zealand,.., owned Liverpool. On return from Calcutta, in late 1836, was for sale at London. Left for Launceston in May 1837. Registered at Launceston, and wrecked on the coast of Victoria on 15th January 1838, with loss of 16 lives.

[from Records on New Zealand Whaling...]
On 11th March 1835 the brig Children, 254 tons, Durocher, sailed for New Zealand. She had been chartered to convey stores to Otago, intending to call at another part of the country for a cargo of flax.

[from Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser - Tuesday 07 March 1837]:
Brig CHILDREN, 255 tons register, built by Mr. Bland, at Liverpool, under contract; copper-fastened and coppered; is a handsome-moulded brig, flush deck, with bust bead, of good capacity, and sails fast: in excellent order, well found in stores, and may be outfitted for any voyage at moderate expense. W. Durocher, commander. Now lying the St. Katharine Dock. For inventories and further particulars apply WM. WOOLCOMBE, 1. Freemans-court, Cornhill.

[from Lloyd's List - Tuesday 23 May 1837]:
Deal, 22 May, Children, Durocher, arrived from the river and sailed for: Launceston.

[from Lloyd's List - Friday 21 June 1839]:
Hobart Town, 23rd Feb. The Children, Browne, from Launceston to Port Adelaide, struck on Lady Julian Percy's Isles on the night of 15th January, and became a total wreck; the Master and 15 persons drowned; 22 saved.


Wooden ship Rachel (also Rachael), built Liverpool, 1826, 383 tons, first owner Gibson, Liverpool. LR 1838 quotes owned Chaloner, Liverpool, so possibly built Chaloner. Later rigged as a barque. Voyage Callao to Queenstown, leaky, put into Talcahuano, prior to 21st June 1853, and was later condemned there,

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 03 August 1826]:
For Savannah, the fine ship RACHEL, R. J. Potter, Commander; Built for the Trade, coppered, sails fast, and in every respect a first rate conveyance for goods and passengers; will be despatched about 20th August. For freight or passage, apply to Captain Potter; to Wm. Gibson, Oilhouse, or N. HURRY and SON, Brokers.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 06 March 1828]:
For BATAVIA and SINGAPORE, The fine British-built Ship RACHEL, Captain R. J. Potter; Burthen 388 tons, coppered, only one year old, and in all respects an eligible conveyance; lying in the Prince's Dock. For freight or passage, apply Messrs. Murray, Syme and Co. or to ASHLEY BROTHERS.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 08 September 1836]:
First Ship to clear positively on the 10th instant. For CHARLESTON, The fine Liverpool-built Ship RACHEL, James Moffatt, 353 tons register; coppered and copper fastened; sails remarkably fast, and will be punctually despatched. Apply CHAPMAN and WILLIS.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 04 September 1854]:
Thursday Aug 31. Rachel, Brown, from Callao for Queenstown put into Talcahuana, leaky, and was discharging.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Saturday 12 May 1855]:
Liverpool. May 11. The Rachel, Brown, from the Chinchas for Queenstown, which put into Talcahuano prior to 21st June leaky, has been condemned there; her cargo has been brought home by the Charles Napier, arrived here.


Wooden brigantine Nandi, built Bland & Chaloner, Liverpool, 1827, 315 tons. Owned W F Porter, registered Liverpool. In LR as brigantine. Voyage Liverpool to Rio de Janeiro, Captain Bishop, struck Arklow Bank on 12 August 1834, wrecked.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 18 May 1827]:
On Saturday last a fine new ship, called the Nandi, belonging it to Mr. W. F. Porter, was launched from the yard of Messrs. Bland and Chaloner, Baffin-street. The vessel went off in fine in style, and the yard was crowded with spectators. After the launch, the friends of the owners, along with a great number of ladies and gentlemen, were invited, by the builders, to partake of an elegant cold collation, and several appropriate toasts were drunk, amongst which were the following:- "Success to the Nandi," "The Owners of the Nandi," "Mr. W. F. Porter," with three times three. The vessel is commanded by Lieutenant W. Ramsey, and is intended to sail immediately for the East Indies.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 21 August 1828]:
For CALCUTTA, - The fine Liverpool-built Ship NANDI, Captain Walter Ramsey; A 1 at Lloyd's, coppered and copper fastened, and in all respects a very superior conveyance. For freight or passage, apply to Mr. W. F Porter or to ASHLEY BROTHERS.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 12 August 1834]:
Nandi Bishop for Rio sailed 9 Aug

[from Lloyd's List - Tuesday 19 August 1834]:
Arklow, 13th Aug. The Nandi, Bishop, from Liverpool to Rio Janeiro, on shore on Arklow Banks, is full of water. 16th. The Nandi has sunk. A small part of the cargo and some of the materials saved.


Wooden ship Mary, built Bland & Chaloner, Liverpool, 1827, 308 tons, for Bamber, Liverpool, for service to Calcutta. Later Fairhurst, master, voyaged regularly to Berbice and Trinidad until March 1836. In LR until 1838, with minimum information. Voyage Liverpool to Berbice, captain Hogarth, ashore at Rossall Point, 31 March 1836, and wrecked, crew and passenger saved.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 17 May 1827]:
Saturday last.....launched from the yard of Messrs Bland and Chaloner [Nandi]... And this day another fine vessel, belonging to Captain Bamber, is intended to be launched from the same yard, at a quarter after one, pm.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 17 September 1827]:
Warranted first vessel. To sail immediately. For Calcutta direct. The beautiful new Liverpool-built Ship MARY, J. Bamber, commander, burthen per register 308 tons, coppered and copper-fastened, a most desirable conveyance for fine goods, and carries a surgeon. For freight or passage, having elegant accommodations, apply to W. & J. TYRER or M'NAIR & BREBNER.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 09 October 1835]:
Ships Loading: West Indies: Mary, Fairhurst, 308, Berbice, J Crossthwaite & Co

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 14 March 1836]:
Tuesday March 8. Arrived: Mary, Fairhurst, Berbice, sugar, molasses, coffee and cotton.

[from Lancaster Gazette - Saturday 02 April 1836]:
LOSS OF THE MARY OF LIVERPOOL. We have received the following communication from our active correspond at at Poulton-le-Fylde, dated Thursday night:
I have just heard of two disasters at sea, but cannot give any particular account. The first, that a vessel (brig) was seen to sink about eight this morning off Lytham, and all hands perished. The second that a large ship, or barque, came on shore at Rossall Point about noon, this day [31 March 1836], but as far as I can learn the crew is safe.
A subsequent communication from our correspondent informs us, that the vessel on shore at Rossall Point is the ship Mary of Liverpool, 380 tons burthen, commanded by our townsman, Capt. Hogarth, and bound for Berbice with a general cargo. We are rejoiced to learn that all hands on board are safe. There was only one female passenger, Miss Jane Ness, of Edinburgh, a young lady about eighteen or nineteen years of age. She arrived at Poulton on Thursday evening. The Mary sailed from Liverpool on Wednesday morning about nine o'clock.

[from Lancaster Gazette - Saturday 09 April 1836]:
TO BE SOLD, by auction, On Wednesday, the 13th day of April, FOR THE BENEFIT OF WHOM IT MAY CONCERN; THE Hull, Masts, Yards, Boats, and other Materials of the Barque Mary, 308 tons, as they now lie on the Beach at Rossal, near Poulton-in-the-Fylde. Also part of the Cargo of the said Vessel, consisting of Puncheons of Ship Bread, Salted Provisions, Puncheons of Oats, Hoop and Bar Iron, a Gig, and quantity of Harness, 2 Horses, about 20,000 Bricks and a number of empty Lime Puncheons and Hogsheads; Also (subject to Duty, being Cabin Stores), a quantity of Loaf Sugar, a Piece of Brandy, and 2 Cannisters of Tea; And such other Property aa may be offered at the time of Sale. Sale to commence at "Cleveleys", near Rossall, at 12 o'clock precisely. F. KEMP, J. HOGARTH, J. FAIRHURST, agents For the Ocean Assurance Company.


Wooden ship Bland, built Bland & Chaloner, Liverpool, 1829. 573 tons. Owned Ashley, Porter & Bland, registered Liverpool. Service to Calcutta and to Sydney. For sale 1837. Registered Liverpool, owned J Bonus & Co. Left Callao, 5 Sept 1854, master Robertson, for Queenstown [Cobh], spoken 12 February 1855, and posted missing with all aboard lost.

Image from painting by Samuel Walters, after 1840, of Bland off Cape Town. [Walker Art Gallery]

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 08 January 1829]:
Launch of the Bland. An extremely fine ship called the Bland, after the respectable ship-builder of that name, was launched yesterday from the building yard of Messrs. Bland and Chaloner. The Bland is one the largest vessels that has been built here for some years; she registers 573 tons, and is intended for the East India trade. Immediately after the launch, a very large and highly respectable company of ladies and gentlemen, consisting of about 250, sat down to an elegant collation in the moulding-room, prepared by the munificence of the owners, who were unremitting in their attentions to their numerous guests. "Success to the Bland" was drunk, of course, with all the enthusiasm befitting the occasion. To this we cordially respond. We believe she is owned conjointly by Mr. Francis Ashley. Mr. W. F. Porter, and Mr. Bland.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 20 June 1837]:
ON SALE, The well-known Ship BLAND; 573 tons, old register; as she now lies, in the Prince's Dock. For further particulars apply to Messrs. Ashley Brothers; or to Messrs. W. F. Porter & Son; or to JONES, MANN, and FOSTER.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Friday 23 February 1855]:
Callao: Bland Robertson [Sept] 5 England. [Baticola, Lyon left on Sept 15]

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Saturday 14 April 1855]:
LIVERPOOL April 13: The Bland, from Callao for Queenstown, was spoken about Feb. 12, in lat. 38 N., long. 34 W., by the Baticola, Lions, arrived at Lisbon, which lost rudder in gale three days after speaking the Bland.
A bale of cotton, marked "T174" was picked on the 6th April, in lat. 48, long. 11

[from Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Saturday 09 June 1855]:
Lieutenant-Colonel Robertson, of Bath, has received the sad intelligence of the loss of the ship Bland, commanded by his son Capt. R. D. Robertson, in the southern ice. The Captain, his wife and all on board perished.

Wooden schooner/brig Frank, built Chaloner, Liverpool, 1831. Described in LR as schooner, 187 tons, owned W Porter, Liverpool, registered Liverpool. In LR to 1838. Traded to South America, South Africa and Jamaica. Voyage Jamaica (Morant Bay on SE coast) to Liverpool, master Jones, departing 31st May 1838 and posted missing.

[from Liverpool Albion - Tuesday 26 July 1831]:
LAUNCH. On Wednesday next, about twelve o'clock, a brig, to be called the Frank, and intended for the Lima trade, will be launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Chaloner, Son, and Co., in Baffin-street.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 11 March 1833]:
For LIMA & GUAYAQUIL, The beautiful A 1 Liverpool-built Schooner, FRANK, Edward SEARIGHT, master, burthen 167 tons; now on her second voyage, sails remarkably fast, and is in every respect well calculated for the trade, lying in the Prince's Dock,. For freight or passage, apply to Mr. W. F. PORTER, Messrs. Gibbs, Bright & Co. or to ASHLEY BROTHERS.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 02 October 1835]:
Frank, Searight, from Singapore at China 4th April.

[from Lloyd's List - Tuesday 22 August 1837]:
Liverpool. Frank, Seawright, arrived from Jamaica. 21 Aug.

[from Morning Chronicle - Saturday 01 September 1838]:
Liverpool Aug 30. The Frank, Jones, sailed from Morant Bay, Jamaica, on the 31st May for Liverpool, but has not since been heard of.

Wooden schooner Reindeer, built Chaloner, Liverpool, 1832, owned Hugh Owen, 172 tons, 84 x 21.2 ft, maiden voyage to Buenos Ayres. Registered Liverpool, voyages to Valparaiso, etc. Voyage Liverpool to Danube, 31st March 1843, ashore near Sulina [port in Romania, at one of the mouths of the Danube], and sold.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 24 May 1832]:
A New BRIG, now building at the Yard, in Baffin-street, the following dimensions; length 84 feet, Breadth 21 ft 2 inches. Depth of hold 14 ft, And will measure about 170 tons register, now planked with African Oak; a small poop; her frame of English and African Oak, well seasoned; and could be finished in two months; she is well adapted for the Mediterranean, or the West Coast Trades.- For further particulars, inquire of the Builders. P. CHALONER, SONS and CATO, Queen's Dock, Liverpool.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 03 September 1832]:
LAUNCHES. On Monday last a fine new brigantine, intended, we understand, for the Mediterranean trade, and built for Captain Hugh Owen, master and owner, was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Peter Chaloner, Sons, and Cato, Baffin-street. She went off the stocks in gallant style, amidst the cheers of a numerous body of gratified ...

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 01 October 1832]:
Warranted fast vessel and will sail in a few days. For BUENOS AYRES Direct. The beautiful A 1 Liverpool- built schooner REINDEER, HUGH OWEN, Master, Burthen 172 tons, coppered and copper-fastened, now on her first voyage, and is expected to sail remarkably fast: She can discharge the entire of her cargo in the Inner Roads, and is in every respect, a most eligible conveyance for both goods and passengers; lying in the Prince's Dock. For terms, &c. apply to ASHLEY BROTHERS.

[from Lloyd's List - Monday 08 May 1843]:
Constantinople, 17 April, The Reindeer, Kemp, from Liverpool to the Danube, which went on shore near Sulina, 31st ult., will be sold, as there is no chance of getting her off.

Wooden barque Isis, built Chaloner, Liverpool 1835, 298 tons, owned Holt & Co, registered Liverpool, trading Liv-Jamaica [from LR 1845]. Owned and registered Maryport from 1848. ON 26396. Last MNL listing 1867. Last voyage reported: Cronstadt to Bristol, cargo shifted, 20 th October 1866,

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 02 March 1835]:
On Saturday there was launched, from the building-yard of Peter Chaloner, Sons, and Co., Baffin-street, Queen's Dock, a fine ship, of 300 tons burthen, for Messrs. T Holt and Co., intended for the Jamaica trade.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 14 February 1839]:
For KINGSTON, Jamaica, The fine A 1 armed Barque ISIS, J. Graham, Master, For freight or passage, apply to Thomas Holt, Benjamin Simpson, or TORY, HOLT and Co.

[from Carlisle Patriot - Saturday 07 November 1857]:
BARQUE ISIS FOR SALE. TO be SOLD, by AUCTION, on Monday the 16th of November, at the Savings Bank, Workington, Cumberland, at Six o'clock in the Evening, (unless previously disposed of by Private Contract). The fine substantial barque Isis, 325-348 Tons, 5-6 th Class, in French Lloyd's to the end of 1856. She has just delivered a Cargo of Greenheart Timber, is well found in Stores, shifts without Ballast, is a large Carrier, and well worthy of the attention of buyers. Her Dimensions per register are: Length 102 Feet, Breadth 24 5-10ths Feet, Depth 16 Feet. For Particulars and Inventories, and for Inspection, apply to Mr. C. Lamport, Shipbuilder, Workington.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Tuesday 23 October 1866]:
Southampton, Oct 22. Capt. Kemp, of the Europa, arrived here, reports having spoken off the Start, at Noon 20th inst., the barque Isis, of Maryport, from Cronstadt for Bristol, with cargo shifted.

Wooden barque Dorothea, built Chaloner, Liverpool, 1836, 305 tons, LR 1840 confirms built April 1839, Liverpool, 305 tons, owned Laidmans, for Jamaica trade. Wrecked on 1st May 1847 in Auckland Channel at Mud Point, in the Hooghly river entrance, when leaving, one man drowned.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 22 January 1836]:
A fine new SHIP of 305 tons, nearly ready for launching, built of the best materials, and intended for the West India trade, for further particulars builders P CHALONER, SONS, & CATO, 3, Baffin-street. NB A register has been taken out under the old system of measurement.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 04 April 1836]:
LAUNCH. Today there will be launched, from the building-yard of P. Chaloner, Sons, and Co., Baffin-street a fine new ship of 305 tons, for Messrs. J. Crosthwaite and Co. She is intended for the West India trade. [Another report - for Berbice]

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 08 October 1846]:
For CALCUTTA, The fine Liverpool-built Barque DOROTHEA, Captain J. Harrison; A 1 twelve years, 305 tons, and a well-known eligible conveyance: loading in the Prince's Dock. Apply COTESWORTH, WYNNE and LYNE.

[from Hull Packet - Friday 02 July 1847]:
The Dorothea, Harrison, of Liverpool, was totally lost on Mud Point, in the river Hooghly, on 1st of May; one man drowned. [Another report states in Auckland Channel - which is one of the entrance channels to the Hooghly]


Wooden barque Isabel, built Chaloner, Liverpool, 1836, 215 tons, owned Laidman, London. For trade to S America.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 24 October 1836]:
LAUNCH. A fine barque, to he called the Isabel, will be launched tomorrow, at eleven o'clock, from Mr. Chaloner's building-yard in Baffin-street. She is intended for the South American trade.


Wooden brig Elizabeth Wood, built Chaloner, Liverpool, 1839, 240 tons, owned J. M. Wood. Registered Liverpool for trade to Barbados. LR states launched Liverpool April 1839. In MNL, ON 24130, to 1857. Voyage Sunderland to Elbe, abandoned, crew saved, 11 September 1857.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 01 April 1839]:
Ship Launch. There will be launched from the building-yard of Messrs. P. Chaloner and Sons, Baffin-street, this day, at twelve o'clock, a vessel, burthen 250 tons, intended for the West India trade, the property of James M. Wood, Esq., of this town.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Friday 17 November 1854]:
THE fine Brig ELIZABETH WOOD. 246 tons N.M., and 240 tons O.M., built at Liverpool, in 1839, under particular inspection, by Messrs. Peter Chaloner, Sons, and Co., for her present owner, classed A 1 for twelve years, and continued in 1850 A 1 for four years, sheathed with yellow metal, and everything she required done to her in May, 1853. Her sales require no outlay, and she has always been kept in excellent order. Flush decked, with an excellent round-house; her beams are placed for sugar cargoes, and she is well known in the Barbadoes trade for fast passages and good delivery. Length, 89 8-10 feet; breadth, 21 9-10 feet; and depth, 15 7-10 feet. Now lying in the London Docks. For inventories and further particulars apply SUART and SIMPSON, 9, Clement's-lane. Lombard-street. [LR 1857 gives owner G. Peverall, Liverpool, trading Brs.London]

[from Glasgow Chronicle - Wednesday 23 September 1857]:
HARBURG, September 10. - Captain Schroeder, of the Danish galliot Johannes, just arrived here, reports that on the 11th instant at 6 30 a.m., Heligoland bearing E.S.E., distant about 80 miles, he fell in with a boat containing the master and crew (in all eight hands) of the English brig Elizabeth Wood, of Sunderland (coals), for Hamburg. That vessel had foundered at two on the same morning, and the crew had taken to the boat, having only saved their clothes. [Capt Robinson; landed at Cuxhaven, also 70 miles from Heligoland]

Wooden barque Mary Ellen, built Chaloner, Liverpool, 1839, 211 tons, owned G Yates, Liverpool, for Mediterranean trade. ON 26940, registered Belfast 1854, but Liverpool by 1860. For sale 1848 and bought Poole. Voyaged to Mauritius and to Demerara. Voyage Liverpool to Surinam, ashore at Ballyteigue (west of Kilmore), and wrecked, 16 October, 1861, crew saved.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 22 October 1839]:
LAUNCH. A fine new barque will be launched on Thursday next, at about half-past eleven o'clock, from the building yard of Messrs. P. Chaloner, Sons, and Co., Baffin-street, Queen's Dock, for Captain Joy, and intended for the Mediterranean trade.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 07 November 1839]:
For MALTA snd SMYRNA, With leave to call at Gibraltar, The fine new Liverpool-built Barque MARY ELLEN, R. Joy, Master; A 1 at Lloyd's; 200 tons per register, and coppered....

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 08 July 1848]:
Also, the fast-sailing Barque MARY ELLEN; Built Messrs. P. Challoner and Son, in 1839, and classed at Lloyd's A 1 for 12 years ; burthen per register 227 tons, carries 300 tons dead weight, was new sheathed with metal, and had a new main-mast in August 1846; is now on her passage home from Barbadoes, (daily expected,) and is a well-known vessel in, and peculiarly adapted for, the West India trade. For further particulars, apply to Mr. Charles Turner, Official Assignee, 53, South John-street. [sold to James Poole & Co, Liverpool for £1550.]

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 24 August 1848]:
For MAURITIUS, Direct, the fine Liverpool-built Barque MARY ELLEN, Captain Porter; 226 tons, A 1 for twelve years, and a remarkably fast sailer. For terms &c, apply to Messrs. Boyd and Brown, or JAMES AIKIN, SON and Co.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Wednesday 16 October 1861]:
Wexford, Oct. 15. The Mary Ellen, from Liverpool for Surinam, is on shore at Ballytigin [sic]. Crew saved. Part of cargo and materials will be saved. Vessel most likely to be a wreck.

[from Wexford People - Saturday 19 October 1861]:
WRECK SALE. TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION, (for account of whom it may concern,) on THURSDAY. the 24th OCTOBER. 1861, on the STRAND OF BALLYTEIGUE, (near Kilmorej the Hull as it will then lie of the Barque "Mary Ellen" of Liverpool, 204 Tons Register, lately wrecked on her voyage from Liverpool to Surinam. Also, a large portion of her Materials and Stores, comprising about Thirty-five Sails, (some of which are new); Anchors, Chain Cables, Small Chains, Side Lights, Rigging, New Manilla Ropes, Long Boat, Spars, Timber, 4 Casks of Meat, Preserves, Large Water Tank, &c. Also, a quantity of Coals, some Staves, Rice, Hoop-Iron, Wood Hoops, Roman Cement, &c. Terms - Cash. Sale to commence at 12 o'clock. WALSH & SON, Auctioneers Wexford, October 18th, 1861.

Wooden brig St Vincent, built Chaloner, Liverpool, 1840, 274 tons, owned J Cropper, Liverpool, registered Liverpool. Trade to St Vincent and Demerara. LR1842 has St Vincent, Brig, 255 tons, built Liverpool 1840, owned J Cropper. In MNL, ON 24680, until 1864. Voyage Cardiff to St Thomas with coal, abandoned, sinking, 3 August 1863, crew rescued.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 17 March 1840]:
LAUNCH. On Thursday next will be launched, from the building yard of Messrs. P. Chaloner, Sons, and Co., Baffin-street, a fine new vessel, for John Cropper, Esq., intended for the St. Vincent trade.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 25 September 1840]:
St Vincent, T Sheperd, 274, Madeira & St Vincent, J Cropper.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Friday 07 August 1863]:
The brig St Vincent, of Liverpool, from Cardiff for St. Vincent was abandoned on the 3rd of August, in lat 49 N, long 9 W; crew landed at Falmouth. [Another report: crew landed by Hannah Secor at Falmouth. St Vincent, of Liverpool, cargo coal, for St Thomas]


Wooden Lightship Albert , built Chaloner 1840, for MDHB. 85 tons. 74.5 x 17.6 ft. ON 76370. Later converted to steam and in service at Liverpool to 1940.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 28 August 1840]:
THE "ALBERT" LIGHT-SHIP. The CHAIRMAN requested the committee to give a name to the new light-ship which would be launched from the yard of Messrs. Chaloner and Co. on Saturday next. Messrs. Chaloner and Co., the Chairman added, had applied for leave for the vessel to remain upon the stocks till the 12th October, in order that they might be enabled to finish the joiner's work more conveniently, but the committee could not consent to the application. On the suggestion of the Chairman the new vessel was ordered to be called "the Albert."


Wooden ship Duke of Cornwall, built Chaloner, Liverpool, 1842, In LR 1844, Duke of Cornwall, is a steamship, built Liverpool 1842, owned British & Irish S N Co., 425 tons- see here. So possibly name changed after launch.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 29 April 1842]:
LAUNCH. On Tuesday was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. P. Chaloner, Sons, and Co., a splendid vessel called the Duke of Cornwall, suitable for the China, East India or West India trade. She went off in grand style, without the least stoppage, in the presence of an immense concourse of respectable spectators, who were extremely delighted. She is calculated to carry a very large cargo, and sail fast. She stands A 1, we understand, at Lloyds for 12 years ; and we have no doubt, from the well known character of vessels built by this firm, she will extend their celebrity as builders.

Irrelevant? [from Liverpool Albion - Monday 02 March 1846]:
The ship Duke of Cornwall. which arrived on Thursday in the East India Docks, from St. Helena, has brought home the crew of the brig Lady Sale, of Liverpool, which was seized on the coast of Africa by a Portuguese man-of-war, on suspicion of being fitted out for the slave trade. .....


Wooden schooner Panope, built Chaloner, Liverpool, 1841, 136 tons, owned Liverpool & London Shipping Co, for London - Liverpool service. Lengthened 1852, rigged as a barque, 190 tons. By 1853 owned W D Chellew, St Ives, for service to Mediterranean. ON 12785. Abandoned 15 February, 1861, 100 miles SW of Cape Clear, carrying coal from Liverpool to Gibraltar, 9 crew, crew saved.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 10 May 1841]:
LAUNCH. A beautiful schooner, called the Panope, was launched from the yard of Messrs. P. Challoner, Sons, and Co., at eleven o'clock, on Thursday forenoon last. She glided into her native element amidst the acclamations of a numerous company of spectators. We understand she is the property of the Liverpool and London Shipping Company, to be put on the line with their other fast-sailing schooners, which, by the remarkable expedition of their voyages, have afforded so many facilities to the shippers of goods between the two great ports of Liverpool and London.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Thursday 21 February 1861]:
SHIP'S REPORTS. - Report of Captain D. Cathcart, master of the Panope of St. Ives, from Liverpool for Gibraltar.
Feb. 8. Sailed from Liverpool, 1 p m, pilot left, fresh gale from NE, with rain. 5 p m., second reef to topsails. At 11 p m, carrying a strong press of canvas to clear Holyhead, split foresail and jib, wind about NNE. Feb. 9. Running down channel, gale increasing with heavy seas, washed away part of bulwarks and other things off the deck. Hove ship to under a close-reefed maintopsail. until weather moderated; pumps attended to. Same evening weather moderated a little; bore away down channel again. Midnight, sighted Tuskar Light, still blowing heavy with cross sea. 10th - a.m., a sea struck the ship, and stove the longboat; Noon, weather moderated; repaired bulwarks, etc., and proceeded. Pumps attended to. 11th, p.m., wind veered to SE, with a fresh gale. 12th; A strong gale from SW. with heavy sea, ship labouring and straining very much, and making a considerable quantity of water. Midnight, shipped a heavy sea, knocked away more bulwarks and boats on the lee scuppers, Hove fragments of longboat overboard to ease the ship, and secure the jollyboat and spars. Heavy cross sea running. 13th; p.m., a sea struck the ship, lifting the jollyboat as high as the rail, and stove it to pieces. Still making a considerable quantity of water, hove jollyboat over to ease the ship; mate and one of the crew disabled in doing this. Weather moderated for a few hours; but owing to such a tremendous sea running was unable to run for a port. A heavy gale came away again from SSW. Kept the pumps constantly going. 14th; Increasing gale with a heavy sea, hove overboard everything on the decks of any weight, to ease the ship, and at 2 pm, bore up for Cork. The master went down to the forehold and found the decks had opened forward, and water running down amongst the coals; and ship sprung a leak, making water at the rate of three feet per hour; crew constantly at the pumps, and could scarcely keep her free. 15th; a.m., Norwegian barque Patria hove in sight; we made a signal of distress, and she bore on us. And after all our exertions to keep the vessel afloat, and to save our lives, we were obliged to abandon the Panope, having at the time six feet of water in the hold, about 100 miles SW of Cape Clear, and crew arrived at Cork harbour on the 16th,


Wooden ship Achilles, built Chaloner, Liverpool, 1844, 500 tons, 112.5 x 28.7 ft, owned Cotesworth & Co. Liverpool. Voyage Calcutta to England, caught fire and abandoned, 24th April 1846. Crew and passengers saved.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 13 February 1844]:
LAUNCH. On Wednesday last, about one o'clock, a fine ship of 500 tons burthen, called the Achilles, was launched from the building-yard of P. Chaloner, Sons, and Co., Baffin-street. Her length is 112 feet 6 inches, and breadth 28 feet 9 inches ; she was built under the inspection of Lloyd's surveyor, and will stand A 1 twelve years. Her model is one of the finest we have seen, and apparently well adapted for the East India trade.

[from Weekly Chronicle (London) - Saturday 01 August 1846]:
CONFLAGRATION AT SEA. By letters received at Lloyd's on Wednesday, dated the Mauritius, April 18, intelligence of the total loss of the ship Achilles by fire is communicated, but happily unattended with loss of life. The Achilles was a first class vessel, 437 tons burthen, the property of Messrs. Colesworth[sic], Wynn, and Lyon[sic], merchants, of Liverpool, who, we are given to understand, are fully insured. The Achilles sailed from Calcutta for Liverpool in the early part of April, with several passengers on board, her cargo comprising indigo, saltpetre, jute, sugar, &c. The cause of the fire is not satisfactorily known; but there is every reason to believe that it arose from spontaneous combustion amongst the cargo in the hold. That it had been smouldering for several days prior to the outbreak of the flames there is little doubt, but the weather being exceedingly hot prevented its discovery until the 24th of April, when the fire burst from the hatchways. In vain did the crew exert themselves to subdue the destructive element, which gained upon them so rapidly that the only chance left was for them to take to the boats with all expedition. Having seen the passengers safe, the crew followed, and abandoned the ship to her fate, the master, Captain Goth [sic, LR gives Goble], being the last person to leave her deck. In a short time flames issued from every part of the ship, and she burned with great fury for many hours, when she disappeared in deep water. The crew and passengers were picked up, near the Rodrigues, by the Ariel, Captain Parsons, which, singular to state, had been sent to rescue the crew of the Iris, that had been wrecked on the Island. Both crews have since reached the Mauritius. The Achilles was destroyed in lat. 21 S., long. 71 E.


Wooden brig Favourite, built Chaloner, Liverpool, 1845, 277 tons. LR 1846 gives Bg, 277 tons, built Liverpool 1845, owned Barton & Co, Liverpool. Registered Liverpool 1848, ON 1134, in MNL to 1866. Voyage Sierra Leone to Liverpool, driven ashore near Blackpool and wrecked, with loss of all 10 crew, on 22 November 1865.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 15 April 1845]:
Launch. On Thursday last, a beautifully-modelled barge [sic, barque] called the Favourite, was launched from the ship-building yard of Messrs. P. Chaloner and Sons, Baffin-street. The ceremony of christening was performed by Mr P Chaloner, junr. The Favourite is upwards of 277 tons burthen, builders new measurement, and is, as yet, the property of the builder.

[from Manchester Courier - Friday 24 November 1865]:
THE GALE. SHIPWRECK AND LOSS OF ALL HANDS AT SOUTHPORT. The barque Favourite, Captain Hinds, from Sierra Leone to Liverpool with palm oil and seeds, was driven on shore near Southport during the gale on Wednesday evening, and became total wreck, her cargo being strewed along the coast. Nothing has been heard of the crew, and there is only too much reason for supposing they have all been lost. She was owned by Mr. J. Thompson, of Liverpool. A lifeboat put out twice but could not reach the vessel. Two bodies were picked up yesterday morning.
A later report: The Favourite's crew consisted of ten men. She left England the 12th of May last, and on her return voyage was bound for Liverpool, from Sherbro, Sierra Leone, with cargo palm oil and seeds, she was 19 years old. Three years ago she was fully repaired and re-classed A red for eight years. William Hinde, of Whitehaven, was her captain. The first mate name was William Nixon, who came from the same town. The steward was named Stephenson, he was a native of Whitehaven.


Wooden ship Georgina, built Chaloner, Liverpool, 1846, 600 tons, owned Worral, Cotesworth,.. of Liverpool. Voyage to Valparaiso for guano which was discharged at Valencia - then wrecked east of Gibraltar on 10th December 1855.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 27 June 1846]:
LAUNCH OF THE GEORGINA. ... On Wednesday last, the ship-building yard of Messrs. Peter Chaloner, Sons, and Co., Baffin-street, presented a scene of this description, consequent upon the launching of a splendid ship belonging to Messrs. John Worrall and Co., and Messrs. Cotesworth and Wynne... The Georgina is a beautiful model, about 600 tons burthen. She is built of English oak and teak, and is intended for the Calcutta trade. Captain Williams, late master of the Robert Finne, will command her.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 05 September 1854]:
LINE OF PACKETS FOR THE WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA. Will sail with or before any other vessel. For VALPARAISO, The splendid Liverpool-built Ship GEORGINA, - Captain WILLIAMS; A 1 at Lloyd's for twelve years; and well-known as a vessel of great speed: loading in Salthouse Dock.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 25 December 1855]:
STORM AT GIBRALTAR. The screw-steamer Orontes, Capt. Haram, which arrived here from Constantinople and Smyrna on Tuesday, brought intelligence of a very violent storm, which swept through the straits of Gibraltar, on the 10th instant. On that night the ship Georgina, Captain Parfitt, of this port, which had been discharging a cargo of guano at Valencia, and was returning here in ballast, was wrecked on the eastern beach near Tunara. Four or five other vessels were lying in the same position, and the storm has done much damage to the shipping at Gibraltar. [one report says 1 man lost from Georgina]


Wooden barque Endymion, built Chaloner, Liverpool, 1847, 619 tons (later 541 tons), ON 26069, registered Liverpool. In MNL to 1877.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Tuesday 31 August 1847]:
On Saturday, at noon, a splendid vessel, called the Endymion, was launched from the building-yard Messrs. Chaloner and Sons, Baffin-street. .. the ceremony of baptism being performed by Miss Maria Cotesworth, a young lady about twelve years of age, daughter of one of the owners. Her burthen 600 tons; length over all, 150 feet; breadth of beam, 29 feet 9 inches, and depth of hold, 19 feet 10 inches. ... Messrs. Chaloner and Sons have now on the stocks, nearly completed, a very handsome vessel, intended by Mr. Cotesworth for the Pernambuco trade; and it is fully expected she will rival the Swordfish for speed.

[from Morning Journal (Kingston) - Tuesday 21 May 1872]:
FOR CHARTER, To any Port in the United States, or the United Kingdom, the British Barque ENDYMION, 541 Tons register, Ferguson, Master. Application for the above Vessel is requested to be made to NUNES BROS.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Thursday 23 November 1876]:
[from] PHILADELPHIA. Endymion, Ferguson [July26] for Cronstadt - put into Arendal leaky; cargo will have to be discharged. (Christiansund Nov 20)

Wooden ship Empress, built Chaloner, Liverpool, 1847, 333 tons, owned Cotesworth & Co, for trade Liverpool - Brazil. Owner changed 1853. In LR1848. Not in MNL. Voyage Liverpool to Mazatlan, wrecked 19 January 1854, on Altamura shoal [Isla Altamura] north of Altata, Mexico.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 23 November 1847]:
A handsome ship, to be commanded by Captain Marden, will be launched from Messrs Chaloner's building-yard, to-day at 11 o'clock. She is intended for the Pernambuo trade, and has been built for Messrs Cotesworth, Wynne and Lyne.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 01 January 1848]:
Line of PACKETS for PERNAMBUCO. The splendid new Liverpool clipper-built Ship EMPRESS, William MARDON, Commander; 361 tons register, A 1 at Lloyd's for twelve years, built expressly for the Brazil trade, and is expected to be one of the fastest afloat - she has superior cabin accommodation, her state rooms being large and airy. Loading in the Queen's Dock. Apply to COTESWORTH, WYNNE, and LYNE....

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 12 May 1853]:
Line of Packets for Rio de Janeiro. ... Will sail next .... The splendid Liverpool built clipper Ship EMPRESS, Captain Scott; 333 tons. A 1 at Lloyd's for twelve years, and one the fastest ships afloat: loading in Salthouse Dock. Apply to to COTESWORTH, WYNNE and LYNE. [Did not sail - presumably sold to new owner]

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Thursday 11 August 1853]:
Salthouse: Empress 332 Llanglois[sic] Thompson & Co. [A later report: Rio de Janeiro, 18 Oct 1853, Empress, Langlois, sailed for Sandwich Isles]

[from Lloyd's List - Wednesday 08 March 1854]:
The EMPRESS, Langlois, struck near Altamira [sic], 3 miles from land, and about 10 miles North of Port Altata. By the last accounts from Mazatlan, dated 19th Jan., the vessel was full of water, and it was supposed that 5-6ths of the cargo would be lost.
[Another report: Culiacan: Empress, Liverpool for Mazatlan, wrecked on Altamura shoals, near Allata [sic], previous to 19 Jan..]

Wooden ship Monarchy, built Chaloner, Liverpool, 1851, 776 tons, owned Browne, ON 15876. For sale 1880. Later barque, registered London, owned Hull.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 23 January 1851]:
On Saturday two beautifully-built ships, for the East India trade, were launched from the building-yards in Baffin-street, on the west side of the Queen's Dock. Eleven o'clock was high tide, and at that hour, a vast assemblage of persons, including many ladies, had collected in the building-yards and within view of the scene of the launches, desirous to obtain a sight of the interesting ceremony. The weather proved most propitious for the occasion, being bright as a May morn, whilst not a ripple ruffled the surface of the magnificent river which was to receive the two noble ships.
The first launch, which took place from the yard of Messrs. P. Chaloner and Sons, was a ship of 776 tons burthen, new measurement. She has been built, we understand, for Messrs. Brown and Harrisons, and Messrs James Browne and Co. ... [Another report - named Monarchy]


Wooden ship Eclipse, built Chaloner, Liverpool, 1851, 425 tons, for service to Bahia, owned Darbyshire. Registered Liverpool. ON 1099. By 1872 barque, 393 tons, owned Friend, Liverpool. Not in MNL 1873. Sold foreign 1872.

[from Morning Herald (London) - Thursday 25 December 1851]:
LAUNCH AT LIVERPOOL. On Monday last was launched, from the yard of Messrs. P. Chaloner and Sons, Baffin-street, a clipper ship, for Benjamin Derbyshire, Esq., intended for the Bahia trade. The model of the vessel is the same as the Empress, also built by the Messrs. Chaloner, and whose performances have been the theme of admiration. The new ship is called the Eclipse, and she differs from the Empress in an additional length having been given to her, which will no doubt give her an advantage in sailing qualifications. The tonnage of the Eclipse is 425 tons, carpenter's measurement; she has a full female figure-head, and is in every respect a first-class ship. The vessel was christened by Miss Derbyshire, a very young lady, who performed the ceremony in a satisfactory manner. The morning was fine, and the vessel, which was profusely decorated with new flags, made a beautiful launch.

Wooden ship Lancashire, built Chaloner, Liverpool, 1853, 855 tons, 149.3 x 32.2 x 21.1 ft, ON 16351, in MNL to 1864, when 751 tons. In LR to 1863, when marked LOST, 719/855 tons. Loss advised to MNL 1864. Last newspaper voyage found is from Akyab [now Sittwe, Burma] for Liverpool, leaving 13th May 1858. Posted missing.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 28 February 1853]:
INTENDED LAUNCH. Owing to the very boisterous state of the weather on Saturday, Messrs. P. Chaloner and Sons were unable to launch the new vessel which they have just completed for Messrs. James Browne and Co. She is intended for the Calcutta trade, and will class A 1 at Lloyd's for thirteen years. Her length over all is 150 feet, breadth of beam 32 feet 3 inches, depth of hold 21.5 feet, registered tonnage 855 tons. The vessel is expected to be launched on Monday; but we learn that great difficulty is experienced in getting hands. No less than 12s. per day has been paid by Messrs. Chaloner to ship-carpenters for the purpose of getting this vessel finished, and, even at this very high wages, sufficient men could not be had.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 07 March 1853]:
On Monday the new ship Lancashire, intended for the Calcutta trade, was launched from Chaloner and Sons' yard, Baffin-street, for James Browne and Co. and Brown and Harrisons, merchants, of this town. The length of the vessel over all is 150 feet, breadth of beam 32 feet 3 inches, depth of hold 21 feet, and registered tonnage 855 tons

[from Dundee, Perth, and Cupar Advertiser - Tuesday 08 May 1860]:
DEATHS. ... Lost, at sea, Mr William Patterson, second officer of the ship Lancashire, of Liverpool, and eldest son of the late Mr Charles Patterson, spirit-dealer, Dundee. The vessel sailed from Akyab, in the East ladies, on her homeward passage, in May 1858, and has not since been of. Friends will please accept of this intimation.


Wooden ship West Derby, built Chaloner, Liverpool, 1855, 821 tons, owned James Browne, Liverpool, ON 1350. In MNL to 1876, when owned T Harrison, barque. In LR to 1876. Service to Mobile, ashore on Tortugas but repaired at Key West 1873. Crew refused to sail to Ascension as vessel unseaworthy, in 1875, - though crew found guilty as survey showed vessel was sound. Crew stated that they preferred to go to prison than risk their lives aboard. Found leaky at Ascension 1875. Then for sale 1876 - not reported after that.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 26 March 1855]:
On Monday Messrs. P. Chaloner and Sons launched a handsome vessel, of 914 tons, from their yard, Baffin-street, for Messrs. J. Browne and Co., and T. and J. Harrison, of this town. The vessel is called the West Derby, and is intended for the China trade.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Monday 28 June 1875]:
OBSTINATE SAILORS. Nine sailors, named Peter Thompson, Daniel Donoghue, George Gallagher, John Hanlon, Denis Crone, John McMullin, George Luxley, John Blair, and John McLean, were charged with refusing to proceed to sea in the ship West Derby, bound to Ascension. The captain (Wren) stated that when the vessel was ready to proceed to sea the previous day the prisoners refused duty, alleging that she was unseaworthy, and at their request they were given into custody. There was no foundation, however, for the allegation, as the ship had just been caulked, and did not make more water than sufficed to "sweeten" her. One of the prisoners here remarked that she was an old ship, and made two feet of water in twenty-four hours. This statement was denied by the captain, who observed that, even if it were true, it was only an inch per hour. Another of the prisoners said he could pick away the rotten timber from the bows: and the others made similar complaints. A shipwright who had recently repaired the vessel in graving dock stated that she was perfectly tight and sound. Upon hearing this evidence Thompson and Donoghue expressed their willingness to return to the vessel and fulfil their contracts, and they were discharged. The seven others, however, asked for a survey, and the magistrate acceding to the request, they were remanded till Monday.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Tuesday 12 October 1875]:
ASCENSION. Sept. 10: The barque West Derby, Wren, which arrived here 30th Aug. from Liverpool, reports that on the 3rd July she encountered a NW gale, causing the vessel to strain and to make 4 inches water per hour, which rate of leakage continued until her arrival. When standing in for the anchorage during a thick squall she touched the ground and hung about ten minutes, knocking away part of her false keel. Sept. 14: The barque West Derby was surveyed on the 10th Sept, and was found to be making about an inch and a half of water per hour. Her hull appeared to be generally in a sound state, but the seams, butts, and waterways required caulking. Another survey was held this morning after more cargo had been discharged, and it was recommended that her bottom should be examined by divers.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Thursday 28 September 1876]:
The well known Liverpool ship West Derby, 821 tons, classed A 1 thirteen years, continued nine years from 1868, yellow-metalled, stands without ballast, just opened out and passed Lloyd's special survey. W M Corner & Co, London [not mentioned in newspapers after this]


Iron brig Peveril of the Peak, built Chaloner, Liverpool, 1856.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 07 April 1856]:
SHIP LAUNCH. At eleven o'clock, on Saturday, Messrs. P. Chaloner, Sons, and Co. launched, from their yard in Baffin-street, the Peveril of the Peak, a splendid new vessel of 750 tons, old measurement. The launch was quite successful, the vessel being christened by Miss Caroline Smith. The Peveril of the Peak, one of the strongest and most substantial vessels we ever saw, is intended for the East India and China trade, will carry a large cargo, and is expected, from her excellent model, to sail very fast. This vessel has been examined by some of our eminent shipowners, and has been much admired. After the launch, the company assembled partook of a dejeuncr in the mould room.


Sailing vessels reported in newspapers as launched by Bland & Chaloner, but un-named.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 22 October 1824]:
Yesterday were launched from the building yard of Messrs Bland and Chaloner, Queen's Dock, two fine vessels intended for the Brazil and Mediterranean trades.
The vessel intended for the Brazil trade may well have been the ship Brazilian. While that intended for the Mediterranean trade could have been the brig Zante.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 10 January 1834]:
Launch. - This day, (Friday) about eleven o'clock, a fine new ship, of 350 tons burthen, intended for the West India trade, will be launched from the building yard of Messrs. P. Chaloner, Sons, and Co. Baffin street.

J Rathbone, Liverpool. (Steam vessels)

William & Richard Haselden, Liverpool & Ellesmere Port. (Steam vessels)
Hellespont SV 1824

Wooden brig Hellespont, built Haselden, Liverpool, 1824, 190 nrt, owned Harrison, Liverpool. LR1826 gives Bg, 193t, Rolston, owned Harrison, Liverpool. LR1830 has master Wade, owned Tindell & Co., captured. LR1833 has master Ward, owned Tindale, Li.Naples. LR1834 - not in. In a voyage to S America, because of the conflict between Buenos Ayres and the rest of Argentina, Hellespont was captured by the blockading Brazilian force on 15th September 1828. More history

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 04 June 1824]:
Launches: On Saturday last ... from Messrs Haselden's yard, the brig Hellespont, ...

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 25 March 1825]:
...Report of Captain Rolston, of the Hellespont, which vessel arrived her on Tuesday last, from Smyrna, after a remarkably quick passage. ...

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 27 August 1827]:
LINE OF PACKETS FOR VERA CRUZ, To sail on the 1st of every month during the season. The remarkably fine A 1 Brig HELLESPONT, Parker, Commander; of 180 tons; Liverpool built expressly for the fruit trade, and is known to be one of fastest sailing vessels out of the port; she is a very desirable conveyance for dry goods, and has superior accommodations for passengers... Edwards & Poole ...

[from Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser - Friday 12 December 1828]:
The Hellespont, Wade, from Liverpool for Buenos Ayres, was captured within sight of Buenos Ayres, September last. [Lloyds List gives 15th September]

[From Hansard] He alluded to the illegal captures of British ships, by the Brazilian squadron blockading the river Plate. ...the Government of Brazil had declared the Rio de la Plata in a state of blockade, in the years 1826 and 1827, and in consequence of that declaration, a number of British vessels were captured, which were ultimately condemned. .... The next cases were those of the Hellespont, and the Unicorn, whose cargoes were valued at £100,000. These were also captured by the squadron, under circumstances not authorised by the law of nations, and were condemned by a petty Judge, who ordered them for immediate sale, though this was as contrary to the Brazilian law, as to the law of nations; for, by the former, no ship could be condemned without an appeal from the minor to the superior court at Rio Janeiro. ....
Later report: With regard to the Hellespont, a vessel seized and detained for adjudication, it was plundered, before the period of adjudication had arrived, to such an extent that it was no longer possible to restore it to its owner, possessing the same value.

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Wilson & Gladstone; J Wilson; T Wilson, Liverpool, later Birkenhead. (Steam vessels).
Note Wilson built what was the largest wooden ship built at Liverpool - Havannah in 1811, a fifth rate frigate, burthen 948 tons, more history, and yet more.
Duke of Lancaster 1820
Happy Return (Pilot V) 1822
Lalla Rookh / Marmion SV 1823
Camoens SV 1824
Royal Saxon SV 1829
Berbice SV 1831
Euphrates SV 1834
John O'Gaunt SV 1835
Victoria (Pilot V) 1843
Duke of Lancaster SV 1844

Wooden ship Duke of Lancaster, built John Wilson, Liverpool, 1820, 565 tons. Considered (in 1835) as one of the 10 finest hardwood-built ships belonging to Liverpool. Owned Gladstone, Liverpool. A new vessel of the same name was built in 1844 by Wilson, and the report of that launch states that the 1820 vessel was built by the late Mr Wilson. There is a report of a launch in early 1820 of a large vessel, by Wilson, 562 tons, for Gladstone - named at the time as Helen Jane. Since the name Helen Jane is not recorded in LR, most probably renamed on registry as Duke of Lancaster. Reported for sale at Liverpool, in May and July 1843, by Gladstone, 565 tons, 123 x 32 x 22 ft. Presumably broken up subsequently - see advert for materials from her.

Image of Duke of Lancaster off Table Bay around 1830s by Walters & son.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 21 January 1820]:
Launches .... and the Helen Jane, of 562 tons, from the yard of Messrs. Wilson and Co. for the house of Messrs Gladstone and Co. The Huskisson and the Helen Jane are intended for the East India trade.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 21 July 1840]:
To sail To-morrow, and warranted first vessel. For BOMBAY, The well-known fast-sailing Ship DUKE OF LANCASTER, JAMES HARGRAVES, commander; burthen 565 tons. For passage, having most superior Cabin accommodations, apply on board, west side Prince's Dock; to Messrs. John Gladstone and Co.; and for freight, to Messrs. FINLAY, ALSTON, and Co., or to W. and J. TYRER.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 10 September 1844]:
TO FLAT AND BOAT BUILDERS, TIMBER DEALERS. CHEMISTS, and OTHERS. By Mr. GREGSON, TOMORROW, the 11th instant, and following days, until all is disposed off, at Twelve o'clock, at the Yard of Mr. Thomas Wilson, Ship-builder, Barrack-street, North-shore. Liverpool, who is leaving the Premises in consequence of the extension of the North Docks.
A Large quantity of Small OAK and other TIMBER, (part of which is suited for Building Vessels of 170 tons,) Knees, Flitches, Slabs and Offal Wood; the above is cut from new but well-seasoned Timber.
Also, a large quantity of old Ship Timber, suitable for Repairs, Strong Beams, Posts, Rails, &c.; Floors, Futtocks, Kelsons, Stringers, Beams, Planks, &c., &c., old Iron Knees, the Materials of the late Ship "Duke of Lancaster." For further particulars apply to Mr. GREGSON, North end Queen's Dock, Liverpool,


Wooden pilot vessel Happy Return, built Wilson & Gladstone, Liverpool, 1822, 53grt, 49.2 x 15.11 x 8.6 feet, Pilot Boat no. 4. Sold 1849, registered Dundee,

Image from painting by Samuel Walters of Pilot Vessel no.4, Happy Return, off the South Stack [from Samuel Walters - A S Davidson]



Wooden brig Camoens, built Wilson, Liverpool, 1824, 160 tons, for owner T Martin and with captain Benjamin Haram, for Liverpool - Oporto service. Registered Liverpool. Later voyaged to Nassau and to Trinidad. In March 1844, sailed for Africa, captain Tanner. Wrecked at New Calabar, 30 August 1844.
Note confusion with Camoens, Sw, 168 tons, built Chester 1824. LR has ony one vessel - called Camoens - which is described as built Liverpool 1824 until 1833, then from 1834 as built Chester 1824, with a change of owner. So report of place of build is ambiguous. See discussion below.
Note that there were other vessels called Camoens/Camoena - built 1837 and 1843. [Camoena was a Greek goddess associated with childbirth and singing; Camoens was the English spelling of the name of a Portuguese poet].

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 02 July 1824]:
On Tuesday morning last, a fine brig, called the Camoens, burthen 150 tons, was launched from the yard of Messrs Wilson; built for Messrs T and R Martin for the Oporto trade and commanded by Captain Benjamin Haram, late of the Douro.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 24 September 1824]:
Camoens, Haram, hence at Oporto.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 02 May 1825]:
For Oporto, the new brig, Camoens, Benj. Haram, master, burthen per register, 168 tons, having the greater part of her cargo engaged, she will be despatched immediately. For freight or passage, apply to the captain on board, King's Dock, or to Thomas Martin, Liver-street.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 02 July 1840]:
For TRINIDAD, The AE 1 British-built Brig CAMOENS, W. Wilson. Master; Registers 168 tons, coppered and copper fastened, sails fast, and having a great part of the cargo engaged, will be quickly despatched: loading in George's Dock For freight, &c. apply to IMRIE and TOMLINSON.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser, Thursday 21 March 1844]:
Sailed Tuesday, March 14. Camoena, Tanner, Africa

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 23 November 1844]:
Camoens, Henry Winch, and Panope, in coming out of New Calabar River, 30th August, got on shore on the Bar; the two first became total wrecks, but the Panope was got off 1st September, and taken into Bonny without much damage. The captain, mate, and one seaman of the Henry Winch were drowned.


Wooden ship Royal Saxon, built Wilson, Liverpool, 1829, 510 tons, Registered Sydney by 1851, ON 32561. In MNL to 1864. In LR to 1857, when a new larger Royal Saxon was advertised sailing to Australia. This vessel was then to be offered for sale in 1862 at Calcutta, Singapore, Batavia,.. More history.

Image of Duke of Lancaster and (to left) Royal Saxon, off Table Bay around 1830s.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 09 February 1829]:
LAUNCH OF THE ROYAL SAXON. There has seldom, perhaps never, in Liverpool, been witnessed a finer launch than that of this beautiful vessel, which took place on Thursday, from the building-Yard of Messrs. Wilson and Sons, amidst a large concourse of highly gratified spectators. The Royal Saxon registers between 500 and 600 tons, is intended for the East India trade, and is to be commanded by Captain D. W. Petrie, formerly of the well-known ship Corsair. The class of vessels between this port and the East Indies has, till lately, been considered inferior, in point of accommodations, to the London ships in that trade; but the Royal Saxon, in every respect, will be found inferior to none of the 800-ton ships belonging to the port of London, and is likely to assist in giving a much higher character to the East India traders from this port.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 01 May 1829]:
To sail early in May, FOR MADRAS AND CALCUTTA, The superior new Ship, ROYAL SAXON, DAVID WAUGH PETRIE, Commander; 600 tons, built expressly for the India trade, under the particular inspection of Captain D. W. Petrie, (late of the Ship Corsair,) and will be found, on examination, equal if not superior to any ship that has yet sailed from the United Kingdom; every attention having been paid to combine the two very necessary properties of strength and fast sailing. The accommodations for passengers are spacious, having a lofty poop and between decks, and will carry an experienced surgeon. Plans of which, and other particulars, may be had on application to the Captain, on board, in the Prince's Dock; in London, to Messrs. RICHARDS. MACKINTOSH, and Co.; or Mr. EDMUND READ, Riches-court, Lime-street; ...


Wooden barque Berbice, built Wilson, Liverpool, 1831, 282 tons, owned Crosthwaite, for service to Berbice. In LR to 1838. For sale 1846, 1850. In MNL, ON 39588, latterly owned William Burnyeat, Whitehaven, registered Liverpool. Voyage Quebec to Swansea (Briton Ferry) with timber, abandoned on Sept 1 1972, in 46 N, 58W. All 11 crew saved.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 07 February 1842]:
DEATHS. On the 19th of December, after a few days' illness, of fever, Captain Robert GRAYSON, of the barque Berbice, who had command of a vessel trading to that colony for the last twenty years.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 23 July 1846]:
For SALE, The Barque BERBICE, Isaac Blackmore, Master; Built by Messrs. Wilson, in this port, and now lying in the Waterloo Dock. Apply to JOHN CROSTHWAITE and Co.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Tuesday 19 March 1850]:
At LLOYDS CAPTAINS ROOM, ROYAL EXCHANGE, On WEDNESDAY. MARCH 27 1850, at Half-past Two (Unless previously disposed of private contract), The good copper-fastened Barque BERBICE, 282 tons O.M.; built at Liverpool, in 1831; has a flush deck, is sheathed with copper, which is in good order, carries a very large cargo, and requires but a small quantity of ballast. Length, 102 feet; beam, 25 feet; depth, 17 feet 7 inches. Now lying the West India Export Dock, north side....

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Saturday 28 September 1872]:
Berbice. Report of Thomas Naile, Master of the barque Berbice, of Liverpool, 283 tons, from Quebec for Swansea, with cargo of timber, and a deckload. Left Quebec Aug. 17, p.m., wind S.E., moderate, fine. Proceeded, and on Sunday, the 1st of September, at 1 a.m., weather and wind S.E. by E., heavy gale, with rain, the ship took in the foretopmaststaysail. At 1 30 took in the foretopsail and mizentopsails and lay to; then pumped the vessel out as dry as possible. Pumps kept going till 4 A.M.; gale at its height, with a heavy sea. Wind backed into N. of E. Shipped a heavy sea on change of wind, which lifted the fore end of the deckload on the starboard side. Immediately after shipped another sea, which caused vessel to fall over to starboard, with rails under water. Tried to get vessel before the wind, but would not answer his helm. Made an effort to get the deckload off, but unable to so. At 5 a.m., fell over on her broadside to starboard, masts and yards in the water. Cut away the lanyards of the main and mizen rigging. Mizenmast went by the board, mainmast broke off at the foothook shrouds, taking away the foretopmast and jibboom and the longboat. Began to right, starboard deckload having been washed away; the after cabin house washed away, taking along with it all nautical instruments and provisions; main deck broke up and vessel filled; masts and spars still hanging to the vessel, being under water could not be cut away. On the 2d, at 10 30, the German barque Robert Wendt came to the rescue of deponent and Crew. Sent a boat to take them off, which was accomplished in two trips. When deponent left the vessel she was fast breaking up, several planks having started from round the bows. After being on board of the German 22 vessel days, during which time they were kindly treated and lodged, were landed at Dublin on the evening of the 24th.


