Ancient book

Admouit iam bruma foco te, Sabino?: The transformation of the Horatian Sabine farm in Persius’ Satire 6

1:00pm - 2:00pm / Thursday 22nd April 2021
Type: Seminar / Category: Department
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Anthofili Kallergi
(National and Kapodistrian University of Athens)

The aim of this paper is to focus on the motif of the countryside in Roman satire, by examining its evolution from the Horatian Satires and Epistles to the 6th Satire of Persius. In Horace's Satires, and especially in 2.6, the poet’s affection for the Sabine farm is depicted, where it is a locus of simplicity and friendly associations, far away from the curae and stress of urban life. In his Epistles, however, it is transformed into a universal symbol that does not only pertain to the creator’s individual-poetic well-being, but has to do with every person who wants to live happily. The locus of the Sabine farm acquires another dimension in Persius’ 6th Satire. Bassus retreats to Sabine to seek poetic inspiration. He appears trapped in the paths of earlier poetry in Sabine and he cannot attain bliss, an element that Persius seems to achieve in his own way in the port of Luna.

Please email Rachael Cornwell (R.H.Cornwell@liverpool.ac.uk) or Daniel Lowes (D.G.Lowes@liverpool.ac.uk) for the zoom link.