Lunchtime Lecture Series - Cracked it! Tool Use and the Field of Primate Archaeology by Kristian Boote

12:30pm - 1:00pm / Friday 26th July 2019 / Venue: The lecture will take place in the Leggate Lecture Theatre Victoria Gallery & Museum
Type: Lecture / Category: Department / Series: Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology Seminar Series
  • 0151 794 2348
  • Admission: Free for all, booking is required.
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To celebrate the Council for British Archaeology, Festival of Archaeology the Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology are hosting a series of lunchtime lectures. This lecture series offers a chance for the public to learn more about the variety of interesting research projects currently taking place in the Department. With talks from postgraduate students, early career researchers, lecturers and Museum staff the lectures are also a great way for current and prospective students to discover the potential career pathways open to those studying in these fields.

Which pebble works best to crack open a nut? Which stick can pick up the most termites? This session by PhD student Kristian Boote will explore the emerging evidence for extensive tool manufacture, use and culture amongst our closest living relatives, and how they can help us understand our own evolutionary history.