Wooden ship Euphrates (Thetis), built Wilson, Liverpool, 1834, 730 tons, 188 x 33 ft. Owned M'Cracken & Jamieson for trade to China.
Launched as Thetis; not found in LR or MNL. Probably renamed. LR 1834 has Ship, Euphrates, master Hannay, built Liverpool 1834, 617 tons, owned Jamieson, Liverpool, for Liverpool - Calcutta service. This is almost certainly the vessel launched as "Thetis".
ON 25520, registered Liverpool, 617 tons, 128.3 x 32.6 x 21.8 ft, in 1865 owned Brenner, London; In 1868 owned Roberts, London. In LR. Wrecked 21 January 1868, foundered off Holyhead, all aboard lost. Hull was washed ashore at Trwyn Euphrates, near Rhosneigr.

Image of ship Euphrates by Samuel Walters, circa 1835.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 20 May 1834]:
Ship Launch. On Thursday next there will be launched firm the building-yard of Messrs. Wilson and Sons, in Trentham-street, a magnificent vessel, 730 tons register, 188 feet keel, and 33 feet beam. She is to be called the Thetis, and is intended for the China trade. The owners are Messrs. M'Cracken, Jamieson, and Co. This is the largest vessel that has been built in Liverpool since the Havannah frigate was launched from the same yard twenty years ago; and she is also first vessel built at this port expressly for the China trade.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 24 July 1834]:
For CALCUTTA, The fine new Frigate-built Ship EUPHRATES, A. Hanny (late of the Duke of Lancaster), commander; 721 tons. This ship has a splendid poop, her cabin accommodations in other respects are or a superior description, she carries an experienced surgeon. - For freight or passage, apply to Messrs. M'Crackan, Jamieson and Co.; to the Commander, on board. Prince's Dock, or to ASHLEY BROTHERS.

[from Liverpool Weekly Courier - Saturday 25 January 1868]:
ATKINS. Drowned at sea, 15 miles from Holyhead, through the foundering of the ship Euphrates, Thomas Atkins, master, native of Dartmouth, Devon; his wife and all hands perished.

[from Brecon County Times, Saturday 25 January 1868]:
LOSS OF A SHIP AND ALL HANDS OFF HOLYHEAD. Another sad and melancholy sea disaster was reported in the London papers on Thursday evening. The barque Euphrates left Bonny for Liverpool on the 1st October with a full cargo of palm oil and nuts. The vessel had a tedious and exhaustive voyage, and on entering the English Channel encountered a series of very heavy easterly and westerly gales. On Tuesday afternoon [21 January 1868], the Euphrates, labouring under a tremendous sea, and evidently waterlogged, was sighted by the Braganza (s.s.), from Oporto to Liverpool, about sixteen miles southwest off Holyhead. The Braganza at once hove to, and her boats were lowered. One or two of the boats approached the sinking vessel, and a line was thrown on board the Euphrates, which was seized by two men, but their exhausted condition did not admit of their retaining hold of the rope. The vessel sank with all on board. The Braganza lay to for several hours, but did not succeed, though every effort was made, in saving a life.


Wooden ship John O' Gaunt, built Wilson, Liverpool, 1835, 449 tons, owned Gladstone, Liverpool, for trade to East Indies. Regarded in 1835 as one of the finest hardwood-built vessels of Liverpool.
Voyage Whampoa to Liverpool, on 17th January 1854, wrecked on back of Holyhead Mountain, crew and passenger saved.

Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 01 May 1835 To sail on the 25th instant. For BATAVIA and LINTIN, the new Liverpool-built Ship JOHN O'GAUNT, JOHN ROBERTSON, Commander; burthen 449 tons. For freight or passage, having a most superior poop cabin, apply to JOHN GLADSTONE and Co.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 21 January 1854]:
Loss of the Ship John O'Gaunt. The splendid clipper, ship John O'Gaunt, belonging to this port, and well known in the China trade, was totally lost on Tuesday morning last, on the coast of Anglesea. The John O'Gaunt was the property of Messrs. Gladstone and Co., of this town. It appears that at three a.m., on Tuesday, the vessel went ashore at the back of Holyhead Mountain (Port Griffiths [sic - possibly Porth Rhufydd]). Five of the crew with Mrs. Macdonald, widow of the commander, who had died on the homeward voyage, left the wreck in a boat, and were landed in safety. The remainder of the crew scrambled from the wreck to a rock, where they remained until the afternoon, when they were taken off by means of a boat and life buoys. The ship struck on a rock, and afterwards went down in deep water. A great portion of her cargo floated out of her seaward, and the only articles cast ashore where some broken chests. The loss of property will, therefore, be very great. At the time of the accident the weather was very bad; a snowstorm prevailed, accompanied with a dense fog, the crew being scarcely able to see each other standing on the deck; no blame, therefore, attaches to the commander and crew, the disaster being purely accidental. Land had never been seen since the vessel left St. Helena, neither had the men been able to discern a light.
The John O'Gaunt sailed from London on the 25th September, 1852, for Bombay, under the command of Captain M'Donald, who was accompanied by his wife. From India she proceeded to China, and sailed from Whampoa for this port on the 10th of August last. On the 25th of October, Captain Donald. who was suffering from dropsy, died, and the ship was taken charge of the chief mate. She had on board a valuable cargo of silks and teas, which was partially insured. The principal consignees were Messrs. Thomson, Finlay, and Co., of this town. The John O'Gaunt was built by Mr. Thomas Wilson, in 1837; her burthen was 449 tons, and she was 13 year's ship. Her extraordinary performances under the command of Captain Robertson, subsequently of the Stornaway and now of the Cairngorm, first attracted attention to the Chinese "clippers", and ultimately led to the extensive construction of vessels of that class, especially the Aberdeen clippers. As a Liverpool built vessel, she always reflected the highest credit on this port, and was the favourite ship of her talented builder.


Wooden pilot vessel Victoria, built Wilson, Liverpool, 1843, 43grt, 50.2 x 14.5 x 9ft, ON 6034, Pilot boat no. 5, served to 1856. Then owned and registered Liverpool, but owned Amlwch from 1882. In MNL to 1888, as a sloop.


Wooden ship Duke of Lancaster, built Wilson, Liverpool, 1844, 600 tons, 124 x 20 ft. LR 1844 gives Ship, Bulley, 510 tons, built Liverpool 1845, owned Stringer & Co. Voyage Liverpool to Shanghai, ashore on reef near Namoa, east coast of China, and lost, 21 July 1846. Crew saved. [Now Nanpeng islands, offshore of Nan'ao]

[from London Evening Standard - Wednesday 29 May 1844]:
Launches. On Saturday, the 1st of June, at a quarter before eleven, and on Monday, the 3d June, will be launched, from Messrs. Wilson's yard, North Shore, a ship of 500 tons old measurement, an improvement on the celebrated ship John o' Gaunt, built by the same builders, to be called the Duke of Lancaster, after the distinguished ship of that name built by the late Mr. Wilson. She is copper-bolted through and through, including all the lower deck bindings, in short neither skill nor expense have been spared on this ship, and the builders pronounce her superior to any of their former works.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 10 June 1844]:
LAUNCH ... The Duke of Lancaster, a splendid wooden ship, also built by Mr. Wilson, will be launched next spring tides. [sic, see below]

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Monday 13 January 1845]:
On Thursday at noon, a ship, called the Duke of Lancaster, was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Wilson, North Shore, Liverpool. The Duke is 124 feet long, broad, and 20 deep, 600 tons burthen, and intended for the China trade. She belongs to Messrs. Stringer and Mann, and will be commanded by Mr. Bulley, late of the Thomas Lowrey.

[from Leeds Intelligencer - Saturday 14 February 1846]:
Arrival from China. The fine ship Duke of Lancaster, belonging to Messrs. Stringer and Mann, John Dudley, commander, arrived in this river [Mersey] on Sunday morning, after passage of 94 days, from Canton. She sailed from Liverpool on the 28th May last, discharged her cargo in China, took on board a full cargo there, consisting of upwards of 860 chests of tea, and completed the voyage in eight months and ten days, being the shortest time on record.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 30 October 1846]:
Hong Kong. Aug. 22. The Duke of Lancaster, Bulley, from Liverpool to Shanghae [sic], was totally wrecked near Namoa, 21st July, crew saved.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 03 November 1846]:
SHIPWRECK. That fine vessel, the Duke of Lancaster, belonging to Messrs. Stringer and Mann, of this town, was wrecked on the 21st of July, on the reef near the Lammock Islands, a few miles south of Namao, on the east coast of China. Captain Bulley and the crew got safe away in the boats after the vessel had sunk in deep water, she having been carried over the reef by the force of the current, and from Namoa they were conveyed to Hong Kong. Before quitting Namoa, Captain Bulley revisited the wreck, but nothing could be saved.

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Sailing vessels built at Liverpool by Joseph Steel, Queen's Dock. All wooden
Joseph Steel (1780-1854), a Cumbrian, established a shipbuilding yard with two partners at Queens Dock, Liverpool in 1831. He was later joined by his son Joseph. Several of the vessels built were owned by Steel and seem not to have been classed at Lloyds, so they do not appear in LR.
Cordelia SV 1831
Imogen SV 1832
Thomas Leech SV 1832
Faerie Queen SV 1833
Mary Somerville SV 1835
Maia SV 1839
Livingstone SV 1840
Buenos Ayrian SV 1840
Viscount Sandon SV 1842
Hannah Salkield SV 1845
Anna Henderson SV 1846
Helen Wallace SV 1848
Jhelum SV 1849
Tinto 1852
Joseph Steel 1854
Agra 1858

Wooden ship Cordelia, built Steel, Liverpool, 1831, 378 tons. Owned Taylor, Liverpool. Trade to India. ON 15688. Registered London 1856, in MNL to 1886, 407 tons.

[from Liverpool Albion - Tuesday 12 April 1831]:
A fine new ship, of 400 tons register, intended for the East India trade, and to be called the Cordelia, will be launched on Thursday next, at half past eleven o'clock, from the yard of Messrs. Steele and Co., Baffin-street.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 04 April 1831]:
To sail early in May. For CALCUTTA, The new ship CORDELIA, GEORGE WEAVER, Commander; has excellent accommodations for passengers, and carries a surgeon.... Apply to TAYLOR, PORTER & CO.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 19 November 1849]:
A SHIP ON FIRE. On Wednesday evening a fire was discovered in the ship Cordelia, in the King's Dock. It originated in the after part of the vessel. By the great personal exertions of Lieut. Maxwell and the fire-police it was confined to that part, but contrary to Mr. Maxwell's recommendation, the vessel was ultimately scuttled. The fearless and judicious labours of Mr. Maxwell and the firemen were very praiseworthy. The cargo consisted of four hundred tons of salt and a few bales of sundries, all of which, we understand, is destroyed. Messrs. Taylor, Potter, and Co. are the owners of the vessel, and she was commanded by Captain Caddick.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 24 March 1853]:
Filling up and will sail immediately. For MADRAS, Direct. The Liverpool built Ship CORDELIA, James Partridge, Commander; 378 tons, coppered and copper fastened, sails fast, and is well known in the East India trade as a first rate conveyance. For freight or passage apply to JAMES AIKIN, SON and Co.


Wooden Ship Imogen, built Steel, Liverpool, 1832, 350 tons, owned Andrew Taylor & Co. Voyage Liverpool to St Petersburg, Jacques, master, struck Neckmansgrund, off Kõpu, on 21st August 1845. Captain and 7 men lost, 7 saved.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 20 January 1832]:
Launch. Yesterday, a fine vessel, intended for the Calcutta trade, was launched from the ship-building yard of Messrs Steels, near Cornhill, and went off in a most gallant style: Capt. Jackson besprinkled her "with a bottle of the best". amd named her the Imogen. She is the property of Messrs. Tayler, Potter, and Co,, who entertained a party ....

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 05 March 1832]:
For CALCUTTA, The fine new Liverpool-built armed Ship IMOGEN, J Richardson, master, burthen 330 tons. coppered and copper-fastened, and has superior accommodation for passengers; lying in the Prince's Dock. For terms of freight or passage, apply to Messrs. TAYLOR, POTTER & CO. or to ASHLEY BROTHERS.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Friday 31 March 1843]:
THE Barque IMOGEN, 330 tons per register O.M. This fine vessel was built at Liverpool in 1832, and was classed A 1 for ten years; she sails remarkably fast, and is well found, and in good order in every respect. Now lying in the West India Import Dock. For further particulars apply to STUART and SIMPSON. 19, Birchin-lane.

[from Lloyd's List - Friday 05 September 1845]:
St. Petersburg, 26th Aug. The Imogene[sic], Jaques, from Liverpool to this port, struck on Nickman's Ground 21st inst., and went to pieces the next day; Master, Mate and six men drowned; seven men picked up by the Integrity, Cockburn, arrived here. [Nickman's Ground, in Swedish, Neckmansgrund, is off the end of the Kõpu peninsula in Hiimaa Island, Estonia; Dagerort in Swedish] [described as of London]


Wooden brig Thomas Leech, built Steel, Liverpool, 1832, 188 tons, owned Taylor, Potter, Liverpool for trade to S America. Voyage from Guano Islands to Liverpool, driven ashore and wrecked, 7 Jan 1846, on coast of Patagonia.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 03 September 1832]:
A fine brig, named the Thomas Leech, was launched on Tuesday last for Messrs. Taylor, Potter, and Co., from the building-yard of Messrs. J. Steel and Co., Queen's Dock. She is built expressly for the trade between this port and the western coast of South America.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 09 August 1832]:
For VALPARAISO, Intermedios, & LIMA, The fine new Liverpool-built brig THOMAS LEECH, - Master, Burthen per register 185 tons, coppered and copper-faMened, built expressly for the trade, and expected to sail remarkably fast. For freight or passage, apply Messrs. Taylor, Potter and Co. or to GEORGE HIGHFIELD, Drury-lane.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 02 May 1846]:
Pernambuco, March 13. The Melvina is wrecked on the coast of Patagonia. 18. The Severn, for Liverpool, is wrecked on the Bar of Anicati. The Acapulco, Harrison; Stewarts, Fisher; Thomas Leech, Goulding; and Nightingale, Hunter, with several other vessels, are reported to be lost on the coast of Patagonia.

[from Lloyd's List - Wednesday 29 April 1846]:
The Thomas Leech, Slaughter, of Liverpool, drove on shore on Long Island in Seabear Bay, Coast of Patagonia, 7th Jan, with 200 tons guano on board. [Seabear Bay, 54km S of Puerto Deseado: Bahia Oso Marino]


Wooden barque Faerie Queene (also Faery Queen), built Steel, Liverpool, 1833, 313 tons, owned Taylor, Potter, Liverpool. In LR to 1838. For sale 1839. Reported as calling at Hong Kong, Manila, Batavia, Singapore, Sydney and Hobart. Voyage Batavia to Sydney, 21 June 1840, struck a reef in Straits of Lombok and abandoned.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 17 July 1835]:
For LINTIN and CANTON. the fast-sailing Barque FAERIE QUEENE, Wm HOLMES, Commander. For freight or passage apply to TAYLOR, POTTER, and Co.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 29 March 1839]:
ON SALE, The Barque FAERIE QUEENE, 312 tons, old measurement. Length 104 feet 7 inches, Breadth 25 feet 8 inches, Depth 17 feet 6 inches. This vessel was built in Liverpool, by Mr. Steel, of the best materials and launched in August, 1833; she is well known as one of the fastest sailing vessels out of the port and has always delivered her cargoes in good order, was coppered last voyage with heavy copper; is abundantly found in stores and may be sent to sea at a moderate expense. She is well adapted for the Pacific, or any other trade requiring despatch. ... Taylor, Potter & Co.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 16 May 1839]:
For BATAVIA, LINTIN and MANILLA, The Liverpool-built Barque FAERIE QUEENE, P Hickman, Commander; 312 tons register; coppered and copper-fastered, and is well known as a remarkably swift-sailing vessel, and in all respects a most eligible conveyance for goods or passengers, loading in Prince's Dock, Apply to Brodie & Hamilton or Charles Cotesworth.

[from Witness (Edinburgh) - Wednesday 19 February 1840]:
Arrivals at Hong Kong. Faerie Queene October 11 from Liverpool and Batavia.

[from Morning Advertiser - Wednesday 19 August 1840]:
HOBART TOWN, VAN DIEMENS LAND. Arrived .... March 29th, Faerie Queene, Hickman, from Manilla and China.

Sydney Newspaper [1840] May 23. Sailed. The barque Faerie Queen, Hickman, for Singapore, in ballast.

[Liverpool Albion - Monday 12 October 1840]:
Singapore July 16. The Faerie Queene, from Batavia for Sydney, struck on a reef near Antelope Islands on the 21st June and was abandoned after being plundered by the natives. [another report: Straits of Lombock]


Wooden ship Mary Somerville, built Steel, Liverpool, 1835, 408 tons, owned Taylor, Potter, Liverpool, for trade to Calcutta. Voyage Calcutta to Liverpool, left St Helena on 9-10-1852 and missing.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 05 January 1835]:
LAUNCH OF THE MARY SOMERVILLE. - On Wednesday, at eleven o'clock, the fine ship Mary Somerville, built by Messrs. Steel and Co., for Messrs. Taylor, Potter, and Co., merchants, of this town, was launched from the builders' yard, in Baffin-street, Queen's Dock.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 10 October 1837]:
Under engagement to sail on the 15th instant. For CALCUTTA, The fine British-built Ship, MARY SOMERVILLE, JOHN ROBERTS, Commander; Burthen per register 408 tons, A 1, coppered and copper-fastened, and is a remarkably fast sailer. For freight or passage apply to Messrs. TAYLOR, POTTER, and Co., or to BOLD and STARKEY.

[from Morning Post - Friday 18 February 1853]:
The Mary Somerville, from Calcutta to Liverpool, sailed from St. Helena 9th Oct. [1852], and has not since been heard of. The front of a clothes chest, marked Mary Somerville, was picked up at St. Michael's Mount, 10th Jan. last.


Wooden barque Maia, built Steel, Liverpool, 1839, 277 tons, owned Mondell, Liverpool, for trade to Australia. Burnt and lost at Maceio, Brazil, on 3 January 1862.

Image from painting by Joseph Heard of Maia, riding out a tropical storm at anchor [from MMM].

[from Cumberland Pacquet, and Ware's Whitehaven Advertiser - Tuesday 28 May 1839]:
A handsome new barque, of 270 tons register measurement, called the MAIA, was launched from the building yard of Messrs. Steel and Son, Liverpool, on Tuesday last. The Maia is the property of J, Mondell, Esq., merchant, Liverpool, and Capt. Benjamin Sproule, son of the late Captain Sproule, R. N.. of Richmond Hill, near this town. She will shortly sail for Sydney, New South Wales, under the command of Capt. Sproule.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Monday 24 February 1862]:
MACEIO Jan. 23. Only bales of cotton wool were saved ex Maia, Robinson, burnt at this port in the night of Jan. 3. Parts of this wreck, together with the cotton, were sold at public auction, realising gross 1.9858000 rs.


Wooden ship Livingstone (also Livingston), built Steel, Liverpool, 1840, 467 tons, owned Steel, for trade to Sydney.

Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser Tuesday 28 January 1840
LAUNCH. - On Thursday a beautiful barque, of about 400 tons register, called the Livingston, intended, we believe, for the East India trade, was launched from the building yard of Messrs. Joseph Steele and Son ...


Wooden Barque Buenos Ayrian, built Steel, Liverpool, 1840, 324 tons, owned Steel, Liverpool, for trade to Montreal.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 04 August 1840]:
LAUNCH. On Thursday, the Buenosayrian, a beautiful new barque of 320 tons burden, was launched from the building yard of Mr. Joseph Steel, Baffin-street. The Buenosayrian dashed into her native element in gallant style, amidst the shouts of hundreds of delighted spectators.


Wooden ship Viscount Sandon, built Steel, Liverpool, 1842,

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 28 February 1842]:
LAUNCH. The new ship "Viscount Sandon", a vessel of about 550 tons register, was launched from the building. yard of Mr. Joseph Steel, Baffin-street, on Saturday last. She is, we believe, the property of Messrs. Taylor, Potter, and Co., merchants, of this town. The symmetry of her model, the beauty and superior style of her workmanship, and her adaptation to carry and sail well elicited the cheers of an admiring, respectable, and influential multitude of highly gratified spectators. She went off the stocks in gallant style, and dipped into the bosom of her destined element with the good wishes of each individual present.


Wooden vessel Hannah Salkield, built Steel, Liverpool, 1845, 553 tons, owned M'Govern, Liverpool, for trade to China.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 29 March 1845]:
On Wednesday, fine new vessel, called the Hannah Salkield, intended tor the East India trade was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Steel and Sons, Baffin-street.


Wooden ship Anna Henderson, built Steel, Liverpool, 1846, 587 tons, not found LR. In MNL ON 26037, 587 tons, registered Liverpool. By 1865 owned Robert Grey, Moulmein, Burma. By 1869 registered Moulmein, Bk, 531 tons. In MNL to 1876. Last newspaper report seems to be spoken 5 May 1873, heading North at 34 S, 75 W. [Moulmein is now Mawlamyina]

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 03 April 1846]:
On the same day, and about the same time, a very fine vessel of 600 tons burthen was launched from building-yard of Messrs. Steel and Son, Baffin-street. Her intended commander, Captain Coull, performed the ceremony of christening, and named her the Anne Henderson. She is the property of the builders, and is intended for the Calcutta trade.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 21 May 1846]:
For CALCUTTA, The remarkably fine new Liverpool-built Ship ANNA HENDERSON, J. W. Coull, Commander; 520 tons per register. For freight or passage apply to BOLDS and Co. or HUGHES, COWIE and Co.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 22 June 1848]:
Warranted first ship. Takes neither salt nor coals; has a considerable portion of her cargo on board and in course of shipmeent, and will be despatched forthwith. For CALCUTTA. The splendid Liverpool-built Ship ANNA HENDERSON, W. Coen,, Commander; A 1 at Lloyds for twelve years, 587 tons per register, copppered and copper-fastened, only two years old, sails remarkly fast; presents an eligible opportunity to shippers, and has excellent accommodations for passengers. For freight or passage, apply Joseph Steel. Esq. or to GEORGE B. WAINWRIGHT, 13, Rumford-place. Will be succeeded by the splendid new Ship HELEN WALLACE.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Tuesday 07 May 1872]:
Rangoon, April 5. ... Anna Henderson, 530, teak, Moulmein for Kurrachee, Rs 30 per ton. ...


Wooden ship Helen Wallace, built Steel, Liverpool, 1848, 642 tons, not found early LR but LR 1870: Bk, Stanton, 572t, 130.4 x 30.4 x 21.1 ft, built Steele, Liverpool 1838, owned Stanton, Liverpool. In MNL, ON10526, 641 tons, registered Liverpool. Leaky and called at Mauritius, August 1872, voyage Cocanada [now Kakinada, India] to Liverpool, owned Thomas Stanton, Liverpool, all 15 crew saved. Salvaged, condemned, sold and repaired. Registered Port Louis, Mauritius, 1875-7, then Rangoon, owned Moulmein, 1878-80, barque.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Tuesday 06 June 1848]:
LAUNCH. - On Saturday, at noon, a splendid new ship, built for the East India trade, was launched from the building-yard of Mr. Joseph Steel, Baffin-street. She was named Helen Wallace, by Miss Brice, the accomplished daughter of Mr. Brice, of this town. She will measure about 650 tons, is a most beautiful model, and a fine specimen of the perfection of British naval architecture.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 03 August 1848]:
For CALCUTTA. The splendid new Liverpool-built Ship HELEN WALLACE, William Robertson, Commander; A 1 twelve years, 642 tons per register, coppered and in copper-fastened, and is expected to prove herself one of the swiftest sailing vessels out the port; she presents most superior opportunity to shippers, and has excellent cabin accommodation. For freight or passage apply to Joseph Steel, Esq. or to GEORGE B. WAINWRIGHT. 13. Rumford-place.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 22 June 1848]:
Warranted first ship. Takes neither salt nor coals; has a considerable portion of her cargo on board and in course of shipmeent, and will be despatched forthwith. For CALCUTTA. The splendid Liverpool-built Ship ANNA HENDERSON, W. Coen,, Commander; A 1 at Lloyds for twelve years, 587 tons per register, copppered and copper-fastened, only two years old, sails remarkly fast; presents an eligible opportunity to shippers, and has excellent accommodations for passengers. For freight or pasage, apply Joseph Steel. Esq. or to GEORGE B. WAINWRIGHT, 13, Rumford-place. Will be succeeded bv the splendid new Ship HELEN WALLACE.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Saturday 05 October 1872]:
MAURITIUS. (Via Aden, Oct. 3): The Helen Wallace barque has put in here leaky, and is discharging. Mem.: The Helen Wallace, Stanton, left Cocanada 28th June for Liverpool. [spoken 4 August, 25 S, 50 E]

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Friday 01 November 1872]:
Helen Wallace barque, which put into Mauritius, leaky, &c, has been condemned and sold for £100, cargo transhipped into the brig Pennine.


Wooden ship Jhelum, built Steel, Liverpool, 1849, 428 tons, owned Steel, for trade to the west coast of S America, later barque rigged. In MNL as Ihelum, ON 10600, 428 tons, More history with image of wreck. She was abandoned, damaged, on the Falklands around August 1870, where she was used for harbour storage, before disintegrating.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 28 May 1849]:
A splendid vessel of 500 tons, named the Jhelum, which will be commanded by Captain Bell, a gentleman well-known lo the East India trade, was launched from the building-yard Mr. Joseph Steel, jun., on Friday. A number of ladies and gentlemen witnessed the launch.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 29 April 1850]:
For ARICA and ISLAY, The fine Liverpool built Ship JHELUM, Captain Bell; A 1, being only ten moothe old, and a very swift sailor. ...

[from Birmingham Journal - Wednesday 15 April 1857]:
REGULAR LINE OF PACKETS TO WEST OF SOUTH AMERICA. FOR VALPARAISO direct, the fine Liverpool-built ship JHELUM, 428 tons register, Walter Crawford, commander, This well-known ship was built in Liverpool in 1848, of the best selected materials under the careful inspection of the Owner, Mr Joseph Steel, the celebrated ship-builder; and although never classed, her cargoes have always been discharged in first-rate order, so that insurances continue to be effected by her on the very best terms. She has just delivered a full cargo of Nitrate of Soda without damage....

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Tuesday 27 December 1870]:
HAVRE. Dec. 22: Accounts from Monte Video, dated Nov. 15, state that the Pelham ship has been chartered to go to the Falklands to take on board the cargo of the Jhelum, from Callao for Dunkirk, which put into Stanley Aug. 18. [she had suffered damage passing Cape Horn and was deserted by her crew who considered her unsafe]

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Page & Grantham, Liverpool. (Steam vessels)

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Davenport, Grindrod & Patrick, Liverpool. (Steam vessels)

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Hodgson, Liverpool. (Steam vessels)

Barque Richard Cobden 1844

Iron barque Richard Cobden, built Hodgson, Liverpool, 1844, One of the earliest iron sailing vessels, owned Darby, Coalbrookdale. Lloyds Register 1846 as 461 tons, Iron; MNL ON 25779, included to 1876, registered Liverpool. LR 1864 as 136.5 x 27.6 x 19.1 ft. Ashore at Drogheda in March 1870 - refloated and for sale in Graving Dock at Liverpool, "as she lies". Not found in newspaper reports after that date.

An article by J Grantham in the Journal of Arts, April 7, 1871, states than she was built at Bristol in 1844, and broken up in 1870, as it was too expensive to repair her. LR and Liverpool newspapers, state built Liverpool, however. Possibly she was designed at Bristol, but built at Liverpool.

excerpts [from Bolton Free Press - Saturday 27 July 1844]:
LAUNCH OF THE IRON BARQUE, RICHARD COBDEN. On Thursday week, a beautiful barque, constructed of iron, was launched from the yard of Messrs. Jas. Hodgson and Co., North Shore, Liverpool. It was called Richard Cobden, after the distinguished gentleman of that name, who is the acknowledged champion of the principles of free trade. .. The vessel, which is one of half a dozen to be constructed on similar principles by the same firm,... The Richard Cobden is intended to sail immediately for Chusan, with a valuable cargo of cottons, &c, &c. She is the property of Messrs. Darby and Co., of Liverpool. Her extreme length from figure-head to taffrail is 150 feet, breadth of beam 28 feet 8 inches, depth of hold 19 feet 6 inches, and she is provided with two water-tight bulkheads. The bottom plates are 3/4inch thick. The cabin is to be fitted with eight state rooms and a handsome saloon.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 03 November 1846]:
THE IRON BARQUE RICHARD COBDEN. This vessel, which sailed from Liverpool, in July last, arrived out at Bombay after a short passage of ninety-four days, although she was becalmed, on the Line, fourteen days; and as doubt has arisen about the fouling of iron vessels on long voyages, it is proper to mention that she had no coating when she left the port of Liverpool, except good oil red paint, and although she did foul a little, on the Line, while she was becalmed, when she arrived at Bombay she was as clean as when she left the port of Liverpool. The Richard Cobden is 140 feet long, 28 feet 8 inches beam, and 20 feet depth of hold, and great rise of floor, with a fine run fore and aft, and was built by Messrs. James Hodgson and Co., iron shipbuilders, of this town, and launched on the 18th July, 1844.

[from Illustrated London News - Saturday 27 January 1866]:
Liverpool Pilot boat leading 12 vessels into the Mersey during the late storm. One of these vessels is the barque Richard Cobden from Bombay, with foretopmast gone, - image below:

[from Lifeboat Magazine Archive]:
March 4, 1870. The barque Richard Cobden, of Liverpool, stranded on the North Bull, near Drogheda Bar, during a strong gale from the E.N.E. and in a heavy sea. The Drogheda life-boat went out and brought safely ashore 13 men, the master and the two mates refusing to leave their vessel. The flood tide, however, began to make with a very heavy sea, and the three men then hoisted a signal of distress, whereupon the life-boat proceeded out a second time, and with great difficulty and danger rescued the 3 men.

[from Shields Daily News - Friday 08 April 1870]:
The lifeboat, Old George Irlam of Liverpool, at Drogheda, Ireland, was happily the means saving the whole of the crew, numbering 16 men, from the barque Richard Cobden, of Liverpool, which, while on a voyage from that port to Monte Video, with a valuable cargo, went ashore on the Irish coast in a strong gale and heavy sea.

[from Liverpool Courier and Commercial Advertiser - Saturday 19 March 1870]:
FLOATING THE RICHARD COBDEN. We are glad to state that this fine old iron ship, built at Liverpool years 26 ago, is once more afloat. The Liverpool Underwriters yesterday received the following despatch relating to her: "Richard Cobden, Liverpool to Monte Video, ashore near Drogheda. There was discharged from this ship on the 16th, 1,280 bars iron, 32 bundles iron, 11 crates, and 3 casks. The vessel is being put in order for an attempt to float her mid-day today. The steam pump will be put to work this morning, if the weather permits, to assist the operation." The vessel has since been got off and taken alongside the quay at Drogheda, preparatory to being towed to Liverpool.

[from Liverpool Courier and Commercial Advertiser - Wednesday 09 March 1870]:
Loss of Richard Cobden. .... In 1857 the late Mr. Hodgson published a pamphlet, Remarks on Iron Ships, which, speaking to this vessel, and contrasting her with heavier ships, which at that date weighed 15 cwt. per builder's tonnage, he says:
I am not aware that the heavier ships are any better than the lighter ones. In a mechanical point of view, I am decidedly of the opinion that the ship Richard Cobden is a superior vessel to any of them, is a better, sounder, and more seaworthy ship, and will last longer although much lighter. She has been on trial now for nearly fourteen years, and has given the most complete satisfaction, so that we may safely conclude that she is everything that can be desired. She was built for the Coalbrookdale Iron Company, for the purpose of testing the capabilities of iron material for shipbuilding. She has not had the slightest repair done to her, has taken out an entire cargo of iron from London to the East, has never made a drop of water, and she is apparently as good and sound now as the first day she sailed. She obtains the highest freight in Bombay, and was insured on the most favourable terms: but the owners now have so much confidence in her that they do not effect any insurance on her. This vessel was built long before Lloyd's recognised iron ships.

[from Liverpool Daily Post - Thursday 12 May 1870]:
The renowned iron barque, RICHARD COBDEN, 522 tons B. M., 461 tons register. Built Mr, James Hodgson, at Liverpool, in 1844, and is now the most celebrated iron vessel afloat. In 1867 her class of A 1 for 20 years in Liverpool Underwriters Registry was continued. She is at present in Messrs Clayton and Bayley's Graving Dock and will be sold as she there lies. Dimensions: Length, 136.7 feet; breadth, 27.6 feet; depth, 19.2 feet.

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Thomas Royden, Liverpool.
Yard numbers: mostly sailing vessels - all wooden - some sailing pilot vessels - from 1824 on. (Steam vessels).
Mersey 2; Rocket 3; Alecto 4;
Dyson 7; Chatham 8; Robert Finnie 9; Judith 10;
Charles Eyes 11; Sir John Beresford 12; Annie Baldwin 13; John Brooks 14; William Rushton 15;
Mary Worrall 16; Frederick Huth 17; Tapley 18; Eliza Sanders 19; Ranger 20;
Argentina 21; Agnes 22; Isabella 23; Hermes 24; Earl of Liverpool 25;
Town of Liverpool 26; Jane 27; John Bull 28; PS Thomas Royden 29; PS Pernambucana 30;
Abbots Reading 31; Creamore 32; Devon 33; Seagull 34; Chimbrazo 35;
James Graham 36; Perseverance 37; The Duke 38; Joshua Waddington 39; PS Dreadnought 40;
Barkhill 41; Lima 42; Mary Woods 43; Albert Edward Prince of Wales 44; Seraphina 45;
Countess of Sefton 46; Mersey 47; PS Affonso 48; Lancastrian 49; Auspicious 50;
Geraldine 51; Ismyr 52; Annie Worrall 53; Trojan 54; Mersey 55;
Thomas Royden 56; Rosamond 57; PS Cisne 58; Chilena 59; Netherton 60;
Anne Royden 61; Frankby 62; Chili 63; Sir John Lawrence 64; Japanese 65;
Our Queen 66; La Zingara 67; Pride of Liverpool 68; Ceara 69; Inca 70;...


Wooden ship Mersey, built Thomas Royden , Liverpool, 1824, yard no 2, 327 tons, for Birch, Liverpool. Traded Liverpool to Jamaica, On 25 August 1852, was damaged by a hurricane at Mobile, and sold - hull used as a floating seaman's hospital.

[from Globe - Tuesday 21 September 1852]:
The Mersey (British ship), loaded at Mobile, had to cut away her masts during a hurricane there on the 26th Aug to prevent her going shore.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 16 October 1852]:
New York, September 25. The ship Mersey, of Liverpool, wrecked during the gale last month at Mobile, was sold by auction at that port on the 14th inst, for 2500 dollars. Fifty-nine bales of cotton were also sold for 2713 dollars. The Mersey is twenty-seven years old, and yet in staunch condition, and is to be appropriated as a bethel hospital for seamen.


Wooden brig Rocket, built Thomas Royden , Liverpool, 1823, yard no 3, 237 tons, for Hatton, Liverpool, for trade to Jamaica. Later owned Horsfall, Liverpool, for trade to Africa. After suffering damage in a gale, condemned 4th September 1842, at St Helena.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 21 September 1835]:
For KINGSTON, JAMAICA, The fine A 1 Brig, ROCKET, H. D. SAGE, Commander, New coppered, and will have immediate despatch. Apply to THOS. HATTON. jun. 34, South John-street, Canning-buildings.

[from English Chronicle and Whitehall Evening Post - Thursday 03 November 1842]:
St Helena. Sept 4. The Rocket, Bishop, from the coast of Africa, has been condemned, having received considerable damage in a gale on the coast.


Wooden brig Alecto, built Royden, Liverpool, 1825, 266 grt, yard no.4, owned Hatton, Liverpool, for service to Jamaica. Later owned Prowse, Liverpool, 321 tons. Traded to China, Tasmania,.. In LR until 1856. In 1856 was for sale, as a barque, described as lengthened in 1841.
Possibly became Norwegian barque, Alecto, captain Moller, of Fredrikstad, that was wrecked in 24th April 1859 at Winterton.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 29 December 1828]:
For KINGSTON, Jamaica, The armed Brig ALECTO, Myles Jas. Ayshford, Commander; Will have immediate despatch; Apply to THOS. HATTON, ...

Liverpool 1st February, 1850, Alecto, Grace, arrived from China, leaky.

[from Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser - Saturday 20 January 1855]:
Deal: 19th January 1855, Alecto, Evans, sailed for Moreton Bay.

[from Montrose Review - Friday 07 September 1855]:
At Moreton Bay, May, Alecto, from London.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Friday 18 April 1856]:
THE ... barque ALECTO, belonging to Messrs. J. Prowse and Co., Liverpool, 321 tons OM ; built at Liverpool in 1825; copper fastened, and was sheathed with yellow metal in 1854, was lengthened and restored in 1841 for six years; specially surveyed in 1853, and classed *AE (in red); she has delivered 440 tons of guano from the West Coast; has always been well kept up, and is now abundantly found in stores. Now lying the St. Katherine's Dock. ...

Possibly the same vessel.[from Morning Chronicle - Saturday 30 April 1859]:
WINTERTON, Norfolk. During the gale of the 24th inst., the new lifeboat of the Royal National Lifeboat institution, on this station, put off very early in the morning to the stranded Swedish barque Alecto, of Fredericstad [sic]; her mainmast was hanging over her side. The poor foreigners were assembled in the forecastle, and the sea was making a breach over the after part of the vessel. it was blowing very hard from E.S.E. The lifeboat's crew, however, persevered, and safely brought on shore the wrecked crew of nine men.
[when her cargo of timber was for sale on the beach at Winterton, vessel described as Norwegian barque, Captain B Moller]


Wooden barque Dyson, built Royden, Liverpool, 1826, 267 grt, yard no.7, owned Tyrer, Liverpool. ON 869, Registered Dumfries from 1854, Liverpool 1862-5, then Whitby 1866-7. More history. Stranded on the Bar at Archangel and sold as a wreck, 28 July 1867.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 20 July 1826]:
This day, a fine new vessel, to named the Dyson, and intended for the Brasil trade, will be launched from the ship-building yard of Mr. Royden, Queen Ann-street South, beyond the Queen's Dock.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Thursday 09 April 1857]:
THE BARQUE DYSON. The following letter was posted in the Underwriters' Rooms: Liverpool, April 8, 1857, Thos. Court, Esq. Secretary to the Underwriters' Association.
Sir my attention having been directed to a report in the Liverpool Telegraph, Lloyd's List, and Shipping Gazette of the 6th last, relative to the barque Dyson, under my command, which gives a very exaggerated statement of what occurred on the late passage from Rio de la Hacho to this port, I beg to furnish you with the correct particulars, and trust you will be good enough to give it the same publicity - as the report in question conveys an incorrect impression of the damage actually done. We undoubtedly experienced heavy weather in the month of March, but instead of the port quarter being stove in, it was only the after panel of the mock quarter gallery, the quarter-piece not being in the least shaken. One stanchion only was started, and that so slightly as merely to crack the pitch around it, while the loss of bulwarks amounted to two pieces of plank about 5 feet each in length. No sails were lost, and the accident to the foremast was in consequence of its being struck by lightning on the 16th ult. The vessel sprung a leak on the port side, which we were able to keep under with the pumps. When on the larboard tack she made scarcely any water, and knowing the locality of the leak, I anticipate little difficulty in discovering it, when the cargo is discharged. I am, Sir, your obedient servant David Graham.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Saturday 25 May 1867]:
Lerwick. Put into Cullivoe 12 May, The Dyson of Whitby, Gibson, from Shields for Archangel.

[from Shields Daily Gazette - Tuesday 13 August 1867]:
The Dyson, Gibson, from Archangel (oats), which was stranded on the outer bar during a heavy gale that prevailed there, July 28 and 29, is considered a complete wreck, and will be sold with the cargo on board. About 300 chetwts of oats that remained in the lighter, from which she was loading, were saved.


Wooden barque Chatham, built Royden, Liverpol, 1827, 354 grt, 105.5 x 27.4 x 19.0 ft, yard no.5, owned Watson, Liverpool. ON 1633, in MNL to 1865, registered Liverpool. Voyaged to China 1860. By 1862 in Liverpool Docks. Sold foreign 1865. More history.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 01 August 1837]:
WEST INDIES. To sail immediately. For DEMERARA, The Barque CHATHAM, J. Gill, Commander; Burthen per register 351 tons. For freight or passage, having very superior cabin accommodations, apply to JOHN GLADSTONE and Co.


Wooden barque Robert Finnie, built Royden, Liverpool, yard no.9, 1829, 255nrt, owned Worral, Liverpool, then Nicholson, Liverpool. ON 26017. Registered Dumfries 1854-62. For sale at Dundee 1862. Later registered Dundee. In MNL to 1865. More history.
Voyage Dundee to Archangel, in ballast, Captain Robert Dron and 9 crew, lost among ice in White Sea, during May/June 1865, crew saved.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Saturday 29 November 1862]:
Sale. ... THE A 1 (Red) Barque ROBERT FINNIE, of Dundee. 260 tons N.N M.. built at Liverpool, and originally classed twelve A 1, has always been well kept up. Is now in good order, and is being sold in consequence of the death of a party interested. Upset price to insure a sale £1150. Inventories and further particulars of WELCH and JACK. Dock-street. Dundee.

[from Dundee Advertiser - Friday 23 June 1865]:
Loss of the barque Robert Finnie of Dundee. A telegram has been received by Mr Welch, the managing owner, conveying the intelligence that the barque Robert Finnie, of this port, been lost in the White Sea among the ice. The vessel, which was commanded by Capt Robt Dron, was built in 1829, and was 260 tons register. She left Dundee in the beginning of May last for Archangel, for a cargo of flax, tow, &c, and had almost completed her voyage when the unfortunate accident occurred. It is a matter of satisfaction, however, that the whole of the crew, 10 in number, were saved; but no further particulars have as yet come to hand, regarding the wreck of the vessel. The Robert Finnie was fully insured.

[from North British Daily Mail - Saturday 24 June 1865]:
Loss of a Dundee vessel. A telegram has been received in Dundee intimating the loss of the barque Robert Finnie, Captain Dron, belonging to Messrs Welch & Jack, Dundee, in the White Sea, among the ice. All of the crew were saved. The vessel, which was in ballast, left Dundee on the 3d May. The telegram mentions that two foreign vessels had also been lost among the ice about the same time.


Wooden barque Judith, built Royden, Liverpool, yard no.10, 1829, 253grt, ON 25809. Owned Tapley, Liverpool, for trade to Valparaiso. Later registered at Whitby, owned Weatherill. More history.
Voyage Danzig (Gdansk) to Hartlepool, captain and owner Weatherill, ashore at Falsterbo [SW tip of Sweden] and wrecked, 22 January 1860.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 02 March 1829]:
For VALPARAISO, ARICA, ISLAY, & LIMA, The fine new Liverpool-built Barque JUDITH, RICHARD TAPLEY, Commander; 220 tons per register; A 1 at Lloyd's; coppered and copper-fastened; built expressly for the South American trade, of the best materials, and expected to be a remarkably fast sailer; and is, in every respect, a superior vessel for goods and passengers, her accommodations being commodious, having two cabins. As a great part of her cargo is engaged, she will have despatch. For terms, &c. apply on board, west side Prince's Dock; to Messrs. EYES, WYLIE, and COOKE or to W. and S. TYRER.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 25 April 1854]:
On THURSDAY, the 4th May next, at One o'clock, at the Brokers' Sale-room, Derby-buildings, Fenwick-street, The well-known A 1 British-built Barque JUDITH; 253 tons register; built at Liverpool, by Mr. Royden, in 1829; classed originally A 1 twelve years; and was restored in 1847 A 1 eight years; is copper-fastened, and was resheathed with yellow metal in 1850. This vessel is in most excellent condition; stows a large cargo; and is quite ready for immediate employment. Dimensions: Length, 94 feet 8-12ths ; breadth, 24 feet 3-12ths ; depth, 16 10-12ths. Lying east side Prince's Dock. Apply to TONGE, CURRY and Co., Brokers.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Wednesday 25 January 1860]:
ELSINORE, Jan. 22. The Judith. of Whitby, from Dantzic for Hartlepool (wheat). was stranded on Falsterbo today, and likely to be a wreck.


Wooden barque Charles Eyes, built Royden, Liverpool, yard no.11, 1829, 256grt, owned Chapman, Liverpool. More history.
Voyage Liverpool to Vera Cruz, captain Moss, departed 6 September 1852. Entering Vera Cruz from Liverpool, on 17th November 1842, was driven on Gallega Reef (Arrecife La Gallega) and wrecked.

Image from painting by Joseph Heard of Charles Eyes [from MMM]. Location stated as near an iceberg, 40 miles east of Falklands.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 20 July 1829]:
For Valparaiso ....... Apply to Messrs. EYES, WYLIE, and COOKE; or to W. and J. TYRER.
Succeeds the above, The fine new Liverpool-built Barque CHARLES HEYES, THOMAS CHAPMAN, Commander.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 09 August 1842]:
For VERA CRUZ, The fine Liverpool-built Barque CHARLES EYES, Captain WILLIAM MOSS; A 1; newly coppered ; a remarkably fast sailer, and in every respect a first-rate conveyance both for goods and passengers. For terms, &c. apply on board, Prince's Dock, or to W. and J. TYRER.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 09 January 1843]:
VERA CRUZ, 26TH NOVEMBER. The Charles Eyes, Barr, in entering this port by the North Channel, 17th instant, was caught by a sudden gale from the northward, driven on the Gallega Reef, and became a total wreck.


Wooden ship Sir John Beresford, built Royden, Liverpool, 1830, yard no.12, 292 tons, owned Smith, Liverpool. For sale 1836. ON 24053, registered Cardiff by 1858, in MNL to 1864. Voyage Ardrossan to Genoa, with coal and iron, foundered 50 miles west of Cape Clear, on 7 October 1857. 3 crew lost.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 28 January 1830]:
Launch. A fine vessel, (named the Sir John Beresford) was launched yesterday, from Messrs. Royden & Co.'s yard. At half-past twelve o'clock, all the preliminaries having been arranged, the gallant vessel glided in fine style into her destined element amid the cheers of a large number of persons who were assembled on the occasion. She is intended for the Montreal trade, is owned by Messrs. Smith & Son, and will be commanded Captain Boag, a gentleman of high character in his profession.

[from Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser - Wednesday 30 November 1836]:
The fine Barque SIR JOHN BERESFORD. 292 18-94 tons; built at Liverpool in 1830, of the very best African and English oak; coppered and copper-fastened; a substantially built vessel, and adapted for general purposes; has just discharged a cargo from Calcutta in excellent condition; abundantly found in stores and can be sent to sea at a very moderate expense. Lying in the St. Katharine Docks. Michael Mitchell, commander. For further particulars, apply to Captain Mitchell, on board ...

[from Ardrossan and Saltcoats Herald - Saturday 31 October 1857]:
TOTAL WRECK OF THE BARQUE SIR JOHN BERESFORD, OF CARDIFF. The following account of the wreck of this vessel is sent us from one of the surviving crew: The barque, Sir John Beresford, of Cardiff, Captain Jones, sailed from Ardrossan on the 1st current, with coal and pig iron, bound for Genoa. On the 5th it came on to blow, and the gale continued on to the 7th. When about fifty miles in a parallel latitude off Cape Clear she was struck by a heavy sea, which shifted the cargo and hove the ship on her beam-ends, the seas beating over the ship, washing away everything. All the boats were carried off but the long boat. The crew cut away the masts, but she did not right. The ship was fast going down, and the master and eight of the crew saved their lives by taking to the long boat and three were drowned in the attempt. The survivors had neither meat, drink, nor clothing, and having only one oar in the boat they were tossed about with wind and sea for three days and two nights. The three men who were drowned were: James Peterkin, mate, belonging to South Shields; George Ailan, cook and steward, belonging to Ardrossan; and a French seaman, name unknown. On the third day, the survivors were picked up by the ship Euphrates, of London, M'Killor, master, bound for Bombay. By the captain's kind and humane treatment, the famished seamen soon recovered, and after being three days on board, were transferred to the Rimac, of Liverpool, Wise, master, who also treated them with the utmost kindness, and landed them all safely in Liverpool.


Wooden barque Anne Baldwin (also Annie), built Royden, Liverpool, 1831, yard no. 13; 281 tons, 99.0 x 25.1 x 17.4 ft, ON 1438, in MNL to 1871 (as Anne Baldwen), registered Liverpool, 311 tons, listed as owned James Tasker in 1871. Voyage Jamaica to Britain, leaky and put back for Key West, aground on Conch reef, 16 April 1865, and wrecked, crew saved.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 16 December 1830]: [from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 11 November 1834]:
.... Cleared-out this day, the ANNE BALDWEN; Crawford, for Calcutta, 280 tons.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Saturday 08 July 1865]:
THE LOSS OF THE ANNE BALDWIN. BOARD OF TRADE inquiry: Thursday, an inquiry was held at the Police Court, Dale-stret,..... barque Anne Balwin, of which Messrs Tasker & Radford were the owners .... represented the master, Captain R. H. Netherelift.
The Anne Baldwin was a ship, built at Leith[sic] in 1831, her tonnage being 310, her length 98 feet, her breadth 26 feet, and her depth 17 feet. She left Leith in October last, laden with coal, bound for Barbadoes, which she reached on the 6th of December. She cruised around from port to port, taking in cargo, and finally sailed from Port Royal, Jamaica, on April 1st, having previously been surveyed, at the request of the crew, and pronounced seaworthy. The wind freshened a few days after the vessel left the port, and the ship began to leak more than usual, requiring to be pumped five or ten minutes every hour. Up to this time, the captain had been taking the windward channel, but he now determined to take the Florida channel, thinking that he should there get a more favourable voyage. The leak increasing, on the 16th of April the men went aft, and requested the captain to take the vessel into the nearest port. The captain put back for Key West, and while on the way back, the ship struck on the part of the Florida reef knows as the Conch reef. Although the captain and crew remained on board two days, endeavouring to get the ship off, their efforts proved ineffectual, and ultimately she became filled with water, her decks blew up, and she sank. The captain and crew then proceeded to Key West. The inquiry was held for the purpose of ascertaining if there was any fault attributable to the captain. The inquiry was adjourned.


Wooden brig/schooner John Brooks, built Royden, Liverpool, 1831, yard no.14, 180 tons, owned Kendall, Liverpool, for service to S America, In MNL, ON 925, registered London 1849, owned Hilbery by 1865. In MNL to 1865. Voyage to Bonny, inward bound, aground and abandoned, 25 November 1863, later recovered and sold.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 28 April 1831]:
ASHLEY BROTHERS. ... For VALPARAISO, ARICA, ISLAY, and LIMA, The fine English-built and armed Brig DAWSON, Capt. Frank Dawson, 220 tons per register,....
Succeeds the above. The fine new Liverpool-built Brigantine JOHN BROOKS, 190 tons per register built expressly for the trade, and expected to sail remarkably fast.

[from Liverpool Daily Post - Tuesday 13 January 1863]
Bonny. Trade very dull. The fever has nearly disappeared from the river. The brig John Brooks, after crossing the bar on the 25th November (inward bound) went on shore the same afternoon on the eastern breakers, and was abandoned the same night by the captain and all the crew. She was picked up next day afloat, about ten miles to seaward, by Mr Ward, and brought into harbour at considerable personal risk, both on account of the natives and the distance she had drifted to sea. Although being the consignee of the vessel, he claims the privileges of a salvor. [a subsequent court case arose over whether the captain had gone ashore to seek assistance, or had abandoned the vessel, the vessel was sold at Bonny].

Wooden brig William Rushton, built Royden, Liverpool, 1832, yard no. 15; 183 tons, owned William Rushton, Liverpool. Trade to S America. Voyage Laguna, Mexico to Liverpool, with timber, sunk by collision with PS Minerva off east coast of Anglesey, 20 August 1850, only 4 of the crew survived, 7 lost.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 22 March 1832]:
Waiting a wind. For VALPARAISO, Intermedios, and LIMA, The fine new Liverpool-built Brig WILLIAM RUSHTON, John Strachan, Commander; Burthen per register 182 tons, coppered and copper fastened; expected to sail remarkably fast, and will be found a very superior conveyance. For terms of freight or passage apply GEO. HIGHFIELD, Drury-lane.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 26 August 1850]:
FATAL COLLISION AT SEA. On Tuesday morning a frightful collision took place between the steamer Minerva, plying between this port and Kingstown, and the brig William Rushton, the consequences of which are the loss of seven lives, and the total destruction of the William Rushton. The circumstance of the case are as follows:-
On Monday evening the Minerva left Liverpool at seven o'clock, in company with the Iron Duke, both vessels being bound for Kingstown. During the whole of the evening it blew very hard from W.S.W., and the Minerva, not being able to make much way, kept on the Welsh coast. About one o'clock the following morning [Tuesday 20 August 1850], when the Minerva was between Puffin Island and Point Lynas, a strange sail was descried close upon the steamer. The vessel proved to be the William Rushton, from Laguna, on the coast of Mexico, heavily laden with mahogany and a few parcels of a general cargo. As far as our information goes, the brig was not observed by the steamer until she was close upon her, the former showing no light. We have, on the other hand, been informed that the people on the brig saw the steamer's lights some ten minutes before the frightful collision which eventually occurred. Immediately on the brig being seen coming in the direction of the steamer, it was clear to all on board that a collision was inevitable, and, consequently, the engines were at once reversed, the helm put hard up, and everything done to mitigate the effects of a calamity which seemed inevitable. Only a few moments elapsed after the brig was first seen before the bowsprit of the steamer came in contact with her, striking her about amidships, and the collision was a very violent one, from the circumstance that the steamer was going at full speed, when she first saw the brig, and the engineer had, therefore, not time to reverse engines in time to prevent serious consequences.
As soon as Captain Hall, of the Minerva, saw what had happened, and that it was evident the brig would sink, he promptly ordered out the lifeboat of the Minerva, and, although he was remonstrated with by many of the passengers for doing so, on the ground that such a step was rash and useless, in consequence of the sea running so high at the time, he still persisted in sending the boat which succeeded in saving the lives of four persons on board the brig, namely, the captain, the cook, and two seamen. The remainder of the crew, which altogethr numbered eleven, were drowned. In about ten minutes after the collision the brig sank in deep water, and not a vestige of her was to be seen.
The lifeboat belonging to the steamer had the utmost difficulty in regaining the Minerva, as the sea was running so very high at the time. On examining the Minerva, Contain Hall found that her fore compartment was so stove in by the collision as to be completely filled with water, and the ship was considerably down by the head. He also found that she had lost her bowsprit, her foremast, and all the running gearing forward. Under these circumstances he deemed it prudent to run the steamer into Beaumaris, where he landed his passengers, the greater part of whom went on from Banger to Holyhead by the railway, and thence took the steamer to Kingstown.
Previous to leaving Beaumaris the passengers presented Captain Hall with the following flattering testimonial of their opinion of his seamanship under the trying circumstances in which they were placed, and in acknowledment of his intrepid conduct in endeavouring to save the lives of those on board the William Rushton:
"We, the passengers on board the Minerva, which left Liverpool on the 19th instant, at seven o'clock, p.m.. much as we regret the fatal collision which occurred between her and the brig William Rushton, cannot fail to record our sense of the gallant conduct of Captain John Henry Hall, who, though at imminent danger to his vessel, sent out his boat to render all the assistance to those in the unfortunate brig; and we further beg to record our high sense of the propriety and conduct of Captain Hall on this very trying occasion. (Signed,) Rd. Letre, Julius Delmege, William Chambers, Edward Garwood, James Leary, Samuel Corbishley, Charles M'Maher, John Mangay, Laurence Sanvige, H. D. Jenkins, William Mooney, William Burgess, H. Ebsworth, Henry Smith."
At Beaumaris Captain Hall, with all dispatch, got his vessel so far repaired as to enable him to bring her round to Liverpool, here to undergo a thorough renovating. She arrived on Wednesday evening, and was placed on the gridiron in the Prince's-basin. The vessel is stove in at the bow on the starboard side. At the time she was brought up the river she had fifteen feet of water in her front compartment, and was nearly four feet down at the head.
[In a later court case, the widow of a seaman, Doyle, who was drowned in the collision, was awarded £250 compensation, to be paid by the Dublin and Cork SP Company]


Wooden barque Mary Worrall, built Royden, Liverpool, 1832, yard no. 16; 238 grt, owned Worrall, Liverpool, registered Liverpool. LR 1835 has barque, 238 tons, built Liverpool 1832, owned Worrall, marked LOST. She sailed for Buenos Ayres, master Smith, and her arrival was reported in UK newspapers on 14 September 1835. There is then confusion - some papers quote Mary Worral, Herbert, an American vessel, as sailing from Monte Video, arriving Cork for orders, then lost on Oester Bank making for Antwerp. Some papers quote Mary Worrall, as lost on Island of Goree (this is off Dakar, Africa). Either way, she was lost in late 1835, and a new Mary Worrall, ON23911, was launched at Newport in August 1836.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 11 February 1833]:
In lieu of the Mary & ANN. A regular Trader, and will have quick despatch. For BUENOS AYRES, Direct, The fine A 1 Livernool-built barque MARY WORRALL, David Smith, Master; (Who is well ac?uaiuled with the navigation of the River Plate.) Burthen 237 tons, now on her second voyage, sails remarkably fast, having made her last passage to Buenos Ayres in 56 days; her cabins are fitted up in a superior style for the accommodation of passengers: lying in the Prince's Dock. For freight or passage, apply to ASHLEY BROTHERS.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 03 April 1835]:
For BUENOS AYRES direct, the well-known A 1 Barque MARY WORRALL, David Smith, Master, Liverpool-built, expressly for this trade; burthen - 237 tons, has very superior accommodations for pasaengers; lying in Georges Dock. For freight or passage apply to ASHLEY BROTHERS.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 14 September 1835]:
Buenos Ayres, Mary Worrall, Smith, from Liverpool [Arrived in 57 days]

[from Liverpool Albion - Tuesday 12 January 1836]:
Mary Worrall, Herbert [sic], from the River Plate to Antwerp, was lost on the Island of Goree pevious to 31st Dec. Crew saved.

