Book Launch: Toussaint Louverture: A Black Jacobin in the Age of Revolutions

12:00pm - 2:00pm / Sunday 1st October 2017
Type: Other / Category: Department / Series: Centre for the Study of International Slavery
  • Suitable for: Anybody interested in the topic, including university staff and students and members of the public.
  • Admission: The event is free and open to all. No registration neccessary. For further information please contact Charles Forsdick: c.forsdick@liverpool.ac.uk
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Come and join the authors, Charles Forsdick and Christian Høgsbjerg to discuss their new book Toussaint Louverture: A Black Jacobin in the Age of Revolutions.

Refreshments will be served.

“In overthrowing me, you have done no more than cut down the trunk of the tree of the black liberty in St. Domingue—it will spring back from the roots, for they are numerous and deep.”

“This exciting new biography of Toussaint Louverture seeks to reclaim him from conservative revisionist interpretations. Inspired by C.L.R. James and informed by the latest research, Forsdick and Hogsbjerg deliver a spirited, nuanced profile of this great revolutionary leader. The book provides a fascinating analysis of the range of reactions to Toussaint, from Wordsworth in 1802 to contemporary comic books and rap.”

Alyssa Sepinwall, California State University San Marcos