Photo of Dr Marie McIntyre

Dr Marie McIntyre Ph.D, BSc (HONS)

Epidemiologist Epidemiology and Population Health

Research

eHealth methodologies to aid the detection, identification and collation of information on infectious diseases, particularly for antimicrobial resistance, gastrointestinal, zoonotic and emerging infections in One Health approaches.

Grants
2018 Understanding of the development of emerging antimicrobial resistance at the interface of the agricultural and natural environments; exploring the availability and quality of open-source information - Liverpool lead, £14,957, funded by N8 pump priming, University of York
2016 Big data approaches to host-pathogen mapping: EID2 - an open-access, taxonomically- and spatially-referenced database of pathogens and their hosts - Research Co-Investigator, £186,796, funded by BBSRC
2014 NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Emerging and Zoonotic Infections, Risk Assessment theme - Developed a research project to identify likely animal sources of novel human infections, £69,566, joint funded by NIHR/UoL
2012 What, where and weather? Integrating open-source taxonomic, spatial and climatologic information into a comprehensive database of livestock infections - Wrote as Research Co-Investigator, £148,000, funded by BBSRC

Associated media
The Liverpool View: Can big data save the world? Public debate panel speech https://news.liverpool.ac.uk/2015/12/22/can-big-data-save-the-world/ ) (published 22/12/2015)
Using big data to map and defeat disease. BBSRC website Case Study www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/topic/using-big-data-to-map-and-defeat-disease/ (published 04/09/2015)
‘Big data’ approach to map relationships between human and animal diseases. BBSRC Business Magazine, Autumn 2014

Invited lectures and workshops
- M. Wardeh and K.M. McIntyre (2018) Big Data epidemiology: turning trends into useful preventive medicine. Workshop at SVEPM 2018, 21-23/03/2018, Tallinn, Estonia
- K.M. McIntyre (2017) EID2: Background and outputs. Collaborative meeting, 02/03/2017, World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), Paris, France
- K.M. McIntyre (2016) Using Big Data Approaches in Risk Assessment. Antimicrobial Resistance One Health Surveillance Masterclass, 11-15/07/2016, Foresight Centre, University of Liverpool
- K.M. McIntyre (2016) Prepare, Predict, Prevent: Creating Objectivity in Infectious Disease Risk Assessment using Big Data Approaches. NEOH Workshop on evaluation of data and information sharing in One Health initiatives, 20-21/04/2016, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
- K.M. McIntyre (2015) Can Big Data save the world? - Examples from epidemiology and public health. Panel member for a public debate at the Battle of Ideas festival, 17/10/2015, the Barbican Centre, London
- B. Häesler, J. Rushton, K.M. McIntyre et al. (2014) An International One Health Network - NEOH (Network for Evaluation of One Health). Second International Symposium on One Health, 20/06/2014, Foresight Centre, UoL
- Predicting the effects of climate change on pathogens: the ENHanCE project - a large scale risk assessment of human and animal pathogens. Workshop: Modelling interactions between climate and livestock pathogen transmission, 22/01/2014, The Pirbright Institute, funded by Macsur
- Quantifying the burden of disease: which pathogens are the most important? North West Zoonoses Group annual conference on Zoonoses in a Changing Socioeconomic Environment, 06/07/2011, UoL
- The ENHanCE project: assessing the scale of climate change’s impact on health. At: UoL workshop supported by the Living with Environmental Change research theme, 21/06/2011, Ness Gardens, UoL
- Links between climate change and emerging infections: a bottom-up approach. MEEGID X conference workshop, 3-5/11/10, Amsterdam, Netherlands
- ENHanCE project: A risk assessment of the impact of climate change on human health and well-being, including potential impact upon animals. Invited keynote speaker at SVA Climate Change: Health and Ecology conference, 1-3/09/2010, Uppsala, Sweden
- A risk assessment of the impact of climate change on human health and well-being. Climate Change, Adaptation and Migration workshop, 24/04/2009, University of Sussex

Quantifying the impacts of infectious diseases from a One Health perspective

Human health and well-being are increasingly affected by global challenges such as malnutrition, emerging and endemic zoonotic diseases, antimicrobial resistance and climate change. A One Health approach has been proposed to tackle the challenges through accepting that their complexity requires interdisciplinarity. Several One Health initiatives have been implemented, such as the establishment of cross-sectoral coordination, communication and data sharing mechanisms, but no standardised methodology exists for quantitative evaluation of One Health activities.Therefore the Network for Evaluation of One Health (NEOH) aims to enable future quantitative evaluations of One Health activities and to further the evidence base by developing and applying a science-based evaluation protocol in a community of experts.