[from Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser - Saturday 09 January 1836]:
Amsterdam Jan 1. The American [sic] ship, Mary Worrall, Herbert, from Monte Video for Antwerp, is the ship lost upon the Oester Bank, crew all saved. [Oester Bank is presumably Oestergrond - Oyster Ground, in southern North Sea]


Wooden brig Frederick Huth, built Royden, Liverpool, 1832, yard no. 17; 209 grt, owned Tyrer Liverpool and registered Liverpool. LR has built 1833. By 1838 owned Billingsly, London. ON 16972. By 1853 registered Cape Town. By 1860 London. By 1865 registered Sunderland. In MNL to 1867. More history. Voyage Sunderland to Hamburg, leaky and foundered at sea, near Juist, crew rescued by fishing boats, 21 November 1867.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 25 February 1833]:
For VALPARAISO, ARICA, ISLAY & LIMA, The fine new Liverpool-built armed Brigantine FREDERICK HUTH; Captain W. S. Turner, (Who is well acquainted round the Horn). 200 tons per register, coppered and copper-fastened. expected to sail remarkably fast, being built expressly for the trade, of the best materials and under inspection of the owners. For freight or passage, her accommodations being superior, apply on board, west side King's Dock; to Mr. GEORRGE KENDALL, or to W. & J. TYRER.

[from Shields Daily News - Saturday 23 November 1867]:
The brig Frederick Huth, Chisholm, from Sunderland for Hamburg, is stranded near Juist; seven men saved by the wherry boat. [Juist is a Friesian Island]

[from Shields Daily News - Tuesday 03 December 1867]:
FOUNDERING OF A VESSEL AT SEA. To-day, the steamer Sentinel arrived in the Tyne from Hamburg, having on board the captain and six of the crew of the brig Frederick Huth, of and from Sunderland for Hamburg. She sprung a leak at sea on the 21st of November, and the crew, after taking to their boats, were picked up by Hamburg fishermen. They were afterwards sent on board Sentinel to come home, they belonging to this locality.


<-- LR1835 T S R tapley 314 Lpl33 W Tapley livCalc

[from London and China Telegraph - Monday 04 November 1889]:
HONG KONG, Nov. 4. British barque Hattie E Tapley, from Sandakan, cargo, timber, ashore; will probably be a total wreck. -->

Wooden ship Tapley, built Royden, Liverpool, 1833, yard no. 18; 314 tons, owned Tapley, Liverpool, for trade to Calcutta. ON 26783. Lengthened 1850. In 1865, owned Tyson, Lancaster, 459 tons, registered Liverpool. For sale at Liverpool, July 1867, as a barque, sold foreign. More history.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 07 January 1833]:
SHIP LAUNCH. One of the finest vessels of her tonnage, to be called the Tapley, will be launched to-morrow, from the building-yard of Messrs. Thomas Royden and Co. west side Queen's Dock, intended for the East India trade.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Friday 22 March 1867]:
At Liverpool. The strong British-built Barque TAPLEY, 459 tons N.M., 412 tons register; length, 123 6-10 feet; breadth, 26 3-10 feet; depth, 17 feet; built Liverpool 1833, and classed A 1 twelve years; restored 1850 eight years, and has been thoroughly overhauled in graving dock since last voyage; large carrier, and has always been well kept up. Lying In the Birkenhead Dock. Apply to NEWETT and SON, Brokers for the Sale, Purchase, and Charter of Vessels, 12, Canning-place, Liverpool.


Wooden schooner Eliza Sanders, built Royden, Liverpool, 1834, yard no. 19; 144 tons, owned Sanders & Co, Liverpool. Registered Liverpool. Voyage Patras to Liverpool, with fruit, on fire 13 January 1850, off Saltee Islands, on fire and abandoned. Crew saved.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 21 August 1834]:
For CONSTANTINOPLE and SMYRNA, The fast-sailing new Schooner ELIZA SANDERS, A 1, Samuel Sanders, Commander; Burthen per register 150 tons; lying in the King's Dock. This vessel has very superior accommodations for passengers. For freight or passage, apply to WALKER and WILKIN, Union-buildingt. North John-street.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 22 January 1850]:
LOSS OF THE SCHOONER ELIZA SANDERS BY FIRE AT SEA. The American ship Ticonderoga, Captain Farren, arrived in the Mersey, on Saturday afternoon, bringing intelligence of the loss of the schooner Eliza Sanders, of and for this port, from Patras, laden with fruit. Captain Farren reports that on the 13th instant, in lat. 51 42, lon. 6 36, he observed the schooner with a signal of distress flying and immediately bore up to her. On nearing her, he was told by Captain Sanders, of the schooner, that his vessel was on fire in the hold, and that every exertion had been used to subdue it, but without success. It was blowing a gale from the northeast at the time, with every appearance of a continuance. Capt. Sanders deemed it advisable to abandon his vessel, and himself and crew, eight in number, were taken on board the Ticonderoga and landed here. We have not ascertained the origin of the fire. [some reports state one man drowned; Ticonderoga inbound from Mobile]


Wooden barque Ranger, built Royden, Liverpool, 1834, yard no. 20; 304 tons, 103.6 x 25.8 x 17.3 ft, ON 7058, owned Lawrence Heyworth & Co, Liverpool. ON 7058. Later owned by her master, Shepherd. Final voyage had new master, Swiney. Voyage Liverpool to Quebec, in ballast, ashore 19th August 1863, at Farrihy Bay, near Kilkee, crew saved, hull sold "as it lies".

Image from painting by Samuel Walters of Ranger in the Mersey [from Samuel Walters - A S Davidson]

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 16 December 1833]:
For VALPARAISO, Intermedios & LIMA, - The fine Liverpool-built Barque RANGER, Wm. Jelland, Master; Burthen per register 298 tons, coppered and copper-fastened, and a most superior conveyance for goods and passengers. For freight, &c. Apply to Messrs. G, F. Dickson & Co. ; Messrs. Pearce, Willacey & Co.; Messrs. Heyworth & Co. or to GEORGE HIGHFIELD.

[from Liverpool Daily Post - Friday 21 August 1863]:
The barque Ranger from Liverpool for Quebec in ballast, went on shore last night, near Kilkee Bay, and expected to become a total wreck, crew saved. [Capt Swiney, left Liverpool Aug 5, loss 19th August]

[from Munster News - Saturday 29 August 1863]:
THE BARQUE "RANGER" OF LIVERPOOL, ON MONDAY Next, the 31st AUGUST, P. COLEMAN has been instructed to Sell by Auction, on acount of whom it may concern, at FARRAHY, within two miles of Kilkee, on MONDAY, the 31st instant, The Hull of the Copper Fastened Barque "Ranger" of Liverpool, 340 tons registered, as she will then lie stranded on the rocks on the north side of Farrahy [sic, now Farrihy] Bay. ......


Wooden barque Argentina, built Royden, Liverpool, 1834, yard no. 21; 245 tons, ON 40115, owned Dowie & Co., for trade to Buenos Ayres. Registered Liverpool. By 1858, owned Nickels & co. Voyage Cardenas to Greenock with sugar, wrecked at Carysfort Reef, Florida, [east of Key Largo] 16 August 1861, 5 lost, 7 saved.

Image from painting by Samuel Walters of Argentina off Anglesey [from Samuel Walters - A S Davidson]

[from Liverpool Albion - Tuesday 05 August 1834]:
On Thursday next, at twelve o'clock, two new vessels will be launched from the shipbuilding yard of Messrs. Thomas Royden and Co., Baffin-street, west side Queen's Dock.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 11 March 1858]:
For CARDENAS. Direct. The Liverpool-built Barque ARGENTINA. Captain H. Bubaer, Burthen 248 tons, classed * A 1 in red, and coppered; lying in Salthouse Dock. Apply to J. T. NICKELS.

[from [Liverpool Albion - Monday 11 August 1834]:
LAUNCHES. On Thursday was launched, from the building-yard of Messrs. Thos. Royden and Co., a very beautiful vessel of 245 tons per register, called the Argentina, - to be commanded by Captain Stephen Wright Kelso, and intended as a regular packet between this port and Buenos Ayres. The vessel is owned by Messrs. K. Dowie and Co., merchants, of this town.

[from Greenock Telegraph and Clyde Shipping Gazette - Saturday 21 September 1861]:
The barque Argentina, Bubear, from Cardenas, with a cargo of sugar for Messrs Pattens and Co. of this port, ran upon the Florida Reef near Carysfort Light, and as soon as striking broke up [16 August 1861, owned Nickels]. A terrible sea was running at the time and breaking with great violence about the vessel. At eight o'clock, one hour after she struck, the first mate, Thomas Jones, was washed from the wreck and lost. Early in the morning William Hubbard and William Kearney, seamen, were swept from the wreck and drowned. Soon after Alexander Guild was overwhelmed by a wave and disappeared. At 11 clock a.mn. of Friday, Captain Henry Bubear, who was at the time clinging to the topsail, was overtaken by a wave and swept from the wreck and disappeared at once from the sight of the survivors. He was seen by the keeper of Carysfort Light, who could not render him any aid on account of the violence of the storm. At 12 the poop was separated from the hull and upon it the following officers and seamen drifted off:- James Carter, second mate; Thos. Judge, carpenter; R. A. Belford, cook; Richard Scott, Isaac Bennett, S. A. Strum, Thomas Burns, seaman. The poop drifted down the reef and came in towards the Carysfort Lighthouse, when they were rescued by the keeper, John Jones, and his assistants, who launched their boat, and at great personal risk rowed through the breakers and conveyed the shipwrecked mariners to the lighthouse. From thence they had been taken to Key West and placed under the care of the British Consul.


Wooden brig Agnes, built Royden, Liverpool, 1834, yard no. 22; 214 tons, owned William Rose, Liverpool. Later owned Butters, Liverpool, as a barque, ON5424, in MNL to 1864 registered Glasgow, owned Kinloch, as a brig, for trade to St Vincent. Voyage from the Clyde, master Stewart, for St Vincent; on 19th March 1859, off Tuskar, she was struck by PS Persia and sunk, one passenger was lost.
Note possible confusion with brig Agnes, 242 tons, of Port Glasgow, ON 39099, built 1856 in PEI, lost March 1864.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 07 March 1834]:
Warranted first Vessel. Under contract to clear for sea on 14th instant. For HAVANA and MATANZAS, the fine new Barque AGNES, J. DEMPSEY, Master; Liverpool-built, register 208 tons, and expected to sail fast. For freight or passage apply to Mr. JOHN WRIGHT, Jun.; Messrs. TENNANTS, MOORE, and Co.; or to KERS, IMRIE, and TOMLINSON.

Agnes, Stewart, from Troon to St Vincent. sailed 27 Feb 1859

[from Greenock Advertiser - Saturday 26 March 1859]:
LOSS of the BRIG AGNES - Further Particulars. - The brig Agnes, of Glasgow. Captain Stewart, on her passage from Troon to St Vincent, was run into on Saturday night last, about 10 o'clock, off Tuskar, by the Cunard steamer Persia, on her outward voyage from Liverpool to New York. Both vessels being steering in the same course, the Persia struck the brig aft of the main rigging, carrying away a large portion of her side. She sunk in about ten minutes. The crew and passengers were, with the exception of one passenger, saved by a boat from the Persia. The exception referred to was a young man named John Miller belonging to Troon, who was going out to be a planter at St. Vincent. He was an amiable, well-conducted youth, and his loss is much regretted. None on board of the ill-fated craft saved anything but what they had on their persons; and some of them were rescued in their night clothes. Early Sunday morning the Persia signalled the steamer Canada on her homeward voyage to Liverpool; and the crew and passengers of the Agnes were put on board of her and landed at Liverpool the same night. The passengers on board the Canada very kindly subscribed the sum of £75 for their relief. The vessel and cargo were insured. Her principal owner was Mr Kinloch, of Ayr. The captain and greater part of the crew belonged to Ayr.
The following letter, vividly describing the catastrophe, has been received in town from one of the passengers, Mr John Kirkland, lately clerk to Mr A. B. Telfer, and son of Mr Thos. Kirkland, formerly seedsman, Ayr.
We left Belfast Loch Friday afternoon, with a fine fair breeze, sailing at the rate of from 7 to 8 knots per hour. Such a splendid night at sea as that was, the moon shining in all her splendour, together with a beautiful calm sea, made us all feel so happy, in the expectation of proceeding on our voyage after our long detention. On the morning of Saturday, the wind was contrary and the tide against us, so that we proceeded but slowly on our voyage. Although we had moonlight that night, it was not so clear as the preceding night. Mr Miller and I went to bed at 9 clock. He was in bed about ten minutes before I was; and, strange to say, we never spoke to each other after getting into our room, as was generally, or rather invariably, the case. He and I were writing the day's proceedings in our log books at the same time; and what was said between us then I cannot remember. All that is saved of his is a pocket-book and another book. Poor fellow! he met with an untimely end. The steamer Persia - or rather her crew - saw our vessel's lights about an hour before she struck us; and our steward says that their lights were not visible till about ten minutes before they ran into us. All whom I have heard speaking of the occurrence say it was an act of gross carelessness on the part of the commander of the steamer. It is said of him that he would scarcely go out of his course for a vessel, but would rather go through her. Of course, when the steamer struck I was asleep, and so sound that I never woke till I was away a good distance from the ship. When I did wake up, I could not bring my mind to any bearing, thinking that it was all a dream. But [ soon found that it was stern reality. The whole of the side of the cabin on which my berth was, was smashed to pieces and carried out into the sea. I thought I would never reach the surface of the water; but I got hold of some pieces of the wreck, and I pulled myself up to the surface. After getting there, I was so feeble that I could scarcely retain my hold, and had I not got a firmer hold, the next wave would have swept me away; but, through the superintendence of the All-seeing One, I was soon removed from my dangerous situation. I think I would be almost ten minutes or a quarter of hour in the water; and the whole of that time I never ceased crying for assistance till the Persia's boat picked me up. When I got my head above water, I was right abreast of the steamer, and would be about 100 or 150 yards distant from the brig. About that time the part of the wreck to which I was sticking floated away down from the steamer towards the brig, and, if I mind rightly, I went round her, still holding on the wreck. On hearing me crying out so desperately, one of the passengers threw a rope, but it fell far short of me, which was a fortunate thing; for if I had I got hold of it, in all likelihood we would have been lost - that is to say if he had held on. The carpenter was at the wheel at the time the brig struck, and with the shock was sent into the sea. A life-preserver was thrown out to him, which he got a hold of, and was enabled to keep himself afloat till he as picked up by the Persia's boat. He was rowing one of the oars of the boat which picked me up; and had he not exerted himself more might have been lost than what was. After they got me into the boat, the fellow who was in charge of it was going to pull to windward of the brig; but the carpenter besought them to pull the nearest way to her, which they did; and had they been two minutes later, it would have been a bad job for those who were on board the brig; for the last passenger who came out of her into the small boat said that the bulwarks were just on a line with the water's edge. When the captain was coming into the boat, the men who were pulling were not going to allow him, saying there was no danger - she all the time going down as fast as she could; and by the time we got board the Persia, not a vestige of her was to be seen. When the steamer was sticking in the brig, the men mounted the rigging and got on board the steamer. The captain was onboard too; but he went back again into the brig to see that all got safe out. The second mate was the only one who was bruised. He was asleep at the time of the collision, and awaking found a great weight upon the top of him, so that he could scarcely get himself extricated from the wreck. He is able to walk about, and can take his food well enough only he is stiff. The men are all in the Sailor's Home, and are going to Ayr with the Emerald tomorrow. The Persia was bound for New York; and, after we had been on board of her all night, the Sabbath morning they hailed the Canada steamship, belonging to the same company, and put us onboard of her, where we experienced every attention and kindness. The passengers raised a subscription, and divided it amongst us. The above statement is an imperfect one but I have not time at present to write any more.
The carpenter referred to above is John M'Skimming, a native of Newton-on-Ayr.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 28 March 1859]:
MONDAY. March 21. Canada (s), Lang, from Boston, at this port. .... On the 20th, off Minehead, passed the Persia, (s) hence for New York and took from her the crew and passengers of the brig Agnes, of Glasgow, from Troon for St. Vincent, which sank after collision with the Persia, on the 19th.


Wooden barque Isabella, built Royden, Liverpool, 1835, yard no. 23, 229 tons; ON 25063, registered Liverpool, owned Worrall, Liverpool. In MNL to 1872, owned Liverpool, then owned Gambles, Workington 1868-72. For sale 1872, reported sold foreign.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 30 March 1835]:
First vessel after the Mary Worrall. For BUENOS AYRES. The fine new Liverpool-built barque, ISABELLA, Captain Samuel Herbert, A 1, 200 tons per register, built expressly for this trade, and expected to sail fast. For terms of freight or passage, having good accommodations, apply to W & J TYRER.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Wednesday 03 July 1872]:
FOR SALE, The useful British-built Barque ISABELLA, 229 tons per register. Built at Liverpool in 1835 and then classed twelve years A 1 at Lloyd's, and restored in 1852 for eight years A 1; classed eight years A 1 in red from 1864, and now appears classed A 1 2 in American books; is sheathed with yellow metal, requires very little ballast to shift, carries 300 tons dead-weight cargo, is well found in stores, and quite ready for immediate employment. Dimenions:- Length, 93 feet; breadth, 23 feet; depth, 15 feet. Lying in King's Dock. For inventories and further particulars apply to TONGE & Co., Brokers, Commercial-court, 17, Water-street.


Wooden barque Hermes, built Royden, Liverpool, 1835, yard no. 24; owned Tayleur & Co., Liverpool.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 28 January 1836]:
For ARICA, ISLAY, and LIMA, The fine new Barque HERMES, -, Master; A 1. 241 tons per register; coppered and copper-fastened, expected to sail fast, and in every respect a first-rate conveyance. For terms freight or passage, having excellent accommodations, apply Messrs. Charles Tayleur, Sons and Co. or to James Aikin.


Wooden cutter Earl of Liverpool, built Royden, Liverpool, 1835, yard no. 25; ON 1629. Pilot boat no. 3. 50.2 x 16.1 x 8.4 ft, 54grt, sold 1851 to Hatton & Cookson, Liverpool. For sale 1886. In MNL to 1890, owned Ness, Bootle, Liverpool, and registered Liverpool, smack, 44 tons, though listed as built Liverpool 1798 [sic]. Here there is confusion since a pilot vessel Earl of Liverpool was built in 1798 and was for sale in 1835 when the new vessel of the same name entered service.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Saturday 10 July 1886]:
FOR SALE, The Smack Earl of Liverpool, 44 tons register. Built at Liverpool of English and African oak; had new decks three years ago; carries 60 to 70 tons, and requires no ballast in dock: has about 35 tons copper dross and iron on board. Dimensions: Length, 49.6 feet; breadth, 16.2 feet. Lying in the Stanley Dock, Liverpool.


Wooden cutter Town of Liverpool, built Royden, Liverpool, 1835, yard no. 26; ON 17995, Pilot boat no. 10, 53 x 16.2 x 8.7 ft, 57 grt, ON 17995, sold from pilot service in 1854. Owned Scotland - registered Inverness in 1857, for sale 1862 (described as a smack), by 1865 registered Banff, owned Macduff, in MNL to 1876. Driven ashore at Portessie [east of Buckie] on 19 November 1875 and wrecked, master Kenneth Gordon and crew saved.

Image, from a painting by Samuel Walters, of Sandbach picking up a pilot off Great Orme from Pilot Boat no.10, Town of Liverpool.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Saturday 24 May 1862]:
Smack for Sale. There will exposed for Sale, by Public Roup, in the HARBOUR Of ROTHESAY, On FRIDAY, MAY 30, 1861, at Two o'clock in the Afternoon: THE TOWN OF LIVERPOOL, of 36.46 tons register, as she at present lies in Mr. M'Lea's Building Yard, Rothesay, with sails, rigging, chains, boat, and whole appurtenances. She is in excellent condition, having undergone a thorough repair. She was originally a Liverpool pilot boat, and is suitable for coasting or any other trade, being entirely built of English oak, and thoroughly copper-fastened. The Smack may seen and examined at the Building Yard of Mr. Robert M'Lea. Conditions of sale will be learned on applying to Mr. WILLIAM HERBERT, Writer, Rothesay.

[from Aberdeen Press and Journal - Wednesday 24 November 1875]:
Storm of Friday 19 November... The smack Town of Liverpool, of Macduff, Kenneth Gordon, master, went ashore at Portessie, and is likely to become a wreck. The crew were saved.

[from Canmore]:
19 November 1875, TOWN OF LIVERPOOL, 40 yrs old, of Banff, wooden smack, 36 tons, 3 crew, Master and Owner K. Gordon, Macduff, departed Middlesborough for Macduff carrying coal, wind NE11, stranded 2.5 miles E. of Buckie, Banffshire.
Buckie, 19th Nov., 7.57 p.m., the TOWN OF LIVERPOOL (sloop) (No. 17,995), is ashore at Strathline, and likely to be a total wreck: she is a vessel of 36 tons, bound from Stockton, with coal.

[from Lloyd's List - Thursday 02 December 1875]:
Town of Liverpool (smack) of Banff, Middlesborough to Macduff, deposition of K Gordon, master.


Wooden barque Jane, built Royden, Liverpool, 1836, yard no. 27;


Wooden ship John Bull, built Royden, Liverpool, 1838, yard no. 28; ON 1379

[from Liverpool Albion - Tuesday 06 February 1838]:
Launches. On Saturday week a very fine steam vessel, of 550 tons, called the Reindeer, was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. T. and W. Wilson, of this town. She belongs to Messrs. Langtrys and Co., and is intended for the Belfast and Liverpool station.
A very splendid ship, of 600 tons register, intended for the China trade, was launched from Mr. Royden's yard, Queen's Dock, on Monday last, at one o'clock, and was christened the John Bull.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 08 October 1838]:
LAUNCHES. On Thursday last, at eleven o'clock, a fine vessel was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Jackson and Co., Herculaneum Dock; another, from the building-yard of Messrs. Royden and Co. Queen's Dock; and a third, from a yard at Birkenhead, on the Cheshire side of the Mersey. The iron ship, which is completing in the yard of Messrs. Jackson and Co., will be launched in a week or two.

Wooden barque Abbots Reading, built Royden, Liverpool, 1838, yard no. 31; ON 1500


Wooden barque Creamore, built Royden, Liverpool, 1839, yard no. 32; ON24182


Wooden ship Devon, built Royden, Liverpool, 1840, yard no. 33;


Wooden barque Seagull, built Royden, Liverpool, 1840, yard no. 34;


Wooden barque Chimbrazo, built Royden, Liverpool, 1841, yard no. 35; ON 1730


Wooden barquentine James Graham, built Royden, Liverpool, 1841, yard no. 36;


Wooden pilot vessel Perseverance, built Royden, Liverpool, 1842, yard no.37, 47grt, 51.12 x 14.2 x 9.6 feet, Pilot Boat no. 12, service to 1860. Possibly ON 1856, in MNL to 1864, registered Liverpool.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 08 May 1860]:
TO BE SOLD. The PERSEVERANCE, Liverpool Pilot Boat. No. 12, deliverable about the end of July, 46 25-100ths tons register; coppered and copper-fastened; built in Liverpool in the year 1843, of the very best materials, and in every way a very desirable vessel, being well adapted for the coasting trade or a fishing smack. Apply .. to THOS. HAMPSON, [sailed for Aberdeen, December 1860, calling at Stornoway from adverse weather]

Wooden vessel The Duke, built Royden, Liverpool, 1843, yard no.38, 765 tons, ON15028. Owned Royden. More history 01/1867 wrecked on North reef, Barbuda on passage Cardiff for Kingston, Jamaica with coal.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 20 January 1843]:
SHIP LAUNCH. - On Wednesday last, at noon, a splendid new vessel called the British Hero, was launched from the building yard of Mr. Thomas Royden, Queen's Dock. She is a fine specimen of naval architecture, and has accommodation equal, if not superior, to any heretofore built in this port. She will register 765 tons is intended for the Eastern trade, and will be commanded by Captain J. F. Bisset.

Wooden vessel Joshua Waddington, built Royden, Liverpool, 1843, yard no. 39; 440tons, ON24394. Owned Cotesworth & Wynne. More history 13/07/1860: Lost in the Carimata Passage, Indonesia. On a voyage from Singapore to Liverpool.

Wooden vessel Barkhill, built Royden, Liverpool, 1845, yard no. 41; ON25787. More history.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 22 August 1845 ]:
A brig, called the Barkhill, of 181 tons, the property of Messrs. Job Brothers, was launched last week from the ship-building yard of Mr. T. Royden, in Baffin-street.

Wooden vessel Lima, built Royden, Liverpool, 1845, yard no. 42; 132 tons, owned Job Bros., Liverpool, More hstory

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 29 April 1845]:
LAUNCH OF THE "LIMA". On Thursday last, there was launched from the yard of Mr. Royden, Baffin-street, a fine merchantile vessel of this name. Though she was of small burthen, compared with the gigantic projects in naval architecture of late years developed in the larger seaports of the empire, the celebrity of Mr. Royden as a skilful and faithful builder, and the extreme fineness of the weather, attracted a considerable number of respectable persons to the spot. The Lima is in length of keel 79 feet 6 inches ; her breadth 19 feet 9 inches; her depth amidships 12 feet 2 inches; her burthen by New Measurement 132 43-100ths, and by O. M. 140 33-94ths. While high and dry she looked remarkably promising for a trader, having just sufficient body for good stowage, with considerable rise of floor, and a fine entrance and clear run. Her upper works displayed a degree of finish rarely to be found in vessels of her class, and we remarked an elegant and chaste wreath on each side of her stem, (which has a billet-head), and another on her stern; beneath the last of which was the arms of the owner, also in alto relief - the whole executed with great taste by our townsman Mr. Andrew Allen. At a few minutes past twelve o'clock, the daggers were struck down; her name was gracefully, given from the platform a-head, by Miss Job, daughter of Messrs. Job, Brothers, the owners, and she dashed down the ways into the river in magnificent style. We should state, as somewhat extraordinary, that she was rigged, at the time, as a brigantine - that is, a brig forward and a schooner aft. Her masts appeared to be judiciously placed well together near the centre of gravity; and when afloat she showed a buoyancy, sharpness, and elegance of appearance in her lines, upper-works, and rig, giving her a strong resemblance to a yacht. The Lima is, we learn, intended for the trade between our colony of Newfoundland and the Brazils. She is built of the best materials, and will rank amongst the first British bottoms at Lloyds. The company assembled were highly gratified by witnessing the launch, which was managed in a masterly manner. Mr. Royden, we may add, has on the stocks two other fine, and much larger vessels, already approaching towards completion.

Wooden vessel Mary Woods, built Royden, Liverpool, 1846, yard no. 43; ON10577.


Wooden pilot vessel Albert Edward Prince of Wales, built Royden, Liverpool, 1846, yard no.44, 42.5grt, 51.5 x 14.4 x 8.6 feet, ON 2387, Pilot Boat no. 8, owned Cape Town 1875, described as a cutter, owned Colonial Government, reported wrecked Buffalo River, 23 January 1882.

Wooden vessel Seraphina, built Royden, Liverpool, 1846, yard no. 45; ON1150.

Wooden vessel Countess of Sefton, built Royden, Liverpool, 1847, yard no. 46; ON26012.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 19 February 1847]:
LAUNCH OF THE "COUNTESS OF SEFTON". Yesterday, at tide time, a fine new ship, called the Countess of Sefton, was launched from the yard of Mr. Thomas Royden, Baffin-street. She was built by Mr. Royden, expressly for himself, but he has since been induced to part with her to Messrs. John Worrall and Co., who intend her for the South American trade, for which, from ber size and build, she is peculiarly well adapted. She is 445 tons burthen, 114 feet long, 26 feet eight inches in breadth, and 18 feet six inches in depth, and is built, from an excellent model, of the best English and African oak, and East Indian teak. The bow of the vessel is ornamented by a splendid full-length female figure. ...


Wooden pilot vessel Mersey, built Royden Liverpool, 1847, yard no.47, 47grt, 55.7 x 14.6 x 8.7 feet, ON 6019, Pilot Boat no.11, served to 1875, sold to Scalloway, Shetland, as a sloop, registered Lerwick, broken up 1909.

Wooden vessel Lancastrian, built Royden, Liverpool, 1849, yard no. 49;


Wooden pilot vessel Auspicious, built Royden Liverpool, 1849, yard no.50, 49.5 grt, 60.5 x 14.7 x 9.2 feet, ON 6015, Pilot Boat no. 4, served to 1878. Later registered Youghal 1880, then Cork from 1881-93, as a sloop, owned London.

Wooden vessel Geraldine, built Royden, Liverpool, 1850, yard no. 51; ON7087.

Wooden vessel Ismyr, built Royden, Liverpool, 1850, yard no. 52; ON27052.

Wooden vessel Annie Worrall, built Royden, Liverpool, 1850, yard no. 53; ON6032.

Wooden vessel Trojan, built Royden, Liverpool, 1851, yard no. 54; ON11935.

Wooden vessel Thomas Royden, built Royden, Liverpool, 1852, yard no. 56; ON15073.

Wooden vessel Rosamond, built Royden, Liverpool, 1852, yard no. 57; ON1422.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 09 April 1852]:
... Another launch took place on Tuesday, from Messrs. Royden and Son's yard. Baffin-street. This was a clipper ship, called the Rosamond, of 375 tons burthen, intended for the Brazilian trade. Her owners are Messrs. Sansuel Johnson and Co.

Wooden vessel Chilena, built Royden, Liverpool, 1854, yard no. 59; ON14784.

Wooden vessel Netherton, built Royden, Liverpool, 1855, yard no. 60; ON25908.

Wooden vessel Anne Royden, built Royden, Liverpool, 1856, yard no. 61; OB13581.

Wooden vessel Frankby, built Royden, Liverpool, 1857, yard no. 62; ON20457.

Wooden vessel Chili, built Royden, Liverpool, 1858, yard no. 63; ON12320.

Wooden clipper ship Sir John Lawrence, built Royden, Liverpool, 1858, yard no.64, ON27139, owned Farnworth & Jardine, Liverpool, for trade to India. Owned Royden by 1865, and sold 1884 to Roed, Tonsberg, Norway. Foundered 1904 in Kristiana Fjord.

Image from painting by Samuel Walters of Sir John Lawrence off the Great Orme [from Samuel Walters - A S Davidson]


Wooden vessel Japanese, built Royden, Liverpool, 1859, yard no. 65; ON27645.

Wooden vessel Our Queen, built Royden, Liverpool, 1860, yard no. 66; ON28618.

Wooden vessel La Zingara, built Royden, Liverpool, 1860, yard no. 67; ON29144.




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Thomas Vernon, Liverpool, later Birkenhead. All iron. (Steam vessels)
Tobin Lightship 1850
Philosopher SV 1857
Slieve Donard SV 1859
Astronomer SV 1860
Sarah & Emma SV 1860


Iron light-ship Tobin, built Vernon, Liverpool, 1850, 171grt, 99.2 x 21.3 ft, ON 78822, owned MDHB to 1894, first registered Liverpool 1878. Owned North British Railway Co as Solway Lightship from 1895 to 1920. In 1921 owned Abel, Liverpool, by 1923, named Garsdale, used as a barge. Sunk 1930. Registry closed 1931 - but in MNL to 1947 - when 97 years old. More history

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 01 November 1850]:
Dock Committee.... The chairman said that the new iron light-ship, built by Messrs. T. Vernon and Co., would be launched on Wednesday next, and he wished to know by what name it should be called. Several names were suggested, but it was ultimately agreed that "The Tobin" would be most appropriate. The decision caused much laughter, in which the worthy member whose name had been so honourably associated with the light-ship heartily joined.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 02 December 1850]:
LAUNCH OF A NEW LIGHTSHIP. The new iron lightship, called The Tobin, was launched, on Saturday week, from the building-yard of Messrs. T. Vernon and Son, Brunswick Dock. She is intended for the northwest station. Several of the members of the Dock Committee were present on the occasion. The following are the dimensions of the vessel: Length, 98 feet; beam, 21 feet; and depth of hold, 11.5 feet. Her draught of water will be about 9 feet, and her register about 200 tons. She is built of iron, in four compartments, and is provided with a number of iron tanks for water, oil, &c. After the launch, the vessel was taken in tow by a steamer and placed in the Toxteth Dock, to receive her masts, lanterns, &c. She will be ready to take her station in about a fortnight.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Friday 29 June 1894]:
MDHB: ... and to accept an offer from the engineer of the North British Railway Company to purchase from the board the disused lightship Tobin.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Saturday 11 May 1912]:
Glasson Dock: Tobin (lightship) 171 Irving, North British Railway Co.

Image of Solway Lightship, built 1858 [sic].

[from Wigton Advertiser - Saturday 28 September 1918]:
Silloth Lightship Adrift. On Sunday distress signals were heard at sea, and it was seen that the Solway lightship had broken away from her moorings. The tug Petrel, in charge of Captain Chisholm, went out to give assistance, but found on reaching the boat that the crew had been extricated from their difficulties by the Maryport lifeboat. The lightship, however, continued to drift, and is now lying on the sandbank opposite the Convalescent Institution. The crew of the lightship are no worse for their experiences.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Thursday 17 June 1920]:
Canning Dock: Tobin (Solway Lightship) 171 - R Abel & Son.

[from Liverpool Echo - Thursday 18 December 1930]:
NEARLY CUT IN TWO. COLLAPSE AFTER RESCUE IN MERSEY. Graphic stories of the night disaster on the river Mersey when, after a collision, the captain and mate of a barge had a narrow escape from being sucked under by their sinking vessel, were told the Echo today. The men are Richard Johnson (38) captain of the barge, 8, Sefton-road Linacre-lane, Orrell, and the mate, Leonard Kenwright, 15, Howarth-street, Runcorn. Their barge, Garsdale, which was sunk after a collision with the oil tanker British Tommy (1411 tons), of Swansea, is owned by Messrs. Abel, of Liverpool.
CAPTAIN'S STORY. Skipper Johnson was taken to the Southern Hospital after the collision, with severe cuts and bruises to his head. He is considerably better to-day, and was quite ready to tell his story. We had left, Langton Dock with a cargo of coal [another report says grain from Canada Dock] for Ellesmere Port, he said, and were being drawn by a tug, the Aviator. There was a thick fog hanging about. Behind us, attached by a tow-rope, was a smaller barge, also with a crew of two. When we were almost abreast of Prince's Landing-stage we heard the siren of a steamer. The captain of the tug veered round so that the steamer should have room, but suddenly we sighted her close upon us and she struck us amidships, and seemed almost to cut us in two. The Garsdale seemed to break before she sank. My mate and I were standing aft, trying to keep a good look-out in the fog, otherwise we would not have escaped as we did. We were both thrown off our feet by the impact, but we scrambled up again just as the barge started to heel over and sink.
SANK IN THREE MINUTES. She sank in about three minutes. and if the men on the barge behind had not been quick she would have taken their craft with her. We were taken aboard the Aviator in the nick of time, and then for the first time I realised there was lot of blood from my head. I went dizzy, and I suppose I must have collapsed. So dense was the fog that nothing was known of the collision until the captain of the tanker brought his vessel to the landing-stage. After examination she was able to proceed. [Barge later lifted and put on Tranmere beach]

Iron ship Philosopher, built Vernon. Liverpool, 1857, ON 14686, 1059grt, 189 x 35 ft, owned Harrison, Liverpool. More history. 26/09/1879 wrecked in the mouth of the Daya River near Puri, Orissa on passage Calcutta for Boston, Massachusetts.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Thursday 02 October 1879]:
CALCUTTA - Sept. 30: A report received from the captain states that the Philosopher, bound hence for Boston, was wrecked at Pooree [sic, now Puri] on the 26th instant; further particulars will be sent as soon as obtained.
[a telegram received by the owners, dated Calcutta, Oct. 1. says:- "Evans reports from Pooree, Philosopher lost; witness asks assistance for saving part ship and cargo; Lloyd's surveyor, with Sargent, proceed to-morrow with tug."]

[from Liverpool Echo - Tuesday 04 November 1879]:
LOSS OF A SHIP AND TWELVE LIVES. News has been received at Calcutta confirming the report of the loss the ship Philosopher off Pooree. Out of a crew of twenty-seven hands, all told, only fifteen are known to have been saved. The captain, his son, second mate, two apprentices, and ten of the crew make up this number, and of the twelve missing it is feared that the mate and at least seven others have been drowned. From the report of the captain of the Government steamer Undaunted, and Captain Sergent, of the ship Artist, who was sent down by the agents to the wreck, it seems that there is no hope of saving the vessel, and the wreck, as it lies, with the cargo, has been advertised for sale.

Iron ship Slieve Donard, built Vernon, Liverpool, 1859, ON 21473, 1569 grt, registered Belfast. By 1882 registered London as Oronsay. 25/01/1897 abandoned in 48.36N - 20.50W on passage Melbourne for London with a cargo including dynamite. More history.

[from Lloyd's List - Wednesday 03 February 1897]:
PORT PHILIP. Oronsay, Cook (21/9) London abandoned Jan 25, 48 36 N, 20 50 W, crew saved.

[from Lloyd's List - Tuesday 23 February 1897]:
OFFICIAL INQUIRY. THE ABANDONMENT OF THE ORONSAY. ... .. the abandonment of the sailing ship Oronsay, which occurred on Jan 25 last, in lat. 48 63 N, long. 20 50 W. The vessel was then on a voyage from Melbourne to London. She was owned by Messrs. James Sheppard and Co., of St. Mary Axe, E.C., Mr. Stutchbury being the managing owner. She was built of iron in 1859 at Liverpool. It was on Sept 20 1806 that she left Melbourne with a crew of 28 hands all told, with a cargo chiefly of wool. She had also on board 25 tons of explosive material called gelignite, which was very much the same as dynamite. It was stowed in a magazine which was constructed under the directions of the Inspector of Explosives at Melbourne. The gelignite was being returned to England. The vessel drew 19 feet 3 inches forward and 19 feet inches aft. The master had intended to pass through Bass Straits, but in consequence of the heavy weather he decided to make England via cape Horn. After she was five days out, on Sept. 28, bad weather was met with, and the jibsail split. The fore royal backstay chain-plate also carried away, but that was repaired. After that, until she rounded the Horn, continual bad weather was encountered, and considerable damage was done to various parts of the rigging. She rounded the Horn on Nov. 4, and the next day, when crossing Burdwood Bank, she was observed to roll a good deal. Nothing further seemed to have happened of any moment until she got into the trade winds on Dec. 13. On the 27th of that month, the upper main topsail split and was blown away. The wind was fresh and gusty. On the 31st a more serious accident happened - the main royal yard broke in two. On Jan. 1, the rigging was observed to be strained, and on the 11th some of it became loose in the fastenings. There was a heavy gale on Jan 19, as would be proved not only by the crew of the Oronsay, but by a witness from another vessel. She was under lower topsails and staysails. In that state of things the rudder broke, and on the same day the foretopmaststays give way. Measures were taken to repair the damage. On the 20th one of the chain-plates on the starboard main-rigging carried away, but the chains were afterwards secured by some means. All this time the carpenter was doing his best to repair the damage to the rudder. Nothing, however, could be done, and on the 22nd a juryrudder was fixed. The spar, however, on which they principally depended, became sprung, and was of no use. On the 24th the crew approached the master and asked to leave the vessel. It was believed that the mainmast, which was made of iron, might fall at any moment, and if it had fallen upon the dynamite there could be no doubt that it would have exploded. The crew on Jan. 25 were taken off by a passing vessel called the Port Douglas. When leaving the Oronsay the captain ordered her to be scuttled, so that she should not be a danger to navigation. He also had painted in large letters on either side of the vessel the word "Dynamite". The next day the Oronsay was sighted by the sailing vessel Annasona, but on a boat being sent to her, the officer in charge, on seeing the word "Dynamite," rowed back as quickly as possible to his own ship. That was the last thing seen of the Oronsay. ...

Iron ship Astronomer, built Vernon. Liverpool, 1860, ON 28181, 1119 grt, owned Harrison, Liverpool. In MNL to 1886. More history. 21/03/1886 wrecked on Pole Rock in Freshwater Bay, Pembrokeshire on passage Port Pirie for Dublin with wheat.

[from Shields Daily Gazette - Monday 22 March 1886]:
FEARED TOTAL LOSS OF A STEAMER. A Lloyd's telegram from Milford Haven this morning, says: The Astronomer (s) [sic, barque], from Australia for Dublin, has stranded fair and upright on the outward end of Poole rocks, Freshwater Bay. Part of her lower stem is completely gone, and about seven feet of the keel. She is apparently bilged on both sides. It is feared the ship's bottom will give way, and if so the tide will be level with the vessel's deck. The ship and cargo probably total wreck, as she is lying in a bad place.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Monday 05 April 1886]:
At the Bathing House, near Linney Farm, Pembroke, South Wales. On Tuesday, the 6th instant, at Two o'clock, THE WRECK of the fine iron Barque ASTRONOMER, 1119 tons register, built at Liverpool, 1859, as she now lies, together with the sails, cordage, spars, anchors, chains, lifeboat, binnacle, &c, as lotted. Also, the cargo (Wheat) remaining on board, and washed ashore after date of sale, together with a quantity of Wheat loose and in sacks, already landed and lotted for sale....

Iron barque Sarah & Emma, built Vernon, Liverpool, 1860, ON 29137, 1160 grt, owned and registered Liverpool. By 1905 owned Genoa as Trento. More history.

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P Cato, Liverpool; and Peter Cato & James Miller. [some late vessels iron]. (Steam vessels)
List including sailing vessels [Cato]:
1839: Competitor; Pilgrim; Formby light vessel;
1840: Mysore;
1841: Bangalore;
1842: Velore; Unnamed;
1843: Lalla; George Canning (Pilot V); Fisher;
1845: Lahore;
1846: Liver (Pilot V);
1847: Diana;



Wooden barque Competitor, built Cato, Liverpool, 1839, 322 tons, owned Holderness, Liverpool. ON 27170. In MNL to 1863, registered Shields. More history. Voyage Cardiff to Cadiz with coal, explosion in Bay of Biscay, 17 Feb 1862, burnt and sank, 4 lost.

[from London Evening Standard - Thursday 20 March 1862]:
The British barque Competitor blew up; took fire, and sunk on the 7th ult. The master and two of the crew were killed by the explosion. The barque was bound from Cardiff to Cadiz with coals. [in the Bay of Biscay, master Radley]

[from Lloyd's List - Tuesday 18 March 1862]:
GIBRALTAR, 10th Mar. The master, his son and one man were killed by an explosion, on board the COMPETITOR, of Whitby, from Cardiff to Cadiz, which took fire 17th Feb. in lat. 46 N, lon. 10 W, and one man was drowned; rest of crew brought here.


Wooden barque Pilgrim, built Cato, Liverpool, 1839, 311 tons, owned Hatton, Liverpool, for trade to Sydney. ON 6114, 327 tons, registered London 1849, 347 tons, then Alloa; owned Kincardine, then Swansea. In MNL to 1868. Last reported voyage Liverpool to Demerara, returning September 1867, master M'Dougall. More history.

[from Liverpool Albion - Tuesday 10 September 1839]:
Launch. Tomorrow will be launched, from the building-yard of Mr. Peter Cato. west side of the Brunswick Dock, a fine new first-class twelve years ship, for Messrs. W. Affleck, Hatton, and Co., intended, we believe, for the China trade.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Tuesday 26 March 1867]:
Loading at Liverpool. Demerara. Pilgrim, M'Dougall. [Sandbach & Co]
Later report: Pilgrim M'Donald (sic) left Demerara 13 July.
Later report: 21 Sept. Pilgrim arr Liverpool, from Demerara


Wooden light-vessel, built Cato, Liverpool, 1839.

[from Liverpool Albion - Tuesday 19 November 1839]:
On Saturday next will be launched, from the building-yard of Mr. Peter Cato, west side Brunswick Dock, a fine strong-built vessel, intended as a Light-ship, on the Formby Station; she is supposed to be a superior model and well adapted for riding.


Wooden barque Mysore, buuilt Cato, Liverpool, 1840, 278 tons, owned Chapman & Willis, Liverpool, ON 18902. By 1854, registered Milford, later Sunderland. More history. 30/11/1867: Struck on Hasborough Sands [sic, Haisborough], came off and sank. On a voyage from Spain to Aberdeen with general cargo.

[from Shields Daily News - Tuesday 03 December 1867]:
The barque Mysore, Calienan, of Sunderland, from Spain for Aberdeen (general cargo), got on Hasborough sands in the fog about midnight on Friday, came off after striking heavily, and sunk in deep water. The crew took to their boats, and after several hours were picked up by the smack Anemone, of Harwich, and landed at Cromer at 6 o'clock last evening.


Wooden ship Bangalore, built Cato, Liverpool, 1841, 456 nrt, owned Chapman & Willis, Liverpool, later rigged as barque. ON 22755. More history.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 09 February 1841]:
LAUNCH. Yesterday, at about a quarter past twelve, a fine ship, "the Bengalore" [sic], belonging to Messrs. Chapman and Willis, was launched from the building-yard of Mr. Cato, west side of the Brunswick Dock. Notwithstanding the extreme coldness of the day, the scaffoldings, and the yard generally, were crowded with spectators, amongst whom were many ladies and gentlemen of the highest respectability. The ship, as seen from the stocks, excited universal attention and admiration. She is, in truth, one of the finest vessels ever brought out of this port. In materials, she is what in technical phrase is called "a twelve years ship"; in other words, her timber is "heart of oak", which has been seasoned for that period. The model of the Bengalore is everything that a nautical man can desire in a merchant vessel, combining capacity for stowage, with a bottom that will "walk the waters like a thing of life". The launch, though, from the shortness of the run, of brief continuance, was beautiful. When on the water the vessel appeared to great advantage. She is of about 500 tons burthen. We learn that she was specially surveyed by the whole of the Liverpool shipbuilders, and pronounced by them to be a first-rate vessel. On her first movement towards her destined element, her name was given, in admirable style, by Master Matthew W. Willis, a fine youth, son of one of the owners. After the launch a number of ladies and gentlemen sat down to a sumptuous cold collation and wines, and the healths of the owners and the builders were drunk with great enthusiasm. The Bengalore is, we learn, intended for the China trade.





Wooden pilot vessel George Canning, built Cato, Liverpool, 1844, 51grt, 54 x 15 x 9.5 ft, Pilot boat no.7, ON 1762, Liverpool pilot service to 1863. Registered Caernarfon 1867, then Bideford 1868 - 1891, as a sloop. Foundered 6 November 1890 in Bristol Channel, with 3 crew all lost.

Image from a painting [in MMM] of pilot vessel, no.7, George Canning.

[from North Devon Gazette - Tuesday 11 November 1890]:
Terrific Gale, ... Appledore. ... Up to the present all have been heard of except the George Canning, owned by Captain Stephen Hare, and commanded by his brother, Thomas Hare, who had with him his son and a young man called Marshall. Grave fears are entertained by old experienced sailors that she has foundered. If this proves correct it will be a sad catastrophe. The captain has a family of nine children, they will be totally unprovided for if he is lost, of which there seems little doubt now. [later confirmed - lost Thursday 6 November, described as a brig]


Wooden ship Lahore, built Cato, Liverpool, 1845, 535 tons, owned Cato & Burt, ON 25646. More history. 31/03/1872: Abandoned in a sinking condition 70 miles W of Ferrol. On a voyage from Shields to Naples with a cargo of coal.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 10 March 1845]:
LAUNCH of the LAHORE. On Saturday the Lahore, of Liverpool, was launched from the ship-building yard of Mr. Peter Cato, at the southwest corner of the Brunswick Dock. Her length is 119 feet, her breadth 29 feet 7 inches, and her tonnage 575 tons. She will be commanded by Capt. Burt. Mr. Cato owns one half, and Capt. Burt the other half of this fine vessel, which is intended for the East India and China trade. Miss Cato, the daughter of Mr. Peter Cato, performed the operation of christening. The launch was a capital one; and, after it had taken place, about 100 of the ladies and gentlemen present were entertained at a dejeune, over which Mr. Peter Cato presided.


Wooden pilot vessel Liver, built Cato, Liverpool, 1846, 51grt, 54.2 x 15.1 x 9 ft, Pilot boat no.9, registered Runcorn 1846, but then Liverpool. In pilot service to 1862. ON 1860, registered London by 1865, owned St Lucia, by 1869 registered Castries, St Lucia. In MNL to 1870.


Wooden ship Diana, built Cato, 1847

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 23 February 1847]:
SHIP LAUNCH. On Tuesday a ship of about 570 tons, new measurement, was launched from the shipbuilding yard of Messrs. Cato and Co., Brunswick Dock. The owners are Messrs. Stringer and Mann, and the vessel is built to replace the Duke of Lancaster, for the China trade. The vessel, as far as we could judge, appeared to be built more for use than beauty; and in planking we observed plenty of Guinea oak, and such woods as are favourites for shipbuilding. All things being in readiness, at half-past eleven the word was given, and the vessel received her name, "The Diana," from Miss Mann, and moved rapidly into the water amidst the cheers of the spectators. She will be commanded by Captain Bulley, late of the Duke of Lancaster. Her length is one hundred and twenty-four feet six inches from stem to stern; beam, twenty-nine feet eight inches; and depth of hold, twenty feet.


List including sailing vessels [Cato & Miller]. Here are sailing vessels: (Steam vessels)
1847: Echo (yacht);
1848: May; Ardencraig; Naomi; Panic(iron);
1849: Margaret Ridley; Balkan;
1850: Peruana; Koh-I-Noor
1851: Bella;
1852: Marian Moore(iron);
1853: Belle; Glow-worm (yacht);
1854: Talavera;
1855: Hermione; Conflict; Snowdon; Contest(iron); Imogen; The Test (yacht);
1857: Esperanza;
1859: Talca;
1860: Chanarcillo;


Wooden barquentine May, built Cato, Miller, Liverpool, 1848, 285grt, 101.1 x 23.1 ft, ON 26029, owned Wilson & Dawson, Liverpool. More history.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 15 January 1848]:
There was also launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Cato Miller, and Co., a fine schooner, of 247 tons, the property of Messrs. Wilson and Dawson, and intended for the Mediterranean trade. She was named by Miss Cato. Also, from the same yard, and at the same time, two mud barges, the property of the Liverpool Dock Trust.


Iron barque Panic, built Cato, Miller, Liverpool, 1848, 449grt, owned Ripley, Liverpool, for trade to China, ON 25859. More hitory.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 07 August 1848]:
IRON BARQUE PANIC. We have been requested by Mr. Rigby [sic Ripley?], the owner of the above-named vessel to insert the subjoined:- The following are some particulars relative to the new iron barque Panic, of Liverpool, built by Messrs. Cato, Miller, and Co., for Thomas Rigby, Esq., and intended for the Shanghae trade. Her dimensions being considered by the uninitiated somewhat of an extraordinary character, the owner determined, in order to test her qualities, to give her an experimental trial before loading her, which led to a match round Ireland with the yacht Sultana, belonging to R. Naylor, Esq., for a stake which has been erroneously magnified into a lage sum of money. The Panic is 400 tons, old measurement, and 450 tons new; her length of keel 135 feet, fore rake and cutwater on line of main deck 16 feet, beam 24 feet, depth of hold 16 feet 6 inches. She is remarkably fine forward, has a very long floor, a good run, and calculated both to sail fast and carry a good cargo. The result of the trial, as regards her capabilities, has completely confirmed the most sanguine expectations of the owner and builders, and she may now be confidently pronounced one of the finest sea boats and safest merchantmen afloat, notwithstanding the sapient predictions to the contrary of a few individuals of the old school, who never were more completely out. It is well known that the Panic was completely beaten, attributable in a great measure to the light winds and calms that prevailed for the first forty-eight hours after starting, which gave the yacht the advantage, and enabled her to reach Cape Clear in advance of the Panic, just in time to round it when a S.W. gale came on, whilst the Panic being astern and not able to round the Cape, was detained upwards of forty-eight hours in a gale, which, had she been round the Cape, would have brought her to Liverpool. The yacht performed the distance in about 5.5 days, and run only 896 miles. The Panic was 10.5 days, and ran 1,484 miles. Her greatest run in 24 hours was 220 miles; the greatest speed (wind on the quarter) 12 knots, and close-hauled 9 knots per hour. She is a remarkably dry vessel, not having shipped a sea during the heavy gales she encountered. She is stiff under her canvas, steers like a boat, rolls very little, and is particularly easy in all her motions.



Wooden barque Ardencraig, built Cato, Miller, Liverpool, 1848, 556 tons, ON 26499, for Cannon, Miller & Co, Liverpool, for trade to India. More history.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 21 August 1848]:
LAUNCH. A finely-modelled vessel was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Cato, Miller, and Co., Brunswick Dock, on Thursday. The vessel was christened the Ardencraig by Miss Robinson, and is about 600 tons burden. Her lines fore and aft are fine, and, though she possesses a long flooring, her run is smooth and without slump. After the launch, which was one of the finest we have seen, a cold collation was given in the mould-room to a large party of ladies and gentlemen. Mr. Cato occupied the chair, and Mr. Robinson the vice-chair. Success to the noble vessel which had that day reached her native element was given with three times three. Afterwards the healths of the builders, Messrs. Cannon, Miller, and Co., the enterprising owners of Miss Robinson, Captain Thompson, &c. were given and efficiently responded to. The Ardencraig is intended for the Indian trade, and, though strongly built,- is in every way adapted for making quick passages and carrying a large cargo. Another vessel in the same yard, intended for Messrs. Harrison and Co., of this town, will be launched in about a fortnight.


Wooden barque Naomi, built Cato, Miller, Liverpool, 1848, 403 grt, ON13523, owned Pryde & Jones, Liverpool, for trade to China. More history. 4-1-1877: stranded on Winterton Ridge near the Newarp Lightship and abandoned. On a voyage from Shields to Brest with a cargo of coal.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 02 September 1848]:
Ship Launch. On Wednesday, the launch of a small, though finely built, ship took place at the yard of Messrs. Cato, Miller, and Co., near the Brunswick Dock. The vessel, which has been built for Messrs. Pryde, Jones, Co., for the China trade, is 108 feet long aloft, 23 feet broad midships, and 18 feet in depth. Her burden is 407 tons, new measurement; and she is in structure all that either a builder or an owner could desire. At a little before twelve the shores were struck, and we never saw a vessel glide more gracefully into the deep. The lads on board were most enthusiastic in their cheering, and presently the vessel was in the safe custody of a steam tug. She was christened the Naomi. After the launch a select company sat down to a cold collation in the mould room, and the healths of the builders, the owners, and of Mr. Farnworth, the timber merchant, were drunk. A dance was then got up, and the party tripped it the light fantastic for some time afterwards.

