ULMS Electronic Module Catalogue

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title Environmental Economics and Sustainability Policies
Code ECON315
Coordinator Dr V Andreoni
Economics
Valeria.Andreoni@liverpool.ac.uk
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2022-23 Level 6 FHEQ Second Semester 15

Pre-requisites before taking this module (other modules and/or general educational/academic requirements):

ECON223 MACROECONOMICS I; ECON227 MICROECONOMICS FOR BUSINESS ECONOMICS; ECON221 MICROECONOMICS 1 

Modules for which this module is a pre-requisite:

 

Programme(s) (including Year of Study) to which this module is available on a required basis:

 

Programme(s) (including Year of Study) to which this module is available on an optional basis:

 

Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours 24

6

        30
Timetable (if known) 120 mins X 1 totaling 24
 
60 mins X 1 totaling 6
 
         
Private Study 120
TOTAL HOURS 150

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Assessment 2: Final Exam Assessment Type: Written Exam, Unseen, Managed by SAS Duration / Size: 2hrs Weighting: 60% Reassessment Opportunity: Yes Penalty for Late Submission: Standard UoL penalty    60       
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Assessment 1: Critical analysis of a selected key journal article Assessment Type: Coursework Duration / Size: 1,500 words Weighting: 40% Reassessment Opportunity: Yes Penalty for Late Submission    40       

Aims

This module aims to provide students with the ability to analyse real world sustainability issues with a multidisciplinary perspective. The possibility to understand how natural resource constraints are affecting the development opportunities of countries together with the socio-environmental implications of economic activities will allow students to better understand the interrelated relationships existing between the human and the ecological systems. The analysis of the main theory and tools used by ecological and environmental economics will also provide practical skills to be used in the analysis of real-world problems. Given the increasing sustainability debate taking place at international level and considering the rising demand for professionals able to use interdisciplinary perspectives, the module well complements and integrate the critical abilities and tools developed during the previous years of studies.


Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to understand and apply the main theory and tools of ecological and environmental economics.

(LO2) Students will be able to understand and analyse the main socio-economic and environmental issues related natural resource constraints and overexploitation

(LO3) Students will be able to critically reflect on Sustainable Development and related policies

(LO4) Students will be able to critically reflect on the existing debate around sustainability and limits to growth

(S1) Flexible and Adaptable

(S2) A Problem Solver

(S3) Numerate

(S4) Commercially aware

(S5) A team player

(S6) Organised and able to work under pressure

(S7) An excellent verbal and written communicator

(S8) IT Literate

(S9) Internationally aware

(S10) A lifelong learner

(S11) Ethically aware


Teaching and Learning Strategies

Teaching Method 1: Lectures
Scheduled Directed Student Hours: 24 hours
Unscheduled Directed Student Hours:
Description: Face to face lectures
Attendance Recorded: No

Teaching Method 2: Seminars
Scheduled Directed Student Hours: 6
Description: Face-to-face classes discussing solutions to questions students have prepared before class
Attendance Recorded: Yes

Self-Directed Learning Hours: 120
Description: Activities related to In class or on-line activities and discussions including reading and research.

Pre-requisites:
Students must have taken ECON223 and either ECON221 or ECON227.

Skills Mapping:

Skill 1: Flexible and Adaptable
How is this developed: Students are expected to contribute to the seminar activities and discussion. This requires to be flexible and adaptable and to take part to group activities and tasks.
How is this assessed: Seminar activities

Skill 2: A problem solver
How this is d eveloped: Students are expected to critically analyse sustainable development issues and related policies.
How this is assessed: Critical analysis of selected key journal articles and final exam.

Skill 3: Numerate
How is this developed: Students are expected to understand the main tools of ecological and environmental economics.
How is this assessed: Seminar activities.

Skill 4: Commercially aware
How this is developed: Students are expected to understand and analyse the main economic implications related to sustainability issues and natural resource constraints.
How is this assessed: Seminar activities.

Skill 5: A team player
How this is developed: Students are expected to take part to the seminar activities and discussions. This requires working collaboratively with other students and to make good contributions to the seminar tasks.
How this is assessed: Seminar activities.

Skill 6: Organised and able to work under pressure.
How this is developed: Students are expected to complete seminar activities, to prepare critical analysis of selected key journal articles and to submit a final exam by a specific deadline.
How this is assessed: Seminar activities; Critical analysis of selected key journal articles and final exam

Skill 7: An excellent verbal and written communicator
How this is developed: Students are required to prepare and present critical analysis of key journal articles and to prepare a written assignment for the final exam. Students are also expected to engage in debates during the seminar activities.
How this is assessed: Seminar; Critical analysis of selected key journal articles and final exam

Skill 8: IT literate
How this is developed: Students are expected to use IT equipment and online resources during the entire duration of the module
How this is assessed: Seminar activities and individual study

Skill 9: Internationally aware
How this is developed: The module includes some of the most important sustainability issues presently debated at international level. Students are expected to critically analyse the socio-economic and environmental implications and the related policies.
How this is assessed: Critical analysis of selected key journal articles and final exam

Skill 10: A lifelong learner
How this is developed: The module includes elements ranging across socio-economic and environmental topics and require the ability to understand the interconnection existing between them. The real-life examples and the sustainability debates taking place at national and international levels will also be considered.
How this is assessed: Seminar activities; Critical analysis of selected key journal articles and final exam

Skill 11: Ethically aware
How this is developed: The module includes elements ranging across socio-economic and environmental topics and requires the ability to understand the interconnection existing between them. The real-life examples and the sustainability debates taking place at national and international levels will also be considered.
How this is assessed: Seminar activities; Critical analysis of selected key journal articles and final exam


Syllabus

 

The module will include the following key topics:
- Theory and tools of ecological end environmental economics (valuing the environment: concepts and methods; externalities; common and private goods and related socio-environmental problems)
- Natural resource constraints and related problems (e.g., energy; water; land; climate related issues)
- Sustainable development: theoretical approaches, related developments, and policies
- Limits to growth: theoretical approaches and initiatives

The module complements and extend some of the topics previously introduced by other modules, such as externalities, development opportunities of countries, business ethics and sustainability.

Key learning resources will be available to students through the module reading list and the material uploaded on Canvas. Students are expected to read and study the material uploaded on Canvas and they will occasionally be required to supplement the provided resources w ith on-line policy reports and academic papers. Students will also be expected to complete independent reading in preparation of seminar and in-class discussions.


Recommended Texts

Reading lists are managed at readinglists.liverpool.ac.uk. Click here to access the reading lists for this module.