Grants - 2014 Network for Evaluation of One Health (NEOH) - Co-Applicant, budget approx. €400,000 total, funded by European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action

Invited lecture - K.M. McIntyre (2016) Prepare, Predict, Prevent: Creating Objectivity in Infectious Disease Risk Assessment using Big Data Approaches. NEOH Workshop on evaluation of data and information sharing in One Health initiatives, 20-21/04/2016, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

Publications -
1. K.M. McIntyre et al. (In press) Chapter 4: Assessing the Ecological Dimension of One Health. (In press). In: A Handbook for Evaluation of One Health One Health Methods and Metrics (Eds. Rüegg, Häsler and Zinsstag). Wageningen Academic Publishers, Wageningen, Netherlands.
2. M. Aragrande, K. Bardosh, H. Bennani, E. Boriani, M. Bruce, S. Buttigieg, M. Canali, L. Carmo, I. Chantziaras, T. Ehlinger, R. Esposito, L. Falzon, M.E. Filippitzi, C. Frazzoli, T. Hald, B. Häsler, C. Ifejika Speranza, H. Keune, K.M. McIntyre et al. (In press). Chapter 3: A One Health Evaluation Framework. In: A Handbook for Evaluation of One Health One Health Methods and Metrics (Eds. Rüegg, Häsler and Zinsstag). Wageningen Academic Publishers, Wageningen, Netherlands.



Relationships between the gut microbiome, infectious and chronic non-infectious disease and diet in great apes and humans

Continuing reductions in costs of next generation sequencing means that gut microbiome studies are an emerging field in humans and great apes. Research to disentangle relationships between the gut microbiome, gastrointestinal disease, chronic non-infectious disease, diet, demographic and behavioural factors has the potential for large impacts by suggesting mechanisms by which population health linked to infectious and chronic non-infectious drivers of gastrointestinal disease can be improved, and future food supplies understood, as well as aiding efforts towards conservation of endangered species.

A recent publication by the Primate Microbiome Project team (PMP-http://www.primatemicrobiome.org/) has identified links between the primate microbiome and convergence towards the human microbiome with time in captivity, due to an increasingly ‘humanized’ diet (Clayton et al., 2016, 2018). This suggests the impact that diet has on our health; the focus of this research.

Grants
2019 The human gut microbiome as the key link between childhood malnutrition and risk of metabolic disorders in later life in south India - Research Co-Investigator, £42,312 total, funded by MRC Global Health Nutrition Developmental Stage Application
2019 The influence of diet and other drivers upon gut microbiome characteristics and gastrointestinal disease: parallel perspectives across the primate spectrum to aid food security and conservation - Principle Investigator (officially led by Prof. Miren Iturriza-Gomara and Dr. Alistair Darby, with Co-Is Mr. Steve Unwin and Prof. Jonathan Rushton), £9,860, funded by ODA Research Seed Funding, UoL, to hold an international Research Sandpit event



Research Group Membership

Research Grants

Big Data approaches to host-pathogen mapping: EID2 - an open-access, taxonomically- and spatially-referenced database of pathogens and their hosts

BIOTECHNOLOGY & BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COUNCIL (BBSRC)

October 2016 - March 2018

Research Collaborations

Steve Unwin and Jonathan Clayton

Project: Great Apes and the gut microbiome
External: University of Minnisota

Continuing reductions in costs of next generation sequencing means that gut microbiome studies are an emerging field in humans and great apes. Research to disentangle relationships between the gut microbiome, gastrointestinal (GI) disease, chronic non-infectious disease, diet, demographic and behavioural factors has the potential for large impacts by suggesting mechanisms by which population health linked to infectious and chronic non-infectious drivers of GI disease can be improved, as well as aiding efforts towards conservation of endangered species.

A recent publication by the Primate Microbiome Project team (PMP-http://www.primatemicrobiome.org/) has identified links between the primate microbiome and convergence towards the human microbiome with time in captivity, due to an increasingly ‘humanized’ diet (Clayton et al., 2016, 2018). As changes in gut microbiome may explain some GI signs seen in Orangutans, we wish to examine the Orangutan gut microbiome for individuals with dysbiosis using full DNA/RNA shotgun genome sequencing methods to be used upon stool samples.

Dr. Kate Arnold

Project: Understanding of the development of emerging antimicrobial resistance at the interface of the agricultural and natural environments; exploring the availability and quality of open-source information
External: Environment Department, University of York

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global health threat, affecting our ability to treat and control infectious diseases impacting on productivity and livestock loss. AMR has significant implications for public health and guaranteeing future food security. While AMR occurs naturally in bacteria, its prevalence increases with exposure to antibiotics. Most AMR research focuses on isolation and detection of AMR genes and bacteria in hospitals/other clinical settings where greatest usage occurs. Little is known about AMR in rural environments, where the main usage is in farming. Swathes of land are fertilised with manure or sewage sludge, from antibiotic-treated livestock or humans, with further run-off e.g. into water catchments. Using ‘Big Data’ approaches, this project will determine the availability and quality of published evidence describing AMR in the environment, including hosts. This is the first step to fully characterizing environmental AMR, providing a framework to investigate its flow, and why it occurs.

Dr. Barry McMahon

External: University College Dublin

NEOH and various others

Dr. Serge Morand

External: CIRAD

Collaborated on the ENHanCE project