[from Shields Daily Gazette - Thursday 25 January 1877]:
THE LOSS OF THE NAOMI, OF SOUTH SHIELDS. BOARD OF TRADE INQUIRY AT NORTH SHIELDS. A Board of Trade inquiry was opened yesterday, at the North Shields Police Court, into the circumstances attending the stranding and subsequent loss of the barque Naomi, owned by Messrs Metcalfe and Blues, of South Shields, which took place on the 4th of January, on Winterton Ridge, while on a voyage from Shields to Brest. The court was composed of Emanuel Young, Esq., and Alexander Stevenson, Eaq., assisted by Captain Wilson and Captain Holt, nautical assessors. Mr Maples, the firm of Messrs Hamil and Maples, Newcastle, represented the Board of Trade, and Mr J. D. Botterell, of the firm of Messrs Oliver and Botterell, Sunderland, watched the case on behalf of the captain, Mr George Mitchell, South Shields.
Mr Maples, in opening the case, said the Naomi was a British sailing ship, built of wood at Liverpool, 1848. She was barque-rigged, and registered Liverpool, her tonnage being 367.57 tons. She was owned by Thos. Metcalfe, Holborn, South Shields, and Jas. S. Blues. The vessel left the Tyne on the 29th December, with crew of eleven hands, and a cargo of coals, bound for Brest. On the 4th January, at one o'clock in the morning, the vessel was on an ESE course, the wind then being SSW, and was proceeding between Hasboro' Sand and Newarp lightship. Half an hour after ahe was close to Newarp, and at this time the vessel appeared to be making a great deal of water, the men being kept constantly at the pumps. At 4 a.m. the mate took charge of the deck, when Newarp Light was about 7 miles upon the starboard beam. Owing to the heavy sea forward, the vessel kept by the wind. No lights were sighted, and the ship ran ashore on the Winterton Ridge at 5 a.m. Efforts were made to get her off, but without success, and she was subsequently abandoned. The following evidence was then taken:
George Mitchell, captain of the Naomi, said he held a certificate of competency. On sailing from Shields the vessel was in good condition, and the day after a strong w:nd came away from the south. From this time up to the 4th January, the weather continued very bad. It was thick with small rain. The last light he was able to see was the Newarp Light about 3 o'clock a.m. on the 4th January. The tide at this time was on the ebb, and an extraordinary strong one. He left the deck at 3 in charge of the second mate, with one man at the look-out. He told the second mate to keep the vessel by the wind; she was then heading ESE. At 5 a.m. he was called, but immediately before the ship had struck. On coming on deck the weather was very thick, and no lights could seen, they could not see the length the ship. The first order he gave was to hau back l the yards, the mainyard having been already hauled back; and next, he ordered the lifeboat out. The vessel was so full of water that there was no time to try the pumps. The vessel gave about five bumps, and then the water burst the cabin floor. As soon as the lifeboat was got out, the boatswain, an A.B., and an apprentice got into her, and parted away from the ship. The other boat - the jolly-boat - was got out, and the crew get into ber. The captaiu was up to his breast in water when he left her. He had no idea at the time where he was. After leaving the Tyne, and getting to Flamborough Head, he began to use the lead, casting about every quarter of an hour. The last time he saw the lead hove was about 10 miles off Cromer, after which, knowing their position, they did not require use it. On leaving the vessel, they dodged about under her lee, waiting for daylight, and at daylight they sighted a buoy about 8 o'clock, and knew they were at the back of Yarmouth Sands. Shortly after they sighted a vessel, but was unable overtake her. They subsequently sighted a steamer- the Admiral, of Newcastle - who took them on board. All hands were saved. A fishing vessel picked up the lifeboat and towed her into Yarmouth with the three men on board. His opinion to the cause of the stranding was the extraordinary ebb tide sending the ship to the northward. He bad sailed in the vessel three years. Repairs bad been done to her before leaving the Tyne on this voyage, and she had been thoroughly overhauled. She was fresh coppered three years ago. She was classed A 1 American Lloyds.
By the Court: When he left the deck at 3 a.m. there was freah breeze and lumpy sea, and thick weather. His orders were to heave the lead every half-an-hour, and if it shoaled to cll him.
John Stephenson, chief mate of the Naomi, was next called, and said on leaving Shields the weather was fresh, but the wind increased on the evening of the 30th, and became very stormy up to the morning of the 4th January. From the evening of the 30th to the 2nd frequent casts of the lead were taken. The captain was continually on the lookout, and every precaution was used to prevent the vessel going ashore. In his opinion the stranding of vessel was due to the atrong ebb tide setting to the northward.
Alexander McArthur, boatswain, gave precisely similar evidence.
The enquiry was adjourned until this (Thursday) morning, at eleven o'clock.
TO-DAY'S PROCEEDINGS. The enquiry was resumed this morning, before the same court, and the same place. Without taking further evidence, the Court decided that there was no default on the part of the master, Mr George Mitchell, and that the loss of the veese was caused by misadventure. The Court, therefore, did not think it necessary to charge the captain. The enquiry then terminated.



Wooden brig Margaret Ridley, built Cato, Miller, Liverpool, 1849, 178grt, ON15432, owned Harrison, Ridley, of Liverpool, for trade from Newfoundland to Mediterranean. More history. Voyage Harbor Grace [Newfoundland] to Constantinople with fish, foundered, 20 January 1874, 1 survivor picked up east of Malta.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 12 March 1849]:
LAUNCH. On Saturday, at noon, a beautiful new brig, the Margaret Ridley, was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Cato, Miller, and Co. She has been built for Messrs. Harrison, Ridley, and Harrison, of this port, and is intended, we believe, for the conveyance of fish from Newfoundland to various ports up the Mediterranean, occasionally bringing a cargo here. She is a first-class vessel, of about 250 tons burthen, clipper-built, of a beautiful model, and will prove, there is no doubt, a remarkably fast sailer. The day was gloriously fine, and the event attracted a considerable concourse of spectators. Rogers and Sons' quadrille band was in attendance, and discoursed sweet music from some huddled timber in the yard. After the launch, which was effected in gallant style, a select company of guests, numbering upwards of 200, repaired to the mould-room, where a splendid collation had been prepared. Mr. Cato occupied the chair, whilst Mr. Harrison, jun., acted as vice-chairman. The usual toasts were given and responded to, and some excellent speeches, chiefly of a complimentary character, delivered.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Wednesday 04 February 1874]:
PATRAS. Feb. 3: George Grey, seaman, of the Margaret Ridley (British brig), from Harbor Grace to Constantinople (fish), was picked up at sea, east of Malta, by a Greek brig, and reported that his vessel foundered about midnight, 20th January; he was in the water 60 hours; fears remainder of the crew perished.



Wooden brigantine Balkan, built Cato, Miller, 1849, 192 grt, ON 24021, owned Lamport & Holt, Liverpool, trade to S America. More history. 23/11/1864: Wrecked on the Alvarado bar, after leaving Vera Cruz..

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 25 October 1849]:
LINE OF PACKETS for BUENOS AYRES, Succeeds the Wilton Wood, the beautiful new Liverpool-built clipper Brigantine BALKAN. Captain Charles T. Sloman, A 1 thirteen years, 235 tons OM, and 192 tons NM, and having been modelled with a view to the attainment of extraordinary speed, is expected to be one of the swiftest vessels afloat; lying George's Dock. Apply Messrs Lamport and Holt, owners, or to COTESWORTH, WYNNE and LYNE.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 02 January 1865]:
SHIPWRECKS, CASUALTIES, &c. The Balkan, from Vera Cruz, has been wrecked of Alvarada [sic, Alavarado, Mexico, SE of Vera Cruz].



Iron ship Marian Moore - Cato Miller, 1036grt, ON 4588 More history.

[from Globe - Thursday 21 October 1852]:
PERILOUS LAUNCH OF THE MARIAN MOORE. The Liverpool Courier gives the following account of the launch of this fine ship of 1,037 tons register, which took place on Thursday last. It was high water before 12, the time fixed for the launch. The vessel went off an hour before her time. At 11 o'clock the men, to about the number of 150, were under the ship about to give her "a rally". Several of the central blocks ad been removed, but seven of them were still standing, and moat of the shores were fixed to the sides of the vessel, and there was no reason to think that the launch would be premature. At this moment "the cleets" or pieces of wood against which the daggers rest, were observed to be splitting:, and a cry was raised to the men underneath the ship, who made a quick and a safe retreat. Captain Tweedie, the commander of the ship, was going on board by a ladder, which slipped from under his feet as the vessel moved down, and he saved bis life by catching hold of the main chains, from whence be got on board. Nothing could stop the vessel when once in motion, and she carried away all the shores like so many chips, and her anchor also caught some scaffolding as she went off the stocks, which was in like manner dragged away. As the ship went down the ways she gave a list to port, and soon as she touched the water the strong tide which was running carried her round, and she drifted at least two miles up the river before the steam boat overtook her. The escape of some hundreds of people from destruction in this case appears to be miraculous. Capt. Tweedie's was as narrow an escape as ever a man had. So was the escape of the men, who might have keen crushed under the ship. And not the least remarkable feature in the launch was the fact that the cleets on both sides of the ship split; if one had held on and the other had broken the ship would have turned over, and one can scarcely conceive what would have been the loss of life. Nor is it to be overlooked that no vessel was in the way of the ship on her passage up the river. Taking this launch altogether, though many were disappointed in seeing it, every one would have reason to be thankful that amidst such manifest risks, no personal injury was sustained. The ship looked truly majestic as she went into the water; and as soon as the natural fear bad subsided to whether any personal injury had been sustained, she was greeted with loud cheers, which were repeated when she again passed the yard on her way to the Brunswick Dock.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Friday 15 October 1852]:
A NEW EAST INDIAMAN. The large East Indiaman, which has been rapidly approaching completion in the building-yard of Messrs. Cato, Miller and Co., was launched yesterday. She is, we believe, the largest merchant ship yet built in this port, and is the property of Messrs. C. Moore and Co. of this town. Her dimensions are: length aloft, 162 feet 6 inches ; breadth at midships, 30 8-10 feet; depth at midships, 22 9-10 feet; tonnage, 1037, and will class 14 years A 1 at Lloyd's. She will be commanded by Captain J. Tweedie and was christened the Marion Moore.


Iron barque Contest, built Cato, Miller, 1855.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 26 March 1855]:
Messrs. Cato, Miller, and Co. launched from their shipbuilding-yard, on Tuesday, the new iron barque Contest, of 270 tons register. She is intended for the Newfoundland and Brazilian trade.

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W C Miller, Liverpool. (Steam vessels)
Nauphante SV 1856 iron
Victor SV 1857 iron
Atahualpa SV 1857 iron
Defiance SV 1857 iron
Edith Moore SV 1858 iron
Elise SV 1858 wood


Iron barque Nauphante, built W C Miller, Liverpool, 1856, 382grt, ON 16880, owned Cotesworth & Lynn, Liverpool. By 1885 owned Otago, registered Dunedin. Last MNL listing 1887. Reported missing 1887. Last newspaper report is of her in distress in February 1886, off Amoy. More history.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 22 September 1856]:
The new iron barque Nauphante, now lying in the Brunswick Graving Dock, will repay a visit of inspection, as possessing peculiar novelty in many points. She is the property of Messrs. Cotesworth, Wynne, and Lyne, merchants, of this town, and was built at the yard of Mr. W. C. Miller, under the superintendence of and from model, plans, and specifications supplied and prepared by Mr. James Hodgson, of Sweeting-street. As soon as her equipment is completed, she will proceed to Pernambuco, to which port it is predicted, by competent judges, she will make a very rapid passage.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Wednesday 07 April 1886]:
Nauphante, of Liverpool. Breeze (British sch.), which arrived at Hong Kong on the 26th February, reports on the 21st Feb. she passed an iron British barque, supposed to be the Nauphante, some time out from Amoy to Manila, close to Bolinao, hove to with her foretopmast gone - (Singapore, March 6)5


Iron ship Victor, built W C Miller, Liverpool, 1857, 1000grt, owned Herring, London. Few further details known. Not in LR 1858 or 1860. Not found MNL. More history.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Monday 27 April 1857]:
LAUNCH OF TWO VESSELS. On Saturday morning last, shortly before twelve o'clock, a splendid iron clipper ship, of 1000 tons register, was launched from the shipbuilding yard of Messrs. W. C. Miller and Son, Toxteth Dock. She was called the Victor, by Mrs. Williams, a relative of one of the owners. Her dimensions are 196 feet between perpendiculars; 32 feet 8 inches beam; and 21 feet depth of hold. She is the property of Messrs. G. and A. Herring, of London, and is intended for the East India trade. ...


Iron barque Atahualpa, built W C Miller, Liverpool, 1857, 497grt, ON 16282, owned Tyrer, Liverpool. Wrecked 11-7-1863, entering Valparaiso. More history.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Saturday 29 August 1863]:
TOTAL LOSS OF TWO LIVERPOOL SHIPS. By the West India mail of yesterday, we received particulars of the loss of the barque Atahualpa of Liverpool, Captain Stocks, while on her passage from this port to Valparaiso. She left the Mersey on the 24th of April and, after a fair passage, she arrived off Valparaiso on the 11th of July. While attempting to enter the bay, she struck on a rock known as the Buey, and notwithstanding every effort was made to get her off, she became a total wreck. On the 14th she broke completely in two, and only a small portion of her hull could be seen above water. The efforts to save the cargo had only been successful to a small degree, and, excepting a very small portion of her cargo and rigging, the vessel and cargo are a complete loss. The rock is well known, but there being no mark or buoy near, it has been the cause of several losses. The Atahualpa was an iron barque of 497 tons, built at this port in 1857, and owned by Messrs. W. and J. Tyrer. ...


Iron ship Defiance, built W C Miller, Liverpool, 1857, On 19187, 955 grt, owned Finlay, Campbell & Co, Liverpool. More history. Wrecked 6-10-1871 near Port Natal, on a voyage from Bombay to London with a cargo of cotton.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Wednesday 06 December 1871]:
SHIPPING DISASTERS. WRECK OF A LIVERPOOL COTTON SHIP. By the arrival of the Cape mail, we learn that the ship Defiance, of Liverpool, bound home from Bombay with 5000 bales of cotton, has been wrecked 60 miles down the coast. All hands were saved.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Wednesday 10 January 1872]:
WRECK OF THE SHIP DEFIANCE. On Oct. 23, and five following days, a Court of Inquiry was held at Durban, Natal, to Investigate the circumstances of the loss of the ship Defiance, near the Umzimkulu, on Oct. 6.... The report states that on the 23d of September last, the Island of Rodriguez was sighted, and the ship's chronometers proved correct. That nothing particular occurred until the vessel was off the coast of Natal, when the same course is stated have been steered as on former homeward voyages from India, four of which Captain Angel had made, though not in this vessel. That on the day before the wreck a good observation was had, which showed the ship's position to have been 30 S., 33 49 E., the nearest land being distant 120 miles. That the next day, the 6th, the weather was rainy, misty, and thick, the wind light and baffling, southerly, the rate of going being about three knots. That at 3 45 p.m. land was sighted apparently 25 miles off - one of the witnesses says about 15 miles. That at 6 30 the ship was put round on the starboard tack, with head off the shore, until 7 30 p.m., but, being taken aback by a sudden shift of wind, she was again put on the port tack and so continued till 9 30, when "breakers ahead" was shouted from aloft. That orders were then given by Captain Angel to throw all aback, but while that was being done the ship took the ground and became unmanageable, the sea making a clean break over all. That the vessel having filled and settled down, the crew left the next morning. ... The certificates of the master and mates were returned to them.


Iron ship Edith Moore, built W C Miller, Liverpool, 1858, 1430nrt, ON 20763, for Charles Moore of Liverpool, registered Liverpool. By 1871 named St Maur, owned Rankin, Liverpool. Posted missing after 4-4-1882, on voyage from Calcutta, as St Maur. 40 crew lost. [More history.]

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 18 January 1858]:
SHIP LAUNCH. There will be launched this day, (Monday,) between the hours of twelve and one o'clock, from the building-yard of Mr. W. C. Miller, Toxteth Dock, a noble specimen of naval architecture, being one of the largest (1,430 tons register) and finest vessels ever built on the Mersey. She is the property of Messrs. Charles Moore and Co., East India merchants, of this town, and will be called the Edith Moore, after the amiable daughter of the senior partner of the firm. Her commander is Capt. Jas. Tweedie, long known in the Australian and Calcutta trade.

[from Liverpool Weekly Courier - Saturday 20 May 1882]:
Grave fears are entertained as to the safety of the fine iron ship St. Maur, of Liverpool, 1,486 tons, homeward bound from Calcutta to the Mersey. She sailed on the 17th December last, and was spoken in the beginning of April last off the Western Islands, but has not been heard of since. Underwriters fear that she was in the Channel during the severe weather a fortnight ago, and foundered during the storm. Her crew numbered 40 hands all told.


Elise, wood, brigantine, 165grt, ON 21486, built W C Miller, Liverpool, 1858. Owned J Hassan. Abandoned, 15-10-1860, off Point Lynas after collision with Nova Bella [ON 6077, 391 tons], all 8 crew saved, voyage Liverpool to Africa with iron. Listed as 214 tons. [more history]

[from Liverpool Mercury - Wednesday 19 May 1858]:
STEAMERS FOR THE BRAZILS - On Monday last at noon, a fine brigantine of upwards of 160 tons, was launched from the ship yard of Messrs. W. C. Miller and Sons, Toxteth Dock. The little craft was launched in a hurry to make room for the construction of four large steamers and five barges for the Brazils. Messers Fawcett, Preston, and Co., of this town, are to construct the engines for the steamers,

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 22 October 1860]:
Nova Bella, which sailed for Bombay on the 10th inst., has put back with loss of foretopmast, &c., having been in collision off Lynas with the Elise, hence for Africa, which was abandoned. Crew saved by the Nova Bella.

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Rennie, Johnson & Rankin, Liverpool (Steam vessels)
Cutter 53 tons SV 1850
Wild Flower SV 1851
Margaret Deane SV 1853
Esther SV 1854
Buoy tender Mersey SV 1854 steam screw from 1904
Sappho SV 1854
Elizabeth Barter SV 1854
Fusilier SV 1855
Fiery Cross SV 1855


[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 18 November 1850]:
On Wednesday there will be launched from the building-yard of Messrs. W. Rennie, Johnson, and Co. a beautiful new cutter, fifty-three tons register, the property of Mr. W. Simpson, of this town.

Wooden ship Wild Flower (also Wildflower), registered Liverpool, ON 24114, 478 tons, 131 x 27.4 ft, owned Anderson, Aberdeen; then Marshall, Rotherhithe; then Natrass, Sunderland, 456 tons. In MNL to 1873, built Liverpool 1852, barque, 444 tons. Advertised sailing Liverpool to Madras July 1865, Captain Cook. Reported serious damage after a stormy voyage carrying timber from Quebec to Hartlepool in late 1871, Captain Natrass.

[from Glasgow Herald - Friday 28 November 1851]:
A fine ship named the "Wild Flower" was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Rennie, Johnston, & Co., of this town [Liverpool], on Monday, for Mr. Anderson, of Aberdeen.

[from Newcastle Journal - Tuesday 28 January 1868]:
SALE, the fast-sailing Barque WILD FLOWER, 456 Tons Register, Dimensions 131 by 27.4, built at Liverpool 1852, and classed nine Years A 1, continued six years from 1861, and is now discharging from the Madras Coast in the St. Katherine's Dock. Is well found in Stores, and carries a large Cargo. ..

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Tuesday 31 October 1871]:
Report of Nicholas Nattrass, Master of the barque Wildflower, of Liverpool. 443 tons, from Quebec for Hartlepool (492 pieces of oak and elm timber and 4,260 pieces of deal):- Left Quebec Sept. 11, weather fine, wind light from westward. Proceeded, and on the 30th, when in lat. 54 55 N., and long. 37 53 W., ship under close-reefed topsails, going about three knots, blowing a hurricane from W.N.W., with rain. At 4 a.m. heavy squall, the ship labouring heavily and shipping much water. Clewed up the foresail and braced the yards forward on the port braces, and in coming to the wind a heavy sea struck the ship, which hove her on her beam ends, floating the deck cargo and taking away the port quarter bulwarks, rails and stanchions, spare and spare lower yard, the port side of the deck being under water, and for safety of ship and cargo, cut away the fore and main topsails, to lighten. Then set the balance reef mizen, which shortly afterwards burst, ship lying in the trough of the sea and making much water. The Mate and one Seaman were washed overboard, but were afterwards saved by holding on a rope lying alongside. I then put the tow-rope and warp overboard for drag, to keep ship's bows to the sea. At 8 a.m. heavy gales with hard squalls. All hands at the pumps. Ship straining heavily, and making much water. Found the port quarter started and leaking very much, quantity of deals washed overboard. The running rigging washed under the deck cargo, and fore sheet main tack blocks, bell and belfry gone. Also studdingsail gear and water casks washed overboard, head knees gone, rails broken and started. At noon all hands at the pumps, but could not suck them. Tried to sound pumps, but could not do so. Oct. 1, 4 a.m., wind and sea moderate, found the tow-rope and warp gone. Kept the watch constantly at the pumps. At 7 a.m. bore away for destination. On 2nd, got the pumps to suck, and arrived safely Hartlepool on 22nd inst. at 9 am.


[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 22 February 1853]:
Partnerships dissolved: W. Rennie, Johnson, and Co., Liverpool, shipbuilders.


Wooden ship Margaret Deane, built Rennie & Co, Liverpool, 1853. ON 25921. 423 tons, registered Liverpool. In MNL to 1870.
RCUS: Voyage Bahia to Liverpool, 4-9-1870, burnt, 8 N, 29 W, barque 423 tons, owned S Graves, wood. Wreck info.

[from Northern Daily Times - Thursday 01 December 1853]:
SHIP LAUNCH. A fine ship, named the Margaret Deane, intended for the Brazilian trade, was yesterday launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Rennie, Johnson, and Rennie [sic, Rankin], Brunswick dock. The Margaret Deane is owned by a company in Manchester, and is to be commanded by Captain Green.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 10 October 1870]:
The ship MARGARET DEANE, of and for this port, which left Bahia on the 24th Aug., with a full cargo of sugar and cotton, is reported burnt at sea, in lat. 8 N, lon. 29 W, on the 4th Sept. The crew were picked up by the Emily[sic], and landed at Crookhaven on Wednesday.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Friday 21 October 1870]:
Report of James Joss, Master of the Barque Margaret Deane, 423 tons, from Bahia, of and for Liverpool (general cargo) (previously reported): Left Bahia Aug. 24, weather showery, wind moderate from southward and eastward. Proceeded, and Sept. 3, at A.M., weather overcast and squally, wind S.E. to S.W. moderate, at the above time I observed smoke, and smelled fire in the cabin, and immediately proceeded to ascertain where the fire was. I found it proceeded from the cargo in after hold. I afterwards got the companion, fore cabin skylight and hatches battened down. I found the fire increasing, which caused the decks to burst. We then cleared away all boats, and managed to get them in the water. We then took off the companion and got a little bread and meat, and placed it in the boats over the stern. The fire still increasing, could not remain below. We came on deck and battened down companion again to stop all ventilation. It being then about 11 A.M., lat. 7 22 N., long. 29 46 W., we shaped our course towards Cape de Verd Islands to near them, to get in the track of vessels for assistance to save life. On the morning of 4th, fire still increasing, fell with the barque Emilia, of and for Hamburg. I spoke the Master, and asked him to stop with me, which he did. Finding no possibility of extinguishing the fire, the flames breaking through the hatches, we took to the boats and went on board the Emilia at 10 a.m. We had scarcely got on board before the mainmast went over the side, taking the topmast with it. The ship at this time in flames fore and aft. I saved two chronometers, part of ship's papers, and one boat. The Emilia remained alongside from 6 30 a.m. until 10 30 a.m., until all the Crew of the Margaret Deane was safe on board. The Emilia proceeded her voyage, and put into Crookhaven windbound.


Wooden barque Esther, built Rennie, Johnson, Rankin, Liverpool, 1854, ON28289, 280 tons, owned William Miles Moss & others, Liverpool. Sold 1874 to Walsh & Duckett, Liverpool. Then 1881, owned Sulymah Trading Co, Liverpool. In MNL to 1885, registered Liverpool. Wrecked 1885 on west coast of Africa.

Painting of barque Esther from Merseyside Maritime Museum.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 03 April 1854]:
On Tuesday morning a fine barque, the Esther, was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Rennie, Johnson and Rankin, Brunswick Dock, for the Mediterranean trade. She is 116 feet long, 22 feet 3 inches beam, 14 feet depth of hold, and 270 tons register, old measurement. The vessel is the property of Messrs. James Moss and Co., and other gentlemen, and the name is in compliment to the lady of one of the owners.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Thursday 17 November 1881]:
SALE at LIVERPOOL... THE Liverpool-built Barque ESTHER, 260 tons register; built at Liverpool in 1854, and originally classed A 1 for ten years; was classed 5-6 L 1.1 in Bureau Veritas for five years in 1877, when she received new decks and other repairs; was sheathed with yellow metal in 1880; has pitch pine lower masts and wire rigging, and carries about 280 tons dead weight on 15 feet. Length, 113 7-10 feet; breadth. 19 9-10 feet; depth 15 feet. Lying in King's Dock. ... [sold by private treaty for £450]


Wooden buoy tender Mersey, built as a schooner by Rennie & Co, launched 1854, for MDHB. 68 ft long, 90 tons burthen. ON 76372, first registered Liverpool 1876 as Dandy 76 tons, owned MDHB. Converted to steam 1904, when 71.5 x 17.8 ft, 78 grt, 31 nrt, 4 hp screw, wood, owned Hans Jensen, Liverpool. Register closed 1930.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 12 August 1854]:
Messrs. Rennie, Johnson, and Rankin have built a new schooner buoy tender [Mersey], 68 feet in length, and of 90 tons burthen, which will be launched from their yard on Saturday. She is to replace the vessel at present used by the dock trust in buoying the port.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 02 January 1863]:
MERSEY DOCKS BOARD. ... To appoint Mr. John E Manly, at present master of the "Mersey" Buoy Tender, to be master of the Crosby Lightship, with the usual pay and allowances, in the room of Mr John Lugg, superannuated. ...


[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 07 October 1854]:
PROGRESS OF IRON SHIP BUILDING IN LIVERPOOL. - We are glad to observe that another yard has lately been established at the south end of this town, for the building of Iron Ships, by Messrs. Rennie, Johnson, and Rankin. The senior partner is one of the most celebrated draftsmen of the present day, and several ships drafted by him have proved themselves equal in speed to the fastest ships afloat. We would recommend our readers to pay a visit to these gentlemen's yards, where they will now see in course of construction several most beautifully-modelled vessels, equal to any ever built in this or any other country. This day there will be launched one of 350 tons [Sappho], for the Newfoundland trade, to be followed shortly by one of similar tonnage for the West India trade and to be succeeded by a magnificent clipper [Fusilier] of 535 tons for Messrs. Cotesworth, Wynne, and Lyne for the South American trade. This last ship is particularly well worthy of inspection, both as regards model and construction. There is also one building of a tubular form, without ribs, upon an entirely new principle, for the Coal trade [Carbon], and which scientific men will do well to examine, as marking the improvements that are taking place in naval architecture. In addition to all these, there is a large new steamer, nearly in frame [Empress Eugenie].


Iron barque Sappho, built Rennie & Co, Liverpool, 1854, ON 24315, 300 tons, in MNL to 1869, registered Liverpool. Ordered by Gardner. Owner listed as Johnston 1865-9. Voyage Maceio, Brazil, to Liverpool, ashore 4 June 1869 north of Saltee Island. Owned Bramley-Moore. Hull for sale July 1869 at Kilmore. Later broke up in storm.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 09 October 1854]:
Immediately after the Imperatriz was sent off the stocks [by Laird, Dingle], the Sappho, a beautifully-modelled iron vessel, of 400 tons was launched from the adjoining yard of Messrs. Rennie, Johnson, and Co. This was the first craft launched from the new premises of these enterprising builders, and she is the forerunner of five already on the stocks. She is the property of the Messrs. Gardner, and is intended to trade between Brazil and Newfoundland.

[from Liverpool Daily Post - Tuesday 08 June 1869]:
WRECK OF THE SAPPHO, OF LIVERPOOL. Wexford, Saturday. The fine barque Sappho, of Liverpool, laden with cotton, from Macao [sic Maceio, Brazil], Cornelius Opzoomer, master, came ashore on the coast during the fog of last night. It does not appear that the vessel's loss is attributable to any neglect of the captain, as he kept the lead going from the time he sighted Hook light at eight p.m., at 10 or 12 miles distance, on Friday, until the vessel struck. He cannot account for the occurrence unless by a sudden variation of his compasses. The vessel struck on a reef of sunken rocks, known as St. Patrick's Bridge, which runs out from the mainland at Kilmore, on the southern coast of this county, to the lesser of the Saltee islands. The captain backed his yards when he found the vessel striking, and cast his anchor, but the hawser soon parted, and the vessel went still higher on the rocks. The vessel's bottom is greatly damaged, and when the tide rises she takes in a great deal of water. The two tugs belonging to the port made an effort to get her off to-day, but without succeeding. William Coghlan, Esq., Collector of Customs, and Jasper W. Walsh, Esq., agent for Lloyd's, were on board from an early hour this morning, taking steps to get the vessel off. A large quantity of the cargo has been discharged, and when the vessel shall have been lightened it is thought her bottom can be repaired, the water leaves her at ebb tide, and then the tugs will endeavour to get her off at the next flood. No lives have been lost.

[from Dublin Weekly Nation - Saturday 28 August 1869]:
INTERESTING EXPERIMENT. A PROCESS FOR RAISING VESSELS. On Tuesday an experiment of a highly interesting and important character was announced to made near Wexford, by Mr. Maquay with his patented process for raising sunken vessels. It was to be tried upon the iron barque Sappho, of Liverpool, which was wrecked some few months ago off the coast of Kilmore, a fishing village and watering place about twelve miles from that town, the southern coast the county. The most lively interest was manifested in the test of Mr. Maquay's process, not alone by the mercantile community, but by the public generally, who attended in vast numbers to witness the trial.
The vessel to experimented upon is of 300 tons registered tonnage, and lies in about three feet at low water on a ridge of rocks known St. Patrick's Bridge, between the Saltee Islands and the mainland. An effort was previously made to raise this vessel by the underwriters at Lloyd's by the agency of air tanks, but she was held so firmly the rocks that the attempt proved unsuccessful. The late John Howe, Esq., D.L., Ballycross, who purchased the vessel, also attempted to raise her, but the effort proved equally unsuccessful. The process which Mr. Maquay proposed putting into operation on Tuesday is simple in principle, and, under ordinary circumstances, would be easy of application; but the raising of the Sappho presented exceptional difficulties, her bottom was perforated with rocks, and the rise of the tide where she lay is inconsiderable. Two objects were to be attained in raising the vessel - namely, to stop the holes in her bottom, and supply lifting power. Mr. Maquay preposed to accomplish those objects by means of balloons inflated with hydrogen gas. In order to stop the leaks in her bottom he constructed wooden frames which were pressed down upon balloons aver the holes. The balloons being then inflated acted like a double valve and ejected the water from the frame, and stopped the hole through which the water had passed. The lifting power was applied in a nearly similar manner. Balloons composed of india-rubber and canvas were attached to the vessel's bottom by divers There were two inside and two outside, which were secured by a network formed of ropes. These balloons were inflated by hydrogen gas which was generated by sulphuric acid acting upon zinc, and water enclosed in cylinders made specially for this occasion by Messrs. Courtney and Stephens, Blackhall-place, Dublin. The lifting power of the gas is calculated by cubic feet, five and quarter cubic feet being capable of raising 4cwt 68lbs to a height of 72 feet. Mr. Maquay's balloons were 21 feet diameter, and the effect of those should be simply, when filled with gas, that which happens when an aeronaut inflates his balloon, to ascend and bear with them the weight attached below. The preparations necessary for the working of this process are difficult and slow of progress, all the operations must be conducted under water by divers, and hence it was that Mr. Maquay was not quite prepared on Tuesday evening at the appointed hour for making the experiment. Seldom has the cleanly and quiet little village of Kilmore witnessed such a crowd upon its pier as stood expectant there watching the Sappho as the tide rose on Tuesday evening. A large number of visitors drove down from Wexford, while the farmers thronged from the surrounding country to witness the novel experiment. Groups of gentlemen boarded the vessel in the course of the day to see the balloons laid down, but all were disappointed in having the test applied, though every effort was made to have the apparatus ready. Mr. Maquay worked under water himself for eight hours, and was assisted by experienced divers, but it is difficult to get men to carry out an idea novel to them. The trial was therefore postponed until next evening flood tide.

[from Northern Whig - Thursday 16 September 1869]:
Storm: Wexford: no other casualties have been reported, except the breaking up of the iron barque Sappho, which was wrecked at Kilmore some months ago.


Iron brigantine Elizabeth Barter, built Rennie & Co, 1854, 210 tons nm, 103.4 x 20.3 x 13.4 ft, ON 22788, owned Barter, London. In MNL to 1868, 186 tons. Lost, reported 4 December 1867, on voyage Black Sea to Amsterdam, at Camperduin, near Amsterdam, only 2 saved.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 25 November 1854]:
A neat brig, of about 200 tons burthen, was launched on Saturday last, from the new iron-shipbuilding yard of Messrs. Rennie, Johnson, and Rennie[sic], Upper Sefton-street, Toxteth-park. Miss Simpson, niece of Mr. Rennie, gracefully performed the ceremony of christening. The vessel has been built for Messrs. Barter, of London, and is named the Elizabeth Barter, and is intended for the Mediterranean trade. This is the second vessel that has been launched from this yard. In a fortnight, two more vessels will be launched; one of them is without ribs or stanchions, and is so constructed that when her cargo is in course of removal she will charge herself with water. She is intended to run between Shields and London, and be succeeded by others of the same construction.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Wednesday 27 February 1867]:
REGULAR LINE OF PACKETS FOR GALATE AND IBRAIL. Has a considerable portion of her cargo engaged, and will have immediate despatch. The splendid Iron brigantine, ELIZABETH BARTER, Captain Leslie, burthen per register 186 tons, A 1 at Lloyd's for 12 years, and will be found on inspection as an unexceptionable conveyance. ...

[from Lloyd's List - Wednesday 04 December 1867]:
AMSTERDAM, 4th Dec. The ELIZABETH BARTER (schooner), Leslie, from Galatz [sic, now Galati, Romania] to this port, has been lost at Kamperduin [sic, Camperduin]; two men saved, [another report: brig of London, master W H Lesslie, of Appledore, lost near Amsterdam]


Iron ship Fusilier, built Rennie & Co., Liverpool, 1855. ON 1390, registered Liverpool, 500 tons, owned Cotesworth & Co, Liverpool. Lost 13 September 1857 at St Gowan's Head.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 24 April 1855]:
A beautifully modelled ship called the Fusilier, launched on Tuesday from the yard of Messrs. Rennie, Johnson, and Rankin at the Dingle. The handsome craft, which was designed by Rennie, is of the following dimensions: Length, 128 ft; beam, 26 ft 8 in; depth, 17 feet 4 in; o.m., 536 tons; n.m. 513 tons; displacement at 15 ft draught 978 tons. Her owners are Messrs. Cotesworth, Wynne and Lyne, of Tower-buildings, and she will be commanded by Captain Carmichael, late of the Josiah Waddington. The Fusilier is intended for the West Coast of South America trade.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 21 September 1857]:
MILFORD, Sept. 14. The Fusilier was wrecked last night on St. Gowan's Head. Crew and passengers arrived here in boats. [Mem: The Fusilier sailed from Caldera, Chile, for Liverpool.]



[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 30 June 1855]:
The extensive iron ship-building yard, lately occupied Messrs. Rennie, Johnston, and Co., Potteries, bankrupts, has been taken, it is said, by Messrs. Thomas Vernon and Son.



Wooden clipper Fiery Cross, launched from the yard of Rennie, Johnson & Co, Liverpool, 1855, 686 tons, 174 x 31ft. Registered Glasgow 1855, ON 27176, ship. More history.
Voyage London to Hong Kong, wrecked in China Seas, 4 March 1860 [RCUS gives 10 May, date wreck was reported]. Wood, 686 tons, 30 crew. Wrecked on Fiery Cross Reef.

[from Glasgow Herald - Friday 03 August 1855]:
Launches: The Fiery Cross was launched from the shipbuilding yard or Messrs. Rennie, Johnston & Co., of this port, at noon yesterday. She is a noble specimen of naval architecture, and will well maintain the high character which Liverpool has earned to itself in this important branch of industry. She measures 160 feet in length, and 30 feet in breadth, and her registered tonnage will be 672 tons. She has been built for the Messrs. Campbell of Glasgow, and is intended for the China trade.

[from Norwich Mercury - Wednesday 30 May 1860]:
The fine clipper ship Fiery Cross, from London, was totally lost in the Palawan passage on the 4th ult [March]. [8 7 N, 114 42 E, Spratly Islands.]

[from Glasgow Courier - Tuesday 15 May 1860]:
Singapore, April 5. The Lizzie Webber, which was chartered to proceed to the Fiery Cross on shore near Investigator Shoal, has arrived here with 250 bales and cases in a damaged state, and about 38 bottles of quicksilver, &c., from the wreck.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 17 December 1860]:
LAUNCH OF THE FIERY CROSS CLIPPER-SHIP [ON 29165]. MESSRS. CHALONER, HART, and SINNOTT launched from their yard, on Thursday last, the 13th instant, a thirteen years A 1 ship, built by them for the owners of the late celebrated clipper Fiery Cross, which was wrecked in the China Seas in March last. The loss of that ship was much regretted in Liverpool, for it was a source of just pride to the citizens of the good old town that she, the only Liverpool-built clipper in the annual race with the new teas, had so frequently distanced her competitors as to command a higher rate of freight than any other ship in the trade. That ship was designed and built by Messrs. Rennie, Johnson, and Rankine, and launched from their yard here in 1855;...

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 02 August 1855]:
Launch of the John Campbell[sic ?]. This fine new ship was launched on Tuesday from the building-yard of Rennie, Johnson and Rankin, Brunswick Dock. We believe her to the handsomest sailing ship ever built this port, and she is as strong as wood and iron can make her. [this report seems to be of the Fiery Cross - and the name of the owner has been used instead]

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Liverpool Steam Tug Co, Queen's Dock, Liverpool (Steam vessels)

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Sailing vessels built by Jordan, Jones, Getty, etc, Liverpool. (Steam vessels built by them)
Excelsior SV 1850 composite built Jordan
Marion MacIntyre SV 1851 composite built Jordan & Getty
Tubal Cain SV 1851 composite built Jordan & Getty
Evangeline SV 1853 built Jordan & Getty; iron
Black Eagle SV 1854 built Getty & Major; wooden
James Pilkington SV 1854 built Getty; iron
Bristow SV 1854 composite built Jordan & Getty; Jones & Getty
Anne Baker SV 1854 built Getty & Jones; iron
Elizabeth Harrison SV 1854 built Josiah Jones; iron
Khimjee OodowjeeSV 1856; built Josiah Jones, jun.; iron
Lalla Rookh SV 1856; built Josiah Jones, jun.; iron
Jessie SV 1856; built Josiah Jones, jun.; iron
Chiloe SV 1857; built Josiah Jones, jun.; iron
Aphrodita SV 1858 (Wilmslow); built Josiah Jones, jun.; iron
Aconcagua SV 1859 (Parvady); built Josiah Jones, jun.; iron


Composite schooner Excelsior, built Jordan, Liverpool, 1850, 35 tons, 50 ft long, ON 53728, for coastal trade in Demerara. Registered Demerara 1865, 35 tons, at Georgetown, also at New Amsterdam, Berbice. Register closed 1901.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 04 June 1850]:
NEW VESSEL ON MR. JORDAN'S PRINCIPLE OF AN IRON FRAME AND WOODEN PLANKING. We briefly noticed, some time ago, a beautiful model of a ship on the patent principle of Mr. Jordan, shown and explained at a meeting of the Royal Mersey Yacht Club, and which attracted much interest and attention. Several questions were on that occasion put by gentlemen present, as to the mode of fastening, &c.; and the probabilities of the wood and iron combined involving decay of the one and corrosion of the other; and the comparative cost of adopting the plan as compared with a wholly iron, or with what is called a wooden ship. The representatives of Mr. Jordan, (who was not present,) explained the whole to the satisfaction of many present; though, as in all novelties, others entertained a doubt, only to be removed by the practical test of a regular vessel of adequate scale built upon the principle. We are glad to say that this experiment will very shortly be made, Mr. Jordan having since received an order for the building of a schooner upon this principle, from our respected and enterprising townsman, Mr. Josiah Booker. This vessel is now nearly completed, by Mr. Jordan himself, at his new building yard, near what was called the Herculaneum Dock, at the south extremity of the town. ....
The vessel under review, though small, is handsomely moulded in every point, and is evidently of great strength. She is literally "as strong as wood and iron can make her." Her length, including a slight fore-rake, is about 50 feet, and she has ample beam and bearings. She admeasures a little over 40 tons, but will carry 55 tons of dead weight. Nevertheless, her fine bottom and extremities will render her a fast vessel. The ribs are of strong angle iron, like those of an entirely iron vessel. The keel, stem, and stern-post are of wood, and the vessel outwardly will, when closed in, present the precise appearance of a wooden vessel. ..... The vessel is intended to run, with passengers and goods, from place to place on the coast, and on the inland waters of Demerara; and such is the confidence of her owner in her strength and capabilities that, we learn, he would not hesitate to take his passage in her to that colony, in which he possesses estates, and where he purposes to become a resident for a short time, to pursue an improved principle of cultivating cotton for our home market, so as to render us less dependant for that article upon the United States. She will be handsomely rigged as a clipper schooner. ...

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Thursday 15 August 1850]:
Vessels Loading: Trinidad. Excelsior, Monteath, J Brookes, Coburg.

[from Evening Mail - Monday 19 July 1858]:
At Demerara the season was the wettest that has been experienced for years. The public dinner to his Excellency the Governor was take place on the 29th ult. The schooner Excelsior arrived from Surinam on the 22d with five Kroomen who had escaped from Cayenne in an open boat, and were picked up by the schooner on her voyage hence to Surinam. The captain of the Excelsior took the five men on with him to Paramaribo, and thence to Demerara on the return voyage.


Composite barque Marion MacIntyre, built Getty Liverpool, 1851, ON 23469, 283grt, owned MacIntyre, Liverpool. Last MNL listing 1860. Sank March 1859 in Java sea on a reef. More history.

Image of launch of Marion MacIntyre and part of the ship "Iron Frame" at Messrs Jordan and Getty's building yard, Liverpool [from Illustrated London News - Saturday 01 February 1851]:

[from Liverpool Mercury - Tuesday 07 January 1851]:
LAUNCH OF THE MARION MACINTYRE. On Saturday, shortly after noon, a beautiful clipper-built craft, of 300 tons burthen, built for Messrs. K. H. Macintyre and Co,, merchants, of this town, was launched from the building yard of Messrs. Jordan and Getty, Sefton-street, and named the Marion Macintyre, after the lady of one of the owners.
The Marion Macintyre is the second vessel to which a principle patented by Messrs. Jordan has been adapted, a principle which, if it realised the anticipations of those best competent to judge of its merits, will, in a very short time, effect a revolution in the shipbuilding trade of this country. It consists of a combination of iron and wood, the framework of the vessel consisting of iron, the covering being, as usual in wooden-built ships, of timber. The advantages to he derived from this combination are, strength to any amount required without being rendered unwieldy, a lightness of draft unattainable in timber-built vessels, whilst the possibility of dry rot is obviated, which is in itself a great desideratum. The carrying capacity of vessels constructed on this principle is very great. This must be obvious when we consider how much less space the iron framework occupies, and the increased carrying power which is thus realised. At first it was apprehended that it would be difficult to copper vessels built on this principle, so as to prevent galvanic action taking place, occasioned by the proximity of the iron and copper. The introduction of layers of gutta percha has removed this difficulty, and there is nothing to prevent a full and fair trial of this important invention.
The model of the Marion Macintyre is a very beautiful one. She possesses all the requisites for speed, and is fitted up with every recent improvement, amongst which is one of Betteley and Co.'s powerful improved patent windlasses. Her dimensions are as follows:- Length, 117 feet; breadth of beam 22 feet 5 inches; depth of hold 15 feet 6 inches. The Marion Macintyre is intended for the African trade, and in proportion to her registered tonnage will carry a greater amount of cargo than perhaps any other vessel afloat.
... Mr Robert Getty, one of the partners in the firm, presided ... hoped the same good fortune would attend her as the little Excelsior, commander Captain Monteath, built on the same principle,.. ... Getty said he was one of the firm - but not a builder - that was Mr John Jordan, who was the patentee.....

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 18 April 1859]:
The Marion Macintyre, Little, from Hongkong for Sydney, was wrecked Java Seas; part of cargo expected to be saved.

[from Morning Herald (London) - Friday 29 April 1859]:
The Marion Macintyre, Hong-Hong to Sydney, New South Wales, which struck on a reef in the Java Sea, has been taken off and taken into Sourabaya Roads; cargo saved, mostly damaged. [arrived 3 March from Bawean]


Composite (wood on iron frames) ship Tubal Cain, built Jones & Getty, Liverpool, 1851, 787 tons. Used under government contract to transport troops to Burma. Service to Australia and to India. By 1858 owned Captain Charles H Clark, Bath, Maine, American registered. [Tubal Cain is a biblical figure, described as the first blacksmith]. Wrecked 24 August 1862, by collision with ship Constance, 12 lost, Australia.

Image from painting by Samuel Walters of Tubal Cain in the Mersey [from Samuel Walters - A S Davidson]

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 01 August 1851]:
LAUNCH OF THE SHIP TUBAL CAIN. Yesterday a splendid new ship, called the Tubal Cain, was launched from the shipbuilding yard of Messrs. Jordan and Getty, Sefton-street. The weather was exceedingly unfavourable, but, notwithstanding this fact, a very large number of spectators assembled to witness the event. A band was stationed in the building yard, and, up to the time when the vessel left the stocks, performed, a variety of old English airs, and other popular music.... The ceremony of christening was performed by Miss Macintyre, daughter of one of the owners of the vessel. The launch took place about half-past twelve o'clock, and the vessel glided off the stocks in good style, amidst tho Cheers of the spectators. Not the slightest accident occurred. The Tubal Cain is built on the new principle of iron frame-work and wooden planking, patented by Mr. Jordan, and which has been frequently explained in our columns. The plan embraces the introduction of iron ribs and girders, with plates running in the wake of the upper and lower deck bearings; the plates, to which the water way is attached, together with the diagonal plates, knees, and the rest of the iron work, are rivetted closely together - and their positions, with regard to each other, so nicely calculated as to resist any external opposing force which, under any circumstances, can be brought to bear against the ship. The Tubal Cain is 830 tons burthen, of handsome model, and her build such as to combine strength and carrying capacity with the important requisite of speed. She is planked outside, from the keel to the light watermark, with American rock elm and from thence to the gunwale with West India teak and greenheart. The decks are formed of four-inch yellow pine. There is a topgallant forecastle, beneath which are the quarters for the crew. ... The vessel is destined for the East India trade. ...

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Friday 09 September 1853]:
For PORT PHILIP direct. To sail from London early in September, embarking passengers at Southampton, THE splendid new clipper Ship TUBAL CAIN, A 1 ; Andrew Boyd, Jun., Commander; 787 tons register; loading in the St. Katharine's Docks; carries an experienced surgeon, and has very superior accommodation for passengers. ...

[from Bell's Weekly Messenger - Saturday 15 November 1862]:
On the 1st of September the ship Constance, 1106 tons. Captain Hewitt, arrived at Port Phillip Heads in disabled condition, from having come in collision with the ship Tubal Cain, of 528 tons register, off Cape Otway, on the evening of the 24th of August last. The Tubal Cain sank almost immediately after she was struck by the Constance, and 13 lives were lost, only one man, named Brown, the carpenter, being saved.

[from Sydney Morning herald - Mon 8 Sep 1862]:
COLLISION AT SEA. LOSS OF THE SHIP TUBAL CAIN AND CREW.
Early yesterday morning, intelligence was received at Williamstown, of a collision which took place on the 24th August, between the ship Constance, of Swansea, bound for this port [Melbourne] with a cargo of coal for the Great Britain steamship, and the Tubal Cain, which put in at Melbourne some weeks ago on her passage to Wallaroo. The telegram merely contained the melancholy news that when about 200 miles west of Cape Otway the two vessels met, and that the Tubal Cain had gone down with all hands save one.
As the Constance arrived in Hobson's Bay last evening at about 7 o'clock, we are now in a position to relate the circumstances attending the collision, as given by Captain Hewitt, of that vessel, and confirmed by the sole survivor of the Tubal Cain. The event has cast a gloom not only over those who had the pleasure of knowing Captain Clark, of the Tubal Cain, but also upon the seafaring portion of our community; the more so as both vessels were close to land comparatively and within only a short distance of their respect ports of destination. The Tubal Cain was commanded by Captain Charles H. Clark, who has several times visited those seas, and who gained the respect of all to whom he was known. We are informed that he was upwards of seventy years of age, and had only a short time ago expressed an inclination to spend the remainder of his days on land, and resign the command of his ship to his chief officer. The Tubal Cain was a ship of 564 tons register, and was owned partly by Captain Clark and partly by Messrs. Eli Cox and Co., of Bath, in the State of Maine. In consequence of having experienced some very severe weather about six weeks ago, she put in at this port for repairs, and was cleared at the Custom-house on the 15th August, with a cargo consisting of 1000 tons of coal for the Wallaroo Mining Company, South Australia, The cargo was insured, we understand, but the ship was not. She left the Heads on the 20th August, having on board the following crew:- Robert Wright, chief officer; William Wallace, second officer; William Always, Joseph Cummings, William Brown, B. Holdsworth, - King, - Munroe, J. Long, Henry Anderson, Thomas Currie, Kate Perry, the stewardess and a cook, name unknown. Of those Brown, the carpenter, was the only man saved. The Constance, a ship of 1106 tons, left Swansea on the 12th May last, being chartered to convey coal to this colony for the use of the Great Britain. Captain Hewitt, her commander, was congratulating himself upon having sighted the Cape, after a voyage of ninety-eight days, and was making preparations for anchoring in the Bay, by having the anchors and chains got ready on the day of the unfortunate collision. ....


Iron ship Evangeline, built Jordan & Getty, Liverpool, 1853, 995grt, 190 x 34 ft, ON 1570, owned Clint, Liverpool, registered Liverpool. For sale 1875 - owned De Wolf, Liverpool. In MNL to 1880. Voyage Liverpool to Philadelphia, leaky and abandoned on 19 April 1880. Crew (17) saved. More history

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 18 September 1852]:
The New Iron Ship. Messrs. Jordan, Getty, and Co., have nearly finished new iron clipper ship for Messrs. Clint and Co., for the New Orleans trade. She is 200 feet in her extreme length, 166 feet on the keel, 34 feet beam, 25 feet depth of hold, and 1,000 tons old measurement. She will, however, carry 3,500 bales of cotton, estimating three to the ton. The ship will have a round stern, and she will also be provided with tank keelson for her water, capable of holding 3,500 gallons. She will be launched about New Year's Day, and it is expected that she will attain great speed.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 15 March 1853]:
LAUNCHES. At noon on Saturday, the largest iron sailing vessel ever built in Liverpool was launched from the building yard of Messrs. Jordan and Getty, Sefton-street. Her dimensions are, 166 feet, length of keel; rake of stern, 18 feet; extreme breadth, 34 feet; depth of hold amidships, 21 feet 6 inches; registered burthen, upwards of 1,000 tons. She has an elliptical stern, lightly and elegantly carved. She has a house on deck and a a topgallant forecastle. The noble ship glided beautifully into the river, where her symmetrical proportions excited the admiration of a numerous company, assembled to witness the launch. Her owners are Clint and Son who intend her for the Australian trade, for which she is peculiarly suited, although originally contemplated for the New Orleans trade. ...

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 15 April 1853]:
To sail 25th instant. FOR NEW ORLEANS, The splendid new iron clipper-built ship, EVANGELINE, Joseph Easton, Commander, 953 tons register; now loading east side Union Dock. For freight or passage apply to CLINT & CO., 3, York-buildings, Dale-street.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Monday 12 July 1875]:
FOR SALE BY PRIVATE TREATY. The well-known iron Ship EVANGELINE, 964 tons register. Built in Liverpool, of the best materials, in 1853. She had new iron bulwarks, binding, a rake, stringers, waterways, and several new beams: new decks, new charcoal wire rigging; and was continued in the Liverpool (Red) Book for six years in 1870. This ship has always discharged her cargoes in first class condition. Her dimensions are: Length, 184 feet: breadth, 31 feet; depth, 21 3-10 feet. she is a stiff ship, only requiring 40 tons of ballast to shift her, and is celebrated for her rapid passages. For further particulars apply to Clint and Co., owners, 3, York-buildinqs, Dale-street; or to C. W. KELLOCK & CO. Brokers, Walmer-buildings, Water-street, Liverpool.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Friday 09 July 1880]:
BOARD OF TRADE INQUIRY. THE EVANGELINE. A Board of Trade inquiry into the circumstances attending the abandonment of the ship Evangeline, of Liverpool, in the Atlantic, on the 19th April last, was commenced in St. George's Hall yesterday, before Mr. Raffles, stipendiary magistrate, and Captains Wilson and Ward; Mr. Paxton conducted the inquiry on behalf of the Board of Trade, and Mr. Hawkins for the captain and owners.
Mr. Paxton, in opening the inquiry, said the Evangeline was an iron sailing ship of 994 tons register, built at Liverpool in 1853. and owned by Messrs J. S. de Wolfe and Co.. of this port. She left the Mersey for Philadelphia on the 9th of March last, having a crew of 17, all told, including the master (Thomas Manson), and with a cargo of 800 tons of pig iron, 200 tons of soda ash, and between 150 and 200 tons of rags in bale. The greater part of the cargo was stowed in the lower hold, and a portion 'tween decks. Nothing of importance occurred until the 20th of March, when the weather came on stormy, and it was found by the master that there were 17 inches of water in the hold. The water continued to increase, and three days afterwards on making an examination he found that some of the bolts on the port side had given way, and that there was a crack in one of the plates. He endeavoured to stop the leaks as well as he could with cotton and wedges, but still the water increased. He, however, did not tell any of the crew of the leaks, thinking it would scare them, and hoping to reach port; but finding the situation becoming critical, he disclosed the fact to the mates. They went down together and found that there were leaks on both side of the ship. The pumps had been kept going continually, without, however, diminishing the water and the crew eventually complained of being completely worn out. They requested the captain to abandon her, which he, however, first refused to do, ordering them back to the pumps; but in a day or two afterwards over 7 feet of water was found in the hold, and he then resolved to leave her on the first opportunity. The barque Adele and Sabina hove in sight on the 19th of April, and all hands transferred themselves to her, being subsequently landed in safety at New York. A short time after the abandonment, the Evangeline was observed to be on fire, and she had not since been heard of. He could not account for her taking fire - whether it was the action of the soda ash in the water, or that she had in some way taken fire. ...


Wooden ship Black Eagle, built Getty & Major, Liverpool, 1854, 1468 tons, the largest wooden ship built at Liverpool up to that date. ON 10519. Owned builders. Registered Liverpool, traded to Australia, In 1860 registered Glasgow. Registered and owned at Melbourne from Sept 1860, but reported as returned to Glasgow registration in 1861. In MNL to 1863. Voyage Melbourne to London in 1861. Voyage Calcutta to London, leaky and put into Azores, condemned, 17 Sept 1862.

[from Northern Daily Times - Wednesday 01 February 1854]:
The second launch was that of the Black Eagle., a timber built vessel, of 1,600 tons, from the yard of Messrs. Getty and Major. The dimensions of the Black Eagle are as follows: length of keel, 188 feet; length over all, 200 feet; beam, 42 feet; depth of hold, 23 feet. The Black Eagle is intended for the Australian trade, and is owned by her builders. [largest wooden ship built at Liverpool]

[from Glasgow Courier - Thursday 09 October 1862]:
Santa Cruz, Flores. Sept. 17. About 1300 tons of cargo have been landed from the Black Eagle, Smith, [of Glasgow] from Calcutta to London, which has been condemned here. About 300 tons in the 'tween decks are damaged.


Iron ship James Pilkington, built Getty, Liverpool, 1854, 1352 nrt, 200 x 37.5 ft, owned E Bates, Liverpool, registered Liverpool, ON 23966. Voyage Liverpool to Bombay, owned Edward Bates, stranded and wrecked, 17/06/1862, 25 miles north of Bombay harbour, near Bassein [now Vasai], 33 crew, two lost. More history

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 29 April 1854]:
Launch of a Large Iron Vessel. On Thursday morning, an iron ship of 1,404 tons, builder's measurement, the largest iron vessel ever built at this port, was driven from the stocks at the building yard of Mr. John Getty. Sefton-street. The following are her dimensions: Length of keel, 200 feet; rake of stern, 18 feet; breadth amidships, 37.5 feet, depth of hold amidships, 22 feet 10 inches. The ship has been built for Mr. Edward Bates, of this town, and was named the James Pilkington, in compliment to the member [MP] for Blackburn.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Thursday 24 July 1862]:
THE WRECK OF THE JAMES PILKINGTON. The Iron ship James Pilkington, of 1350 tons, commanded by Captain E. Griffiths, left Liverpool on the 13th of February last, with a general cargo, consisting of bale goods, iron, &c. She was consigned to Messrs. Bates and Co of Bombay. On the 17th instant, at a quarter to eight o'clock in the evening, she was totally wrecked near Bassein, about 25 miles distant from Bombay. The unfortunate vessel went to pieces immediately, and in a few hours after she struck, there was not a vestige of her to be seen on the spot where she was wrecked. We are informed that Mr. Edward Bates, of Liverpool, is sole owner, and that the value of the ship was estimated at 150,000 rs. The cargo is valued at 1,000,000 rs. We are sorry to be obliged to report the loss of two of the crew, one a sailmaker and the other an able-bodied seaman.
From information that we have gleaned, it appears that the vessel had been subjected to very rough and adverse weather nearly ever since she left Liverpool, and after a somewhat protracted voyage she arrived off this port on Saturday, the 14th instant, when in consequence of the very bad state of the weather it was considered unsafe to attempt to get into the harbour, the more especially as no pilot could be obtained. The ship, therefore, stood off, and as the gale continued all that night and throughout Sunday she put to sea again. On Tuesday afternoon following, at about four o'clock, she made the land once more, and at dusk was steering well in. The captain was on deck when two lights were reported on the port bow and another to starboard, There can be no doubt that the lights off Bassein were mistaken for the Bombay lights, and the vessel having a fair wind was making all possible way for the desired haven. All at once the unfortunate craft ran full on the shore with a terrific bump, which shook her from stem to stern. This, however, was only the first graze, and took place at a quarter to eight o'clock, and in a few moments afterwards, she received another severe shook and became instantly fixed in the sands. Everything that skill and seamanship could suggest was now done; the captain and officers all went to work vigorously. The foremast was cut away, and everything that could be thought of was tried. All hands vied with each other in their endeavours to right the ship, but every effort proved unavailing. When it was found that it was impossible to render any further assistance to the ship, the pinnace and lifeboats were ordered to be lowered, which was promptly done, but in effecting which the former was unfortunately stove in. Some of the men were then ordered into the boats, and instructed to lie off in them on the ship's quarter, to which they were fastened by a line. In consequence of the pinnace being stove she speedily filled, and the men in her scrambled into the other boat. During this time the ship was making a great deal of water, and it became evident that she would speedily go to pieces, having been in her perilous position for upwards of four hours. The sea had now commenced to make clean breaches over the vessel, and at every rise of the waves the lifeboat was lifted up on a level with the quarter-deck. Captain Griffiths sent for his wife on deck, and stepping over the side lifted her into the boat the next time that she rose, and then left the ship with the second mate and eight seamen, in all eleven souls. They pushed off for the shore, which was distant scarcely a mile and a half.
Mr. White, the first officer, was now in charge of the wreck with 21 hands on board. The men all acted well, and in a manner that only British sailors could act in such an emergency; they were all willing to submit themselves to the directions of their chief officer. It was then determined to make an attempt to launch the long-boat, which was covered in and filled with stores. The men went heartily to work and cleared her; but although every possible exertion was made to launch the boat with all possible care, she unfortunately struck against the sides of the wreck, and was stove in, the whole of the men in her being precipitated into the sea, and she filled immediately. Some of the men clung to the boat, which, though full of water, did not sink, whilst the remainder managed with very great exertion to scramble again on to the wreck. By this time she was evidently going to break up. The men held on by anything they could clutch at, and the sea at every advancing wave dashed over the ill-fated ship, which was rapidly filling with water. The upper deck was wafted up and down by the action of the water within and the sea without. A large wave now dashed over the wreck and broke the leg of a poor fellow named Hugh Jones, an able-bodied seaman; immediately afterwards the unfortunate man and another, Charles Martin, sailmaker, were washed overboard and drowned. In a few minutes afterwards another sea struck the wreck and broke up the deck completely, when the remainder of the men were precipitated into the sea. There was now nothing left for them but to endeavour to reach the shore, which they essayed to do most manfully, and, we are happy to add, successfully. The poor fellows reached the beach about half-past three o'clock in the morning of Wednesday, the 18th, and, as may be expected, in a very exhausted and distressed state. They lay on the beach til daylight in their wet clothes without any food or assistance coming to their aid. In the course of the day, 20 of them made their way to Mahim, where they were hospitably received by Mr. Knight, the European constable in charge of the police at that place, who fed them and afterwards brought them to Bombay; upon their arrival they were taken to the Sailors' Home, where they arrived at ten o'clock at night, Everything was done for them that the dictates of kindness or humanity could suggest by the master of the home, Mr. Avron, The whole of the men were supplied with clothing, of which they were much in need; some of them had scarcely a rag on their back or shoes on their feet.
A good deal of the cargo, consisting of woollen and piece goods, as well as twist and other light articles from the wreck, has drifted ashore, besides portions of the wreck. The consignees have been able to recover some of the things, but as they were washed ashore on different parts of the coast for several miles in extent, great difficulty was experienced in getting possession of them. The natives along the coast have managed to possess themselves of a large quantity of the goods that have floated on the beach.
The salvage from the wreck was sold by auction on the 25th instant, near the Island of Versavo. It realised 30,000 rs.


Composite barque Bristow, designed Jordan & Getty, completed Jones & Getty, Liverpool, 1854, ON 4308, 351grt, 133 x 25 ft, wood planks on iron frame, owned Hughes, Liverpool, registered Liverpool. Traded to Australia. By 1870 registered London. By 1895 registered Hull, owned Dover. Collided off Deal with SS Glenlochy on 16 January 1899 - towed into Ramsgate. Register closed 1899. More history.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 18 September 1852]:
Messrs. Jordan, Getty, and Co., have laid down the keel of another ship of 500 tons, to be built on their principle of an iron framing planked with wood [Bristow]. They also launched an iron coasting schooner on Tuesday, of about 100 tons register, which was fully rigged, and which had her sails bent and all ready for sea.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 14 July 1854]:
SHIP LAUNCHES. THE BRISTOW. Yesterday at noon, a handsome clipper barque named the Bristow, belonging to T. B. Hughes, Esq.; of this town, was launched from the yard of Messrs. Getty, Jones, and Co., Sefton-street, in the presence of a large number of ladies and gentlemen. The vessel is intended for the Australian wool trade. She is built with iron frames and wood planking. Her length, over all, is 140 feet; breadth 25 feet; and depth of hold 16 feet. Her tonnage, old measurement, is 388 tons; new ditto, 373 tons; and she will carry 476 tons dead weight, at 14 feet draught of water. She is well and substantially built, her planking being of rock elm [Ulmus thomasii] below the water and teak above. Her head is ornamented with a carved shield bearing the owner's coat of arms, with the motto "Vigilantibus, non dominantibus." The ceremony of christening was performed by Mrs. Hughes, the mother of the owner, as the vessel glided gracefully into the water. A number of the friends of the owner and builder afterwards assembled together, to the number of about 120, in a long room over the joiners' shop, where a sumptuous repast was laid out by Mr. Robert Walker, of the Mansion-house Hotel, Drury-lane. Mr. Getty presided, ....

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Tuesday 27 January 1874]:
FOR SALE. The composite-built Barque BRISTOW, 383 tons register; built under special survey at Liverpool in 1854 and then classed 12 years A 1 at Lloyd's, and in 1866 was continued for 8 years A 1; in 1867 had very large repairs, including new decks, when she was put in first-rate order; is copper fastened and sheathed with yellow metal; stated to carry 520 tons dead weight, and sails remarkably fast. Lying in the Queen's Dock. Liverpool. Dimensions: Length, 131.8 feet; breadth, 23.7 feet; depth, 15.3 feet. For further particulars apply to Messrs. Suter, McNeilege, and Co., Central-chambers, South Castle-street, Liverpool; or to C. W. KELLOCK & CO., Brokers. Walmer-buildings, Water-street. Liverpool; and at 72, Cornhill, London. E.C.

[from Liverpool Weekly Courier - Saturday 23 June 1883]:
A telegram from Stanley, F.I., dated Monte Video, June 18, states that the British barque Bristow, Falkland Islands for London, got ashore whilst leaving, but came off and proceeded.

[from Maryport Advertiser - Saturday 20 January 1894]:
The composite barque Bristow has been sold for about £400. She is 351 tons register, and was built at Liverpool in 1854; carries 520 tons d.w. on a draft of 14ft. Length, 133.3 ft.; breadth, 25ft.; depth, 15.3 ft.

[from Lloyd's List - Wednesday 25 August 1897]:
BRISTOW. Deal, Aug. 25, 7 29 a.m. Bristow, barquentine, of Hull, has been ashore on the main, off Kingsdown. Dover Harbour tug Lady Vita, lifeboat, and other boats are alongside and assisted her off at 6 40. She is now at anchor off and will probably proceed to Dover, in tow, later on.
Deal, Aug. 25, 9 17 a.m. Sailed, 7 15 a.m., barquentine Bristow, from Sunderland for Dover, with coals, in tow of Lady Vita tug, having been ashore on the main off Kingsdown since 1 a.m.
Dover, Aug. 25, 9 31 a.m. Barquentine Bristow, of Hull, from Sunderland (coals) for Dover, arrived. Master reports that during rain squall he anchored vessel, and on water falling she took the ground at Kingsdown; was assisted off by boatmen without agreement, slipping from anchor and 60 fathoms wire hawser. Afterwards took tug here; agreement £10. Reports vessel makes no water.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Tuesday 17 January 1899]:
Deal, Jan 16. BRISTOW (barquentine), of Hull, from Shields for Dover, coal, while beating west at 11 am, came into collision with Glenlochy (s), of Glasgow, from Norfolk, Va., for London. Steamer stopped for nearly an hour, and is now proceeding for London. Bristow has been taken in tow by tug Shamrock, of London, and is towing towards the shore. Shamrock tug has towed the Bristow barquentine into Ramsgate. (Deal, Jan 16.)


Iron barque Anne Baker, built Getty & Jones, Liverpool, 1854, ON 10501, registered Liverpool, 504 tons. Voyage Liverpool to Peru, leaky and abandoned in Straits of Magellan, crew saved, 5th June 1859.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 25 September 1854]:
On Saturday last was launched, from the yard of Messrs. Getty, Jones and Co., South Shore, a beautiful iron barque, about 500 tons burthen, called the Anna Baker[sic], belonging to Messrs. Baker and Dyer. The christening was performed by the lady whose name she bears. Being very strong, she is well adapted for any trade; and has been built under the superintendence of Mr. James Hodgson.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Monday 05 September 1859]:
Anne Baker barque, from Liverpool for Arles [sic] and Islay, was run ashore in a sinking state and lost June 15, Atlantic entrance to the Straits of Magellan, between Cape Possession and Danger Point [Punta Dungeness]; crew arrived Valparaiso.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Thursday 01 September 1859]:
VALPARAISO July 16. Endeavours are being made here to despatch a vessel for the purpose of bringing away the cargo of the Ann Baker, run ashore near Cape Possession, Magellan Straits. [Bahia Posesion]


Iron ship Elizabeth Harrison, built Josiah Jones, Liverpool, 1854, 1401 tons, 247 x 36.6 x 21 ft. Ordered by James Baines of Liverpool, Black Ball Line, and advertised as intended to sail, as a new ship, to Australia in 1853 - before she was eventually launched. So possibly not accepted since delivered late. Not in LR or MNL, only subsequent mention in newspapers is of experiments with a magnetic compass. Presumably sold foreign, or renamed. Yard no.1 of Josiah Jones is Khimjee Oodowjee which was an iron clipper ship but seems to have been a little smaller, and was first in service in 1856, though with no report of when she was launched.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Tuesday 05 December 1854]:
Ship Launch. - Yesterday morning a very fine iron ship was launched from the building yard of Mr Josiah Jones, jun (formerly Messrs. Getty, and Jones, jun). The vessel belongs to Messrs. James Baines and Co., and was called the Elizabeth Harrison, after the lady of one of the owners; and Mrs. Harrison gracefully performed the ceremony of christening. Her dimensions are:- length 247 feet over all; extreme breadth, 36 foot 6 inches; depth of hold, 21 feet; tonnage, about 1500 tons. She is intended for the Australian passenger trade, for which she will be fitted up in a similar manner to the celebrated clipper Lightning, and altogether will prove a very fine addition to the splendid line of clippers which Messrs. Baines and Co. already possess. [Another report: She has been built under the superintendence of Mr. James Hodgson]

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 06 March 1854]:
BLACK BALL LINE OF AUSTRALIAN PACKETS. - Being the only regularly established Line of Clippers between LIVERPOOL, MELBOURNE; Forwarding passengers to ADELAIDE, SYDNEY, GEELONG and LAUNCESTON at ship's expense. All passengers and luggage landed on the Wharf. These ships are constructed by the finest builders of the day, including M'Kay, of Boston, and Hall, of Aberdeen.
Ship. Reg. Bur. Capt. Date.
NORWOOD 1527 2300 Price 1st April
LIGHTNING (new) 2000 2500 Forbes 15th April
OLIVER LANG (new) 1273 2300 Manning 1st May
CHAMPION OF THE SEAS (new) 2280 3500 Newlands 1st June
MARCO POLO 1625 3000 M'Donnell 1st July
JAMES BAINES (new) 2400 4000 Gardner 1st Aug
INDIAN QUEEN 1040 2000 Mills 1st Sept
ELIZABETH HARRISON (new) 1404 2600 Jackson 1st Oct
BONNIE JEAN (new Aberdeen clipper) 2000 3000 M'Cartney 1st Nov
SCHOMBERG (new) 2300 3500 Duguid 1st Dec
The above ships are of the largest class; are commanded by men of experience and ability, who will take every precaution to promote the health and comfort of the passengers. They also carry experienced Surgeons. .... JAMES BAINES & Co, NB All the ships of this line will continue to take steam as far as practicable.





Iron ship Khimjee Oodowjee (or Khimjee Oudowjee), ON 14779, built Jones & Co, Liverpool, 1856, yard no.1, registered Liverpool 1856-1902. 909 tons. 212 x 33.5 ft. Latterly barque. Owned Edward Bates, Liverpool. Traded to Bombay, and also to Melbourne. More history. Some more history. Register closed 1902.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 09 February 1856]:
For BOMBAY, Direct. ... COTESWORTH, WYNNE, and LYNE. ... The splendid new Liverpool-built clipper Ship KHIMJEE OODOWJEE, A 1 at Lloyd's twelve years, 1050 old and 900 tons new measurement, is intended to succeed, and to sail about the end of March.

[from Lloyd's List - Wednesday 21 January 1857]:
Entered outwards, customhouse, foreign ports: Khimjee Oudowjee Bombay 909t


Iron ship Lalla Rookh, ON 17794, built Jones & Co, Liverpool, 1856, yard no.3, registered Liverpool 1856-1873, 869 tons. Owned Prowse, Liverpool. Crew list to 1873. In MNL to 1873. Voyage Shanghai to London, wrecked near Prawle point on 3-3-1873, crew of 20, 1 lost, also 1 stowaway died.
More history.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 17 October 1856]:
LAUNCH OF A NEW IRON SHIP. - On Wednesday last, there was launched from the shipbuilding yard of Mr. Josiah Jones, jun, Sefton-street, a large and splendid new iron ship, called the Lalla Rookh, intended to trade between this port and the East Indies. She was built for the eminent firm of Messrs. Prowse and Co., and the interesting ceremony of naming the vessel was performed in a graceful manner by Miss Barclay, niece to the head of that firm. The Lalla Rookh, which was built under a special survey, is an exceedingly strong vessel, beautifully modelled, and combines every modern improvement in the art of shipbuilding. She is 180 feet long, 33 feet 5 inches beam, and 21 feet depth of hold. She will carry he 947 tons, builders' measurement, and she is registered A 1 at Lloyd's for 12 years. She has a full poop and forecastle, and her general accommodation will be of a superior description. She will be commanded by Capt. Connibeer, late of the Francis Barclay, who is well acquainted with the East Indian trade. The launch was witnessed by a large number of persons, who cheered most lustily upon the new vessel being driven off the stocks into the Mersey. She was subsequently towed into the Queen's Dock Basin, where she will be fitted up without drelay, and despatched on her first voayge to Calcutta. After the launch, a large number of ladies and gentlemen assembled in one of the large rcoms attached to Mr. Jones's yard, where a substantial and plentiful repast was tastefully served up by Mr. William Ross, of the Eldon Dining Rooms, South John-street. ...

[from Liverpool Mercury - Tuesday 25 March 1873]:
WRECK OF THE LALLA ROOKH. Yesterday, a Board of Trade Inquiry was held at the police court Dale-street, in reference to the circumstances attending the loss of the ship Lalla Rookh on the coast of Cornwall, on the 3rd instant.
Mr. Tyndall, in stating the circumstances, explained that the Lalla Rookh was an iron sailing ship of 869 tons register, built at Liverpool in the year 1856, and ship-rigged; her length being 179 feet, breadth 33 feet, and depth in hold 20 feet. On the 22nd October last she sailed from Shanghai, under the command of Captain George Fullerton, with a cargo of tea, tobacco, &c, on a voyage to London, and had a crew, all told, of 20 hands. The cargo was well stowed, and the ship well found in every respect. During the voyage everything went on well, until the morning of the 3rd instant, when, during a very thick fog, between half-past four and five o'clock, she struck on Gammon Point about three-quarters of a mile west of Prawle Point, on the coast of Cornwall. By their own exertions, and those of the coast guard, all the crew were saved, with one exception - the chief officer, who was unfortunately drowned by the upsetting of the launch. There was a stowaway on board but he was very ill during the voyage, and died an hour or two before the vessel struck. Shortly after striking, the vessel drifted into a sandy cove, where she became a total wreck. From the previous evening a thick fog prevailed; and when the fog lifted and the captain observed her dangerous position with reference to the coast, every effort was made by the captain to prevent her striking; but, as already mentioned, without avail. It was stated that there were two lead lines on board; yet, although the weather was thick, they were not used. The estimated value of the ship was £10000 and of the cargo £50000; and the ship and freight were insured for £10,000. ...


Iron schooner Jessie, built Jones & Co, Liverpool, 1856-7, yard no.10. 81 tons, owned G Horsfall, Liverpool. Possibly ON 16889, registered Liverpool 1856, 44 tons, last MNL listing 1864. More history.


Iron barque Chiloe, built Jones & co, 1857, yard no.38, ON 19980, 457 grt, 145 x 26.5 ft, registered and owned Liverpool. In MNL to 1887. Latterly a barque. For sale at Birkenhead in 1878. Collision 1887 off Montevideo - damaged, condemned and sold, More history.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Wednesday 04 September 1878]:
FOR SALE. The fine iron Barque CHILOE, 457 tons register. Built at Liverpool in 1857, under special survey, and classed *A 1 at Lloyd's and twenty years in red in the Underwriters' book; she is in first-rate condition and well found in all stores. Dimensions: Length, 144 feet; breadth, 26 feet 6 inches; depth, 7 feet 3 inches. Lying in the East Float, Birkenhead. For inventories and further particulars, apply London to A. W. Tonge, 6, East India-avenue or to TONGE & CO.. Brokers. .. Liverpool.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Monday 10 July 1882]:
For Callao direct - ... The fine clipper barque Chiloe, 457 tons, H Collin, commander, loading in West India Docks...

[from Blackpool Gazette & Herald - Friday 10 August 1883]:
ON SALE, a good 23 feet GIG, English oak built, mahogany thwarts and fittings, copper fastened thoroughly, and in excellent condition. Apply to Captain Collin, Barque "Chiloe," Fleetwood.

[from Western Morning News - Saturday 23 July 1887]:
Part of the crew of the barque Chiloe, of Liverpool, 438 tons register - Mr. Bridson, the chief officer, the carpenter, boatswain, nd steward - were passengers to England by the Cotopaxi, steamship, which arrived at Plymouth yesterday from South America. The Chiloe was built in 1857. On her last voyage she was run into by a Spanish barque [Carmen] 90 miles off Montevideo, and very much damaged. Her crew, however, managed to navigate her into Montevideo, where she has been condemned and sold.


Iron ship Aphrodita, built Jones & Co, Liverpool, 1858, ON 21497, yard no.48, 1663 grt, 227 x 36 ft, registered Liverpool. In MNL to 1888. Latterly described as a barque. Damaged at Capetown and sold to US in 1889, as Wilmslow. Posted missing 1889 on voyage St John, N.B to Belfast. More history.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Monday 04 June 1888]:
LATEST MARITIME INTELLIGENCE. Aphrodita - Yesterday a coastguardsman picked up near Borough Island a bundle of papers and letters belongng to the ship Aphrodita. It appears that the vessel, which belong to Liverpool, was from Valparaiso, and was last heard of from Falmonth, where she called for orders. Some of the postmarks bear the date of April 11th. They were addressed to Captain Tate, Aphrodita, Falmouth. Only one vessel of this name appears on the register, and she is of 1,620 tons.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Wednesday 06 June 1888]
Aphrodita. .... The owners, Messrs W Price & Co ... The Aphrodita is now discharging safely at Antwerp, where she arrived all well on Friday last, the 1st inst.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Saturday 03 November 1888]:
Aphrodita, British barque, from Antwerp for Melbourne, has put in with chain plates carried away, decks and hatches started. (Cape Town, Nov 2) [later reported as having 100 tons of damaged cargo and awaiting orders]

[from Lloyd's List - Wednesday 24 April 1889]:
APHRODITA. Cape Town, April 3. The barque Aphrodita is stated to have been sold. She is now being refitted under the American flag, and her name has been changed to Wilmslow; it is said she will leave here in ballast -- later reported, as Aphrodita, leaving Table Bay for Barbadoes, on April 8.

[from Shields Daily Gazette - Friday 19 July 1889]:
A telegram from St. John, N. B., states that the barque Wilmslow, late Aphrodita, is at Liverpool, N.S., leaking badly.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Thursday 10 April 1890]:
MISSING VESSELS. The two following vessels, previously referred to as overdue, have been posted at Lloyd's as missing:
Bridgewater, of New York, which left Darien for Queenstown, December 5, cargo pitch pine;
and Wilmslow, of New York, which left St John NB, for Belfast, November 30, cargo deals, and have not since been heard of.


Iron barque Aconcagua, built Josiah Jones, jun, Liverpool, 1859, yard no.69, 496 grt. 150 x 26.5 ft, owned James Gardner & Edward Broomhall, Liverpool, registered Liverpool. ON 27949. Sold 1878 to J Walmsley. Registered Glasgow, owned Roxburgh in 1891-2, then not in MNL. Ashore at Mauritius in a tropical storm on 29 April 1892 at Port Louis, and was abandoned. Wreck put up for sale. From 1895 named Parvady, barquentine, 458 tons, registered, Port Louis, Mauritius, closed 1904. More history.

Image from painting in MMM of Aconcagua. Also shown is no.2 pilot boat, Leader.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Saturday 15 October 1859]:
LAUNCH. On Thursday last, a launch took place at the iron ship building-yard of Mr. Josiah Jones, Sefton-street. The vessel, a splendid iron clipper barque, 504 tons, A 1 for twelve years at Lloyd's, is built for Messrs. Gardner and Broomhall (managing owners), and Messrs. Graham, Kelley & Co., of this town, under special superintendence, for the West Coast South American, trade and is the second of the same class that the builder has launched for the same firms. She is to be fitted with Cunningham's patent topsails, Newell's wire rigging, etc., and is confidently expected to prove herself one of the swiftest and best vessels in this trade. The ceremony of naming the Aconcagua was performed by Miss Kelley, when the noble craft glided into her element with a steadiness that, combined with the symmetry and beauty of her design, elicited the greatest admiration. The company, numbering about 300, then proceeded to the spacious mould-room adjoining, where a splendid collation was prepared, Fowles' quadrille band being in attendance. Jas Gardner, Esq., in compliment to Mr. Jones in his skill as an iron ship-builder, on behalf of himself and co-owners, expressed his entire satisfaction at the manner in which that gentleman had completed his contract; in acknowledging this pleasing compliment, Mr. Jones expressed his obligation to the managing owners for many valuable suggestions with which they had from time to time favoured him, and for their courtesy on all occasions. After launching, the vessel was moored in the Queen's Basin, where she now lies.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 20 October 1859]:
For VALPARAISO. The splendid new Liverpool-built clipper Barque Aconcagua, Thomas Fox, Commander, 498 tons register, A 1 at Lloyd's for twelve years, built expressly for the West Coast trade; and is expected to prove herself one of the fastest vessels afloat. ... ACONCAGUA has superior accommodation for cabin passengers. For terms apply to Gardner & Broomhall.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Tuesday 22 October 1878]:
VESSELS ON SALE, The fine Liverpool-built iron Barque ACONCAGUA, 496 tons register. Built, under special survey, at Liverpool in October 1859, for her present owners, and is now classed *Aa 1 at Lloyd's, and 20 years A1 red in the Liverpool book; carries 710 tons dead weight; has iron masts and bowsprit, rigging nearly all new, and many new spars; in 1878 had part new decks; is well found in stores, and in splendid order; has been constantly employed in the West Coast trade, and is now discharging a cargo of nitrate in the Southampton Dock. Dimensions: Length. 150 feet; breadth, 28.5 feet; depth. 17.5 feet. For inventories and further particulars, apply to C. W. KELLOCK & Co, Brokers, Walmer-buildings, Water-street, Liverpool; and at 72, Cornhill London.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Wednesday 08 January 1890]:
On Thursday, the 30th January, at One o'clock (gun time), at the Saleroom, Exchange-buildings, Rumford-street, Liverpool (unless previously disposed of by private treaty). The Mersey-built Iron Barque ACONCAGUA, 496 tons register. Length 150 feet, breadth 26 feet 5-10, depth 17 feet 5-10. Built at Liverpool under special survey in 1859, and A 1 at Lloyd's, classed No. 3 survey in 1884, is a handsome model, and carries a very large cargo, having delivered 754 tons nitrate from Iquique. Has always been very well kept up and fully equipped. She sailed from Charleston for the Clyde on 8th December. For further particulars apply to JOHN HUGHES & CO., Shipping Salesmen, Auctioneers, and Valuers, 13, Tower-buildings, Old Church-yard, Liverpool.

[from Lloyd's List - Friday 02 September 1892]:
ACONCAGUA. Mauritius, Aug. 11. The British barque Aconcagua, which drove ashore here, has been abandoned, and will be sold by auction on Aug. 15.

[from Lloyd's List - Wednesday 21 September 1892]:
Aconcagua, Mauritius, Aug. 24. The materials, stores, &c., of the Aconcagua have been sold by auction for Rs. 2,760. Offers for the hull have been called for by advertisement, but none have been yet received. [later hull sold for Rs 620]

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Wednesday 22 January 1902]:
Arived: FREMANTLE. Parvady from East London, Dec 14 [last newspaper mention of Parvady: January 1902 at Fremantle]

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Miscellaneous sailing vessels built at Liverpool. (Steam vessels).

George the Fourth SV 1820 J & W Quirk

Rio Packet SV 1820 Mulby & Evans

Kitty (Pilot V) 1824 John Corkhill

Hardware SV 1821 James

John M'Adam SV 1834, James Gordon
Tory SV 1835 Gordon
John Knox SV 1836 Gordon
Ironsides SV 1838 Jackson & Gordon, iron
Syria SV 1841 William Jackson
Excelsior SV 1850 John Jackson

Liverpool (Pilot V) 1834 William Dickinson

Fishing smacks Salmon, Turbot, Sole Christopher Heyes

Elizabeth SV 1823 J and R Fisher
William Salthouse SV 1824 J and R Fisher
Tickler SV 1824 J and R Fisher
Warwick SV 1825 J and R Fisher
Memnon SV 1826 J and R Fisher
Lady Rowena SV 1827 J and R Fisher
Un-named SV 1828 J and R Fisher
Cheshire SV 1830 J and R Fisher

Frances Ann SV 1830 Clover
Orixa SV 1836 Clover
Anne Jane 1838 Clover

Columbine SV 1839 Bannister & Simpson
Harlequin SV 1840 Bannister & Simpson
Grimaldi SV 1841 Bannister & Simpson
Anna Dixon SV 1842 Bannister

Lancaster SV 1838 Porter

Grace Darling SV 1840 Robert Talbot

Meg of Meldon SV 1840 Haselden, Pearson, Troughton
Centaur SV 1839 Hasleden, Pearson & Troughton,
Sphynx SV 1839 Hasleden, Pearson & Troughton,

Tom Banks SV 1839 Grayson

Rosanna SV 1840 John Johnson

Unknown SV 1846
Loodianah SV 1846 W Buckley Jones
Pioneer (Pilot V) 1852 W Buckley Jones
The Duke (Pilot V) 1852 W Buckley Jones
Unknown schooner 1856 W Buckley Jones

Lockett SV 1852 J Brooke
SV 18


Wooden brig George the Fourth, built J & W Quirk, Liverpool, 1820, 189 tons, for service to Brazil, owned Bibby & Co. In LR to 1840. Newspaper reports George IV, loading at Liverpool for St Thomas's, West Indies, owned Bibby, 6 March 1835. No later newspaper reports found. Reported wrecked 1835.

[from Lancaster Gazette - Saturday 19 February 1820]:
On the 2d inst., a fine brig, of 189 tons burthen, intended for the Brazil trade, was launched from the building yard of Messrs. J. and W. Quirk, at Liverpool, and was called George the Fourth, being the first vessel launched at that port in the reign of his present Majesty.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 19 May 1831]:
To sail on the 22d inst. For NAPLES and MESSINA, The A 1 Brig GEORGE IV, J. Parry, master, A 1, 187 tons; and having the greatest part of her cargo on board, will be despatched as above. For freight, &c. apply to JOHN BIBBY and Co.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 25 April 1834]:
For PUERTO CABELLO, the fine Liverpool-built Brig, GEORGE THE FOURTH, M Rothwell, Master, 187 tons register, coppered and copper-fastened, and will be despatched as above, with whatever freight offers. For terms of freight or passage apply to the owners, JOHN BIBBY and CO.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 06 March 1835]:
Vessels entered for loading: West Indies. J Bibby & Co; 187; George IV; St Thomas's.


Wooden ship Rio Packet, built Mulby & Evans, Liverpool, 1820, 205 tons, for Kerslake, Liverpool. In LR 1824, described as built Liverpool. For sale 1824. In July 1850 arrived Port Jackson, NSW, from Oporto, barque Rio Packet of London , 205 tons, Andrew Shifley master. Voyage Sydney to Java, wrecked in Torres Straits on 24 June 1852, 4 lost, 6 saved.

The builders names are reported as Mulby and Evans. When Mulvey opened a larger shipyard at Chester in 1825, he was described as late of Mulvey and Evans. So the builder was most probably Mulvey, who may have had premises at Liverpool before returning to Chester in 1825.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 21 January 1820]:
Launches in this port. .... the Packet, of 216 tons, from the yard of Messrs. Mulby and Evans, for the house of Messrs. Kerslake and Co.;

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 18 February 1820]:
Intended for a Constant Trader. FOR RIO JANEIRO. The fine new Liverpool built Ship, RIO PACKET, JAMES KERSLAKE, Master; Burthen 205 Tons, Coppered to the bends, a very superior vessel, carries a small cargo for her tonnage, being built for despatch, and is particularly calculated for the conveyance of dry goods; a great part of the cargo is engaged. For freight of the remainder, or for passage, having excellent accommodations, apply to Capt. Kerslake, on board, King's Dock, to Duncan Gibb, or to HASELDEN and WILLIS.

[from Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser - Wednesday 18 August 1824]:
SALE... On MONDAY, the 23rd Instant, at Two, THE very superior, fast-sailing, A 1 Ship, RIO PACKET, Capt. James Kerslake, burthen per register 205 tons; built at Liverpool, under the inspection of the present owners, coppered and copper fastened, and is desirable Vessel for the Cape or South American Trade. She was expressly built for a Rio Packet Ship, to which Port she has been constantly employed. Apply to Capt Kerslake, on board, in the King's Dock; to Mr. J. G. MAKZETTI, Langbourn Chambers, London, or to RICHARD BATESON and Co. Brokers. Liverpool.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Wednesday 17 June 1846]:
Salthouse Dock, Liverpool, Rio Packet, 205, Harry, Cotesworth & Co.

[from Lloyd's List - Saturday 09 February 1850]:
London. Cleared outwards, Feb 8. Oporto & Sydney, Rio Packet, Shifley, 205, Gillespy. [later reports: arrived Sydney Oct 6 1851: Rio Packet Shripley[sic]; sailed Rio Packet, Shifeley, June 1 1852 from Sydney for Java]

[from the Maitland Mercury - Wednesday 6 October 1852]:
LOSS OF THE "RIO PACKET" AND "LADY SALE". - The English barque Rio Packet, Capt. Shifely, left Sydney June 1st, bound to Java. On the 24th June, at 10:30 hours p.m., this vessel struck on the Great Barrier Reef, Torres Straits, in south lat. 11 deg. 46 min., and became a total wreck. The chief mate and five seamen quitted in the long-boat, and made the best of their way to Raine Island, where they landed on the 13th July. They were fortunately taken off the island two hours afterwards by Captain Punchard, of the George, brought on to Singapore, and are now inmates of the Sailors' Home. From the mate's statements it would appear that Captain Shifely, the second mate, steward, and one seaman, left the wreck in the jolly-boat; they pulled towards the northward, and were lost sight of. In the jolly boat there was no compass or any provisions. ...


Wooden pilot vessel Kitty, built John Corkhill, Liverpool, 1824, 54grt, 50 x 16.1 x 8.5 feet, Pilot Boat no. 2, ON 9214, sold 1846, by 1847, registered Caernarfon, by 1870 registered Tralee, latterly owned Berehaven, in MNL to 1891.

Image, from a painting by Samuel Walters, of Pilot Boat no.2, Kitty, in a rough sea.



Wooden brig Hardware, built James, Liverpool, 1821, 152 tons. LR 1829 owned J Bibby, trading Liverpool - Leghorn. In 1841 sold to Shaw, Liverpool. ON 9365. By 1854, registered Whitehaven, as a snow. The Hardware collided with the steamship Wans Fell and sank in the Bristol Channel, 2 miles off the Flat Holm. Her crew were rescued by Wans Fell (ON 186197). Hardware was on a voyage from Newport, Monmouthshire to Queenstown, County Cork, 10 September 1882.

[Liverpool Mercury 3 May 1821]:
Yesterday, two fine brigs were also launched: one (the Pacific) intended for the South-sea trade, from the yard of Messrs. Clarke and Dixon[sic], south shore,
the other (the Hardware) from Mr. James's yard, adjoining, for the Brazil trade. Both went off in fine style one of them some minutes after the other, which gave the numerous spectators, and among whom were many elegant females, an opportunity of gratifying their curiosity at the interesting spectacle.

Advert for Bibby Vessels 1823.

[from Western Mail - 14th October 1882]:
At Westminster, yesterday, an inquiry was held into the circumstances attending the collision between the steamship Wans Fell and the sailing ship Hardware off Newport on the 10th of September last, resulting in the loss of the latter vessel. The Wans Fell was bound for Newport with a cargo of sleepers, which were consigned to Messrs. Jones, Heard, and Co., of Newport. The Court said that the blame, to a certain extent, attached to the look-out man, but not to the master, whose certificate would not be dealt with. For sale 1840.


Wooden barque John M'Adam, built James Gordon, Liverpool, 1834, 271 tons, owned Gibb, Liverpool, for trade to Montreal. Also described as a ship. Listed in LR to 1839, when marked LOST. Last newspaper report of a voyage: 4 August 1834: arrival at Montreal. Reported as lost on return voyage to Liverpool, Captain Leader. Note possible confusion with paddle steamer of the same name built Liverpool 1836.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 30 May 1834]:
Ship launch. On Saturday last a beautiful ship, built by Mr. James Gordon, for Duncan Gibb, Esq. was launched from the Herculaneum Dock-yard, and went off the stocks in excellent style. She is named after John M'Adam, Esq. of Castle Dykes, formerly of Liverpool, and is intended for the Canada trade.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 06 June 1834]:
Will be despatched: forthwith. For MONTREAL direct, The new ship JOHN M'ADAM, JAMES LEADER, Master. For freight, &c. apply to DUNCAN GIBB. [Arrived Montreal 4 August 1834 - no subsequent newspaper mention]

[ from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 01 May 1835]:
DEATHS. Same day - Mrs Jane Leader, relict [widow] of the late Capt James Leader, (who was lost in the ship John M'Adam from Montreal to this port), leaving an interesting litte girl an orphan.


Wooden ship Tory, built Gordon, Potteries, Liverpool, 1835, 608 tons, owned Duncan Gibb, Liverpool, for American trade (Savannah). In MNL, ON 23367, 608 tons, registered Liverpool, in MNL to 1864. Voyage Hong Kong to England, off Ascension Island, captain Johnstone attacked, injured and killed members of the crew. He was charged with murder. Voyage St Petersburg to London, wrecked on Sommers, Baltic, 19 Sept 1864, crew were rescued.

[Liverpool Mercury - Friday 06 February 1835]:
Launches. - On Friday morning a fine ship, the property of Duncan Gibb, Esq. and intended for the American trade, was launched from the building-yard near the Herculaneum Pottery. She was named the Tory, by Sir Howard Douglas, who appeared quite recovered from the effects of the accident which lately befell him on a similar occasion.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 03 February 1835]:
SHIP LAUNCH AT IHE HERCULANEUM YARD A beautiful and finely proportioned vessel was launched on Friday morning, and, although not generally known, the sight collected a considerable concourse of people, who were freely admitted into the building yard adjoining the Herculaneum Pottery Works, where she was built. - Shortly after eleven o'clock. Major-General Sir Howard Douglas, Baronet, accompanied by his son, Captain Donglas, arrived in the yard, and was greeted with the same warmth and cordiality which always marks his reception whenever he appears in public. .....
The Tory is a fine piece of naval architecture. Her dimensions length of-decks 140 feet; breadth of deck 33 feet; depth of hold 22 feet, and will consequently register from 640 to 650 tons. She was built by Mr. James Gordon for Mr. Duncan Gibb, a well-known merchant of this town. She was immediately towed into the Brunswick Deck, where she will be rigged, and, when ready for sea, receive her first cargo; all the cordage required for her use will be manufactured from hemp grown in British colonies and imported in British bottoms. It will be seen by our advertising columns that the first voyage of THE TORY will be to the great republic of America. The English TORY surrounded, or rather lashed alongside the Cincinatus and the Napoleon, the Hector and the Andrew Jackson, the Andrew Doria and the Commodore Rodgers, the Spartan and the Nicholas Biddle. the Capitol and the Nantucket, the Liberator and the Virginian Planter, or other ships bearing the equally high sounding names of ancient and modern heroes, and ancient and modern places, or events of celebrity, will be in strange company, and may excite something like commercial jealousy in the minds of our transatlantic republican friends, who probably may not admire this open and daring attack upon their carrying trade. But we would ask, why have the British shipowners so long neglected this trade? Why have they suffered their ships and sailors to remain idle with so immense a staple as cotton to be imported from America to England? That staple having to be paid for either in English money or English manufactures, surely we should secure to our own people some portion of the freight. The American ships expend but very little, comparatively, in our ports to what is expended by our own ships. A second suit of rigging is, we understand, frequently taken out in American vessels to supply their new ships. ....

[from Leeds Times - Saturday 15 November 1845]:
CHARGE OF MURDER AND MUTINY ON THE HIGH SEAS. EXTRAORDINARY DETAILS. A charge of Mutiny on the high seas was brought before the magistrates at the Thames Police-office, London, on Wednesday last, which revealed some occurrences of a most awful nature. Franklin Tucker, Julian Cordoviallo (an Italian), William Burton, David Johnson, William Beresford, William Dunn, Thomas Gair, John Allison, Thomas Lee, Andrew Nelson, Barry Yelverton (said to be grandson to the celebrated Lord Avanmore), Stephen Cone, Richard French, Peter Curtis, James Blaedon, (a German), and Robert Thompson, sixteen of the crew of the Tory, belonging to Mr. Duncan Gibb, of Liverpool, were charged with piracy on the board of the above-named ship.
The prisoner Gair, the right side of whose face appeared to be dreadfully injured, and who had his head bound up, was accommodated with a chair, and several others of the prisoners, who looked miserable, were more or less wounded in various parts of their bodies.
The statement made by the Master or Captain of the "Tory," George Johnstone, who preferred the charge, was given in a most confused and unintelligible manner. He appeared to be labouring under a degree of uncontrollable excitement and agitation, which led the magistrate, Mr. Broderip to caution him as to what he said. From what could be gathered from his statement, it appeared that in the months of October and September, the Tory, a free-trader, of 608 tons burden, was on her way from Hong Kong to England when off Ascension Island a conspiracy was entered into by the crew, in which they were joined by William Ramberts and William Mars, the first and second mates. The plot was discovered, Rambert apprehending the consequences, jumped overboard. Witness said he was told by the prisoners, Yelverton and French, that the crew were sharpening knives to take his life. The men afterwards rushed forwards, armed with bolts and bars, to take his life, but it does not appear from the witness's statement what prevented them from doing so. They afterwards returned to their duty, but again broke twice out into mutiny, first at the Island of Fayal, and secondly, in the Channel. On the former occasion the witness deposed to being seized by the throat by Mars, (who was afterwards killed, he said, by the men) who tore a piece out of his hand. He struck him with his cutlass, and ordered him into irons. The object of the crew was to take his life, and seize the vessel and cargo which were £8,000. From the witness's account, it appeared that the prisoner French had rather assisted him than otherwise.
The manner of the witness, during the delivery of this statement, was exceedingly agitated and confused; and he scarcely seemed to be aware what he was saying.
He was in some measure confirmed by Sinclair, a carpenter in the vessel, who, however, gave his evidence in similar state of confusion.
The most extraordinary parts of the case were developed when the men were called upon for their defence, and the statements which they then made, perfectly horrified all assembled in the Court. These statements implicated the captain in a series of frightful crimes, and, if true, made the charge preferred against the prisoners appear to be an expedient for concealing his own guilt. We are unable, for want of room, to give the statements made by each of the prisoners; we select that of the prisoner Yelverton, (a lad), which was the fullest, and thrilled the Court with horror.
Yelverton said: "I deny that I ever told the captain that the men sharpened their knives. I'll tell the truth, but I can't speak as to dates. I told him Reason said to Cone, that when the ship reached Ascension Island he would put out a blue shirt on the foreyard, so as that some of her Majesty's men would come on board and see how they were treated. The captain abused the mate (Rambert) on his return from the French vessel for injuring the boat. The mate said, 'By G-, if I had not a wife and family, I'd jump overboard.' After captain and the mate were drinking in the cabin all the afternoon, and the captain said several times to the mate, 'By -, I'll kill you.' The captain about eight o'clock at night asked me if I was afraid of the mate, and I said no; some of the other apprentices said they did fear for their lives, but I told the captain to give the mate another trial. The captain then pardoned him, and giving him a loaded pistol, told him to follow him upon the deck. The captain then asked the crew if they knew of an intention to take his life, which they denied. Reason, (who has since died), Cone, and Lee were then in irons. The captain threatened if they did not tell what they knew, he would take their lives. I think Curtis and Burton said that Mars hauled them out of their berths to secure the captain. On that the captain had Mars put in irons, and went down every half hour, and cut an inch off of him (Frightful sensation).
Mr. Broderip (with great emotion): Do you mean what you say. Do you mind what you say. You are on your oath.
Yelverton: Yes; he said that was what he would do to him.
Mr. Broderip: But you say he did it. That he cut an inch off of him every half hour.
Yelveron: I can't be exact as to an inch, but he said that he would cut him so.
Mr. Broderip: But you did not see him?
Yelverton: Yes, I saw one piece cut off about the size of my hand. It was cut off the man's head, and all the hair was on it.
This reply, which was made with great apparent sincerity and simplicity, made the whole court shudder.
The captain then took Mars to the inner cabin, which was his bed-room, taking with him a strand and a heaver. I don't know what was done there, but we heard Mars sing out as if he was choking. He brought him back again in the presence of Julian and the other boys, and set him against the cabin door, whilst he himself sat on the lockerhead, and whilst there kept pitching the cutlass at him, sometimes sticking it in his head, and sometimes in his breast (sensation). The next morning the captain said to me and Spence, "You boys must spend all your time writing, for this is a serious job." The captain said to French, and myself, "Now, boys, we'll convict all these fellows as prisoners, and if you mind your eyes you'll get all clear of this. These fellows, when they are made prisoners, will not be allowed to speak for themselves any more than to say 'guilty,' or 'not guilty.' Be you my witnesses and we'll get clear of this." We said we would, and he was contriving how to get them all implicated. He then told the cook to send the crew, aft, and when they came he said, "What do you want here Mutiny! mutiny! Fire away Mr. French," and then they snapped off the pistols. There was no charge against me in the log before the officers came on board at Deal out of the cutter. When they questioned me I told the truth, and that is the reason I am here.
This statement, which excited the liveliest and at the same time the most painful interest, rivetted the attention of the whole Court so deeply that but for some shuddering exclamations, one might also hear a feather fall. The statements of the other prisoners detailed similar atrocities. Lee said that the captain charged himself and Cone and a man named Reason, who was afterwards killed, with endeavouring to take his life, and cut at them with a sword. He afterward had them put in irons, and came every two or three hours, and cut away at them. About four o'clock on the morning of the 26th the captain was cutting away at the chief mate (Rambert) who ran aft and jumped over the larboard quarter. Gair also spoke to the captain cutting at him on the head and person, and inflicting various wounds upon him while he was in irons, and compelling French, on the peril of his life, to fire a pistol into his face, which he did several times. Cone also spoke to having been cut and wounded by the captain. The marks were still visible on his head, body, and hands. Some of the other prisoners reserved their defence.
Sinclair, the carpenter, was then recalled, and closely questioned by Mr. Broderip, but his manner was as confused and hesitating as possible. He said he had seen the captain drunk, but could not undertake to say whether he was given to the practice. His manner was frequently excited, but witness could not say whether it was from drink or the conduct of the crew. Witness did not feel himself competent to say whether or not he thought the captain was in his right mind.
Mr. Broderip: You have beard the defence setup by these men; what do you say to it? - I can't tell.
Mr Broderip: When did the man Reason die? - Soon after we left the Eastern Islands.
Mr. Broderip: When did you last see him alive? - I saw him go down to the cabin, and an hour afterwards I understood he was dead.
The carpenter, in his further examination, said he never noticed the captain to be excited until after the vessel had passed Ascension Island. He admitted, but with some reluctance, that he saw the captain strike the man with the cutlass. He saw him strike Reason with it in several parts of the body, but could not say whether he inflicted more than one wound. There was a great deal of blood about Reason's neck.
Mr. Broderip, the magistrate, said that from the extraordinary nature of the case, he should feel it his duty to remand the further hearing till another day.
The prisoners were about to be remanded, when a woman, who sat behind the solicitor's table, watching the proceedings with intense interest, and half sobbing as some of the bloodiest scenes were recounted, rose and stated that she bad been a passenger on board the Tory, and was ready to confirm the statement of Yelverton.
Mr. Broderip, however, declined to hear her evidence at that stage of the proceedings.
The prisoners were then remanded Wednesday next.

[from Leeds Times - Saturday 27 December 1845]:
The evidence being closed, the depositions were read over, and the witnesses severally bound over to appear and give evidence against the prisoner at the next sessions to held in the Central Criminal Court. Mr. Broderip then addressing the prisoner, informed him that, after a long and careful examination, it was his painful duty to commit him for trial at the ensuing session of the Central Criminal Court, on three capital charges of murdering William Rambert, chief mate of the ship Tory, Thomas Reason, second mate, and Wm. Mars, common sailor and also on the charge of feloniously cutting and wounding the crew of the same ship. The prisoner was then removed in a most exhausted state, and thus terminated one of the longest and most extraordinary magisterial investigations upon record.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 25 February 1847]:
For Manilla. the fine Liverpool-built Ship TORY, Captain James Teulon; 606 tons register, coppered and copper fastened, very fast, has just delivered her cargo in good order ... apply to CARTER and BAINES. [July 12 1849, Tory, Teulon, cleared for sea to Calcutta, from Liverpool, owned D Gibb]

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Wednesday 21 September 1864]:
St Petersburg. Sept 19. The Tory, Gardiner, from this port for London, has been wrecked on Somers, waterlogged; crew saved.


Wooden barque John Knox, built James Gordon, Liverpool, 1836. 540 tons burthen, 366 tons register, 120 x 30 x 20 ft. Owned D Gibb, Liverpool, registered Liverpool. 23rd March 1845, voyage Bombay to London, wrecked on Goodwin Sands, crew saved by Deal lugger Industry.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 22 January 1836]:
SHIP LAUNCH. A very fine vessel, burthen 540 tons, built by Mr. James Gordon for Mr. Duncan Gibb, and intended for the East India and China trade, was launched on Tuesday at the Herculaneum building-yard. She is a finely-proportioned craft, her dimensions being length of deck 120 feet, depth of hold 20 feet, and breadth of beam 30 feet. The timber used in her construction is principally Bombay teak. She is built with a flush deck. Shortly after eleven o'clock, when a considerable number of spectators had assembled in the yard, Mr. Gibb arrived, accompanied by Lord Sandon and some other friends.... Lord Sandon, her sponsor, named her with the usual ceremonial and benediction, the John Knox.

[from Bombay Gazette - Wednesday 06 December 1837]:
FOR The New Fast sailing Barque JOHN KNOX, JOHN THOMPSON, Commander, will have quick despatch. For freight &c. apply to. DUNCAN GIBB, AND CO: Dady's Building.

[from Canterbury Journal, Kentish Times and Farmers' Gazette - Saturday 29 March 1845]:
Early on Sunday morning last the barque, John Knox, of Liverpool, with a valuable cargo of cotton, coffee, tea, Japan wood, Cassia camphor, cashmere shawls, silk, &c., struck on the Goodwin Sands in very thick weather. The sea at the time being very heavy the ship became leaky, and a great part of the crew abandoned her in the boats; but the Captain and a small part of the crew remained by the ill-fated vessel, although the sea was making a complete breach over the ship. Providentially a Deal boat's crew succeeded in rescuing them from their most perilous situation.


[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 08 October 1838]:
LAUNCHES.--On Thursday last, at eleven o'clock, a fine vessel was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Jackson and Co., Herculaneum Dock; another, from the building-yard of Messrs. Royden and Co. Queen's Dock; and a third, from a yard at Birkenhead, on the Cheshire side of the Mersey. The iron ship, which is completing in the yard of Messrs. Jackson and Co., will be launched in a week or two.


Iron ship Ironsides, built Jackson & Gordon, Liverpool, 1838, 271 tons, 99.9 x 24.6 ft, first iron sailing ship built at Liverpool. Traded to Americas from Liverpool. Voyage New Orleans to Cork, leaky and abandoned on 2nd April, 1847.

Image from painting by Samuel Walters of Ironside in the Mersey [from Samuel Walters - A S Davidson]

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 19 October 1838]:
LAUNCH OF AN IRON SHlP. Yesterday, the first iron ship built in Liverpool, was launched from the building yard of Messrs. Jackson, Gordon, and Co., the builders, near the Potteries. As a model this ship is a beautiful thing. She has somewhat of the American build about her bows, has great breadth of beam, and a fine run. With the exception of her decks, she is entirely built of iron. She is 271 tons old measurement, 24ft. 6in. breadth of beam, 13ft. 10in. depth of hold, and 96ft. keel, and has 99ft. 9in. for tonnage. All being ready, at eleven o'clock, the dagger was knocked down, and the beautiful vessel, with all her masts and rigging up, glided majestically into the river. She was christened the "Ironsides" by Captain Mitchell, formerly of the ship Abbotsford, who is to sail her. It is understood, that she is for the Brazil trade. When in the water, she floated like a cork, and her toasts were as stiff, and steady as possible.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 14 May 1839]:
IRON SHIPS. We last week furnished a brief account of the successful voyage of the Ironside iron ship, hence to South America and back, the first vessel of that material that has yet crossed the ocean, and the interest and curiosity which she has since excited induces us to submit a few additional particulars. The Ironside, Capt. Mitchell, now lying in George's Dock, opposite Brunswick-street, has throughout the week been visited by vast numbers of persons of all classes, including merchants, shipowners, and marine surveyors, and her light and elegant structure and equipments, together with her extraordinary capacity for stowage, notwithstanding the "sharpness" of her build, have been a theme of no little wonder and admiration. There is great probability, indeed, so successful has been this experiment of an iron vessel in the several requisites of roominess of hold, quickness of sailing, strength, extreme buoyancy, and perfect safety even in the heaviest gales, that the construction of other sea-going vessels of the same material is already in contemplation, and from this ship may perhaps be dated the commencement of a new era in the art of navigation. Registering only 264 tons, (new measurement,) she receives a cargo equal to that of a vessel of 340 tons. Her draft of water, when laden with cotton and hides, was only 8.5 feet. With cotton alone she would probably draw one foot less; so that such vessels have a decided advantage over those built of wood in the crossing of dangerous bars or banks, the navigation of rivers, &c. The whole of the iron of which she is constructed, though the plate with which she is "planked" is half an inch thick, does not exceed 120 tons. The waste of iron in her construction was comparatively trifling, and, the whole being of the best quality, even when she becomes unfit for sea (by corrosion or otherwise,) the metal will still be worth £4 to £5 a ton. We need scarcely say that the weight of the material of a wooden vessel of the same tonnage is probably three times as great; that she has all the difference to carry with her as cargo; and that, when worn out, she is comparatively worth nothing. We saw one of the last bales of cotton taken out of the Ironside's hold close to the well, where, if there were any leakage, the water would lodge, and it was as dry as tinder. She made not a drop of water; yet, strange to say, the underwriters required fifty per cent. premium to insure her cargo additional to that charged on cotton in wooden bottoms, scarcely one of which arrives without bales being more or less damaged by leakage. It was, however, an experimental trip, and they will doubtless be in future guided by its success. Meantime it is impossible to ascertain how long she may rank as A 1 at Lloyd's, the surveyors being quite puzzled how to estimate her qualities of endurance. She appears to have suffered nothing from rust or corrosion on long voyage; and if kept well painted, or heated and japanned (an easy operation), she may be as good a vessel ten years hence as now, with no need of coppering or repairing. We understand the intelligent builders, Messrs. Jackson, Gordon, and Co., have already received a communication from government, requesting their opinion of the adaptation of iron, as regards strength, &c., to the general purpose of building; and the reply has been, that, with a comparatively light weight of material, iron ships may be constructed of greater strength than vessels of wood, of any given tonnage. Messrs. J. and Co. are now engaged in building a smaller iron vessel for the owners of the Ironside. We should add, that the whole of the deck beams are of iron, and have a very light appearance. The deck planks are fastened by screws through them from below, and not perforating the planks, so that no nail-holes are perceptible. and the deck is beautiful.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Tuesday 13 April 1847]:
FRIDAY, April 2. Queen Pomare, Davis, from New Orleans at this port. On the 2nd inst., in lat. 47, lon. 23, fell in with the iron ship Ironside, Campbell, from New Orleans for Cork, with nine feet water in the hold, and took off the crew.

[from Cumberland Pacquet, and Ware's Whitehaven Advertiser - Tuesday 20 April 1847]:
On Tuesday last. Intelligence was received at Cork of the loss of the fine iron ship Ironsides, from New Orleans for the above city, laden with a very valuable cargo of Indian corn, and within a few days' sail of her destined port. The Ironsides sailed from New Orleans on the 25th of February, and was abandoned the 2d instant, with nine feet water in the hold.


[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 01 August 1839]:
TO SHIP-BUILDERS, BOILER-MAKERS, &c, TO be LET, the YARD in Sefton-street, occupied by the late firm of Jackson, Gordon and Co. This Yard is well worth the attention of the trade, having very extensive Forge, Sawpits, Moulding Loft, Blockmaker and Joiners Shops, and other necessary buildings, with 21 feet of water up to two launching slips. Apply to John Johnson, 18 King-street.


Wooden ship Syria, built William Jackson, Liverpool, 1841, 460 tons. In LR 1852, owned Brooks, London, registered London, trading to Melbourne. ON 24649. In LR 1859, owned Humble, of Durham, as barque, 453 tons. Left Swansea for Barcelona on 14 November 1858 and posted missing.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 18 September 1841]:
On Wednesday last a ship of 540 tons, named the Syria, was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. William Jackson and Co., South Shore. The ceiling is constructed on the diagonal principle, which is adopted in the navy, and adds greatly to her strength; and the spaces, or rooms, being filled with mahogany moveable panels, give a very unique and handsome finish. These panels go down to the second foothook heads, and, being only fastened with latches, can removed without any trouble so as to admit air to the ship's frame.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 03 July 1843]:
On Wednesday, the 12th instant, At D. Tonge's Office, 7, Castle-street, The very new Liverpool built Ship SYRIA; 460 32-94 tons, n.m.; was launched 13th September, 1841; length, 122 feet 2-10ths; breadth, 24 feet 9-10ths depth, 19 feet; coppered with heavy copper, and thoroughly copper fastened; carries a large cargo, and sails very fast, on a light draft of water; has a poop and topgallant forecastle; her between decks laid; her cabins fitted up with mahogany, and is in every respect a most desirable ship for the India and China trades; is abundantly found in every description of stores, and may be sent to sea at a trifling expense. - For particulars apply on board, in Prince's Dock, or to N. CAIRNS. 3, Royal Bank Buildings.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Tuesday 05 April 1859]:
Missing Ship. Barque Syria. The undersigned will feel obliged to anyone who can give him information regarding the barque Syria, of London, Anthony Howell, master. This vessel sailed from Swansea on the 8th November last, bound for Barcelona, and has SINCE NOT BEEN HEARD OF. JOHN HUMBLE, Birtley White House, Chester-le-street, County Durham.


Composite schooner Excelsior, built John Jackson, Liverpool, 1850, 33 tons, owned Booker, Liverpool, registered Demerara 1865, ON53728, later registered new Amsterdam, Berbice, register closed 1901.

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Wooden pilot vessel Liverpool, built William Dickinson, Liverpool, 1834, 58grt, 55 x 15.11 x 8.4 feet, Pilot Boat no. 1, ON 17799, sold 1856 and used for fishing from Hoylake., owned Simon Parr, register closed 1899.


Fishing smacks Salmon, Turbot, Sole, built Christopher Heyes, Liverpool, 1836, wooden. Owned Liverpool Fish Co - set up 1836.
Salmon, ON 23954, 30 tons, in 1872 owned Samuel Jones, Hoylake.
Turbot, ON 24358, 31 tons, in 1872 owned John Parry, Bangor.
Sole, not found MNL.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 24 October 1836]:
There will be launched, this day, at eleven o'clock, from the building-yard of Mr. Christopher Heyes, jun., Trentham-street, three beautiful smacks, called the Salmon, Turbot, and Sole, belonging to the Liverpool Fish Company. [reported in 1837 as having a fleet of 21 vessels]

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 03 March 1845]:
FISHING SMACKS FOR SALE. Registered Tonnage, from 35 to 40 Tons each. The LIVERPOOL FISH COMPANY, being determined to reduce the number of their Fleet, are prepared to receive TENDERS for any one or more of their FISHING BOATS.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 23 May 1845]:
FISHING SMACKS FOR SALE. BY I. T. GREGSON, On Tuesday next, the 27th Instant, at Twelve o'clock, on board, (where they are now lying) in the Albert Dock, The well-known and substantial FISHING BOATS,
SALMON 36 tons,
JOHN and MARY 33 tons.
WILLIAM and MARY 36 tons.
RAPID 38 tons.
The Property of the Liverpool Fish Company. The Salmon was built in Liverpool in the year 1837, of the very best materials, and is in excellent order, has two Nets and some of her Trawl gear on board; and the other three Vessels have lately undergone a thorough repair at very considerable expense, ... [Echo 37 tons added, and Salmon removed, in advert Oct 1845 - Liverpool Fish Company not mentioned in newspapers after that]


Wooden ship Elizabeth, built J and R Fisher, Liverpool, 1823, 303 tons, owned C Fletcher, Liverpool. Armed. Traded to New Orleans. Later traded to Mauritius and India. In LR to 1833. Note another Ship Elizabeth, of 336 tons, was built in Liverpool in 1824.
Voyage Bengal to Liverpool, ashore at Northam Burrows [near Appledore] and wrecked, 17 December 1833, crew of 18 saved by Appledore lifeboats.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 25 September 1823]:
On Monday last, a fine ship, called the Elizabeth, 300 tons, was launched from the yard of Messrs. J. and R. Fisher. She belongs to Messrs. C. Fletcher and Co. and is intended for the New Orleans trade.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 24 October 1823]:
FOR NEW ORLEANS, The fine new armed Ship ELIZABETH, R H Ekin, master, For freight or passage apply to Messrs. ALEXANDER DENNISTOUN and Co. or to CALEB FLETCHER and Co.

[from Bell's New Weekly Messenger - Sunday 22 December 1833]:
Bideford, 17th Dec. The Elizabeth, Hill, from Bengal to Liverpool, was driven on shore on the Northam Burrows this morning, during a heavy Gale, and nearly filled with water. Crew saved, also part of the cargo, in a damaged state.

Appledore RNLI record: Silver Medal awarded to Thomas Burnard for a service to the ship Elizabeth that went aground on Northam Sands in a violent storm on 17 December 1833. Mr Burnham was first on board one of the two Bideford lifeboats that after launching had a strenuous pull through the surf. One boat took off ten survivors, the other rescued eight.


Wooden brig William Salthouse, built Fisher, Liverpool, 1824, 254 tons, owned Salthouse & Co., for trade to Demerara. Also described as a barque. For sale 1840 at Liverpool - not in LR 1840. On Feb 18 1841, sailed from London to Montreal, master Barn. She then left Montreal for Port Phillip (near Melbourne), but was wrecked on 28 November 1841, attempting to enter Port Phillip. More history.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 07 May 1824]:
Ship Launches. - On Saturday last, two fine vessels were launched from adjoining shipyards, west side of the Queen's Dock, one called the William Salthouse, built by Messrs Fisher; the other called the Smyrna Packet, built by Messrs. Bland and Chaloner.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 09 February 1826]:
For ST. THOMAS and SAVANAH, The very fine Brig WILLIAM SALTHOUSE, Captain John Gainiss; Burthen 254 tons; coppered and copper-fastened; Liverpool built, only one year old; Armed with 8 carriage guns, and sails uncommonly fast; lying in George's Dock. For freight or passage apply HOWLAND EDWARDS, 11, Fenwick-street.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 24 April 1840]:
On WEDNESDAY next, the 29th instant, at Bushby and Son's Office, Dale-street, The Liverpool-built Brig WILLIAM SALTHOUSE, STANTON, Master; Burthen per register 254 tons; is in good repair; standing and running rigging complete; recently coppered; stows a large cargo; sails fast; and is fit to proceed on any Voyage; may be seen in Victoria Dock; For further particulars apply to Thomas & Henry Murray, or BUSHBY and SON, Brokers.


Wooden brig Tickler, built J & R Fisher, Liverpool, 1824, 252 tons, For sale 1826 at Liverpool. Sailed to Sydney, owned Winder & Co, Liverpool. Voyage Sydney to Manilla, aground in Manilla Bay and wrecked, 18 October 1839.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 03 September 1824]:
FOR KINGSTON, JAMAICA. The new Brig TICKLER, Wm Wright, master, Loading west side Prince's Dock. - For freight or passage, apply to Captain WRIGHT, on board, or to CAMPBELL and. MACKIE.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 07 August 1826]:
The fine Brig TICKLER, 252 tons per register; built in Liverpool by Messrs J. and R. Fisher, of the best materials, and launched in July, 1824, completely found in the most valuable stores and furniture, in excellent condition, and one of the fastest sailing vessels out of this port. - For inventories and further particulars, apply to Captain Wright, on board, in the Prince's Dock; to Mr. HARMOOD BANNER, Accountant, Commerce-court, Lord-street, or to CAMPBELL & MACKIE, Chapel-street.

[from Lloyd's List - Thursday 13 February 1840}:
Manila, 16th Oct. It blew a heavy gale 12th inst. during which two Lighters, with hides and hemp, for the Tara, of Liverpool, were totally lost.
25th Oct. The Narcissa, from Singapore, & Tickler, Ellis, from Sydney, NSW, were driven on shore 18th inst; during a heavy gale, on the South side of the Bay; the latter is a complete wreck, the former was got off 23rd instant, after discharging part of her cargo.


Wooden brig Warwick, built J & R Fisher, Liverpool, 1825, 270 tons, owned Gibson, Liverpool, for service to Calcutta. For sale 1840, also 1843. Reported voyages to Africa, with crew losses, presumably from disease, latterly in 1847 in Bonny River. Traded to Calcutta, then to West Indies, latterly owned Hatton. Voyage Liverpool to Apalachicola, Florida, aground on Bird Island Reef and wrecked 19 January 1852.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 29 June 1829]:
For CALCUTTA, DIRECT, and having the chief part of her cargo engaged and now shipping, is intended to be despatched in a few days. The WARWICK, Captain James Gibson; A 1 at Lloyd's, burthen 277 tons, was built at Liverpool in 1824 under inspection and for the use of the present owners, was coppered last year, and is a well known remarkably fine sailer, and has invariably made quick passages; lying in the Prince's Dock; For freight or passage, apply to ASHLEY BROTHERS.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 23 March 1840]:
On Sale, The fine Brig WARWICK, Burthen 277 tons, old measurement; coppered and copper-fastened; built by Messrs Jonathan and Roger Fisher, at Liverpool, under particular inspection. For inventories, &c, apply on board, Victoria Dock, or to RICHARD BENSON, Castle-street.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 21 August 1843]:
For SALE. The well known Brig WARWICK: 277 16-94th tons register; Liverpool built, and a fast sailer; coppered to 16 feet water mark; has a roundhouse on deck, figurehead, &c. Length on deck 94 feet 6 inches; breadth 23 feet 8 inches; depth of hold 17 feet 5 inches; now lying in Victoria Dock. For inventories and further particulars apply to CRAM, SMITH & Co.

[from Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser - Monday 01 March 1852]:
Antigua, February 2. The Warwick, Head, of and from Liverpool for Apalachicola, ran on Bird Island Reef on the 19th ult., and went to pieces next day; crew and a portion of the materials saved.


Wooden ship Lady Rowena, built J & R Fisher, Liverpool, 1827, 399 tons, owned Lodge, Liverpool, for service to Charleston. Later owned Buchanan and then M'Donald. Later barque rigged. Service to Bombay, then Mediterranean. In LR. Voyage Alexandria to Liverpool, 16th March 1853, burnt off Cape St Vincent, crew saved and landed at Lagos. Part of the wreck came ashore at Sagres Bay.

[from London Packet and New Lloyd's Evening Post - Friday 26 October 1827]:
LAUNCH OF THE LADY ROWENA. This fine vessel, of 400 tons burden, for the Charleston trade, was launched yesterday forenoon from the yard of Messrs. J. and R. Fisher, at the Queen's dock, Graving-dock. The spectacle was not so numerously attended as is usual on similar occasions, owing to the election for mayor, which gave more lucrative employment to many of the freemen. Several hundreds of persons, however, were. present, amongst whom were many ladies and gentlemen of respectability. Exactly at ten minutes before twelve, the supports being removed, the vessel glided majestically into the water, amidst the cheers of the spectators and those on board; and Mr. Lodge, jun. the son of the proprietor, at the same moment performed the ceremony of christening, by dashing a bottle of wine against the bow. Not the slightest accident occurred, except it should be called such, that at the entrance of the Queen's dock the bow of the vessel came in contact with the mast of a flat, and became entangled in the rigging. The concussion was not violent, and the flat was soon disengaged, we believe, without injury. The Lady Rowena is to be fitted up in excellent style for passengers; she has eight births in her cabin, six of which are double births, and two for families. Captain Pease [sic also Pace] is the commander, and she is expected to be ready for sea by the middle of next month.

[from London Evening Standard - Monday 04 April 1853]:
Lisbon, ... The British barque Lady Rowena, Macdonald, master, from Alexandria to Liverpool, with a cargo of cotton and dried beans, has been destroyed by fire. On the 15th instant, the vessel being then about 50 miles to the westward of Cape St. Vincent, it was discovered that spontaneous combustion had taken place in the cargo. As soon as this was perceived to be the case, every vent through which air could be admitted was stopped, in order, if possible, to smother the fire, and the vessel was steered right for the land, on nearing which, however, it was found to be so rocky and precipitous that running her on shore was quite out of the question. Fortunately, on rounding Cape St. Vincent they saw two French vessels, the brigs Grand and Zenith, the masters of which immediately sent boats to take them off. Seven of the crew were kindly taken charge of by Captain Petit, of the Grand (strange conjunction of names so opposite in signification !) who undertook to convey them to Havre, to which port he was bound. The remainder of the crew and the captain have since been brought here by her Majesty's ship Firebrand. The captain, at the recommendation of her Majesty's consul in this city, is about to return to the spot (Sagres Bay), as it appears that the vessel, after burning to the water's edge, drifted on shore, and that there are hopes of saving a great part of the cotton, which formed the principal part of the cargo. The surviving crew go home in the packet.



Wooden brig, un-named, built J and R Fisher, Liverpool, 1828, 255 tons.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 01 December 1828]:
A fine new brig, of 255 tons measurement, will be launched from the yard of Messrs. Fisher, Queen's Dock, on Monday next, at eleven o'clock in the morning.
  [no clear candidate name known]


Wooden barque Cheshire, built J and R Fisher, Liverpool, 1830, 376 tons, ON 7788, first owner Barton, Irlam, & Higginson, Liverpool. Traded to West Indies. One voyage to Australia. LR 1854 gives owned Maddock, Liverpool. Last newspaper mention: July 1856 when inbound from Barbados to Liverpool. Not in MNL 1857. Not in LR 1857. In Liverpool Dock, owned Longton, until Sept 1856. Probably sold foreign or renamed Sept 1856.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 23 April 1830]:
A Launch: Tomorrow (Saturday) about eleven o'clock, a fine vessel, of 370 tons burthen, intended to be called the Cheshire, built for Messrs. Barton, Irlam & Higginson, will be launched from the yard of Messrs. J. and R. Fisher.

[Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 29 April 1830]:
For BARBADOES, The new Ship CHESHIRE, Daniel Campbell, Master; Intended to sail 8th May, For freight or passage apply to BARTON, IRLAM and HIGGINSON.

[from Patriot - Thursday 17 November 1853]:
DIRECT for PORT ADELAIDE (South Australia), the fine, first-class Liverpool - built Ship CHESHIRE, register 376 Tons. WILLIAM HOGG, Commander. Lying in the West India Docks. Has most excellent accommodations for a limited number of passengers. For terms of freight and passage, apply to Devitt and Moore, 9, Billiter-street. [arrived 30 March 1854; returned via Callao, Pernambuco, Cork]

[from Liverpool Daily Post - Saturday 10 November 1855]:
On Thursday next, the 15th instant. at One o'clock, at the Brokers Sale-room. The very superior Liverpool-built Barque CHESHIRE; 376 tons register: built in 1830, and had a complete overhaul, and been classed AE 1 red star; is copper-fastened, and remetalled in August 1852, and which is good for twelve months longer; was built particularly for West India trade; delivered 600 tons dead-weight. Dimensions: length 109 feet; breadth, 27 feet; depth, 18 feet. lying in Prince's Dock. Apply to Curry and Co., Brokers.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 19 May 1856]:
Cheshire, Hogg, from Demerara for this port, at Barbadoes, very leaky, having been aground on the bar of the Demerara River.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Wednesday 23 July 1856]:
In the river inward bound: Cheshire, Hogg, Demerara and Barbadoes.



Wooden brig Frances Ann, built Clover, Liverpol, 1830, 280 tons, owned Clover for trade to India & China. For sale 1847. Not in LR 1847 on.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 28 January 1830]:
Launched yesterday, from Messrs. Clover's ship-building yard, opposite the Salthouse Dock, a very fine vessel of about 300 tons register, intended for the East India trade, and is now on the berth for Calcutta.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 28 January 1830]:
For CALCUTTA. The fine Liverpool-built brig FRANCES ANN, John Clover, Commander; A 1; being new; 280 tons per register, coppered, and in every respect most desirable conveyance for goods and passengers, her cabins being spacious. For terms. &c. apply to Messrs. Fletcher, Alexander & Co., London or to Messrs M'Nair & Brebner or to W & J Tyrer.

[from Newcastle Journal - Saturday 09 January 1847]:
FOR SALE BY PRIVATE CONTRACT, the well-known Liverpool built Brig FRANCES ANN, now lying at Leith. Length, 97 Feet; Breadth, 25 Feet 6 Inches; Depth, 17 Feet 8 Inches; 279 55-94ths Tons per Register; Coppered and Copper-fastened ; combining Sailing and Carrying Properties; shifts without Ballast; was built by and for the present Owners, and is very superior Vessel. For further Particulars, apply in Liverpool, to Messrs. W. & J. TYRER; or to Messrs. CLINT, TREGONING & CO.


Wooden ship Orixa, built Clover, Liverpool, 1836, 363 tons, owned Clover & Co, Liverpool.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 22 January 1836]:
A Launch. On Tuesday last, at high-water, a fine vessel called the Ourixas [sic] about 360 tons burthen, was launched from Mr Clover's yard, west side Salthouse Dock. The river at the time was covered with outward-bound vessels which had long been detained by westwardly winds.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 01 March 1836]:
For LINTIN, And will forward Goods to CANTON, at ship's expense, but shippers' risk, With leave to call at SINGAPORE, where she will only be detained a few ays, The fine Liverpool-built Baque JUDITH, Capt. WM. AGER; A 1, 253 tons, ....Apply to Mr. TAPLEY; or to W. and J. TYRER. Succeeds the above, The fine new Liverpool-built Ship ORIXA.

Wooden barque Anne Jane, built Clover, Liverpool, 1838, 302 tons, owned Clover, Liverpool, for trade to China.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 21 May 1838]:
LAUNCHES. On Wednesday next, about eleven o'clock, there will be two launches: ..... the other from the building-yard of Messrs. Clover and Co., both in Trentham-street.

Messrs Bannister & Simpson, Liverpool. Wooden sailing vessels.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 21 May 1838]:
LAUNCHES. On Wednesday next, about eleven o'clock, there will be two launches: one from the building-yard of Messrs. Burmister [sic, Bannister?] and Simpson, the other from the building-yard of Messrs. Clover and Co., both in Trentham-street.

Wooden schooner Columbine, built Bannister & Simpson, Liverpool, 1839, 186 tons, owned W S Dixon for Glasgow - Liverpool service. ON 3315, registered Glasgow 1853, reported lost 1857. Voyage Liverpool to Glasgow, leaving 5th December 1856 - posted missing.

[from Liverpool Albion - Tuesday 18 June 1839]:
LAUNCH OF A SCHOONER. On. Wednesday morning, at twenty minutes past eleven o'clock, a new schooner, the property of the Glasgow and Liverpool Shipping Company, was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Bannister and Simpson, Trentham-street. This fine vessel, named the "Columbine," by the accomplished daughter of the worthy and indefatigable owner, W. S. Dixon, Esq. is intended to complete the "Pantomimic" line of schooners sailing between this port and Glasgow. Notwithstanding the strong opposition of antagonist steam navigation, the Glasgow and Liverpool Shipping Company resolved upon placing in the trade a number of beautiful schooners, being determined to maintain the character they had hitherto held, viz., that of an undoubted first-rate sailing communication between this port and the large and influential manufacturing city of Glasgow. That line they have now completed, inasmuch as they have placed on the station the four characters that we were wont to look upon in our schoolboy days, though, in different stations, we being then delighted at beholding the mimicry of the Clown and Pantaloon, and the beautiful and not unfrequently graceful dancing of the Columbine and Harlequin; and now, having grown up and become men of business, that we may not forget our habits of childhood, we have continually floating on the waters; from the Mersey to the Clyde, a fleet whose names tend to remind us of our playful days. In addition to the Pantomimic, the Company have a number of schooners that were classed under the title of the Menagerie line, inasmuch as they comprise the Lion, Tiger, Stag, &c. &c. We have, however, digressed from our original subject. The Columbine is larger by about 30 tons than any of the vessels that have preceded her, being 186 tons register. She is an exceedingly handsome modelled vessel, well finished, and, from her exterior appearance, her qualities for sailing must be of a superior order. She is exempt from the exception, usually taken to Liverpool-built vessels, that of being wall-sided. She has a beautiful full-length figure-head, (bearing, at the time of the launch, wreaths of flowers). She is commanded by Captain Marshall, an experienced seaman, who has been long acquainted with the coast between her intended ports.

[from Greenock Advertiser - Friday 19 December 1856]:
The schooner Columbine, Borland master, which left Liverpool for Glasgow on Monday week has not since been heard of. The captain is a native of Ayr. Captain Carnachan of this place [Ayr] was also on board as a passenger. [There were gales during that time]

[from Glasgow Courier - Tuesday 16 April 1844]:
THE GLASGOW & LIVERPOOL SHIPPING COMPANY'S FIRST-CLASS SCHOONERS,
PORTLAND, 151 Tons,
PANTALOON, 178 Tons,
CLOWN, 155 Tons,
COLUMBINE, 218 Tons,
HARLEQUIN, 165 Tons,
GRIMALDI, 193 Tons, and
ANNA DIXON, 207 Tons.
THREE of the above VESSELS Sail every Week to and from LIVERPOOL. Their character has long been well known as very fast sailers, are ably commanded, and kept in excellent order. Measurement Freight, 1.5d. per foot; others in proportion. ... Apply in Liverpool to William Swan Dixon & Co., 4, Irwell Street; in Greenock, to Rippen & Lindsay; and here, to LEWIS POTTER, 43, Buchanan Street.

Wooden schooner Harlequin, built Bannister & Simpson, Liverpool, 1840, 165 tons. Owned W S Dixon for Liverpool - Glasgow service.

Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser Friday 16 October 1840
LAUNCH OF THE HARLEQUIN, SCHOONER. - On Tuesday a fine schooner of 150 tons burthen, named the Harlequin, was launched from the building-yard of Messrs. Bannister and Simpson, Trentham-street. ...

[from The Scotsman - Wednesday 20 November 1844]:
Wigtown. .. a violent gale from NNW ... the schooner Harlequin, a Liverpool trader from Glasgow, lost all her sails. ...

Wooden schooner Grimaldi, built Bannister & Simpson, Liverpool, 1841, Owned W S Dixon for Liverpool - Glasgow service. ON 3293. 162 tons, registered Glasgow. Registered Fowey with crew lists from 1863 - 1901. In MNL to 1901, owned Watchet, 99 tons. On 5th July 1901, voyage Fowey to Antwerp, collided with SS Torrington, off Isle of Wight, damaged, towed into Teignmouth, then sold as a coal hulk at Plymouth.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 24 May 1841]:
LAUNCH. On Friday last, Messrs. Bannister and Simpson launched, from their building-yard, Trentham-street, another schooner, named the Grimaldi, intended to sail in conjunction with the Pantaloon, Columbine, and other vessels of the Pantomime Line, the property of Messrs. Swan Dixon and Co. She is a beautiful vessel, and the builders have made it their study to combine all the qualities the shipowner so eagerly seeks after; she will not only be a fast sailer, but will carry a large cargo for her tonnage. She has a full-length figure-head of Grimaldi, in his grotesque costume. Her windlass is fitted-up with Gladstone's Patent Purchase. ....

[from Glasgow Chronicle - Wednesday 15 November 1848]:
FOG IN THE RIVER. On account of the fog in the river on Friday, which extended as far down as the Cloch Light, the steamers due on that day from Liverpool and Ireland did not arrive at the Broomielaw till Saturday morning. ... On Saturday night the barques Elijah Swift and Fame, for New York, were taken down the river by tugs, but they got no farther than the spot indicated, viz., the neighbourhood of Renfrew; and as the schooner Grimaldi was being towed up, at the time of the same fog, she came in contact with the Fame, and injured her cutwater, in consequence of which the latter had to return to our harbour.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 31 March 1857]:
The schooner Grimaldi, from Glasgow, anchored in the Mersey, was run into on Sunday morning, by a schooner, and had her bulwarks and head rails on port side injured.

[from St. Austell Star - Thursday 11 July 1901]:
DISABLED FOWEY SCHOONER. The Cornish schooner Grimaldi, Captain Harris [owner, of Watchet], from Fowey to Antwerp, with stone, in collision with the steamship Torrington, Captain Shingler, from Hull to Teignmouth, in ballast, on Friday night off the Kentish coast [sic, off Isle of Wight]. After the collision the Torrington took the schooner in tow, and brought her into Teignmouth late on Saturday night. The steamer, which was on her maiden voyage, had a couple of plates stove in. These were repaired, and she is loading clay at the quay. The Grimaldi, however, had her bowsprit broken off, and sustained injury to her bow. Her galley is keeping up the foremast, and her bulwarks are half an inch out from the decks. The collision occurred during a fog.
[Later reports: damages of £350 paid to owner of Grimaldi; the Grimaldi was sold to a Plymouth firm to use as a coal hulk.]


Wooden schooner Anna Dixon, built Bannister, Liverpool 1841, for owner W S Dixon, for Monte Video service. ON 3227, 162 tons. Registered Glasgow 1853, registered Southampton 1862, crew list to 1887. Voyage Hamburg to Runcorn, with salt, abandoned at sea, off Texel, 2nd September 1887, crew saved.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 31 December 1841]:
LAUNCH. - Tomorrow (Saturday) a very handsome schooner of 204 tons measurement, will be launched from the building yard of Messrs. Bannister and Co., Trentham-street. We understand she is intended for the Monte Video and Buenos Ayres trade. In point of construction and beauty of model she is first-rate, and reflects great credit upon her talented builder, Mr. Bannister. She is the property of Messrs. W. S. Dixon and Fairclough.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 28 February 1842]:
LINE of PACKETS For MONTE VIDEO and BUENOS AYRES, Sailing on the 8th and 21st of every Month. To sail 24th March, The fine new Schooner ANNA DIXON, D. Hardie, Master; Burthen 190 tons; coppered, and expected to sail very fast. Apply to IMRIE & TOMLINSON. The THOMAS LEECH, an extra ship, is intended to clear on 12th March.

[from Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette - Thursday 08 September 1887]:
LOSS OF A SUNDERLAND VESSEL. The schooner Anna Dixon, of Southampton, while on a voyage from Hamburg, with a cargo of salt, was abandoned in the North Sea, with loss of foremast, on the 2nd, during the severe gale, and the crew were taken off by a barque and landed at Gravesend this morning, all well. The schooner was a vessel of 162 tons register, and was owned by H. D. Dennis, of the Exchange-buildings, Sunderland.

[from Lloyd's List - Saturday 17 September 1887]:
THANKS. To the Editor. Kindly allow me, through the medium of your valuable paper, on behalf of myself and crew, to tender our heartfelt and sincere thanks to Captain Johannesen and crew of the barque Aristides, of Krageroe, [Norwegian] for their great kindness in rescuing us from our vessel, when disabled through the loss of the foremast, etc., during the severe gale on Sept. 1 in the North Sea, and also towards us during our detention of seven days on board their vessel. We likewise tender our warmest thanks to the captain and crew of the Bewick (s), of Newcastle, for their kindness towards us when we were transferred to their steamer, which landed us safely at Gravesend on Sept.8. I am, &c., CHARLES W. REECE, late master of schooner Anna Dixon, of Southampton. Sunderland, Sept. 16, 1887.


Wooden ship Lancaster, built W F Porter, Liverpool, 1838. Materials from their shipyard were for sale soon afterwards. Ship advertised, un-named, as 756 tons, this matches Lancaster which is of that tonnage, is described as Liverpool-built, and entered service in 1838. Not in LR. In MNL, ON 34928, 656 tons, registered and owned Liverpool, entry to 1869. Last newspaper report: voyage to Liverpool from Quebec, captain W Tickle, leaving 28 October, 1868. Barque foundered 46N, 42W, with 4 lives lost, survivors picked up by schooner Warrior on 18 November 1868.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 16 April 1838]:
For SALE, A splendid SHIP, Now on the stocks in the building yard of W. F. Porter and Co.; nearly ready for launching, and can be inspected to the greatest advantage, challenging comparison with the finest specimens of naval architecture in or out of the kingdom. This vessel has been two years in building, the frame is of British oak, Kyanised, thoroughly copper-fastened, with poop and forecastle. Her dimensions and model ensure a large capacity for stowage, at a light draft of water, together with fast-sailing, being 143 feet long, 30 feet broad, and 20 feet deep, and will measure about 600 tons, old measure. For further particulars, apply to Messrs. W. F. Porter & Co. or to CHAPMAN & WILLIS.

[from Liverpool Albion - Tuesday 01 May 1838]:
LAUNCHES. On Wednesday at noon, Messrs. W. F. Porter and Co. launched a splendid ship of 756 tons register, intended for the East India. trade. The fine weather attracted an immense concourse of spectators, whose cheers testified the gratification they experienced at beholding a sight so interesting. Notwithstanding the great number of people on the poop and forecastle, the noble vessel never heeled over in the least, although with a clean swept hold, and a strong tide under her lee.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 06 July 1838]:
For BOMBAY, The Ship LANCASTER, DANIEL CAMPBELL, Master; 756 tons burthen; has excellent accommodations for passengers, and carries a Surgeon. For freight or passage apply to BARTON, IRLAM, and HIGGINSON.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 23 July 1838]:
This DAY, the 23d instant, at twelve o'clock, at the Shipbuilding-yard of Mesas. W. F. Porter and Co., South Pierhead. Queen's Dock, The STOCK and SHIPBUILDING MATERIALS of every description, together with a Quantity of Firewood, Rails, Posts, Stage Planks, Poles, two Guns, Carts, two Horses, Timber Carriage, Wheels, &c, &c.. Apply to JOHN HURRY, Broker.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 06 April 1848]:
For Sale: The fast-sailing Liverpool-built Ship LANCASTER; Registers 756 tons, coppered, and carries a very large cargo; will be found a most desirable ship where capacity and despatch are required; in Queen's Dock.

[from Bradford Observer - Tuesday 01 December 1868]:
WRECK OF A BARQUE AND LOSS FOUR LIVES. Captain Cashing, of the Victory, which has arrived in the Mersey from New Orleans, reports:
Nov. 18, at 5.30 a.m., took from the schooner Warrior, of Jersey, bound from Oporto for Newfoundland, the surviving crew of the barque Lancaster, from Quebec for Liverpool. They report lost: William Tickle, master, William Ormond, cook; William Bowls, seaman; and Thomas Scales, boy. They report the barque wrecked by the sea in lat. 46, lon. 42. I took them on board in lat. 45 56. lon. 40 50.



Wooden brig Grace Darling, built Robert Talbot, Liverpool, 1840, 242 tons om, 198 tons nm, 92.6 x 24.5 x 14.6ft. For sale 1841. Sailed mainly from London. 2nd October 1848, sailed to Hobart. Owned at Hobart. Voyage Manilla to Singapore, departing 6th December 1849, posted missing.

Robert Talbot seems to have been involved in ship-repairing: he is reported to have lengthened, by 12.5 feet, the barque Celt from a brig (originally built at Greenock) in 1844. He also converted the steamer George IV into a sailing vessel. So he may not have had a ship yard - but used the graving docks - which were owned by the Dock Board and could be hired.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 04 September 1840]:
A FINE NEW SHIP THAT WAS NEVER LAUNCHED. Our first paragraph on a new vessel, built at Our Port, we have hitherto invariably headed with the word "Launch." On the present occasion, however, we have to notice a very fine brig, recently consigned to her destined element, but which never was and never will be launched, unless, indeed, by some fortuitous circumstance, she should be drawn or driven so far high and dry as to render it necessary that she should be indulged, as ships have been time out of mind, by being allowed to glide down "majestically" from land to water. The brig "Grace Darling," now lying in the Canning Dock, was floated into her present position, she having been entirely built in No. 3, Graving Dock, close by. She is a remarkably beautiful and faithfully built vessel, admeasuring about 240 tons, but, though with all the apparent requisites of a quick sailor, will carry a cargo considerably above that weight. She has a flat flooring, but is of a beautiful model, combining sharpness with rotundity; and having great beam, she floats upon a comparatively light draft of water, and will doubtless carry sail well. As builders would say, "you cannot see a lump upon her," and she strongly resembles a yacht. Her length is 101 feet over all; her beam 24.5 feet. She is built entirely of English oak, with the exception of the bends, which are of African oak. Her frame and fastenings are all of the best materials and of the most approved construction, and she has been entirely constructed under the inspector for Lloyd's, who has pronounced her to be in every respect a superior vessel. Amongst numerous fastenings, including stringers, shelfpieces, clamps, wood knees, horizontal and hanging iron knees, we observed a hook ten feet in length, to keep together the heels of the canting timbers - a strengthening not very frequent in vessels of this size. The transome knees are 20 inches through, and 10.5 feet long. The Grace Darling was built by Mr. Robert Talbot, ship and boat builder, and as a specimen of naval architecture is a credit to the port.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 16 February 1841]:
ON SALE, Now lying in the Victoria Dock, launched in September last, The splendid new Liverpool-built Brig GRACE DARLING. Coppered and copper-fastened, built on the best construction to sail fast, and to carry a large cargo, under the immediate inspection of Lloyd's surveyor; She is a beautiful model, and shifts without ballast. Length, 92 feet 6 inches; breadth, 24 feet 5 inches; depth, 14 feet 6 inches; and admeasures 242 tons o.m. For particulars apply to GLADSTONE, EDDOWES, and Co., 40, Castle-street.

[from Morning Post - Thursday 28 March 1850]:
The Grace Darling sailed from Manilla, Dec. 6, for Singapore and Hobart Town, and had not arrived at the former place on the 9th Feb.

[from Bombay Gazette - Friday 19 July 1850]:
Shipwreck. The Grace Darling, brig, of Hobart Town, has been wrecked on her passage from Manila to Singapore. - South Australian Gazette and Mining Journal, April 11.



Wooden schooner Sphynx, built Hasleden, Pearson & Troughton, Liverpool, 1839, 124 tons, owned W H Woods, for Liverpool - Cadiz service. LR 1853 described as a snow, 124 tons, master H Dixon, built Liverpool 1839, owned J Ritson, Liverpool. Voyage Liverpool to Belize, ashore on Pedro shoals, (off Savanna la Mar, Jamaica, 17N, 77 50W), 11 June 1853 and lost.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 02 May 1839]:
For GIBRALTAR and CADIZ. The splendid new coppered Schooner SPHYNX, James Luscombe, Master, 120 tons: loading in the King's Dock. Stands twelve years A 1 at Lloyd's.
Will be followed by the new Schooner CENTAUR, of the same size and description. Both these vessels were built at this port, under particular inspection, for the trade, and are expected to sail fast. Apply to W. H. WOOD, 16. Hanover-street.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 17 December 1840]:
For GIBRALTAR and MALTA. The fine A 1 coppered Schooner SPHYNX, William Connibeer, 120 tons, one year old, built at this port expressly for the trade; loading in the King's Dock, and will have immediate despatch Apply W H. WOOD, 16, Hanover-street.

[from Freeman's Journal - Friday 13 December 1850]:
Schooner Sphynx from Liverpool for Syria, general cargo.

[from Morning Chronicle - Wednesday 13 July 1853]:
The brig Sphinx, from Liverpool for Belize (Honduras), was wrecked on the 11th of June, on the Pedro Shoals, about seventy miles to the windward of Savannah-la-mar. [left Queenstown, 27 April, master Dixon]


Wooden schooner Centaur, built Hasleden, Pearson & Troughton, Liverpool, 1839, 125 tons, launched May, owned W H Woods, for Liverpool - Cadiz service. In 1846, owned Marwood, rigged as a brigantine. Sold by Marwood in late 1846 to Perriham, Topsham. ON 4251, registered Exeter 1848, 123 tons, later rigged as a schooner.
Voyage Newcastle to Exeter with coal, 26th October 1865, struck in Pakefield Gat (S of Lowestoft) and foundered, 2 crew lost, 5 saved by Kessingland Lifeboat.

Image from painting by Joseph Heard of Centaur off Formby [from MMM]. No.5 Pilot boat, Victoria, is seen at left.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 14 May 1839]:
We were much gratified yesterday in witnessing a beautiful launch from Messrs. Hasleden, Pearson, and Troughton's yard, Baffin-street, of a very fine schooner of 130 tons burthen, intended for the Cadiz and Gibraltar trade, and the property of our townsman, W. H. Wood, Esq.

[from Globe - Saturday 28 October 1865]:
Lowestoft: Friday. SEVERE GALE ON THE EASTERN COAST. ... The three-masted schooner. Centaur, Lee, master, from Newcastle, [for Exeter] with coals, struck in Pakefield Gat about the same time [4 pm 26 Oct], and almost immediately filled and went down. Two of her crew were washed overboard and drowned. The Kessingland lifeboat launched and proceeded to her assistance, and succeeded in rescuing five hands, and afterwards landed them here in a destitute condition. They were cared for at the Sailors Home.


Wooden schooner Tom Banks, built Grayson, Liverpool 1839, 106 tons, owned Thomas Jones, registered Liverpool. Voyage Barrow to Newport, sank after collision with brigantine Jersey Tar of Youghal, 31 December 1853, off Milford Haven.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 25 October 1839]:
LAUNCHES. Three fine vessels were yesterday launched at this port, ... The "Tom Banks," a schooner of about 120 tons burthen, built by Mr. Greyson [sic, John D Grayson had a shipyard at Trentham Street in Liverpool], who is, we understand, part owner; ...

[from Waterford Mail - Wednesday 01 February 1854]:
COURT OF ADMIRALTY. On Friday, Jan. 27, ... The schooner Tom Banks, Promovent; the Jersey Tar, Impugnant. This was a suit instituted by the owner of the schooner Tom Banks, of Liverpool, to recover compensation from the owners of the brigantine Jersey Tar, of Youghal, for the loss of their vessel, which came into collision on the night of the 31st of December, 1853, with the brigantine.
The owner of part of the cargo of the schooner, and the mate intervened for the purpose of being remunerated for the losses which they sustained by the sinking of the vessel, whose alleged value was £1,000, and cargo £200.
It appeared that the schooner sailed from Barrow to Newport, Monmouthshire, on the 18th of December last, with 150 tons of iron ore, and four tons of tallow, and that about nine o'clock on the night of the 21st, she having passed Milford Haven that morning, the collision took place which caused her destruction. The allegation the promovent was that at the time of the accident the schooner was beating up the British Channel, and on her port tack, when the impugnant vessel came down on them and struck them two violent blows, from the effect of which she almost immediately went down.
The case of the brigantine was, that, according to the position of the two vessels, the course they pursued was the correct one, and that, in consequence, liability could not be fixed on them, but that, on the contrary, they were entitled in strictness to a sum of £80 for the damages which their vessel had sustained.
The schooner was ninety-nine tons register, and the brigantine, which was laden with 200 tons of coal, 132 tons burden.
..... The court granted the promovent a decree, with costs.


Wooden barque Meg of Meldon (also Meg o'Meldon), built Haselden, Pearson and Troughton, Liverpool, 1840. 396 tons, 104.4 x 25.1 x 18.3 ft. ON 23339, in MNL to 1859, registered Shields in 1853. Sailed Liverpool - Calcutta, then sailed from Shields. For sale 1853 at Newcastle. Voyage London to Madras, wrecked Cape Verde Islands, 29th October 1855, crew saved.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 06 November 1840]:
THE "MEG O'MELDON". We recently noticed a beautiful new barque of this name, of 376 tons burthen, built by Messrs. Haselden, Pearson, and Troughton, at their yard, south side of the Queen's Dock Basin. She is a remarkably fine vessel, whether as regards materials, model, or workmanship, and we are glad to announce that, after being neaped for a short time, she will be launched on Tuesday next to the gratification, doubtless, of numerous spectators.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 14 February 1850]:
For CALCUTTA, The remarkably fine Liverpool-built Ship, MEG OF MELDON. William Rickertt, Commander, (Who has great experience in the trade), 396 ton; A 1 twelve years, and is well-known fast sailer, and in every respect first-rate conveyance for goods and passengers: loading Prince's Dock. Apply to Archibald SincLair, Esq. owner, or to COTESWORTH, WYNNE and LYNE.

[from Newcastle Journal - Saturday 23 April 1853]:
OR SALE, the A 1 Ship MEG OF MELDON, of this Port. She was built at Liverpool, in the Year 1840, under particular inspection. Register Tonnage 396 New Measurement. Length from the Inner Part of the Main Stem to the Stern Post 104.8 Feet. Breadth in Midships 25.1 Feet, Depth of Hold 18.3 Feet. The Meg of Meldon is Copper-fastened; was retrennelled throughout, sheathed with Yellow Metal, and thoroughly Overhauled by Messrs. T. and W. Smith, Ship Builders, last Spring. She will continue on the first Letter Four Years from 1852. She is now discharging in the Tyne, a Cargo of 550 Tons of Nitrate of Soda from Iquique. Apply to COOKSON, CUTHBERT, & CO. Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

[from Newcastle Chronicle - Friday 23 November 1855]:
St. Vincent (Cape de Verde). Oct 29. The barque Meg of Meldon, Stove, of South Shields, from London for Madras, was wrecked upon one of the islets called Romes Islands, situate about five miles north of the island of Brava, on the 15th September; crew saved.



Wooden barque Rosanna (also Roseanna), built Johnson, Liverpool, 1840, 366 tons, owned Johnson, Liverpool, for trade to Brazil.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 28 August 1840]:
LAUNCH. A fine ship, of about 400 tons burthen, to be called Roseanna, will be launched to-morrow noon, from the ship yard of John Johnson, Esq., above the Herculaneumn Pottery.


Wooden vessel Unknown, built W B Jones, Liverpool, 1846, circa 400 tons/

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 03 April 1846]:
- On Tuesday, a vessel of 400 tons was launched from the building-yard of Mr. W. B. Jones, Brunswick Dock,


Wooden ship Loodianah, built W Buckley Jones, Liverpool 1846, 744 tons, registered Liverpool, owned Moore, for trade to India. ON15067, in MNL to 1864. For sale at Liverpool May 1864, and not reported after that.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 11 September 1846 ]:
LAUNCH OF AN EAST INDIAMAN. We announced in our last paper that on Monday, the 7th instant, there would be a noble ship launch from the building yard of Messrs. W. B. Jones and Co near the South-west corner of Brunswick Dock: the launch, in fact, of one of the finest merchant vessels ever built in this port. Frequently, as our shipbuilders gratify the public by exhilarating spectacles of this kind on the banks of our famous river, there was a peculiar attraction in this occurrence from the first-class character and magnitude of the vessel, and the wish, everywhere entertained, that the untiring zeal of the builders to do justice to the work they had in hand, should be crowned by the most perfect success. It did not surprise us, therefore, to find that some thousands of the higher and middle ranks of society crowded the building-yard and its vicinage early on Monday forenoon, when the scene around was extremely gay, the advantages of fine weather being heightened by flying colours, smiling faces, and elegant dresses, the ladies adding life and grace to the coup d'oeil. The vessel was greatly admired. She is of large size, measuring upwards of 750 tons, but calculated to carry probably 1100 tons of measurement goods; and is intended to trade between Liverpool and Calcutta. Her dimensions are as follows:- Length over all, 155 ft; Length of measurement, 132 ft 4; Breadth of beam, 31 ft 7; Depth of hold 22 ft 5. On standing before her stern, and looking at her bows, her appearance was that of a steamer or other craft built for quick sailing; but on going on board and looking into her hold, or down her sides, she gave the idea of a vessel constructed for the amplest carrying capacity only, so that the union of bulk and speed seems to have been peculiarly attained as the leading object of her modellers. She is built of massive British oak and Indian teak; and her space between decks forms a truly noble room, in which tall persons may walk about with their hats on; the ceilings from floor to deck are planked with solid polished mahogany, and there is a tracery of handsome open iron work, where ventilation can be had, without weakening her sides, should she ever be engaged to convey troops, &c. The cabin is on the flush deck, its roof, indeed forming the quarter deck, as the seamen's berth forms the forecastle in an equally airy position; and in many suitable places evidences of taste are visible in papier maché mouldings, &c. The figure-head is a superbly carved image, by Allen, of a General of the Sikhs, in his war army; on the gallery and stern are embellishments suggested by, and conected with, the owners, Messrs, Henry Moore and Co. and the sides of the gangway are ornamented with the crest of captain Heron, being a representation of a bird of that name. The knees, the stanchions, the capstans, &c., are all of solid metal, and no expense has been spared to render her as distinguished for strength as for symmetry of form. It is calculated that by the time she is conpleted for sea, as a full-rigged ship, she will have cost her spirited owners not less than £13,000. We need hardly say she is an A 1 ship for twelve years at Lloyd's. It is worthy to remark, that neither the stem nor stern-posts are scarfed, but formed of solid English oak, while the cutwater itself is solid teak. ... named Loodianah .... builder W Buckley Jones ...

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 04 February 1862]:
THE LIVERPOOL SHIP LOODIANAH. Advice just received per the Overland Mail, reports that the ship Loodianah, of Liverpool, Captain Walton, bound from Moulmein, for Liverpool, had been picked up at sea a derelict, and taken to Point de Gall, Ceylon, by the ship Nagasaki. The advices per the previous mail reported her as loading at Moulmein, for the United Kingdom on the 11th of December. She was expected to have a full cargo of rice on board.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Wednesday 09 April 1862]:
THE LOSS OF THE LIVERPOOL SHIP LOODIANAII. By the overland mail just to hand we have received advice of a most gallant act performed by Captain McKay, Commander of the British ship Nagasaki, while on her passage from Newcastle, New South Wales for Bombay. On the passage he discovered a ship in distress and made haste to relieve her. She proved to be the ship Loodianah, of Liverpool, from Moulmein, with a cargo of teak for England. Her commander stated that she was sinking, and that he was desirous of abandoning her. Captain McKay hove his ship to immediately and took on board all hands and their effects. He then wished to see for himself, if possible, the cause of her leaking, and went alongside, where he carefully examined her seams near the water's edge. Being an experienced naval architect, and having had large experience in repairing large ships, it naturally occurred to him, that a ship so recently from port without having experienced any bad weather would have had only a seam or two open above the water's edge, which might be filled up sufficiently close to admit of her being taken into port. Instead of discovering open seams, he saw that she had been scuttled in three places. He sent to his own ship for his carpenter, and for suitable materials and tools, and after a good deal of labour, in which he took an active part himself, he effectually stopped the holes, pumped the ship out, and placed his chief mate in charge of her, with eight men to work her. He then sailed in company with the Loodianah, and had the satisfaction to see her safely anchor in the harbour of Point de Galle, Ceylon, where she was surrendered to Lloyd's agent, to act for the Owners, Underwriters, and Salvors. Although short handed, the Nagasaki reached Bombay in safety. There is little doubt, that the tact and seamanship displayed by Captain McKay on this occasion, will earn for him a tangible acknowledgement from the Owners and Underwriters.

[from Liverpool Daily Post - Saturday 13 December 1862]:
For Sale: The fine A 1 British-built Ship LOODIANAH, 744 tons register; built for the owners, under their own inspection, and originally classed A 1 at Lloyd's for twelve years; in 1858 was continued A 1 for four years; scantling is all extra throughout, and she is iron kneed in the most substantial manner; is copper-fastened, and sheathed with yellow metal; had new wire rigging of the best quality in 1861; Dimensions:- Length 138 feet 3-10ths; breadth 28 feet 8-10ths; depth 22 feet 3-10ths. Lying St George's Dock... [For sale to Feb 1863; then reported 26 March 1863 sailing to Shanghai, capt Thomas Moir; who was reported to have died at Shanghai 26 October 1863; Loodianah was for sale again May 1864, lying Liverpool, by order of the Mortgagees.],



Wooden pilot vessel Pioneer, built W Buckley Jones, Liverpool, 1852, 53 grt, 68 x 15.7 x 7.8 feet, Pilot Boat no. 6, schooner rigged, ON 7073, sold 1879, sailed to Dakar and wrecked there.

Image from painting in MMM of Pilot boat no.6, Pioneer.

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Thursday 02 October 1879]:
FOR SALE, The very handsome Liverpool-built pilot Schooner PIONEER, 53 tons register. Built expressly for the Liverpool pilot service in 1852, of the very best materials. In May last was thoroughly overhauled by Messrs Clayton, and Co, at a cost of nearly £300; She is sheathed with yellow metal, which is in good order, and has now on board between 50 and 60 tons of ballast; sails fast and is well equipped. Lying in the Salthouse Dock.

Wooden pilot vessel The Duke, built W Buckley Jones, Liverpool, 1852, 52 grt, 69 x 15.7 x 7.6 feet, Pilot Boat no. 3, ON 1946, schooner rigged, sank 10 March 1881 after collision with Grab Hopper A. Savaged and repaired, sold 1894 to Denmark for use as a fishing boat.

Image from a painting by Samuel Walters, of Pilot boat no.3, The Duke.
>

[from Liverpool Albion - Saturday 12 March 1881]:
LIVERPOOL PILOT-BOAT SUNK. NARROW ESCAPES. About half-past eight o'clock on Thursday night a serious collision took place in the river between No. 3 pilot-boat (the schooner the Duke, 61.33 tons) and one of the Garston mud hoppers, named the "A." The pilot boat was returning from Point Lynas, and when off the Rock Lighthouse she was run into with great force by the mud hopper which was proceeding down the river. The boat was struck on the port bow, and commenced to rapidly fill with water. One of the apprentices on board, named Boyd, jumped into the water and climbed on to the hopper, and Dixon, another apprentice, leaped on board the hopper as she swung round after the impact. Immediately on the collision taking place, it was deemed necessary to run the pilot-boat on the beach, and the master got her inside the Rip-rap buoy, where she sank, the water having poured in through a large hole caused by the blow received from the hopper. The other members of the crew were rescued by a Mr. Bailey in a private boat, and by the New Brighton lifeboat, which came alongside promptly; the hopper, which was not much damaged, also put out a boat. The crew of "No. 3" consisted of T. G. Wilkin, master; George Bland, cook; Edwin Beeson, William A. Dixon, Thomas F. Boyd, and James Cousins. apprentices. Although the water was washing over the bulwarks of the boat, the master stood by her to the last, and it is not unlikely that an attempt will be made to repair the breach and get her off at low water. All the crew lost their clothing and some of them were conveyed to Liverpool at a late hour by the New Brighton boat.



Wooden schooner Unknown, built W B Jones, Liverpool, 1856,

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 08 April 1856]:
Launch. On Saturday, the 5th instant, there was launched from the shipbuilding-yard of W. B. Jones and Co., a strong well-built schooner. She has been modelled to carry a very large cargo on a very light draft of water - say about 200 tons on 8 feet 10 inches to 9 feet water. She was launched with all her masts on and rigging complete, similar to other vessels launched from the same yard on former occasions. She has ben built under special survey with ... English oak frames to class 9 years at Lloyds.



Wooden barque Lockett, built J Brooke, Liverpool, 1852, for owners Lockett. 616 tons. 132.2 x 25.7 x 20.3 ft. Registered Liverpool. For sale 1873 and in 1882. In MNL to 1884, ON 25959, owned Thomas Rhys, Plymouth, registered Liverpool. Voyage Swansea to East London, while at anchor off East London, driven ashore and wrecked, 4th January 1884.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 09 April 1852]:
Ship Launches. - On Wednesday last a splendid ship intended for the China trade, was launched from the building yard of Mr. J. Brooke, west side of the Coburg dock. The day being favourable, a large number of persons assembled to witness the event. Amongst those were Mr. J. Lockett, Mr. Wm. Lockett, and Mr. R Lockett, Mr. W. B. Jones, Mr. Willoughby, &c. &c., besides several parties of ladies. The vessel, which was named the Lockett, went off in good style amidst the cheers of the spectators. The ceremony of naming was performed by Miss Lockett, eldest daughter of one of the owners of the vessel. The Lockett is 600 tons burthen; length 150 feet; beam 26 feet; and is copper fastened throughout. She is of handsome model, and the workmanship is considered very superior. After the launch .... the vessel, adding that though it was Mr. Brooke's first, he believed such a one was never built in the port of Liverpool. ...

[from Liverpool Journal of Commerce - Tuesday 10 June 1873]:
FOR SALE. - The handsome A 1 Barque LOCKETT, 616 tons register. Built at Liverpoool in 1852; then classed 14 years A 1 at Lloyd's, and was continued in 1866 for nine years A 1; is copper treenailed and fastened, and was newly sheathed with yellow metal in 1872 at London, when she passed her half-time survey, had double topsail yards and wire rigging, and recently had new lower masts. Carries 800 tons dead weight, sails well, and is most abundantly found in stores. Lying in the Brunswick Dock. Dimensions:- Length, 132.2 feet; breadth, 25.7 feet: depth, 20.3 feet. For inventories and further particulars apply to C. W. KELLOCK & Co., brokers.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Tuesday 12 February 1884]:
OFFICIAL INQUIRY. THE WRECK OF THE LOCKETT. A Court of Inquiry into the wreck of the Lockett was held at the West Bank, East London, South Africa, on the 8th, 9th, and 10th of Jan., before H. M. Blakeway, Esq., Acting C.C. and R.M., and Captain Thomson, Port Captain, as nautical assessor. Mr. A. Tatham (Messrs. Walker and Tatham) watched the case on behalf of Lloyd's. The captain was called upon to hand in his certificate. which he did, and also handed in a written statement as follows (the captain had no test certificate of his cables):-
Left Swansea on Aug. 4, 1883. and on the 8th ship sprung a leak. We then went back to Plymouth, got necessary repairs done, and left again on Oct. 5, arriving at East London on the morning of the 17th Dec. Lost an anchor on the evening of the 22d Dec., and got it replaced on the following day. Wednesday, the 27th, shifted ship further out, according to port captain's instructions, and after that all went on well until the morning of the 4th of Jan., when there was a light breeze from eastward, but towards noon it freshened to a brisk gale with very heavy chopping sea and a strong westerly current. Having ballast boat alongside, which carried away our ropes, and doing other damage, hoisted the flag "W" to get the boat taken away. About noon the vessel parted starboard chain and canted with her head towards shore. Could not let go port anchor on account of a steamer being close under our sails, and loosed the foretop sails to wear ship round. Slipped remainder of chain (starboard one). As vessel being hung broadside on and would not pay off, hauled down head sails and let go port anchor, giving her over 90 fathoms, but vessel would not even come head to wind, and still kept driving ashore, and soon afterwards struck heavily. Seeing it impossible for me to get off, slipped port chain to let vessel come in as much as possible. A few minutes after a rocket was fired on board. Did what was necessary with the rocket line. Crew all landed, say about 5 p.m., which included 11 sailors and myself, also 6 Kafirs. And I beg to thank the inhabitants of East London for their timely assistance, as also the Port Captain and the Rocket Brigade. T. Merchant.
Wm. Berawheitt, the carpenter of the ship Lockett, gave evidence as to putting back to Plymouth for repairs, and to the details attending the stranding of the vessel. Witness further added that as soon as he noticed the ship dragging he called to the captain. "The ship is drifting." The captain said," No, she is not drifting." Witness said "She is." The mate then ordered him to cockbill the port anchor. Witness did so at once. The mate said "Let go the anchor." The captain said "No, wait a little." Witness stated that he shipped in Liverpool, but although desired would not engage to serve on the barque until he had seen her; that when on board he met a gentleman who was unknown to him, who, in the course of conversation, remarked "Well, the barque may take you to East London, but she will never bring you back."
At the request of Lloyd's Agents (Walker, Tatham and Co.), William Wright, captain of the Trevose, and master mariner, was called, and, being sworn, stated: I am master of the steamtug Trevose. I was outside the roadstead on the 4th January when the Lockett parted; there was a fresh breeze blowing from the eastward, and a short jumpy sea. I saw the Lockett part. I was lying astern of the steamer. As soon as I saw this I went down to her. Her signal W put up. I understood it to mean I was to come and take the lighter away. The lighter was then close under the stern of the Lockett. I took it away. I was quite close to the Lockett, but could not give her any assistance as I had the lighter in tow. My instructions are to attend to my company's lighters first, and then render any other assistance I can. The captain of the Lockett did not ask me for any assistance, nor did he put up any signal for the same. It was possible for me to anchor the lighter; but my intention was to put her alongside the Danube. I saw the port office signals (which were an instruction to me to render assistance to the Lockett). and then I turned again with the lighter and went close to the Lockett and called out to the master to get the tow-rope ready. I told the coxswain of the lighter to sheer his boat alongside to get the hawser, but he did not get close enough. The ship commenced to bump immediately after. When the signal W was first put up the vessel had already parted. The following questions were put by the Court at the instance of Lloyd's agents: - I consider the signal was meant for me to come and take the lighter away. The signal was taken down after I had removed the lighter from the vessel. Of this I am positive. When I first came down to the vessel I told the captain to let go his second anchor; he was well clear of the Danube, and in a clear berth altogether.
The Court delivered judgment as follows: After carefully considering the evidence in the matter of the wreck of the Lockett, British barque, of Liverpool, registered number 25,959, we find the that the barque Lockett left Swansea on the 4th August, 1883, with a cargo of coal, manned with a crew of 15 hands, bound for East London. That all went well until the 8th of August, when she put back to Plymouth in very leaky condition, and after having been duly surveyed and undergoing sundry repairs, she finally, on Oct. 5, sailed for, and arrived at East London on Dec. 17, 1883. During the passage out the vessel made a considerable quantity of water, necessitating pumping every four hours. On the 18th the discharging of the vessel was commenced, and all went well until the 22d, when the vessel parted an anchor during very calm weather, also 90 fathoms of chain. After drifting a short distance she was brought up with the second anchor. The lost anchor was replaced on the 24th, and by order of the Port Captain the vessel was shifted to a safer berth. On Jan. 4 there was a fresh breeze blowing from the east. There were three other vessels, besides steamers, in the roadstead, all of which had lighters alongside, and were discharging. At about 1 o'clock p.m. the Lockett parted, and after drifting a considerable distance, and when nearing the breakwater, the second anchor was let go, which was of no avail; the vessel continued drifting and ultimately came ashore. The Court is of opinion that the master apparently made little or no attempt to get to sea, and is to blame for not having let go the second anchor immediately the vessel parted, as advised by the captain of the tug Trevose, she being a considerable distance from the nearest vessel, which would have given him time to obtain assistance from the tug, or falling that, had the topsails been set aback, and the weather jib-sheets been hauled flat aft, the vessel would probably have drifted down the coast with a stern board and gone to sea. On these grounds the captain, Thomas Merchant, is guilty of grave errors of judgment, and we recommend the suspension of his certificate for a period of six months. The chief mate also is deserving of severe censure for the careless manner in which his logbook has been kept, and also for the very unsatisfactory manner in which he gave his evidence, and had he been in charge of the vessel we should not have hesitated to recommend the suspension of his certificate for a certain period. It is now returned to him - [The certificate was here handed to the chief mate, and the second mate's certificate is, or was, waiting application for its return.] In conclusion the Court would remark, without the slightest hesitation, that it is evident that the cables of the Lockett were very defective and insufficient to hold the vessel, as the state of the weather was not such as to warrant any vessel with proper ground tackle parting at the time of the casualty. In support of this assertion we would special draw attention to the evidence of the carpenter, which was given in a straightforward and positive manner.

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Liverpool built sailing vessels - builder unknown. Mostly identified by newspaper adverts describing vessel as "Liverpool-built" or as reported in LR as "built Liverpool". Yard numbers are known for builder Royden, so these will have been built by other Liverpool yards.
Mary Catherine SV 1820
Bootle SV 1820 Bibby
Kate SV 1820 Bibby
Columbia SV 1820
Agaphea SV 1820
John Heyes SV 1820
John Begg SV 1820
Sarah SV 1820
Constantine SV 1821
Lancashire Witch SV 1821 Bibby
Devonshire SV 1821
Corsair SV 1821 whaler
Frances SV 1821
Mary Brade SV 1822
Rapid SV 1822
Allerton SV 1822
Morro Castle S 1822
St George SV 1823
Thomas Dempsey SV 1823
Thomas Hyde SV 1823
Camoens SV 1824
Mary Ann SV 1824 Bibby
Brazilian SV 1824
Colombian SV 1824
Porter SV 1824
Cuba SV 1824
Murray SV 1824
Zeno SV 1824
Oporto SV 1824
Elizabeth SV 1824
Zante SV 1824
Irlam SV 1825
Arab SV 1825
Inca SV 1825
Ayacucho SV 1825
Indian Chief SV 1826
Richard SV 1826
Dennett SV 1826
Bahamian SV 1826
Ann Paley SV 1827 Bibby
Lusitania SV 1827
Joseph Winter SV 1828
Cicely SV 1828
Lucy SV 1828
Miranda SV 1829
Mary Scott SV 1829
Laura SV 1829
Livingston SV 1829
Statesman SV 1829
Hope SV 1829
Parker SV 1830
Llama SV 1830
Eliza Killick SV 1830
Gratitude SV 1830
Lady Charlotte SV 1831
Frances SV 1832
John Souchay SV 1832
Thomas Worthington SV 1833
Ellen German SV 1833
Charles Hamerton SV 1833
Emma SV 1833
Lynx SV 1834
John Bagshaw SV 1835
Irlam SV 1836
Enterprize SV 1836
Tiger SV 1836
Emily SV 1837
Paragon SV 1837
Sunda SV 1838
Priscilla SV 1838
Dorset SV 1838
Dinah SV 1838
Henrietta SV 1838
Helena SV 1838
Margaret SV 1838
Helen Stewart SV 1839
Currency SV 1839


Wooden ship Mary Catherine, built Liverpool 1820, 391 tons, sailed to Boston, Charleston, New Orleans, etc. Later owned Ward, Hull. Voyage Shields to Alexandria, wrecked near Alexandria before 23rd March 1838, crew saved.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 21 December 1821]:
Notwithstanding the prejudice that British vessels cannot make as good passages as the Americans, the Mary Catherine, which arrived this day from Liverpool, also the brig Jessie from thence, have beat not only every vessel that sailed in company, but many by 10 or 20 days. - Boston Paper.

[from Newcastle Journal - Saturday 12 May 1838]:
ALEXANDRIA, March 23. The Mary Catherine, Powdrell, from Shields, on some sunken rocks five miles to the westward of this port, lost her rudder, filled, and sunk in deep water; part of the cargo and materials saved.


Wooden brig Bootle, built 1820, Liverpool. 152 tons. Owned Bibby, Liverpool. Another advert for Bibby Vessels 1823. Sold to Workington owner, registered Workington 1845. Shipping register annotated: went missing, presumed lost with all hands, on a voyage from New York, sailed circa November 4 1852, - as reported by owners in 1855. Below: sailing from New York seems to have been 15 November 1851

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 19 June 1823]:
LINK PACKETS FROM LISBON, to sail on the 1st of every month. To sail on the 1st of July, full or not full. Freight 30s per ton measurement, The fine Liverpool-built Brig BOOTLE, R. Blundell, Master; 152 tons register. In older to insure quicker despatch for goods and passengers, to and from Lisbon, to Liverpool, than heretofore, the owners of the Lancashire Witch, Bootle, Hardware, Joe, and others now building, have undertaken to despatch a vessel on the 1st of every month. These vessels are all Liverpool-built, for and under inspection of their present owners; first-class, and their cabins fitted up for the convenience and comfort of passengers. The periods of sailing will be strictly adhered to the owners, John Bibby and Co. or VIANNA and JONES.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 25 January 1841]:
For SALE by PRIVATE TREATY, The following well known Liverpool built VESSELS: The Brig BOOTLE; burthen per register 152 51-94 tons, old measurement; length 83 feet 10 inches; breadth 21 feet 10 inches; depth 14 feet 2 inches: lying in Union Dock. .....built of the best selected English and African oak...

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 15 January 1849]:
For PERNAMBUCO, The fine A 1 British built brig BOOTLE, Captain Wilson [sic, Nelson], registers 135 tons, ...

[from Carlisle Patriot - Saturday 10 February 1849]
Workington: Bootle, Nelson, seven days out from Liverpool, came in contact with the barque Red Rover, through the thickness of the atmosphere, carrying away the bulwarks, stanchens, and losing anchor, and otherwise much damaged. She is now undergoing repair and will be enabled to proceed again to sea in a few days. The cargo has received no damage. [sailed from Workington 23rd February for Pernambuco] z
[Horatio Nelson, master of brig Bootle died Workington 2 Feb 1850, aged 37, after a short illness]

[from Lloyd's List - Thursday 18 September 1851]:
Mauritius. July 23. Bootle, Patrickson, sailed for New York.
[later report: Bootle, Patrickson, cleared at New York for Clyde, 15th November 1851]


Wooden brig Kate, built Liverpool, 1820, for Bibby, 150 tons, for Liverpool - Dublin service.
Voyage Dublin to Liverpool, 15 March 1824, ran aground on Skerries and full of water, captain Kearns [sic also Keiran or Kaimes]. Still in LR to 1827, master Kaimes[sic]. Note an obituary in April 1824, states Peter Kieran, master of brig Kate, died, aged 59. So evidence points to Kate not being put back in service after striking the Skerries, and the master died soon afterwards at Holyhead.

Bibby advert [from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 23 October 1823]:
LINE OF PACKETS FOR LISBON, To sail on the 1st of every month. To sail on 1st November, full or not full. The LANCASHIRE WITCH, Thos. Neale, Master; In order to insure quicker despatch for goods and passengers, to and from Lisbon and Liverpool, than heretofore, the owners of the well-known superior fast-sailing vessels Lancashire Witch, Bootle, Hardware, Joe, Kate, Ellen Jenkinson, and others now building, have undertaken to despatch a vessel on the 1st of every month. These vessels are all Liverpool-built, for and under inspection their present owners; first-class, copper-fastened, and their cabins fitted up for the convenience and comfort of passengers. The periods of sailing will be strictly adhered to. Apply to the owners, John Bibby and Co. or VIANNA and JONES.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 24 April 1823]:
IRELAND ... The Kate, P Kieran, from Dublin, with 1200 staves, E Dearman & Co - in the Salthouse Dock. ...

[from Lloyd's List - Friday 19 March 1824]:
Holyhead, 16th March. The Kate, Kearns [sic], and the James Walters, Roberts, both from Dublin to Liverpool, ran upon the Skerries last night; the former is full of water, and the latter is totally wrecked. Two Passengers drowned.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 16 April 1824]:
DIED. ... Sunday, 4th April, at Holyhead, in his 59th year, Captain Peter Kieran, of the brig Kate, of this port.


Wooden ship Columbia, built Liverpool, 1820, 508 tons, owned Benson & Cropper, Liverpool, for trade to Calcutta. Voyage Bombay to London, via Mauritius, abandoned, leaky, in the Atlantic, 28 January 1838, crew and passengers saved.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 15 March 1822]:
FOR CALCUTTA, The new Ship COLUMBIA, JAMES CHAPMAN, commander, (Late of the Ganges). This ship is on her first Voyage, and intended to be despatched in April; burthen 508 tons, Her accommodations for passengers are extensive, and in every way comfortable and elegant. For terms of freight or passage, apply to CROPPER, BENSON, and Co.

[from Southern Reporter and Cork Commercial Courier - Thursday 22 February 1838]:
The ship Columbia. On Tuesday last, the Dutch ship Phenomene, Capt Hood came into this port [Plymouth], having on board the crew of the ship Columbia consisting of the Commander, H. Thornton, 25 officers and seamen, and 7 passengers whom they took off the wreck of that vessel, on Monday 29th of January, off the Western Islands. Many of the men are sick, and one named Cane, died on Wednesday. The Columbia was a fine ship of 580 tons, and belonged to Messrs. Clint and Lethbridge Liverpool.

[from Hampshire Independent - Saturday 17 February 1838]:
The Columbia, from Bombay and the Mauritius, bound to London, on the 21st of January, in lat. 43 30 N., long. 29 30 W., experienced very heavy gales of wind, by which she lost her redder, and before it could he cleared she was much injured abaft. that, as she descended, the sea ran into her. In this state she continued, momentarily expecting to go down, and was ultimately abandoned. Part of the specie saved, Captain Thornton, crew, and passengers, arrived off Plymouth in the Phenomenon.


Wooden brig Agaphea, built Liverpool, 1820, 146 tons, owned Finlay, Liverpool, for service to Berbice. Later owned Ross, Liverpool. Registered Whitehaven by 1851; ON 9274. Voyage Cardiff to Dublin with coal, ashore, 24 January 1865, near Wicklow, crew saved by coast-guard using ropes from shore. Vessel wrecked.

[from Lancaster Gazette - Saturday 11 November 1820]:
LIVERPOOL, November 9. The Agaphea, M'Intosh, hence at Berbice.

[from Barbadian - Tuesday 06 July 1824]:
James Walsh: Has arrived to him by brig Agaphea from Dublin: ..Beef...Pork...

[from Cumberland Pacquet, and Ware's Whitehaven Advertiser - Tuesday 27 February 1849]:
For sale at Whitehaven: One Sixteenth of the Brig Agaphea, 153 Tons Register, O. M., Edmondson, Master.

[from Wicklow News-Letter and County Advertiser - Saturday 28 January 1865]:
BRIG ASHORE NEAR NEWCASTLE. The brig Agaphea, one hundred and fifty tons, coal laden for the Great Southern and Western Railway, from Whitehaven, ran on shore near five mile-point, a coast-guard station, near Newcastle, on the Dublin and Wicklow Railway line, at about six o'clock, a.m., on Tuesday morning last. Captain Balfour, Inspecting-Commander of Coast-Guard, and some of his men were present, and, through their exertions, the crew of the vessel were brought on shore. Two tug steamers from Dublin were brought in the hope of getting her off, but without success. Owing to the heavy sea which has since prevailed she has become a total wreck.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Tuesday 14 February 1865]:
Report of Captain Stewartson, of the Brig Agaphea, of Whitehaven, 147 tons, from Cardiff for Dublin (coal).
Left Cardiff, Jan. 19, and met with heavy seas and variable weather. On Tuesday, Jan. 24, at 3 30 A.M., weather thick and hazy, wind SE, very strong, struck on the beach at Five-mile Point, about three-quarters of mile from the shore, a very heavy sea on. Hove sails all aback, and used every exertion to get her off, but without success. I then made signals for assistance, and at 5 A.M. the coastguard came off in their boat. On their first attempt to get to us, their boat was capsized and the crew nearly drowned. We had drifted in considerably, and by aid of the coastguard got a hawser conveyed to the shore and rescued the crew. The vessel has since broken up.


Wooden ship John Heyes (also Hayes), built Liverpool, 1820, 310 tons, owned Heyes & Co., Liverpool, for trade to Barbados. Later owned Gladstone, Liverpool. ON 23370, registered Whitby 1854, 310 tons, in MNL to 1862. Damaged while being caulked at Shadwell, 3 September 1856, - and condemned.

[from Barbados Mercury and Bridge-town Gazette - Saturday 24 June 1820]:
THE undersigned are receiving from on board the ship John Heyes, the following articles, which they are vending very cheap for cash: Superfine Philadelphia Flour, Indian Corn, Hams, Cheese, Earthen Ware in crates and hogsheads, Burton Ale, &c. &c. Bovells & Heyes.

[from Newcastle Courant - Friday 05 September 1856]:
London, Sept. 3 - The barque John Heyes, Harland, of Whitby, is lying on the hard at the New Crane Dock, Shadwell, in a wrecked condition. About a fortnight since she came onto the ways (on the hard in front of the entrance to the dock), to undergo some caulking. The starboard side was completed, and in consequence of her ballast (60 tons) not having been trimmed, so as to keep her listing inwards towards the dock wall, she listed outwards on her port side towards the river, and gradually went over on her beam ends, starting her sides, and straining herself severely, the tide flowing into her every tide. Her back and timbers are broken, cutwater damaged, frame and sides ripped open, and the ship generally twisted and strained. She continues lying on her beam-ends, on the mud, blocking up the entrance to the dock. No attempts have been made by the owners to remove her in consequence of some dispute with the Insurance club, but the dock people, by means of chain-lighters, are endeavouring to get her out of the way of the entrance to the dock.

[from Essex Standard - Friday 16 January 1857]:
Insurance losses: John Heyes of Whitby, £500.


Wooden brig John Begg, built Liverpool, 1820, 157 tons, owned Liverpool. Service to S America. For sale 1840. Later sailed from Galway - to Baltimore arriving 1849, no further voyages found. Possibly condemned, sold foreign, or lost on return. In LR to 1850.

[from Lloyd's List - Tuesday 13 March 1821]:
Valparaiso. John Begg, Murphy, [arrived from] Liverpool.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 21 August 1828]:
For VALPARAISO, ARICA, and LIMA, The very fine A 1 Brig JOHN BEGG, Thos. Dick, Master; Burthen per register 157 tons, a well known remarkably fast sailing vessel, and superior conveyance. Her accommodations for passengers are spacious, and fitted up with every attention to comfort and convenience. Apply to THOMAS and JOHN BROCKLEBANK.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Tuesday 24 November 1840]:
The fine Brig JOHN BEGG, 157 tons register (O.M.), and 149 (N.M.); built at Liverpool entirely of English and African oak; coppered with heavy copper; is in excellent order, having had extensive repairs; adapted for general purposes, stowing a large cargo, sailing fast, and having good accommodation. Has a raised quarter-deck, standing figure-head, sham galleries, well found in stores, and fit for immediate employment. Dimensions, per register, Length, 75 feet; breadth, 19 feet; depth 13 feet 2-10ths. Now lying in the Surrey Canal, Rotherhithe. For further particulars apply to O. PAQUALIN. Ship and Insurance Agent.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Friday 09 March 1849]:
BALTIMORE Feb 19. The John Beggs brig, M'Donough, 60 days from Galway, Ireland, arrived here on the 14th inst.; she had 63 passengers, five of whom died on the passage. Experienced very heavy weather, lost bulwarks, stanchions, etc
  More detail of this disastrous journey across the Atlanic.


Wooden ship Sarah, built Liverpool, 1820, 284 tons, owned Tobin, Liverpool, to trade to Demerara. Voyage Liverpool to Demerara, driven ashore by a storm at Crigyll (near Rhosneigr, Anglesey) on 11 September 1835, crew saved by ropes from shore.

Image of rescue. See more detail.

[from Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser - Tuesday 27 March 1821]:
At Demerara, Sarah, Tobin, from Liverpool.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 14 September 1835]:
Saturday Sept 12: Sarah, Sims, hence for Demerara, was totally wrecked this morning [Friday] in Carnarvon Bay, crew saved, part of cargo is washing on shore. [left Liverpool Tuesday 8th September]

[from North Wales Chronicle - 22 September 1835]:
On the Friday morning, during the same gale, the ship Sarah from Liverpool to Demerara, came ashore at Crigill [just north of Rhosneigr] in Carnarvon Bay, when, under the directions of the Rev. James Williams (Secretary to the above-mentioned Institution) eighteen men were landed by a rope passed from the mast head to the shore. The mate, who first made the attempt brought with him the end of a line, for the purpose of hauling the rest one by one; but before he reached the shore, the line got foul, and kept him suspended for some time in the most imminent peril. Three men however dashed in to his rescue, and caught him by the leg. At that moment three tremendous seas broke over them, and it was for some time feared that all four would have been drowned, but by clinging fast together and to a rock, until the water had receded, they kept their hold and were ultimately pulled on shore, where they were immediately rewarded for their intrepid conduct, a circumstance so unusual on that coast, that it seemed to make a great impression on all the bystanders, and it is hoped will have the same effect as on other parts of the Island, namely, to make the peasantry more anxious about saving life and property, than about helping themselves to the latter.


Wooden ship Constantine, built Liverpool, 1821, 516 tons, owned W C Jones, Liverpool. In LR 1824-30. LR entries appear erratic - built Liverpool 1821 and also built Liverpool 1819. LR gives master Granger - not found in newspapers. Newspaper reports are also sparse. Latest clear report is: Constantine, White, sailed March 1823 from Liverpool for New Orleans.
  Possible builder was Humble & Hurry - who launched in 1821 the Ellen Mar a vessel of similar size (516 tons burthen) and which was then advertised for sale, unnamed.


Wooden brig Lancashire Witch , built Liverpool 1821, 135 tons, owned Bibby. Also described as a schooner. Driven ashore and wrecked 20th October 1833 at Vera Cruz [Gulf of Mexico].

Bibby advert, 1823.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 12 August 1833]:
For VERA CRUZ, The fine Liverpool-built Schooner, LANCASHIRE WITCH, Captain William E. James; Who is well acquainted with the Gulf, having been many voyages to Vera Cruz. 127 tons register, coppered and copper-fastened; well known as one of the packets to Lisbon: as a remarkably fast-sailer, and as the greatest part of her cargo is engaged, will have despatch; lies in the King's Dock. For terms, &c. apply to the owners, Messrs. John Bibby & Co,....

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 30 December 1833]:
Lancashire Witch, James, from Liverpool, sunk at Vera Cruz, 20th Oct. in deep water; crew saved.

[from Hull Packet - Friday 03 January 1834]:
Vera Cruz. Oct 27. From the 18th to the 22nd, there was a most tremendous Norther. The Lancashire Witch, which arrived on the 17th from Liverpool, was driven onshore and totally wrecked; the cargo is under water, and obliged to be taken out piecemeal.


Wooden brig Devonshire, built Liverpool, 1821, 165 tons, owned Hurry. For sale 1829. Last newspaper mention June 1831, arrived Helvoet [Netherlands] from Cuba. In LR to 1833.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 19 October 1829]:
On FRIDAY, the 30th instant, at one o'clock, at Nicholas Hurry and Son's Office, 4, Tithebarn-street, The first class Liverpool-built Brig DEVONSHIRE, STRICKLAND, Master; with all her Stores, as she arrived from sea, lying in George's Dock. Burthen per register 165 tons; copper-fastened and sheathed; sails very fast; and is a very desirable Vessel for the South American or Mediterranean trade. For Inventories and other particulars apply to Messrs. SMITH and HUTCHINSON, or NICHOLAS HURRY, Broker.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 08 April 1830]:
For BARBADOES and TRINIDAD, The first class Brig DEVONSHIRE, R. Carron, master, Burthen 165 tons; will clear out on the 20st April and will sail on the 21st, wind permitting. For freight, apply N. Hurry Son, or GEO. and JNO. SMITH.

[from Lloyd's List - Friday 01 July 1831]:
Helvoet: June 25, Devonshire, Carron, arrived from Cuba.


Wooden ship Corsair, built Liverpool, 1821, 300 tons, for service to Charleston, Captain Petrie. Voyaged to Manilla. Later sold to London owners, Curling & Young, as a whaler. In February 1833 reported as carrying 1700 barrels of whale oil. Voyaged to Pacific and wrecked 13 January 1835 - Kingsmill Islands [now Gilbert Is, most probably Tabiteuea] - details below.

[from Manchester Mercury - Tuesday 11 December 1821]:
A remarkable instance of fast sailing: The fine British ship Corsair, Captain Petrie, of Liverpool, arrived at that port, Wednesday, in eighteen days and eighteen hours from Charleston, S. C.

[from Book: A Narrative Of The Shipwreck Of The Corsair: In The Month Of January, 1835, On An Unknown Reef Near The Kingsmill Islands, In The South Pacific Ocean, William Reney (Ist mate), Longman 1836]:
Corsair (1833) Captain William Venables). This vessel of 370 tons left London in October 1833. It was wrecked on a reef near the Kingsmill Islands on 13 January 1835. The crew took to the boats and spent 26 days at sea and covered 3,000 miles before they reached Tinian (Buena Vista) Island, Marshall Islands. The captain and other crewmen were killed by hostile natives along the way. Some crewmen from the vessel were still living on the island in 1840.

Image of wreck and confrontation of crew with natives:



Wooden ship Francis (also Frances), built Liverpool 1821, 412 tons, owned Barton, Liverpool, for service to Barbados. Later owned Magee, Liverpool, and some service to Calcutta. In LR to 1852.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 22 September 1828]:
To sail on the 27th instant. For BARBADOES. The Ship FRANCIS, John Gillespie, Master. For freight or passage, apply to BARTON, IRLAM & HIGGINSON.

[from Morning Advertiser - Saturday 26 April 1851]:
Spoken: Francis, Calcutta to London, Feb 24, in 2 S, 30 W [later report: London, Oct 9, entered inwards, Francis from Calcutta.]


Wooden barque, Mary Brade, built Liverpool, 1822, 243 tons, registered Liverpool. Traded to Lima, Havana,.. Reported ashore on Serranilla Reef, and wrecked, 13th January 1839, voyage from Santa Martha (Colombia) for Apalachicola (Florida), all crew lost.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 22 May 1823]:
Mary Brade Monteith hence for Lima, was on 10th ult in lat 10 41, lon 22 0, all well.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 10 March 1828]:
A regular trader. For HAVANA, The fine coppered A 1 Brig MARY BRADE, J. Lincoln, Master; 243 tons, sails fast, and is in all respects an eligible conveyance; lying in Prince's Dock. For freight or passage, apply to Messrs. TENNANT, MOORE & Co. or to ASHLEY BROTHERS.

[from Lloyd's List - Thursday 14 March 1839]:
Two Vessels (one supposed to be the Mary Brade, Jones, from Santa Martha to Laguna) are reported to be ashore on the same reef; and from the position of the Vessel supposed to be the Mary Brade, it is expected that all on board have perished.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 15 March 1839]:
BELIZE, Jan. 20. The Eleanor Laidman, Watson, from Santa Martha for Mobile, was totally lost 13th Jan. on Serranilla Reef; crew arrived here, after being six days in the boats. Two other vessels were also seen on the Reef by the Eleanor Laidman; one of which was supposed to be the Mary Brade, from Santa Martha for Apalachicola.


Wooden brig Rapid, built Liverpool, 1822, 152 tons, first owner Porter & Co, Liverpool, for service to Jamaica. Later to Bahia. In LR, owned Liverpool, to 1850. Later owned Treweek. Last newspaper report seems to be arriving Callao from England, 3 May 1853, master Lindsay. In LR to 1855.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 28 January 1839]:
For MARANHAM, The fine fast sailing Brig, RAPID, Wm White, master, 255 tons register, coppered and copper-fastened, and a desirable conveyance for goods. For freight or passage, apply to Alex Parlane, ..


Wooden ship Allerton, built Liverpool, 1822, 282 tons, owned Fletcher, Liverpool, for trade to New Orleans. Lengthened 1843 to 364 tons, rigged as barque. ON 24548, registered Dumfries 1854, Shields by 1860. Voyage Newcastle to Garrucha [SE Spain], with coal, stranded 8 April 1872 at Villaricos and wrecked, 12 crew, 3 lost, owned William Whittles, father of captain.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 09 August 1822]:
FOR NEW ORLEANS, DIRECT, Intended for a regular Trader, The fine new Ship ALLERTON, R. H. EKIN, Master; Burthen 281 tons, intended to sail the 15th instant, a considerable part of her cargo being now on board, she will not be detained. - For freight or passage, apply to the Master, on board, Queen's Dock-gates or to CALEB FLETCHER and Co.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 30 November 1848]:
For HONG KONG and WHAMPOA. The splendid Liverpool-built Ship ALLERTON, Archibald Phillips, Commander, who is well acquainted with the navigation of the China seas, A 1 at Lloyd's, 423 tons per register, coppered and copper-fastened, well known for her quick passages and the delivery of her cargos in good condition. For freight or passage, apply to the owners, Messrs. Caleb Fletcher,...

[from Shields Daily Gazette - Thursday 11 April 1872]:
WRECK OF THE BARQUE ALLERTON, OF SOUTH SHIELDS. THE CAPTAIN AND FOUR OF THE CREW DROWNED. Intelligence was received in South Shields, this morning, announcing the wreck of the barque Allerton, of that town, near Villaricos. It appears that the vessel was driven ashore during the prevalence of a south-easterly gale, on Tuesday last, and that the captain and four of the crew had perished. The following list ot those drowned Capt, Wm. F. Whittles, aged 34, South Shields. Hugh Ellis, 25, Edinburgh. William Ballantine, 22, Dundee. William McCullock, 19, Dundee, Fori Johanssen, 19, Sweden. The Allerton is a vessel of 389 tons register, was built at Liverpool in 1832 [sic], and is the property of William Whittles, Thorney Terrace, South Shields. The Allerton left the Tyne on the 7th of February, with cargo of coals, bound Garrucha, under the command of W. F. Whittles, son of the owner.


Wooden ship Moro Castle, built Liverpool, 1822, 365 tons, owned Tobin, for trade to Africa. Also traded to Jamaica. Took Irish emigrants to Brazil - but returned with them. In LR to 1836. Reported on a voyage Fernando Po to Liverpool, 31 Oct 1835. Not reported after that, except for a ship of that name, reported as on fire and scuttled at New Orleans on 12 March 1837, and a piece of wreckage, marked Moro Castle, picked up September 1841, 40 miles east of Cape Henlopen [Delaware].

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 20 December 1822]:
Liverpool Sailed Dec 11. Morro Castle, Voyce, Jamaica.

[from Kilkenny Moderator - Saturday 13 September 1828]:
RETURN OF THE IRISH EMIGRANTS. CORK, SEPTEMBER 6. Yesterday, the Moro Castle, Captain Lenox, arrived at this port from Rio de Janeiro, after a passage of 64 days. She brought over 312 of the persons who emigrated from this part of the country in the months of August and September last year. It is already known to the public that there have been discontents and disturbances in the Brazils among the German and Irish emigrants, and the causes, as explained to us by Captain Lennox, are those which have been already assigned, namely, that the parties considered that the engagements which were entered into with them were not fulfilled. They insisted that they were sent out as settlers, at a certain rate per day; but on their arrival they were told they were to be soldiers, and at a diminished rate of payment. This engendered angry feelings, which broke out in mutinies, ....

[from Liverpool Albion - Tuesday 12 January 1836]:
Vessels spoken: Moro Castle from Fernando Po to this port, Oct 31, in lat 11 15, lon 21 30.

Possibly a different vessel [from Lloyd's List - Friday 21 April 1837]:
The Moro Castle, Smith, which cleared at New Orleans, 10th inst. for Havre, (with 486 bales of cotton on board), caught fire on the 12th, and burnt to the waters edge.


Wooden brig St George, built Liverpool, 1823, 115 tons, owned Smith, registered Liverpool, for Liverpool - Drogheda trade. Reported ashore in storm of 1826, but refloated. ON 15121. Registered Drogheda 1836, owned Smyth, Drogheda. In MNL to 1885, as brig 70 tons. Crew list to 1883. Reported in 1886 sold as a wreck at Drogheda, but then sank in river Boyne.

[from Greenock Telegraph and Clyde Shipping Gazette - Wednesday 23 November 1881]:
THE DISASTER TO THE BRIG ST GEORGE. The brig St. George, of Drogheda, which was reported yesterday having been picked up in disabled condition off the Holy Isle by the Londonderry steamer Mastiff, and afterwards towed to Greenock, was on the passage from Drogheda to Ayr with a cargo of limestone when she met the full force of the gale. Her sails were literally blown to ribbons, and to add to the difficulties of her position, the rudder became disabled. She was fast drifting ashore when fortunately the Mastiff hove in sight and took her in tow to the Tail-of-the-Bank. From there she was brought into the West Harbour by the tug steamer Stork. The tattered appearance of her sails shows the severity of the gale which visited the west coast yesterday. The brig is making no water, and what repairs are necessary will be made good here. [St George reported to have struck and damaged perch at entrance to River Boyne]

[from Drogheda Conservative - Saturday 13 November 1886]:
Messrs the Harbour Commissioners. I have to report that the wreckage, brig St George, is now sunk alongside the stage. The first intimation I got of the occurrence I served notice on the owner, Mr Edward Monahan, to remove the wrecked vessel, but up till the present there has been no effort made towards her removal. Your obedient servant, ANDREW LEECH, Harbour Master.
... The owner of the St George was Mr J Smyth, and the purchaser of the wreck was Mr E Monahan. Captain Leech, in reply to the Mayor, said that, owing to the position into which the wreckage had drifted, no complaints had been made as to an impediment in the navigation.


Wooden brig Thomas Dempsey, built Liverpool 1823, 210 tons, owned Thomas Dempsey, trading to Montevideo, West Indies, Africa, etc. Became leaky in 1849 - 1850, eventually abandoned on a voyage from Liverpool to Trinidad, Captain Collis, on 1st February 1850.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 18 September 1828]:
A regular trader. For MONTE VIDEO, well-known Brig THOMAS DEMPSEY, John Coxon, Master; Burthen 201 tons, A 1, and Liverpool built; will be despatched punctually by 28th instant. For freight or passage apply Messrs. R. and T. Edwards, or EDWARDS and POOLE

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Saturday 19 February 1848]:
KINGSTOWN, Feb. 1. The brig Thomas Dempsey, in putting back to this harbour last night on the ebb tide, grounded on the back of the east pier and remained there four hours, when she floated off on the flood, and has since proceeded to Dublin to be surveyed.

[from Caledonian Mercury - Monday 05 November 1849]:
Liverpool. Oct.31. The Thomas Dempsey. which arrived here yesterday from Rio Grande, had her hull strained, and was leaky, and lost spars. sails, &c. having experienced heavy weather 3d ult. in lat. 29. S. long. 33. W. 18th inst. in lat. 38. N. long. 29. W. and on the 23d, in lat. 45. long, 25.

[from Morning Herald (London) - Tuesday 26 March 1850]:
The Thomas Dempsey, from Liverpool to Trinidad, sprang a leak, and was abandoned on the 1st of February; crew arrived at Barbadoes on the 10th ult.


Wooden brigantine/schooner Thomas Hyde, built Liverpool, 1823, 100 tons, also described as a schooner. In 1830 owned Robinson, Liverpool, for trade to Mexico. Voyage Liverpool to Tampico, ashore on Triangle Reef, 2nd October 1830, and wrecked. [Campeche Bank, Triangulos Reef]

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 27 March 1828]:
For OMOA and HONDURAS. The remarkably fine brigantine, Thomas Hyde, James Heay, Master; Liverpool built, only three years old, and newly coppered; laying in Salthouse Duck. For freight or passage apply Messrs. Fernel Fernandez and Co. or EDWARDS and POOLE.

[from Liverpool Saturday's Advertiser - Saturday 18 December 1830]:
The Thomas Hyde, Dart, hence for Tampico was driven on shore in the night of the 2d October on Triangle Reef. The captain and crew arrived at Campeachy 5th October and vessels were despatched to save the cargo.


Wooden schooner Mary Ann, built Liverpool, 1824, 177 tons, owned Bibby. Sold 1842 to James & Co. For trade Liverpool to Jamaica. Voyage Liverpool to St Ann's Bay, Jamaica, driven ashore on a reef at the harbour entrance and wrecked, Sunday, 16th November 1845, crew saved.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Monday 22 December 1845]:
Jamaica. Nov. 20: The brig Mary Ann, Edwards, 44 days from Liverpool for St. Ann's Bay and other north side ports, was on Sunday evening wrecked on the windward reef, at the entrance of the harbour of St. Ann's Bay, and little hope is entertained of saving much of her cargo or hull, from the very heavy sea which was breaking over her, and which, it is anticipated, will wash out the greater part of her cargo, or so damage it as to make it valueless - the greater portion consisting of dry goods, and being very valuable. The vessel stood off the port at about two o'clock and having made signal for a pilot, one boarded her, and took charge of her, after which she stood well up to the windward, to get a good offing, and ran down to the port, the wind blowing fresh from E. - After going about, she ran down with flowing sheets towards the port, but on nearing the windward reef, the wind suddenly failed, and she made no headway, whilst a heavy rolling sea gradually forced her on the bank outside the reef, in 13 feet water, where she struck, and subsequently was forced by the sea on the rocks of the reef, as she stands, and now lies bilged in about eight feet water. The officers and crew of the barque Lady Sarah Baily; Mr. Spicer, master of the Defiance; and all the aid from the other vessels and boats in the harbour promptly sent to offer their assistance, but the surf was too high to enable them to get near her, and no one boarded her with the exception of the mate of the Lady Sarah Bailey, who did so at considerable risk. The weather being moderate during the night, the seamen, and two passengers were enabled to save their clothes. Every endeavour will be made to save a portion of her cargo; at present but few boat-loads of dry goods, quite damaged, have been landed, and the wreckers run the risk of their lives in doing this. It is but proper to say that Mr. Spicer of the Defiance, who witnessed the occurrence, and who is so well qualified to give an opinion, has certified on the protest, that the accident was one occurring solely by the failing of the wind, and the heavy swell whilst the vessel had no headway. The agents have called a public sale of the cargo and hull, to commence on Monday, the 24th inst.


Wooden ship Brazilian, built Liverpool, 1824, 350 tons, owned J Cockshott. Traded to Brazil. Possibly built by Bland and Chaloner who are reported to have launched a vessel for the Brazil trade in October 1824. For sale 1829. Later sailed to Ceylon, etc., described as a barque. Voyage Liverpool to Lisbon, with coal, driven from anchorage onto rocks and wrecked, 11 November 1853.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 19 January 1826]:
PACKETS TO RIO JANEIRO. ... The well-known fast-sailing Ship BRAZILIAN, Captain Joseph Nickels; Burthen 250 tons, lying in the Prince's Dock, and has excellent accommodations for passengers. Apply to HOLLIWELL and HIGHFIELD, or FRANCIS ASHLEY. This Vessel will be despatched by the latter House.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 05 March 1829]:
For sale the well known fast sailing Liverpool-built ship Braziian, launched in 1824, now lying in Queen's Dock. For particulars, apply to the master on board or to James Cockshott.

[from Morning Post - Friday 07 December 1838]:
Letters from Bahia .... The English barque Brazilian, which had been chartered by the authorities at Bahia to carry Rio Grande, sailed. on the 7th of October, for that place, with 227 soldiers and several officers. ....

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 15 June 1848]:
For CEYLON, The well-known superior Liverpool-built Barque BRAZILIAN, Captain J A Herriman, A 1 at Lloyd's, 245 tons, copper fastened and coppered, and in all respects, a very eligible conveyance. Apply COTESWORTH, WYNNE, and LYNE.

[from Sun (London) - Thursday 24 November 1853]:
[Lisbon] The English barque Brazilian, which arrived at Lisbon on the 7th with 460 tons of coals from Liverpool, had, after partially discharging, drifted from her anchorage in the quarantine ground at Belem during the night of the 11th, and got upon the rocks near St. Julian, within the bar. She received prompt assistance from Captain Scott and the crew of the Odin as soon as her situation was known, but, the vessel had become a wreck and was advertised for sale. The Odin's crew had much severe work in saving everything removable from the Brazilian, and deserve remuneration for clothes destroyed in the water, &c.


Wooden brig Colombian (also Columbian), built Liverpool, 1824, 275 tons, owned Holliwell, Liverpool, for trade to Valparaiso, etc. Later described as a barque. Voyage Sydney to Singapore, struck rock in Gaspar Straits [now Selat Gaspar] and abandoned, 8 April 1845. Crew and passengers saved in own boats and arrived Singapore, Captain Wakem (or Wakeham).

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 25 August 1828]:
For VALPARAISO, ARICA, ISLAY & LIMA. The fine Liverpool built Brig COLOMBIAN, J. J. GEDDES, Commander; A 1, burthen per register 275 tons, armed with six carriage guns, (9-pounders) well known as a remarkably fast sailer, and a most eligible conveyance for goods; the accommodations for passengers are superior; lying in the Prince's Dock; For terms of freight or passage, apply to Messrs. Eyes, Wylie & Cooke, to HOLLIWELL & HIGHFIELD, or to W. & J. TYRER.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 29 July 1845]:
From Singapore news has arrived of the total loss of the barque Columbian, of Liverpool, Captain Wakem, by striking on a sunken rock in the Gaspar Straits. The crew and passengers reached Singapore in safety in the boats. The passengers sent a letter of thanks to the captain for his good conduct on the occasion.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Thursday 24 July 1845]:
Loss The Barque Columbian. The Singapore Free Press gives the subjoined particulars of the wreck of this vessel, reported some days since in the Shipping and Mercantile Gazette;
The barque Colombian, Wakeham, of Liverpool left Sydney (N.S.W.) on 7th Feb. last, bound for Singapore, by the western route, with part of a general cargo, horses and sheep on board, and passengers. On the 7th April, at dusk, the northern point of Polo Leot bore S.S.E. distant 12 miles; and being clear of all the dangers in the Straits of Gaspar as laid down in the charts, ship kept under sail for the night. At 3 30 a.m. on the 8th, just after casting the lead in twenty-one fathoms water, being under her topsails, and going about three knots, ship struck on a sunken rock, but without stopping her way and the anchor was immediately let go. The carpenter reporting her to be making much water, the pumps were rigged, and the mate on going below found the leak to be under the larboard bow, about two planks from the larboard streak. At 10, finding the water above the ballast and gaining in spite of every effort with the pumps or to stop the leak, the boats were got out, provisioned and armed, and at noon, there bring then about 9 feet water in the hold, abandoned the ship and pulled in for Gaspar Island, intending to land and restow the boats, but seeing some Malay prahas, thought it most prudent to avoid them, and immediately shaped our course tor Singapore, and after being in the boats 11 days, during which, from the strong contrary currents, we ran over between 400 to 500 miles, arrived here all safe and well on Friday, 18th inst., at noon. When last seen, the ship was settling fast and supposed to have sunk half an hour after. Part of the Columbian's mails were thrown overboard from the boats with other things in gale on the 12th inst.
A letter was published from the passengers praising Captain Wakem's behaviour - signed R E A Wilkinson; J M Cockburn; J J Iseline; T Evans.


Wooden brig Porter, built Liverpool 1824, 251 tons, owned Porter, Liverpool. In LR to 1842, when marked "wrecked". Voyage Sydney to Manila, wrecked in Palawan Passage, before 20th October 1842, crew saved.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 16 February 1829]:
For VALPARAISO, an Intermediate Port, and LIMA;. ..Calpe.... To succeed the above, the well known Liverpool-built brig Porter, Captain Callan, a regular trader.

[from Lloyd's List - Wednesday 08 February 1843]:
The Porter, from Sydney to Manila, was wrecked in the Palawan Passage, previous to 20th October; Crew saved.


Wooden ship Cuba, built Liverpool, 1824, 274 tons, owned Kinnear. Later registered London, owned Somes and then Tindall. Traded to West and East Indies, New Zealand, .. Later described as barque rigged. Voyage London to Algoa Bay, on 12 July 1853, sustained storm damage and grounded near her destination and was then driven offshore. Crew and passengers saved, vessel abandoned, leaky.

[from Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser - Monday 13 May 1839]:
THE fine Ship CUBA, 272 81-94 tons per register (O.M.), built at Liverpool in 1824 of the very best materials and under particular inspection; has raised quarter-deck, affording spacious and airy accommodation for passengers, with ample heights between decks; she is thoroughly copper-fastened to the hold beams, and has made but one East and one West India voyage on her present heavy copper; sails very fast, carries a large cargo, abundantly found in stores, and well adapted to the West India or any other trade her size may suit. Lying in the West India Export Dock. Alexander Grey, Commander. For inventories and further particulars, apply to HENRY and CALVERT TOULMIN, B, George-yard.

[from Saint James's Chronicle - Thursday 22 September 1853]:
LOSS OF THE SHIP CUBA. By the arrival of the ship the City of Calcutta from Bombay on Tuesday in the London Docks, we learn of the wreck of the English barque Cuba, while on her passage from London to Algoa Bay, and the fortunate rescue of the passengers and crew by the City of Calcutta and another vessel. The Cuba was nearly a new vessel [sic], between 200 and 300 tons burden, the property of Mr. Peter Tindell, shipowner, Gracechurch-street, City, freighted with a miscellaneous but valuable cargo. She carried several passengers; among them may be mentioned the Rev. Mr. Heavyside and daughter, Miss Kenyon, and two other ladies. Up to within two or three days of the ship's arrival off the entrance of Algoa Bay the weather had been fine, when suddenly it came on to blow heavily from the northward, and on the 12th July, in attempting to make for the bay, a sea struck the ship, and carried her into a reef off Cape Receif (at the western entrance of the bay). It was nearly midnight when this occurred. The ship drove off immediately afterwards, but not without tearing away her rudder, and stoving in several planks under her stern, which admitted the sea rushing in freely. Had the wind been in a contrary direction to what it was, there can be little doubt but that the ship would have been speedily dashed to atoms, and all on board lost. As it was, the escape of the latter was exceedingly fortunate; the wind swept the ship out to sea to the eastward of the bay. All the pumps were vigorously going to prevent her foundering. Perfectly ungovernable, she drove before the wind two days and two nights, to lat. 35 15 south, long. 23 50 [sic 28 50 more likely if 400 miles to east] (some 400 miles eastward of the bay), where the City of Calcutta sighted the wreck. Captain Connell, the master, instantly bore down, and on coming up with the vessel, was hailed by these on deck to take them off. The pumps were still at work, but she was making more water than the pumps yielded. At this moment another vessel came up, the Kirkman, bound to Liverpool from Bombay, the captain of which arranged with Captain Connell to take half of the shipwrecked people. The master with the Rev. Mr. Heavyside and several of the crew, were then transferred to the City of Calcutta, which resumed her course. Just previous to her starting, the captain of the Kirkman signalled the City of Calcutta, to the effect that three of the Cuba's seamen refused to abandon their vessel. The captain of her was positive, however, that it was impossible to save the ship, and the City of Calcutta left the wreck. Three days afterwards the passengers were shipped on board another vessel, bound for Algoa Bay. The Cuba and cargo were fully insured.


Wooden ship Murray, built Liverpool, 1824, owned Lawrence, Liverpool, for service to Jamaica. ON 1104, registered Liverpool, 305 tons, in MNL to 1860. 1857 sailed to Cronstadt for hemp. Voyage Cronstadt to Liverpool, 14 September 1857, sunk by collision with Kate Swanton, crew saved, in the Drodgen - deep channel between Copenhagen and Saltholm.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 08 January 1827]:
For ST. THOMAS & MONTEGO BAY, JAMAICA, The remarkably fine A 1 Ship MURRAY, J. Houston, master, Burthen per register 305 tons, having three-fourths of her cargo engaged, she will have quick despatch. For freight or passage, apply to JOHN SWIRE, Manesty-lane.

[from Morning Journal (Kingston) - Thursday 18 April 1839]:
Landed ex ship Murray, Houston, master, from Liverpool, condemned on survey, being damaged by sea water, and recommended to be sold on account of the underwriters or others concerned.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 26 November 1855]:
For MONTEGO BAY, Direct. And will deliver goods at Falmouth, Lucea, and the intermediate ports at Ship's expense, but shippers' risk, and at Savanna La Mer, if sufficient inducement offer, The Ship MURRAY, JOSEPH BOOKER, Master. Apply to George H LAWRENCE Esq, or to WILLIS & Co, Mersey-court, Old churchyard.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 21 September 1857]:
COPENHAGEN. SEPT.15. The Murray, Booker, of and for Liverpool, from Cronstadt, with hemp, etc., was in contact with the Kate Swanton, in the Droogden, [sic, now Drogden] yesterday, and sank in eight fathoms water; crew saved. The Kate Swanton proceeded.


Wooden brig Zeno, built Liverpool, 1824, 214 tons, for service to S America and to Jamaica. Described as armed. Voyage Liverpool to Jamaica, on 7 December 1843, struck Blackwater Bank and was wrecked. Crew and much cargo saved.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 06 April 1829]:
For BUENOS AYRES, Direct, The fine Liverpool-built Brig ZENO, Captain W. LAWSON, A 1 at Lloyd's, 214 tons per register, copper-fastened and newly coppered, sails remarkably fast, being built for despatch and in every respect a superior conveyance for goods and passengers; lies west side George's Dock. For terms, etc. apply to Messrs. EYES, WYLIE & COOKE, or to W. & J. TYRER.

[from Waterford Mail - Saturday 09 December 1843]:
SHIP NEWS. On Thursday night the brig Zeno, Captain Sunderland, bound from Liverpool to Jamaica, with general cargo, while beating to windward, struck on the north of the Blackwater bank, and bilged. About half the cargo has been landed, and is now being conveyed to this town under the care of that active indefatigable agent for Lloyds, Glasgow, and Liverpool, Francis Harper, Esq., and as the weather continues rather favourable, hope of saving much more is entertained, but the vessel will be total wreck.

[from Wexford Independent - Wednesday 20 December 1843]:
Sale: Wexford Quay,... A LARGE portion of the Cargo of the Brig, Zeno, Alexander Sutherland, Master, lately wrecked on Blackwater Bank, on her voyage from Liverpool to Jamaica, consisting of several thousand pieces of Printed, Blay, White and Stamped Calicos, Muslins, Canvass, Drills, Shawls, Handkerchiefs, etc, etc.... ... also 20 Prime new Sails, and a Warp. ...


Wooden brig Oporto, described in LR as built Liverpool 1824, 172 tons, but from 1848 the same vessel is described in LR as built Hartlepool [presumably a typo]. Registered and owned Liverpool, for service to Oporto, Havanna, then in 1850 to San Francisco. Reports of damage en route, so may have been condemned at San Francisco.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 31 December 1824]:
Oporto, Martin, hence at Oporto 19th inst.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 17 November 1828]:
LINE of PACKETS for OPORTO. To sail on the 25th November. Goods cannot be taken on board on the appointed day of sailing. - The OPORTO, Jos. Martin, Master.
The undersigned has, at the request of the shippers, formed a line of packets to sail every three weeks. The vessels are all of the first class, and have good accommodations for passengers, namely, Camoens, Oporto, Lusitania, Douro, Amelia, and John Ormerod. The appointed day of sailing will be strictly adhered to, wind and weather permitting. Apply to THOMAS MARTIN, Liver-street.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Thursday 02 March 1848]:
Falmouth: ... The brig Oporto, Barnes, from Liverpool for Oporto; main piece of rudder carried away, boats stove, and other damage.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 06 June 1848]:
Loading, Liverpool, Oporto: Oporto, Barnes, J Bibby & Son,

[from Lloyd's List - Thursday 22 August 1850]:
Bahia 11th July. The OPORTO, Armstrong, of and from Liverpool to California, put in here 25th June very leaky, has been surveyed, and ordered to be lightened.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 10 April 1851]:
San Francisco. Oporto, Armstrong, from Bahia and Liverpool, 5th Feb.


Wooden ship Elizabeth, built Liverpool, 1824, 336 tons, owned Tobin, Liverpool. Traded to Demerara, later owned Highat who traded to Mauritius. Voyage Madras to London, wrecked Algoa Bay, crew saved, before 23rd November 1839. In LR to 1839 only, as 366 tons.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 21 August 1826]:
For DEMERARA, to call at Cork, The Ship Elizabeth, Edward Tobin, Commander; burthen 350 tons, coppered and copper-fastened, and will sail on the 26th inst. For freight or passage, apply to Captain Tobin, on board, east side King's Dock or to George Quayle.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 20 July 1837]:
For Sale: The well-known Ship ELIZABETH. Length 106 feet 4 inches. Breadth 27 feet 2 inches, Depth 18 feet 3 inches. Admeasures 335 72-94 tons; was built in Liverpool, of the very best materials, in 1824, and underwent a thorough repair twelve months ago. Has been regularly engaged in the Demerara trade, and is a most desirable ship for the East or West India trade. For particulars, apply BOLD and STARKEY.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 21 January 1840]:
Elizabeth, Highat, was totally wrecked in Algoa Bay, previous to the 23rd Nov.[1839]. She was bound from Madras for this port. [other reports: Crew saved; to London]


Wooden brig Zante, built Liverpool, 1824, 195 tons, for trade to Mediterranean. In 1835, owned Rae, Liverpool. Possibly the vessel launched by Bland and Chaloner for Mediterranean service in October 1824. Last voyage documented in newspapers is Liverpool, Zante, Corfu, Liverpool from July to October 1839, master R Johnson, owned Rae. In LR to 1840.
Note another brig Zante, owned by Watson at Liverpool from 1840, built Nova Scotia 1839, reported as 129 tons in newspapers, traded to Gulf of Mexico and driven ashore and wrecked at Tobasco [sic] prior to 5 February 1848.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 20 June 1825]:
For LEGHORN[sic, Livorno], Direct, The beautiful new Brig ZANTE, John Handley, master, Burthen 190 tons, this vessel being built expressly for despatch, will only carry a small cargo for her tonnage; having a considerable part of her cargo engaged, she will be despatched immediately. For freight or passage, having elegant accommodation, apply to E. RAE, or Vianna & Jones.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 08 September 1831]:
For LEGHORN, ZANTE, The well-known Liverpool built Brig ZANTE, H. Williams, Master; A 1, burthen 194 tons per register, copper-fastened and coppered to the bends.

[from Morning Herald (London) - Thursday 26 April 1838]:
Liverpool, April 24. Sailed Zante, Winsor, Malta and Zante.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 06 June 1839]:
For MALTA. CORFU and ZANTE, The well-known Brig ZANTE, Johnson, Master; 194 tons per register, and coppered. For freight, Ac. apply to GEORGE YATES, LOUTHEAN and YATES. [sailed July 1839]

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 25 October 1839]:
Zante Johnson from Corfu at ditto [ Liverpool??] [LL: sailed 11 Sept from Zante to Corfu


Wooden barque Irlam, built Liverpool, 1825, 299 tons, owned Barton, Irlam & Higginson, Liverpool. Reported trading to Barbados until 1831. During the hurricane of 11 August 1831 at Barbados, driven ashore. No later voyages reported in newspapers. A replacement Irlam was built at Liverpool in 1836.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 07 November 1825]:
For Barbadoes. The new Ship IRLAM, Daniel Campbell, Master; Intended to sail immediately. For freight or passage, apply to BARTON, IRLAM & HIGGINSON.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 03 October 1831]:
Hurricane of 11th August at Barbados. The following vessels were driven on shore, where they still remain: Barques - Irlam and Arethusa. Brigs - Exchange, Quebec, Decagon, Mary, Kezia, Alliance, Antionette, Horatio Nelson, and Eliza. Brigantine - Samuel Hinds. Schooners - Asp and Perseverance. Mail-boats - Barbados and Montague.


Wooden brig Arab, built Liverpool 1825, 175 tons, owned Gouthwaite, Liverpool, for service to Mediterranean. Also voyaged to South America and Africa. ON 14354, registered Bristol 1850-65; Aberdeen 1866; Sunderland 1867-8; Lynn 1869-, capsized and condemned October 1875.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 10 July 1828]:
For VERA CRUZ. The remarkably fine A 1 Brig ARAB. Jos. Walker, R.N. Commander; Burthen 183 tons. Liverpool-built, expressly for fast-sailing, coppered and copper-fastened, and being armed with 8 guns, presents a very desirable conveyance, and has excellent accommodations for passengers; two-thirds of her cargo being engaged, will be early despatched. Apply EDWARDS and POOLE.

See 1832 advert, for Inca and Arab, both described as armed.


Wooden brig Inca, built Liverpool 1825, 217 tons, owned Gouthwaite and registered Liverpool, for service to Lima. Also voyaged to Havanna, Honduras. Voyage Liverpool to Australia, struck Blackwater Bank, 9 May 1840, and later abandoned off Saltees on 10 May, crew saved.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 11 February 1828 First Vessel. For VALPARAISO, an Intermediate Port, and Lima. The fine Liverpool-built Brig INCA, Wm. Prowse, Master; A 1 at Lloyd's, burthen 217 tons, coppered and copper-fastened, built expressly for the trade, a remarkably fast sailer, and in all respects a very desirable conveyance for goods or passengers. Apply to Messrs. Gibbs, Bright & Co. or to ASHLEY BROTHERS. [later Captain Thomas Gibson]

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 12 November 1832]:
Regular Traders. For LIMA & GUAYAQUIL, The armed Brig INCA, per register 217 tons, Captain LINCOLN.
For VALPARAISO, Intermedios, & LIMA, The armed brig ARAB. Captain CARTER, per register 183 tons. Both vessels are Liverpool-built;... Owner Mr F Gouthwaite

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 12 May 1834]:
Sailed: Inca, Lincoln, Havannah.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 23 October 1834]:
For GIBRALTAR, The beautiful fast sailing Brig INCA, John Harrison, master; A 1 at Lloyds, burthen per register 217 tons;

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 04 May 1840]:
For PORT PHILLIP and SYDNEY. The remarkably fine British built brig INCA, Captain -, 218 tons register; copper fastened and coppered; is one of the swiftest vessels out of the port, and in all respects, a most eligible conveyance. Apply to Messrs Rowand & Dunlop, or to BRODIE & HAMILTON, or COTESWORTH & WYNNE.

[from Morning Advertiser - Friday 15 May 1840]:
Cork May 11. The Inca, Gutheridge, from Liverpool to Port Philip and Sydney, N.S.W., was abandoned yesterday, about twenty miles from the land, with 11 feet water in her hold, and in a sinking state, having struck on a bank (supposed the Blackwater) the night previous. Crew landed.

[from Southern Reporter and Cork Commercial Courier - Tuesday 12 May 1840]:
The Crew of the Brig Inca, Guthridge, arrived here in the Ripley, having abandoned their vessel yesterday off the Saltees. She was laden with a general cargo (chiefly spirits) and was bound from Liverpool to New South Wales. She had struck upon a bank on Saturday night last, and was nearly full of water when the crew left her yesterday at 2 p.m.


Wooden schooner Ayacucho, built Liverpool 1825, 109 tons, owned Brotherton, Liverpool, for trade to S America. LR has this vessel named: Argacucha, Ayachucha,... while newspapers have Ayacucha and Ayacucho. [Ayacucho is a region of Peru and the name of a battle in the Peruvian war of independence, the city of Huamanga is also called Ayacucho]. In LR until 1831, but reported in British newspapers as trading from Lima until 1834. Presumably sold foreign.
There are records of a brig/schooner Ayacucho, described as English, trading between California and Hawaii (then called Sandwich islands) up to 1837, with master called Wilson. Note that a schooner Ayacucho, with French captain, Limantour, was wrecked in 1841 near San Francisco - but it is not known whether this is the same vessel. LR 1829-32 has a 246 ton brig Ayacucho, built "Guyal" [presumably now Guayaquil], 1826, and trading from Colombia to Le Havre [reported at Falmouth 31 August 1826].

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 01 June 1826]:
The Ayacucha, Murphy, hence at Lima.

[from Lloyd's List - Friday 06 May 1831]:
Valapraiso Feb 29. Ayacucho, Murphy, arrived from Guymas [Guaymas in Mexico, in Gulf of California]

[from Lloyd's List - Friday 28 December 1832]:
Lima, August 25. Arrived from California, Ayacucho, Wilson,

[from Lloyd's List - Friday 15 August 1834]:
Lima, April 6. Sailed for Rio Colombia, Ayacucho, Wilson.


Wooden ship Indian Chief, built Liverpool, 1826, 416 tons, for service to Calcutta, owned Gladstone & Co.
Voyage Liverpool to Mauritius, Captain M'Donald, aground on Blackwater Bank, 18 November 1837, crew landed at Cahore Point. Some fatalities of salvagers.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 14 September 1826]:
For CALCUTTA, The new Ship INDIAN CHIEF, Henry Gill, Commander, Burthen 416 tons, just launched in Liverpool, and will sail about the 10th November. She will have superior accommodation for passengers, and will be provided with a surgeon. For freight or passage, apply to JOHN GLADSTONE, GRANT & WILSON.

[from Wexford Independent - Wednesday 22 November 1837]:
SHIPWRECK AND LOSS OF LIFE. The large ship, Indian Chief, Captain M'Donald from Liverpool to the Mauritius, Isle of France, struck on the Blackwater Bank on Sunday last at four A.M. The crew immediately left her, she having fourteen feet water in her hold and her foremast cut away. The crew landed at Cahore Point at ten P.M., the vessel shortly after drifted off the bank and continued afloat until four p.m. when she sunk about eight leagues from the shore and two south-east from the Arklow light-ship. Several boats put off from the shore only one or two of which boarded her. One of the boats belonging to Poulduff near Glynn and containing a crew of six or seven persons remained, it is supposed, on board or else too near and was engulfed with the sinking vessel as melancholy to relate no tidings whatever had been heard of them. The vessel left, Liverpool on Wednesday, and had a general cargo, principally bale goods which was estimated at £80,000. value.


Wooden snow/brig Richard, built Liverpool 1826, 296 tons, owned Battersby for service to Trinidad, Calcutta, Pernambuco,.. In 1853 chartered to take shipwrecked emigrants from the Brazil coast to Port Phillip. In LR until 1855.

[from Manchester Mercury - Tuesday 13 March 1827]:
Richard, Gill, from Demerara ..

[from Morning Advertiser - Monday 29 April 1839]:
Liverpool. Arrived: Richard, Blackley, Calcutta

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 28 May 1849]:
For MANILLA. The well known Liverpnol-built Brig, Richard, Captain W White. *AE in red; burthen 296 tons; coppered and copper-fastened; in all respects a very desirable conveyance; having just delivered a cargo of sugar in first rate order. For terms of freight etc, apply to Messrs John Chism & Co, or to ASHLEY BROTHERS.

[from Belfast Mercury - Monday 21 February 1853]:
The British barque Sir Fowell Buxton, from London, bound to Port Phillip, with emigrants, was, about the 10th Dec., totally wrecked at Point Tubarao, the Province of Rio Grande do Norte, lat. 5 02 S, long. 36 28W. all hands and part of the stores saved. The British brig Richard, White, now lying Pernambuco, is chartered, by orders of the British consul at Paraiba, to go to the Northward to embark the emigrants and convey them to Port Phillip. It is expected the brig Richard will ready to leave Pernambuca for that purpose in about three or four weeks.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 19 March 1853]:
Richard, White, for Paraiba, Feb. 20. [later report, May 1853, Richard, White, from Paraiba, at Pernambuco]
[Private diary: Brig Richard: Arrived at Port Philip, Tuesday 5 July 1853, after a long and tedious voyage of three months; not enough room for all emigrants so only some shipped.]


Wooden schooner Dennett, built Liverpool, 1826, 130 tons, advertised for sale 1827 by Henry Jenkins. Voyages to Mediterranean, Cork, Portugal,.. Voyage Aveiro to Liverpool, departing 30 Dec 1842, captain M'Lean, and posted missing.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 17 May 1827]:
On Sale. The Liverpool-built Schooner DENNETT, registers 130 tons; launched in March. 1826; built of the very best materials, and copper-fastened, has two chain cables, and is well found with the best description of materials. Apply to Henry Jenkins.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 17 July 1828]:
For MALTA and SMYRNA, The fine fast-sailing Schooner DENNETT, Saml. Lacey, Master; A 1, coppered and copper-fastened, only two years old, and every respect, a superior conveyance. For freight or passage, apply EDWARDS and POOLE.

[from Lloyd's List - Tuesday 21 March 1843]:
The Dennett, M'Lean, sailed from Aveiro 30th December, for Liverpool, and has not since been heard of.


Wooden barque Bahamian (Buchanan in LR), built Liverpool, 1826, 317 tons. In LR 1827-33 as, Buchanan, owned Taylor, captain Atkinson, for Liverpool - Demerara service, then as Bahamian from 1834. The name, Bahamian, is confirmed by newspapers. Voyaged to Calcutta, China, etc. For sale 1859. ON 16877, in MNL until 1865, when owned L Gruning, Liverpool. Last newspaper report 1863 at Bonny.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 14 September 1826]:
For West Indies: Bahamian, Atkinson, 318, Demerara, Taylor, Potter & co.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 28 February 1828]:
To sail on the 14th March. For CALCUTTA, The fast-sailing Barque BAHAMIAN, Jos. Pearce, Commander. This vessel is of the first class, newly coppered, has a great part of her cargo on board, and will be despatched at the appointed time, full or not full, For freight or passage, having elegant accommodations, apply to Capt. Pearce, on board, west side Prince's Dock, or to TAYLOR and POTTER.

[from Cumberland Pacquet, and Ware's Whitehaven Advertiser - Tuesday 06 December 1836]:
Bahamian, Pearce, sailed from Mauritius for China on 9th August

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 26 December 1839]:
CALCUTTA, The fine British-built Barque BAHAMIAN, M. Tizard, Commander, A 1; 318 tons per register; newly coppered, sails remarkably fast, and presents superior conveyance for goods and passengers. For terms, &c. apply to Messrs. Taylor, Potter and Co. ...

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 18 July 1859]:
Peremptorily, at a low upset price, unless previously disposed of by Private Treaty. On THURSDAY, the 28th instant, at three o'clock, at Cunard, Wilson, and Co's Saleroom, Exchange, Liverpool, The well-known Liverpool-built Barque BAHAMIAN, 318 tons old measurement, per register, about 330 tons present measurement; built at Liverpool, for private use, and has been chiefly employed in the China and Brazil trade. This vessel has a flush deck; requires little ballast; is very heavily fastened with iron hanging and rider knees; carries 480 tons dead weight; in 1855 underwent considerable repairs, when she received new binding bolts, and was retreenailed from the bilges to gunwale. Length, 101 feet; breadth, 26 feet 7-10ths; depth, 18.5 feet. In Stanley Dock. Apply to CUNARD, WILSON, and CO., Brokers. [Advert until May 1860]

[from Lloyd's List - Monday 11 August 1862]:
7 July 1862 Bahamian at Bonny

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Thursday 12 February 1863]:
Bonny: Sickness prevailed, and business quiet. ... Ships ..., Bahamian, ... were in the river [after 7 Jan]


Wooden brig Ann Paley, built Liverpool, 1837, 167 tons, owned Bibby, traded to Portugal. Voyage Lisbon to Liverpool, 12 December 1848, ashore near Tacumshin, Co Wexford, and wrecked - captain Lister, mate and 5 men lost.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 24 September, 1827]:
LINE OF PACKETS FOR LISBON. To sail on the 1st and 16th of every Month throughout the Year. LANCASHIRE WITCH, Thos. Neale, Master; BELEM CASTLE, Thos. Jones, Master; ELLEN JENKINSON, M. Rothwell, Master; TAGUS, W W Wharton, Master; MARY ANN, W A Kempt, Master; MAUNEY, Thos. Kettle, Master; ANN PALEY, -; LANCASHIRE WITCH, R Jackson, Master; ...John Bibby & Co.

[from Liverpool Hurricane of 1839 - Chris Michael]:
During the January 1839 hurricane, in Liverpool Bay, brig Ann Paley, sailing from Liverpool to Lisbon with a cargo of tea under command of Captain Hunter, was driven on shore near Cleveleys (North of Blackpool), three men drowned. She was reported to have been refloated on 20 April and taken in to Fleetwood.

For sale 1840.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 16 December 1848]:
Wexford, December 12 The Ann Paley, Lister, from Lisbon for Liverpool, was totally wrecked near Tacumshin last evening. Master, mate, and five men drowned. A few casks of oil saved.


Wooden brig Lusitania, built Liverpool, 1827, 204 tons, owned Holliwell, Liverpool, for trade to Oporto. Voyage Liverpool to Oporto, captain Crookshank, driven ashore at Ballymacart, on 14th October 1831. Crew and passengers saved, vessel wrecked.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 18 September 1828]:
To sail in a few days. For BAHIA, The beautiful Liverpool-built Brig LUSITANIA, Harry Crookshank, Master; Burthen per register 204 tons, copper fastened and newly coppered, not yet eighteen months old, sails extremely fast, and a most eligible conveyance for goods and passengers, having very superior accommodations; lying west side George's Dock. For terms of freight or passage apply to Messrs. Ormerod, Heyworth and Co. or Holliwell & Highfield.

[Belfast Commercial Chronicle - Wednesday 26 October 1831]:
SHIPWRECK AT ARDMORE. Mr. Thomas John, jun. Agent for Lloyds, in a latter, dated Youghal, 18th Oct. gives the following account of the loss of the Lusitania;
The brig Lusitania, Captain Crookshanks, of and from Liverpool to Oporto, with general cargo, was, in the gale on the 14th inst, driven on shore about five o'clock AM, at Ballymacart, about six miles east of this harbour; the mate and two men succeeded in landing immediately she struck, in the long boat, which was stove on reaching the beach. The Captain and remainder of crew, with two gentlemen and two ladies, passengers, had no alternative but to remain on board; the sea was running so high, at the time I saw them, that I could render no assistance until about three o'clock, at low water, when a signal was made to them to let a spar float ashore with a line attached it, which they did, and this we made fast to the bow of a small boat, and, with another line to her stern, the was drawn backwards and forwards through the surf. The ladies were slung down from the stern into the beat, and in the same way the rest of the crew and passengers escaped from their perilous situation; the Captain being the last man to leave the ship. She was a very fine vessel, over 300 tons burden, about four years old; the cargo, a very valuable one, mostly consisting of bale goods. I have succeeded in saving and bringing here a great part of the cargo, and hope to get most of what remains in, if the weather continues moderate. The vessel, I fear, will not be got off, she lies on a bed of rocks, and is broken through in many places.
I must now add to my melancholy report of the stranding of the vessel, the melancholy disasters which have attended it. Not having sufficient force to prelect the property, it was deemed prudent to call in the aid of some military, and on Sunday it unfortunately happened that one of the sailors got drunk and quarrelled with a soldier of the 37th Regiment on duty, which ended in the soldier's shooting him. The man died instantly, and yesterday an inquest was held, and the verdict returned was unjustifiable homicide, whereupon the soldier was committed to Waterford gaol. Last night one of the Coast Guard on duty, on board the vessel, fell overboard and was drowned. Another of them had his leg broken yesterday by a bale falling on it, and a third was to-day so severely struck by the handle of the winch on his chest, that bis life is despaired of. I think it very likely had there been a light on Cable Island, this vessel would not have been lost, or those disasters have occurred, the former arose out of the Captain not seeing the land, or knowing where he was, until a few moments before the vessel struck, and in the act of tacking her about.

[Cork Constitution - Thursday 20 October 1831]:
TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION, For Account of whom it may Concern, at Youghal, on THURSDAY, 27th Inst., at the Stores of Thomas John, Jun., North Main Street, A LARGE Quantity of WOOLLEN CLOTHS of different qualities and colours, Shirtinq, and other Calicos, Toilinets, Nankinets, Cotton Twist, Velvets, other Manchester Goods, also some Hardware, being more or less damaged from Sea Water, saved from the wreck of the Brig Lusitania, Harry Crookshanks Master, of and from Liverpool, to Oporto. Stranded at Ballymacart on the 14th Inst. Sale to Commence at 12 o'Clock each day, and continue from day to day until all are sold. THOMAS JOHN, Jun. Agent for Lloyds.


Wooden brig Joseph Winter, built Liverpool 1828, 240 tons, owned Taylor, Liverpool, for service to West Indies, then to Calcutta and to Mauritius. Returned 1841 to Bristol and then proceeded to Douglas, IOM, passing Holyhead on 13 August 1841. Her cargo and stores were transported by Fenella from Douglas to Liverpool for sale. In LR until 1838, 253 tons, registered Liverpool, with minimal information. Isle of Man newspapers describe the Joseph Winter as being lengthened in Douglas Harbour in 1841. Not traced there-after.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 11 December 1828]:
First vessel. For VALPARAISO, ISLAY and LIMA, The fine A 1 Liverpool built Brig JOSEPH WINTER, Captain John Richardson; Burthen 245 tons, coppered and copper-fastened, and in every respect a very superior vessel, and has a considerable portion her cargo engaged. For freight passage, apply Messrs. Eyes, Wylie and Cook; to Messrs. Gibbs, Bright and Co. or to ASHLEY BROTHERS.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 19 December 1839]:
For Mauritius Direct. The fast sailing British-built Brig JOSEPH WINTER. Thomas Hodson, Commander, 254 tons per register. For terms of freight or passage, apply JAMES AIKIN and SON.

[from Bristol Times and Mirror - Saturday 07 August 1841]:
Sailed: Joseph Winter, Hodson, Douglas

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 14 August 1841]:
Friday Aug 13. Off Holyhead, inward bound, at 10:30am, No 8390, Joseph Winter, B 143 from Bristol.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 13 December 1841]:
Coastwise: Fenella, Sardon, Douglas with stores and cargo of the Joseph Winter.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 09 December 1841]:
On account of whom it may concern. On Monday next, the 13th instant, o'clock, on the quay, north-west corner Queens Dock. The Standing and Running RIGGING, SAILS, (nearly new), ANCHORS, CHAIN CABLES, and other Stores belonging to the Joseph Winter, about 250 tons, landing from the Fenella. Apply Messrs. Jas. Aikin & Son, Merchants, or to JOHN HURRY, Broker.


Wooden brig Cicely, built Liverpool, 1828, 235 tons, by 1831 owned Mathie, Liverpool, for service to S America. ON 26608, registered London 1852, Scarboro by 1860. Voyage Tavira to Torbay, foundered in Atlantic, 31 October 1860, all 10 crew saved.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 12 June 1828]:
LINE PACKETS FOR RIO JANEIRO. To sail on the 1st and 16th of every month. To sail the 16th instant. The fine Liverpool-built Brig CICELY, Captain Geo. Gilpin; 235 tons per register, A 1, being new vessel, coppered and copper fastened, and in every respect superior conveyance for goods and passengers; lies west side Queen's Dock, opposite a shed. For terms, &c. apply to Thos. F. Dyson, Esq. or W. and J. TYRER.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 09 June 1831]:
Regular Trader, and will be despatched early. For MONTREAL, The superior Liverpool-built Brig Cicely, Wm Sewell, Commander; A 1 at Lloyd's, 233 tons per register, coppered and copper-fastened, sails very fast, having made her passage out this spring in 28 days. Her accommodations for passengers are elegant, and shippers may expect punctuality. For freight passage, apply Capt. Sewell, or HUGH MATTHIE and SON.

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Friday 30 November 1849]:
Report of the brig Gulterus, Cockburn, of Sunderland, from Singapore for London, in the Downs: Spoke,.. Oct 25 The brig Cicely, Sedgley. of Liverpool, 28 days from Liverpool for Bahia, lat. 9 50 N.. long. 26 10 W., having four hours previously in a heavy squall lost topmasts, yards, jibboom, &c. &c.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 17 April 1855]:
DEAL. April 13. The brig Cicely, Armstrong, from London for Kurrachee, put back to the Downs this morning, having experienced very heavy weather, and is making water.

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 20 November 1860]:
Two boats of the British brig Cicely, of Scarboro', Captain W. Holden, from Tavira, with a cargo of locusts[sic], bound to Torbay, had arrived at Gibraltar. The Cicely sprung a leak on the 31st ult., and sank in lat 46 N, long 11 13 W. The crew, consisting of ten, including the master, were picked up the same night by the ship Britannia, of South Shields, Captain G. Pottinger, from Newcastle for Carthagena, and taken to the entrance of the Bay.


Wooden schooner/brig Lucy, built Liverpool, 1828, 160 tons, owned Porter, Liverpool, for service to S America. Later owned Wallace, rigged as a brig. Voyage Liverpool to Valapraiso, master Wallace, wrecked on Isle of Sal, Cape Verde, 9 December 1840, crew saved.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 11 August 1828]:
For VALPARAISO, INTERMEDIOS, and LIMA, The remarkably fine A 1 British-built Ship CAROLINE, R. Sherwood, Commander (Who is well known in the trade); Her accommodations for passengers are of the most superior description, which, united with the fineness of the vessel, her equipment, and the experience of her commander, render her a most eligible opportunity for freight and passengers. The principal part of her cargo is engaged; lies west side Prince's Apply to Messrs. Gibbs. Bright & Co. or to ASHLEY BROTHERS.
To succeed the above - the fine new British-built Schooner LUCY.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 27 August 1835]:
For KINGSTON, Jamaica, With liberty to call at Madeira, The fine A 1 Liverpool-built Schooner LUCY, John Gilman, master; burthen 164 tons, lying in George's Dock; For freight, &c. apply Mr. W. F. Porter, or to ASHLEY BROTHERS.

[from Lloyd's List - Monday 01 February 1841]:
Boa Vista, Cape de Verde, 31st Dec. The Lucy, Wallace, from Liverpool to Valparaiso, was totally wrecked on the East end of the Ihla do Sal, on the night of 9th instant; Crew saved.


Wooden ship Miranda, built Liverpool, 1829, 299 tons, owned Tobin for trade to Demerara. Later barque rigged, 289 tons, owned Sharpe, Greenock, for trade to Calcutta. Voyage Calcutta to London, put back, leaky, and condemned, 14 August 1840.

[from New Times (London) - Tuesday 07 April 1829]:
Liverpool. April 5th. Sailed. Miranda, Taggart, for Demerara.

[from Lloyd's List - Friday 21 December 1832]:
Liverpool, 18th Dec. The Miranda, Taggart, from Demerara, in running for St George's Dock last night, during a violent Gale from WNW, got on the Bank at the entrance of the Basin, but it is expected she will float next tide.
19th. The Miranda has been got off - she had seven feet water in her hold.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 09 October 1840]:
Miranda, Thompson, for Liverpool, put back to Calcutta 14th Aug and it is expected will be condemned. [leaky]


Wooden brig Mary Scott, built Liverpool, 1828, 248 tons, owned Scott, Liverpool, for trade to Brazil. Sunk by collision 1841.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 28 July 1828]: LINE OF PACKETS FOR RIO DE JANEIRO, TO SAIL ON THE 1ST AND 16TH OF EVERY MONTH. To sail on the 1st of August, The fine new Liverpool-built Brig MARY SCOTT, Captain SCOTT; 248 tons per register; coppered and copper-fastened; and in every respect a superior conveyance both for goods and passengers; lies west side George's Dock. For terms, &c. apply to Thomas F. DYSON, Esq., Or to W. and J. TYRER .

See report and image of wreck casued by collision with US ship Brooklyn off Point Lynas 10 May 1841.


Wooden ship Laura, built Liverpool 1829, 329 tons, owned Jones, Liverpool. Trade to Demerara. Last LR entry 1855, owned Nicholson, Liverpool. Later rigged as a barque. Voyage Liverpool to Pernambuco, 18 December 1855, aground on Hoyle Bank, leaky and taken back to Liverpool, Master (John S Waddle) and mate censured for intoxication.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 27 August 1829]:
For DEMERARA, The new Liverpool built Ship LAURA, Robert Bibby, Master; For freight or passage, having good accommodationss, apply to JOSEPH JONES and Co. Brunswick-street.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 22 December 1855]:
The Laura, for Pernambuco, which sailed this morning (Tuesday), put back this evening leaky, having been on shore on West Hoyle.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 31 December 1855]:
Dock Committee: .. An extra day's pay was ordered to be given to the crews of the Point of Ayr and Hoylake lifeboats, for services rendered to the barque Laura, a vessel sunk on the Hoyle bank, and the flat Pink, of Chester, the crew of which was supposed to have been lost.

[from Lloyd's List - Tuesday 15 January 1856]:
An INVESTIGATION under the provisions of the MERCHANT SHIPPING ACT has been held by the Liverpool Local Marine Board to enquire into charges of Drunkenness and Misconduct preferred against JOHN SWALLOW WADDLE, Master, and FRANCIS MAY, Mate, of the Barque LAURA - whereby that vessel was grounded on the West Hoyle bank; and the Marine Board having reported that both the defendants were guilty of gross misconduct, the Board of Trade have, upon consideration of the evidence, determined to act upon the recommendation of the Marine Board, and Cancel Francis May's Certificate of service as Mate, and to Suspend John Swallow Waddle's Certificate of competency as Master for two years.


Wooden ship Livingston, built Liverpool, 1829, 374 tons, owned Taylor & Potter, Liverpool for East Indies service. In LR to 1833. Voyage from Liverpool to Gibraltar and Mauritius, ashore on coast of Portugal, at Sao Martinho, north of Peniche, 11 January 1834, one crew member lost.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 18 June 1829]:
For passengers only. To sail from Bordeaux on the 15th July. For CALCUTTA. The new Ship LIVINGSTON, Joseph Pearce. Commander. This vessel carrying a surgeon, being armed, and commanded by a man of experience in the Eastern seas, offers an eligible conveyance for passengers. Two opportunities of joining her will be afforded by the Leeds (steamer) which is intended to sail from Dublin for Bordeaux on the 16th inst. and again on the 6th proximo, and whose average passage is 72 hours. For terms - apply Taylor, Potter & Co.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 15 September 1831]:
A regular Trader, and succeeds the Royal Saxon. For CALCUTTA. the well-known Liverpool-built Ship LIVINGSTON, J. Pearce, Commander; A 1 at Lloyd's, burthen 374 tons, coppered, and in every respect a first-rate conveyance, and is now lying in Princes Dock. For freight or passage, apply to Messrs. Taylor, Porter and Co. or to ASHLEY BROTHERS.

[from Weekly True Sun - Sunday 06 October 1833]:
Liverpool. Oct 2. ... The Livingston, Cowley, arrived here from Bengal; sailed 11th May, and on the 18th in lat. 11, lon. 88 E. experienced a heavy gale from NNW to SSW, which lasted till the 22d; and on the 20th July, in lat. 37 S, lon. 57 E. experienced heavy gale - from N to W.

[from Bell's New Weekly Messenger - Sunday 29 December 1833]:
Departures, 25th. Livingston, Cowley, for Mauritius.

[from Naval & Military Gazette and Weekly Chronicle of the United Service - Saturday 15 February 1834]:
The Livingston, from Liverpool to Gibraltar, was lost off San Martinho, 11th ult., and the cargo plundered by the natives. One man drowned.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 17 February 1834]:
Livinston, Cook [sic], hence to Gibraltar, was lost 11th ult, crew saved with the exception of the cook, cargo plundered by the Spaniards [sic].

[from English Chronicle and Whitehall Evening Post - Tuesday 15 April 1834]:
The Captain of the British merchant ship Livingston, wrecked some time ago near Peniche, has since arrived here from Figueira, ...


Wooden ship Statesman, built Liverpool, 1829, 346 tons, owned Holliwell & Highfield, Liverpool, for service to S America. Later owned Captain Quiller, for service to Australia, Hong Kong etc. In LR to 1848. Last recorded voyage Hong Kong to Sydney, arriving 26 May 1847, captain Rowett, described as a barque.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 27 April 1829]:
LINE OE PACKETS FOR RIO DE JANEIRO. TO SAIL ON THE 1ST AND 16TH OF EVERY MONTH. To sail on the 16th May, - The remarkably fine new Ship STATESMAN, John QUILLER, Master; Burthen, per register, 345 tons; coppered and copper-fastened; Liverpool-built, and is expected to sail very fast; her accommodations for passengers are excellent, the cabins being fitted-up for that purpose. For freight, &c. apply to Messrs. ORMEROD HEYWORTH and Co, or to HOLLIWELL and HIGHFIELD.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 21 May 1844]:
By order of the Executors of the late W. E. HALL. TO-MORROW, (Wednesday,) the 22d instant, at Twelve o'clock, at the Office of D. Tonge, Castle-street, 16-64ths SHARES of the Ship STATESMAN; Lying in the Prince's Dock; 345 tons, o.m.; coppered and copper-fastened; built in Liverpool in 1829, and re-classed A 1 for six years in 1838, when she was thoroughly opened and repaired.

[from Liverpool Mail - Saturday 16 May 1846]:
For SYDNEY, The fine Liverpool-built Ship STATESMAN, Captain Rowett; 345 tons, copper-fastened and coppered, has exellent cabin accommodations, is well known in the trade as a fast sailer, and invariably delivering her cargo in the best condition and having just been thoroughly overhauled, presents a most eligible conveyance for goods and passengers, lying in George's Dock. Apply Cotesworth & Wynne.

Australian maritime records: STATESMAN, BARQUE, RICHARD ROWETT, MASTER, BURTHEN 345 TONS FROM THE PORT OF HONG KONG TO PORT JACKSON, NEW SOUTH WALES 26TH MAY 1847 [Sailed 7 March 1847]

[from Wed 2 June 1847, Sydney newspaper.]:
May 26. Statesman, barque, 345 tons, Captain Rowett, from Hongkong and Manila


Wooden brig Hope, built Liverpool 1829, 121 tons, owned Shillitoe, London, for service to Cape Coast. Voyage Sierra Leone to London, ashore at St Martin's, Scilly Isles, 19th January 1830, 4 lives lost, 5 saved.

[from Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser - Friday 17 July 1829]:
Outwards: Hope, Noble, for Cape Coast and Accra.

[from Morning Herald (London) - Thursday 04 February 1830]:
The state of the weather at the Scilly Islands has been unusually boisterous and severe. ..... On Tuesday morning the brig Hope, Noble master, was wrecked near St. Martin's, the day mark on that island having been mistaken for the lighthouse on St. Agnes. She dropped her anchor, but was driven on a rock and went to pieces. About 100 casks of palm oil, 300 elephants' tusks, a box of dollars, and some other articles of the cargo, have been saved by the exertions of the islanders, who have behaved with the utmost kindness and hospitality to the captain and crew. Before the ship went down a boat (containing a Dutch officer, his lady, a black boy, and others) put off for the shore, but, before she had cleared the vessel, the mainmast of the brig fell upon and crushed the boat to pieces, by which the officer, his lady, the boy, and one of the crew, were drowned.


Wooden ship Parker, built Liverpool 1830, 440 tons, owned Sandbach & Co, Liverpool, for service to Demerara. ON 24017, in MNL to 1869, owned Sandbach & Co, registered Liverpool. Described as having made about a hundred voyages to Demerara. At Demerara, captain Nickels, loaded with sugar, caught fire and burnt to the water-line, 10th April 1869.
This vessel is an excellent advertisement for Liverpool- built vessels - lasted 39 years, made over 100 voyages to S America, and only lost because of a fire.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 12 December 1831]:
For DEMERARA, The fine Ship PARKER, HENRY RISIEN, Master, Burthen 450 tons; has very superior accommodations. For freight or passage, apply to SANDBACH, TINNE & Co. [similar adverts to 1864; later Captain Kennedy, then Plant, then Nickels]

[from Evening Mail - Monday 18 October 1852]:
... The ship Parker was about to leave Georgetown, and would, on her arrival in England, complete her 50th journey to the West Indies. Her Commander. Mr Risien, being about to retire after 22 year' service.....

[from Globe - Saturday 01 May 1869]:
The ship Parker, from Demerara, bound for Liverpool, with a full cargo of sugar, was totally burnt in the Demerara river on the 10th inst. [said to have made about a hundred voyages to Demerara]

[from Commercial Daily List (London) - Tuesday 18 May 1869]:
Demerara, 10th April; The wreck of the Parker, Nickels, which vessel caught fire here last night, when about to sail for Liverpool with colonial produce, lies on the East bank of the river, about 700 yards from shore, in 16 feet at low water, and is burnt nearly to the water edge.


Wooden brig Llama, built Liverpool 1830, 178 tons, owned Ashley, Liverpool, for service to Lima. Voyage Benin to London, wrecked off Popo, Africa, on 3 July 1846, with some crew lost.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 20 May 1830]:
For LIMA and GUAYAQUIL. The fine A 1 Liverpool-built Schooner LLAMA, George Morce, Commander; 160 tons, built expressly for this trade, and will be found in every respect most superior conveyance. Apply to Messrs. Gibbs, Bright and Co. or to ASHLEY Brothers.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 05 April 1838]:
For VERA CRUZ, The A 1 British Brig LLAMA, George Wheeler, master; 174 tons register; coppered and copper-fastened; sails fast, and will be despatched as above. For terms of freight or passage, having good cabin accommodation, Apply in Glasgow John Cross and Co. here to Messrs. Cross, Anderson and Co. 5, Mersey-chambers, or W. and J. TYRER.

[from Morning Advertiser - Monday 16 November 1846]:
The Llama, Jamieson, from Benin to London, was lost off Popoe, 3d July, master drowned.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 01 October 1847]:
DIED. Lately, drowned from the wreck of the brig Llama, off Popo, Africa, Mr. Nicholas Taylor Ashcroft, first officer of that vessel, and youngest son of Mr. Edward Ashcroft, ... [presumably Grand Popo on the coast of Benin]


Wooden barque Eliza Killick, built Liverpool, 1830, 200 tons, owned Killick, Liverpool, for trade to West Indies. ON 1751, in MNL to 1861. In newspapers to 1859 when arrived Aspinwall from Liverpool, MNL reports condemned.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 18 February 1830]:
For ST. THOMAS & PORT-AU-PRINCE, The fine A 1 Schooner Lady Leitrim, James Clements, Master; Burthen 101 tons, newly coppered, and a most desirable conveyance for dry goods. For freight, apply to Messrs, Hearne, Smith & Co, or EDWARDS & POOLE.
Succeeds the above. The fine new Liverpool-built Barque ELIZA KILLICK.


Wooden barque Gratitude, built Liverpool, 1830, 221 tons, owned Heyes & Litherland, Liverpool, for trade to West Indies. For sale 1849. In LR to 1852.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 11 September 1834]:
For Barbadoes The Liverpool-built barque GRATITUDE, Andrew Whyte, Master, A regular trader, and will have despatch .. Apply Heyes, Litherland & Co.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 22 October 1849]:
Sale: The fine Liverpool built Barque GRATITUDE, lying in the Salthouse Dock. 221 12-94ths tons, om. and of the following dimensions: length 89 feet 3 inches; breadth 23 feet 7 inches; depth of hold 15 feet 10 inches. This vessel is coppered and copper-fastened; abundantly found in stores, and has just discharged a cargo of copper from Puerto Rico in excellent condition; she is well adapted for the West India trade. ...

Lloyds List: Gratitude, Turner, arr Plymouth from Demerara 6 June 1850 [last mention found]


Wooden barque Lady Charlotte, built Liverpool, 1831, 190 tons, owned Tobin, for trade to Africa. Length 89.3ft. After 1 year, rigged as a brig. Sailed for Africa 1832. Later to S America. Sold 1838. Voyage Callao to Liverpool, ashore and wrecked near Cape Clear, only 1 survivor. See more details of salvage.

Image from painting by Samuel Walters of Lady Charlotte off South Stack [from Samuel Walters - A S Davidson]

[from Liverpool Albion - Tuesday 13 November 1838]:
WRECK OF THE LADY CHARLOTTE. Extract of a letter from Mr. Thomas Court, of Liverpool, dated yesteday: I have received a letter from Captain Mackie, this morning, in which he speaks in very sanguine terms of being able to save the specie from the Lady Charlotte, with the assistance of a diver. He has discovered the wreck among the rocks, and thinks, at low water, during spring tides, there will not be more than twelve feet water.


Wooden ship Frances, built Liverpool, 1832, 334 tons, owned Taylor, Liverpool, for trade to USA, later to India. Probably built by Seddon & Leadley. For sale 1854. Last LR entry 1854, owned Brice, Liverpool, for trade to Bahia. Reported ashore NE of Bahia, Brazil, on 15 January 1855 and wrecked, crew saved. Location was possibly the port now called Mata de São João.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 30 August 1832]:
On Tuesday last, there was launched from the building yard of Messrs. Seddon and Leadley, a fine ship of about 350 tons burthen, for Andrew Taylor, Esq.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 05 August 1833]:
For Charleston. The first-class Ship FRANCES, Hugh Leslie, Master; Burthen 333 tons, on her third voyage, is coppered and copper-fastened; and sails remarkably fast; she has good accommodations for passengers. For terms of freight or passage, apply to Captain LESLIE, on board, in Georges Dock, or to ANDREW TAYLOR & CO. [Had sailed for New Orleans, October 1832]

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 04 September 1849]:
Will be despatched punctually on the 11th instant, full or not full, and give any engagement to sail first vessel. For CEYLON , The fast-sailing British-built Ship FRANCES, Captain GUTHRIE, *AE 1 in red; 334 tons; and an excellent conveyance. Apply to COTESWORTH, WYNNE, and LYNE. [Frances, Guthrie, not found subsequently - sailed for Ceylon 17 September]

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 10 July 1854]:
For SALE, The Liverpool built Ship FRANCES; 413 tons om, is well known in the East India trade, and of falcate. carries of Calcutta cargo 700 tons, she is copper-fastened, and sheathed in yellow metal in 1853, and has 'tween decks laid. Dimensions:- Length 110 feet 1-12th; breadth 29 feet 8-12ths; height 'tween decks 6 feet 9-12ths: now lying in Albert Dock. Apply to TONGE. CURRY & CO. Brokers.
[From Liverpool. Dec 7, 1854, Sailed Frances, Coakea, Bahia]

[from Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - Tuesday 27 February 1855]:
Liverpool. The Francis, Coaker, of and from Liverpool for Bahia, ran on shore on the night of 15th January, at Joa, and, together with her cargo, has been totally lost, crew saved. [other reports: 11th January; Joa 6 leagues NE of Bahia]


Wooden barque John Souchay, built Liverpool, 1832, 234 tons, owned Vianna & Jones, Liverpool. ON 265, registered London from 1854. Rigged as a brig. Destroyed by fire at Demerara, 22 December 1866.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 16 July 1832]:
Europe. Loading: Vianna & Jones, 234, John Souchay, Genoa

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 12 August 1833]:
LINE of PACKETS for GENOA & LEGHORN, To sail on the 16th August, The beautiful fast-sailing Barque JOHN SOUCHAY, Thomas Hunter, master, A 1 at Lloyds, 234 tons per register, coppered and copper-fastened. For freight &c, apply to owners Vianna & Jones.

[from Lloyd's List - Thursday 17 January 1867]: br> DEMERARA 22 Dec. The JOHN SOUCHAY (brig), of London, Peterson, loading timber at Palmer's Point, Essequibo river, has been destroyed by fire, nothing but the copper sheathing standing; two boats, some sails, and small stores saved.


Wooden brig Thomas Worthington , built Liverpool, 1833, 202 tons, owned Lockett, Liverpool, for trade to S America. ON 15429, registered Melbourne 1855, Newport 1856-58. Voyage Newport (S Wales) to Southampton with coal, leaky and foundered in a storm, 23 February 1858, off the Smalls, crew of 8 took to boats and were picked up by Winifred and landed at Cobh.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 28 February 1833]:
For VALPARAISO, an Intermediate PORT, and LIMA, The remarkably fine Brig THOMAS WORTHINGTON, George Morce, Master; (Who is well acquainted with the West Coast); Burthen 202 tons, Liverpool built, now on her first voyage, and is expected sail very fast; her accommodations for passengers are very superior, For freight or passage, apply Messrs. Gibbs Bright and Co. or ASHLEY BROTHERS.

[from North Devon Journal - Thursday 25 March 1858]:
Shipwreck. Providential Deliverance. Through the kindness of Mr. Cox, the respected comptroller of Customs at this port, we have obtained the following particulars of the foundering of the brig Thomas Worthington, which sailed from Newport, in South Wales, the 20th ult., bound for Southampton, with a cargo of coals, intended for the West India Mail boat Company. The brig was the property of Mr. Magam, of Newport, was commanded by the owner's brother, and navigated by a crew of eight persons. She set sail down Channel with a fair wind, but when off Morte, it came on to blow and the crew found it necessary to stow the topgallant sails; eventually, as the gale increased, they single reefed the topsail - the wind at the time was southerly. During the night the ship bore down, and, after passing Hartland, it was deemed expedient to double reef the topsail and stow the jib and mainsail, a heavy sea running at the time. Up to this time they had not made much water, but within two hours the water in the hold had so increased that it was with difficulty it could be kept under. The wind was still drawing ahead, and they stood on the same tack till the next afternoon, when they tacked - the water still increasing. During the Sunday night, the wind became very boisterous, bearing off the land, and all hands laboured incessantly at the pumps, after closely reefing the topsails. The captain hoped to reach Milford, bur the weather prevented it. At this time the mate went down into the lazarette, and discovered the water pouring in through the seams in large quantities, and that the stern post had started. He tried to stop the leak by thrusting in pieces of pork, but it was of no avail. After this, they tried to reach Waterford. but failed; the sea was making a clean breach over the ship - the crew were lashed to the pumps for ten hours - the vessel fast settling in the water. Towards day-break, on Wednesday morning, the gale abated, and, there was eight feet of water in the hold, the crew took to the boats, in most exhausted condition from toil, exposure, and lack of food. At half past four they were fortunately seen by the captain of the Winifred, emigrant ship, bound for Melbourne, who picked them up, treated them with the utmost kindness, and eventually put them on board a Cork pilot boat, which landed them at Queenstown. Here the poor fellows were kindly received and hospitably treated by the agent of that valuable institution, the Shipwrecked Mariners' and Fishermen's Friend Society; they were lodged in the Sailors' Home, and at length sent by steamer and rail with free pass to Liverpool, and thence to their respective homes. But for their timely deliverance of the Winifred, this crew of eight persons must have perished. The Thomas Worthington was insured at Lloyd's. She must have sunk within a few hours of her being abandoned by the crew, who last saw her pitching and rolling fearfully.


Wooden brig Ellen German, built Liverpool, 1833, 176 tons, owned Bibby, Liverpool, for trade to Mediterranean. Sold 1840 to Rose & Co. Voyage Port Louis, Mauritius, to Madras, wrecked on Huvadhu, Maldives, 7th May 1846, crew saved.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 15 July 1833]:
For LEGHORN & ZANTE, The beautiful new brig ELLEN GERMAN, R. Blundell, master, 176 tons register, coppered and copper-fastened, and is expected to sail remarkably fast, and will be despatched immediately, For terms of freight or passage, apply to the owners, JOHN BIBBY & Co.

[from Morning Herald (London) - Thursday 23 July 1846]:
Intelligence of the melancholy event [loss of Maria Soames] was brought to Ceylon by Captain Harris, of the Ellen German, who with his crew arrived at Belligam on the 16th inst., in two boats, the vessel having been wrecked on the Maldives on the 7th. The Ellen German left Port Louis on the 27th of April, and the captain reports that out of seven vessels in company with the Maria Somes when the hurricane occurred, only three had reached the Mauritius. [Belligao was the Portuguese name for Weligama]

[from Lloyd's List - Thursday 23 July 1846]:
Colombo, (Ceylon) 7th June. The Ellen German, Harrison, from Mauritius to Madras, was wrecked on a reef of the Secadiva Atoll [now called Huvadhu] in the Maldive Islands 7th May; Crew saved and arrived at Balligam.


Wooden brig Charles Hamerton (also Hammerton), built Liverpool, 1833, 180 tons, registered Liverpool. Traded to West Indies for hardwood. Registered Whitehaven 1851. Voyage St Andrews (New Brunswick) to Cobh, damaged by storm and abandoned 13 September 1853, crew rescued by New Zealand of Newry.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 12 August 1833]:
For LAGUIRA. Direct, The new Liverpool-built Brig CHARLES HAMMERTON, Registers 180 tons, expected to sail very fast, and will be despatched to suit the convenience of shippers. For freight or passage, having superior accommodations, apply to Messrs. William Rose & Co. or to Wm. KER, IMRIE & CO.

[from Morning Herald (London) - Saturday 26 October 1844]:
Cork. Oct 22. Arrived the Charles Hammerton from Bay Chaleur.

[from Newry Telegraph - Saturday 24 September 1853]:
REPORT OF HENRY ROBINSON, LATE MASTER OF THE BRIG CHARLES HAMERTON, OF WHITEHAVEN, FROM ST. ANDREWS, BOUND TO QUEENSTOWN, FOR ORDERS. August 17 - At noon, the pilot came on board, unmoored, made sail, and work'd down the river; 4, p.m., came to. 18th - thick fog with light winds from the South. 19th - at 8, a.m.. got under weigh and proceeded on the voyage; 4, p.m.. discharged the pilot off Mackie's Seal Islands. From the 19th to 30th August light and variable winds; spoke the bark Cora, Captain Law, of, and from, Liverpool, bound Boston, out forty-nine days, short of provisions, supplied them; from the last date to the loss of this vessel, we had continual strong winds and unsettled weather. September 10th - at 6, a.m.. strong winds with rain and heavy squalls; close reefed the main topsail, and balance-reefed boom mainsail. 9th - heavy gales with high sea running; wind from S.S.E. - Lat, 49 25 N., Long., 25 15 N[sic W]. 11th - gale again increasing from the N.N.W.; hove too, under close-reefed main-topsail; shortly after, a heavy squall took the vessel, and laid her so low that were obliged to cut away the main-mast, when the vessel righted, full of water; blowing a hurricane up to Sunday night, the 11th; the sea making a complete break over us all night, got a sail across the forecastle to shelter us. Monday 12th, still blowing heavy; tried get some beef from the cabin - about a pound - and divided it among eight in number; fortunately a cask of water washed out of the after-hatch, when the ship lay on her beam ends. Friday, 13th - blowing a gale with a heavy sea running; about ten or eleven, saw a vessel running to the East, which descried us. This vessel, the New Zealand, of Newry, lowered her boats and took us off the wreck after being three days and nights on the wreck, with nothing to eat, and the sea breaking over us. Great praise is due to Captain Montgomery and his chief mate and crew, the sea was running high at the time we were taken off, and at great risk in sending a boat. Had we not got off, we would have been few in number the next morning. I have to return Captain Montgomery, officers and crew, my sincere and heartfelt thanks and gratitude for their kind attention to crew and self while on board his vessel. Henry Robinson, late master of the brig Chas. Hamerton, of Whitehaven. Warrenpoint, 21st Sept. 1853.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 10 October 1853]:
Eucles, Anderson, from Valparaiso, at this port. On the 1st of October, in lat. 49 N., lon. 18 W., passed the wreck of the Charles Hammerton, before reported abandoned.


Wooden schooner Emma, built Liverpool, 1833, 153 tons, owned Bibby, Liverpool, for trade to Mediterranean. Sold 1849 to Job, Liverpool. Voyage Newfoundland to Liverpool, aground, 21 November 1851, on Burbo Spit and wrecked, 12 drowned, 1 saved.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 28 October 1833]:
LINE of PACKETS for GENOA & LEGHORN. To sail on the 1st November, The beautiful new Schooner EMMA, Captain Joseph Parry; 153 tons register, coppered and copper-fastened, and is expected to sail remarkably fast. For terms of freight or passage, apply to the owners, John Bibby & Co.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 25 November 1851]:
Friday Nov 21. The schooner Emma, Steers, from Newfoundland for this port, was wrecked this morning on the Spit of Burbo; captain, pilot, and ten of the crew drowned; the mate alone saved.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Tuesday 25 November 1851]:
Friday Nov 21. The schooner Emma, Steers, of this port, homeward bound, from Newfoundland, struck on Burbo Bank, at an early hour this morning. She immediately turned over on to her beam ends, and became a total wreck. As the tide made up, the master, pilot, and ten of the crew, were washed from the rigging, the mate alone being saved. [cargo oil and skins]

[from Liverpool Shipping Telegraph and Daily Commercial Advertiser - Saturday 22 November 1851]:
LOSS OF THE EMMA, ON BURBO. We regret to announce the wreck of the above vessel, which has been attended with considerable loss of life. The particulars as supplied by the mate, being the only survivor, are as follows: The brigantine Emma, John Steer, master, from Newfoundland, with a cargo of oil and seal skins, with a pilot on board, drifted on Burbo Spit about one o'clock yesterday morning, being calm at the time. The long-boat was immediately got over the side, an anchor run out, and every possible endeavour made to heave her off, but without effect; the breeze freshening as the flood tide made, she began to strike heavily, and the boat sunk alongside. The vessel soon after bilged, and the sea broke over her with great fury, when the captain and pilot were washed overboard, and subsequently all followed, except Robert Thomas, the mate, who lashed himself to one of the boat's davits, where he remained till about 8 a.m., and was nearly exhausted, when the steam-tug Powerful ran down, and after unsuccessfully attempting his rescue with the boat, succeeded in throwing him a line. This he made fast round his body, and was hauled a considerable distance through the water on board the steamer, where he received every kindness and attention from the master, who landed him about 10 o'clock.
The pilot beloged to no.9, but we could not ascertain his name. The total lost is 12 - viz. the captain, pilot, 8 seamen, and 2 distressed mariners (passengers). The vessel and the cargo are the property of Messrs Job Brothers.
The carpenter's chest has washed up; his name is Nurse, and the contents, some money, will be forwarded to London. With the exception of the master, mate and carpenter, not one of the names of the crew are known, as they must mostly have shipped in Newfoundland.


Wooden schooner Lynx, built Liverpool, 1834, 66 tons, owned Hampson, Liverpool, for trade to Smyrna [Izmir]. In LR to 1839. Last established voyage Lisbon to Liverpool, leaving February 1839.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 10 November 1836]:
For ST, MICHAELS, The very fast-sailing Schooner LYNX, George Rider, Master; Burthen 110 tons (old measurement), recently arrived from Smyrna wth the first cargo of new fruit, having made her passage out in 25, and home in 33 days. Will take such freight as may offer, either direct or to a port not higher than Gibraltar, so as not to interfere with her sailing punctually, first fair wind. Apply to Thomas Hampson.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 01 November 1838]:
For LISBON, The A 1 fast-sailing Schooner LYNX, James Forsyth. Master; Loading west side King's Dock. For terms of freight or passage, apply to THOMAS HAMPSON, 13, Chapel-street.

Some shipping casualties from 9 Jan 1839 hurricane [from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 11 January 1839]:
... Hardware. Viner, for Lisbon. and Lion, -, for Glasgow, with loss of sails, and Lynx, Forsyth, for Lisbon, have put back. Reindeer, for Belfast, is putting back, in tow of the Unicorn, steamer. Ann Paley, Hunter, hence for Lisbon, is on shore near the Ribble; three men drowned. Harvest Home, Kenn, hence for St. Thomas, is wrecked on Mad Wharf; carpenter and one man saved - it is feared the remainder of the crew are drowned. Monkey, - , hence for Gibraltar, is wrecked near Formby; three men drowned. Victoria, Candler, from Charleston to this port, is on shore near Lessowe Castle. and ebbs dry.

Lynx, Forsyth, reported at Lisbon on 7 February; sailed from Lisbon for Liverpool 5th February, 1839.
No mention of Lynx, Forsyth, after this; but Lynx, Rutland, of Bristol is mentioned from March 1839, trading to Oporto.


Wooden ship John Bagshaw built Liverpool, 1835, 416 tons, owned Clarke, London, registered Liverpool, for trade to Canton. Voyage Calcutta to London, driven ashore at Cape of Good Hope, 9 Sept 1843 and wrecked, crew all saved.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 09 March 1835]:
For CALCUTTA, The splendid new Liverpool-built Ship JOHN BAGSHAW, J. HANDY, late of the Huron, Commander, registers 430 tons; coppered and copper-fastened; built expressly for the India trade, expected to sail fast; has a spacious poop, and superior accommodation for passengers; a considerable part of her cargo being engaged, will have early despatch, For freight or passage apply in London to Fletcher, Alexander & Co. or here to JAMES BREBNER.

[from Liverpool Albion - Monday 14 November 1842]:
CAPE OF HOPE, SEPTEMBER 10 th. It blew a gale at N.W. 28th ult., and on the 8 th instant it blew very fresh from the N.W., with a heavy swell rolling into the bay, which increased on the morning of the 9th, during which the following vessels were driven on shore, and not expected to be got off. The John Bagshaw, Bedlington, from Calcutta to London; the Henry Hoyle, Griffiths, from Algoa Bay, (with the crew and passengers saved from the Sabina, from Manilla to Cadiz, wrecked on Cape Recief), crew saved. The Hamilton, Ross, from Fernando, also got on shore.

[from Essex Standard - Friday 25 November 1842]:
Accounts from the Cape of Good Hope, of September 16, notice the continuance of the gale almost up to that date, the sea having been heavier in Table Bay than ever before known, owing to the prevalence of high winds during the previous fortnight. There were twenty-three vessels riding in the Bay at the time, only eighteen of which were left when it subsided. The John Bagshaw, Fairfield, and Reform, which were wrecked, had been condemned, and tbe Henry Hoyle, and Ghicka, cast on shore, remained to be examined. The crews were providentially saved.


Wooden barque Irlam, built Liverpool 1836, 252 tons, owned Barton, Irlam & Higginson, Liverpool. ON 1101. Registered Liverpool. Later owned Laidmans, Liverpool.
Voyage Sunderland to Cronstadt, 16 May 1860, was abandoned off Kristiansand, Norway. Her nine crew survived.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 15 November 1836]:
Intended to sail on 26th November. For Barbadoes, The barque Irlam, J F Dixon, master, For freight or passage, apply to Barton, Irlam & Higginson

[from Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury - Saturday 26 May 1860]:
Christiansand, May 18 -The barque Irlam, Stephenson, for Cronstadt from Sunderland, coal laden, was abandoned on the 16th inst., 20 miles off this coast, with seven feet water in her hold, and the leak increasing. She went down half an hour after the crew left her. The crew have arrived here in their boats.
The barque Irlam, from Sunderland for Cronstadt, lately abandoned on the Norway coast, was built in the Mersey in 1836, was registered 279 tons, and had been several years in the West India trade.


Wooden barque Enterprize, built Liverpool, 1836, 338 tons, owned Steel & Co - so probably built by them. For trade to East.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Friday 16 December 1836]:
Enterprize, Roberts hence at Batavia


Wooden ship Tiger, built Liverpool, 1836, 375 tons, Owned Porter, Liverpool, for service to India. Voyage Liverpool to Bombay, wrecked on an uninhabited island (now called Astove) of the Seychelles on 12 August 1836, some crew left in ship's boat, remainder of crew and 4 passengers saved after spending a long period on the island. One crew member died on the island.

[from Liverpool Mercury - Friday 15 April 1836]:
FOR BOMBAY. The new Liverpool built ship, TIGER, Edward Searight, master, For freight or passage, having excellent accommodations, apply to Messrs Dirom, Richmond & Co or to W F PORTER & SON

[from Liverpool Telegraph - Wednesday 08 March 1837]:
Tiger, Searight, hence for Bombay, sailed from the Cape of Good Hope 12th July [1836], and has not since been heard of.

See also Book: Narrative of the Wreck of the Ship Tiger, of Liverpool, (Captain Edward Searight), on the Desert Island of Astova, on the Morning of the 12th of August 1836. by William Stirling, 1843.

[from Liverpool Albion - Tuesday 14 March 1837]:
The ship Tiger, belonging to Messrs. W. F. Porter and Son, which sailed from this port on the 1st May, 1836, for Bombay, left Cape Town on the 11th July, and was wrecked on the island of Astova [sic, also Astorva] on the 12th of August. The following is a copy of a letter from Dr. Deacon, one of the passengers:
Mahe, Seychelles, Nov. 6, 1836. As a pinnace leaves this to-morrow for the Mauritius, I lose not an opportunity to inform you of the total loss of the ship Tiger, on the island of Astova, northwest of Cape Amber. She struck on a reef southeast side, on the Morning of the 12th of August, about ten o'clock, a. m.: all hands, twenty-six in number, landed safe in the long and jolly boat: the island uninhabited. Add to the melancholy news, Captain Searight jumped overboard, and was drowned, two days previous to the wreck, off the island of St Mary, everything was done to save him, but, owing to the heavy swell at the time, the boat was swamped and one man nearly lost; a second attempt was impossible, owing to the weather.
On the 15th of September, the longboat was lengthened five feet, decked, &c. and sailed for Mahe, Seychelles, with Mr. Spurs, third mate, and ten able seamen, (thinking all along we were on John de Nova, 200 miles more to the eastward), to procure a vessel for the passengers and remaining crew: this was Mr. Spurs' wish, thinking the place safer for all hands. I am sorry to say, up to this date, no tidings have been heard of them. [later reported saved]
We were providentially taken off the island on the 18th October, and brought here by Captain Goodman, of the Emma, (whaler), from London, who saw the wreck and our flags, and sent, in consequence, his boat onshore, to see if there were any people: in fact, our deliverence altogether has been wonderful. What a current to the westward! to be on Astova when Mr. Spurs thought it was John de Nova.
Captain Searight was taken ill on the 5th August with delirium tremens. When he became sufficiently recovered, I allowed him to be on deck for a little fresh air. I remained with him till after eight bells, when Mr. Spurs relieved me to get my taffin; I warned Mr. S. to have his eye on the captain, and to be watchful that he did not get out at the port. Just as I had finished taffin, there was a cry of Captain overboard! Never shall I forget it. His loss was universally regretted on board.
Our wreck was between John de Nova and the Cosmalodo, and we were steering N.N W. by N. by compass when she struck. We did not sight Cape Amber, but did Isle of St. Mary and Cape East. Mr. Blore is here, and I suppose will write you by this opportunity. In haste, your obedient servant, (Signed) William Deacon.
P.S Captain Goodman hove in sight on the 14th of Oct. We were sixty-eight days on the island, living principally on turtle and fish. Fresh water we found the second day by digging two barrels' depth in the sand. We all landed about eleven a.m.

Wooden ship Emily, built Liverpool 1837, 209 tons, owned Cairns, Liverpool, for service to Brazil.

[from Liverpool Standard and General Commercial Advertiser - Tuesday 13 February 1838]:
For PERNAMBUCO, The Liverpool-built fast-sailing Ship EMILY, J. H. Wardle, Master. For freight or passage apply on board. or to N CAIRNS. 4. India-buildings


Wooden ship Paragon, built Liverpool, 1837, 392 tons, 112.8 x 27.8 x 19.1 ft, owned Holt, Liverpool. For trade to Calcutta.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 03 August 1837]:
LINE of PACKETS for CALCUTTA, to sail on the 20th of every Month. Tosail on the 20th August. The fine new Liverpool-built Ship PARAGON, James Coleman, Commander. A1, 435 tons; coppered; built under particular inspection, and is expected to sail remarkably fast.... apply on board, or to W and J Tyrer.


Wooden ship Sunda,built Liverpool, 1838, 375 tons, for East India service. Owned Fyffe, Dundee for trade London - India. Not in LR 1841.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 12 April 1838]:
For CALCUTTA, The first-rate Liverpool-built Ship SUNDA, Alexander Greig, Commander; Burthen per register 452 tons and just launched, and has been expressly built the the East India trade; expected to sail remarkably fast. For freight or passage, apply to Captain Greig, or to BOLD and STARKEY.


Wooden barque Priscilla, built Liverpool 1838, 231 tons, 100 x 22.5 x 13 ft, owned Duncan, Liverpool, for service to Brazil.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 03 September 1840]:
LINE of PACKETS for PERNAMBUCO. To sail on the 15th instant. The fine Liverpool-built Barque PRISCILLA, Captain John Taylor; A 1, burthen per register 218 tons, coppered and copper fastened, and sails remarkably fast. For terms of freight or passage, having elegant accommodations, apply on board, west side Prince's Dock, or to JOHN HOLLIWELL.


Wooden brig Dorset, built Liverpool, 1838, 81 tons, owned Porter, Liverpool, for trade to Australia.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 11 October 1838]:
The Porter, Porter, and Dorset, Bishop, hence at Madeira, and both sailed 13th ult. for South Australia.


Wooden schooner Dinah, built Liverpool, 13838, 109 tons, owned Bannister, Liverpool, for trade to Gibraltar.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 21 February 1839]:
For GIBRALTAR. The superior Liverpool-built Schooner DINAH, G. M. Dick, Master; 100 tons; A 1, not six months old: loading west side of the Salthouse Dock. For rate of freight, apply to W. H. WOOD, 16, Hanover-street.


Wooden ship Henrietta, built Liverpool, 1838, 442 tons, owned Johnson, Liverpool, for trade to New Orleans.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 26 November 1838]:
For NEW ORLEANS, The new Liverpool-built Ship HENRIETTA, George Longford, commander; 450 tons burthen. This Ship is on her first voyage; copper-fastened and coppered, and in every respect a first-rate conveyance for goods and passengers. For terms of freight or passage, apply to Captain Longford on board in Waterloo Dock, to Messrs. THOMAS DIXON & co, or to JOHN JOHNSON, Brunswick-street.

Wooden ship Helena, built Liverpool, 1838, owned Johnson, Liverpool, for trade to New Orleans, not found in LR as Helena up to 1846. By 1851 in LR, 630 tons, owned Locketts, Liverpool. For sale 1851.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 06 December 1838]:
For NEW ORLEANS. The new Liverpool-built Ship HELENA, John Drenning, Master; 490 tons, old measurement. This ship is now on her first voyage; coppered and copper-fastened, and expected to sail very fast. For freight or passage, apply to Captain Drenning, or JOHN JOHNSON, Brunswick-street.

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 01 December 1851]:
For SALE, The Liverpool built Ship HELENA; 630 tons register; length 117 feet 7-10ths; breadth 27 feet 3-10ths; depth 21 feet 4-10ths. This vessel is copper fastened; she was felted and yellow metalled last year; put in first rate order, and classed AE 1 at Lloyd's; has discharged 910 tons weight on a light draft of water; has two iron water tanks amidships, and is well found in stores. ...


Wooden brig Margaret, built Liverpool (?) 1838, 178 tons, owned Rae for trade to West Indies. See details of this vessel - listed in LR as built Chester..

[from Liverpool Mercantile Gazette and Myers's Weekly Advertiser - Monday 10 September 1838]:
For ST. THOMAS. The fine new Liverpool-built Brig MARGARET, James Hunter, Master, registers 170 tons, coppered and copper-fastened, expected to sail fast. For freight or passage, apply to William Rose & Co.


Wooden ship Helen Stewart, built Liverpool, 1839, 353 tons, owned Bold, Liverpool, for trade to Canton. Later owned and registered London.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 23 May 1839]:
For CANTON, Direct, The splendid new Liverpool-built Ship HELEN STEWART, D Stewart, Commander; 353 tons burthen; coppered and copper fastened; A 1 at Lloyd's for 12 years; built under particular inspection; expected to sail very fast. For freight or passage, having good and spacious accommodation, apply to HOLD and STARKEY.


Wooden barque Currency, built Liverpool, 1839, 324 tons, 107.0 x 25.6 x 17.9 ft, owned Bates, Liverpool, for trade to Calcutta. Later owned Laughland, registered Glasgow.

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 03 December 1840]:
For CALCUTTA, With liberty to touch at the Cape of Good Hope, The fine coppered Liverpool-built Barque CURRENCY, D. J. Hoare, Commander; Burthen per register 375 tons; now on her second voyage: has room for light freight, and excellent accommodations for passengers. Apply to BATES, SONS and Co.

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***** odds here on **** -------------------EEE

[from Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 12 January 1837]:
FOR SALE, a new BARQUE, ready for launching, of following dimensions: Keel for tonnage 154 feet; extreme breadth 24 feet 7 inches; depth in hold 16 feet 4 inches. And admeasures about 256 tons (om); is all English and African oak; completely copper-fastened; has raised quarter deck 32 feet long, with a bust head and carved stern, and built under the inspection of Lloyd's surveyor. For further particulars, apply Mr. D. TONGE on 'Change, or to W. and J. TYRER. Also a new SHIP, building, of 400 tons.

Gore's Liverpool General Advertiser - Thursday 16 February 1837
ON SALE, The entire ENGLISH OAK frame &c of a STEAM BOAT, 70 feet long, 12 feet beam, and 6 feet 3 inches depth; she was put together with great care, it having been intended to send the frame out to the West Indies. She can be either taken down, or completed as she now lies. For further particulars, apply to the builder. JOHN. D. GRAYSON. Trentham Street

Georgiana S J Brown 446 Lpl55 Roberts&

Fiery Cross s J Dallas 788 Lpl 1855 J Campbell [advert W C Miller, but Rennie]

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