Zoology BSc (Hons)

Key information


life-sciences-4

Module details

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Animal Biodiversity (LIFE112)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    To foster in students an u nderstanding of structure and function of the basic body plan of the major groups of animals;

    To encourage the a ppreciation of the evolutionary origins of the basic body plan of animals;

    To develop an u nderstanding of how the basic body plan of animals has been modified to adapt to different modes of existence and habitats;

    To develop  knowledge and understanding in animal biodiversity, and the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems in zoology.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To identify the structure and function of the basic body plan of the major invertebrate and chordate groups, and the diversity within the groups that has arisen through evolution

    (LO2) To recognize how the basic body plan of animals has been modified to adapt to different modes of existence and habitats

    (LO3) To read and interpret phylogenetic trees

    (S1) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S2) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Biology & Ecology Field Skills (LIFE124)
    Level1
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    This practical module aims to instruct students in:

    A range of ecological skills in field work that will have a wide application to many fields of modern biology;
    The identification of plants and animals, communities and measurement of selected ecological processes;
    Quantitative skills in field ecology and how they can be used to solve fundamental and applied problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Work safely under field conditions

    (LO2) Use identification keys to successfully identify species

    (LO3) Utilise practical approaches to investigating animal behaviour and abundance

    (LO4) Explain influences on the distribution of plants, and implications for nature conservation

    (LO5) Sample communities and describe ecosystem function;

    (LO6) Interpret field data via quantitative/statistical approaches.

    (S1) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S2) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Ecology and the Global Environment (LIFE120)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This module aims to:

    Describe the physical and chemical contexts of the biosphere, the cycling of important elements at different scales, the distribution of biomes and the ecosystem concept;

    Discuss ecological concepts such as succession, niche, food web theory, ecosystem stability and the impact of human activities;

    Explain conservation of biodiversity at a range of scales;

    Develop knowledge and understanding in ecology, and ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:Identify a range of global problems facing mankind that have ecological origins;

    (LO2) Link each of these problems to key ecological concepts;

    (LO3) Recognize how interactions of individuals, populations and communities with the physico-chemical environment contribute to determining species distributions and abundance, and to the flows of energy and nutrients;

    (LO4) Identify the demographic forces underlying the growth and size of populations and the determination of biodiversity.

    (S1) Students will also develop independent learning and self-evaluation skills.

  • Essential Skills for the Life Sciences I (LIFE109)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to:

    Develop in students the essential skills that they will require to be competent life scientists;
    Enhance the employability prospects of students.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Use a range of mathematical and numerical tools to address biological problems

    (LO2) Structure and communicate ideas effectively, both orally and in writing

    (LO3) Manage time, work to deadlines and prioritise workloads

    (LO4) Actively participate in groups but be capable of independent work

    (LO5) Find relevant information and use IT effectively

    (LO6) Address the relevance and ideas of others

    (LO7) Evaluate own performance and working standards

    (S1) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S2) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S3) Information technology (application of) adopting, adapting and using digital devices, applications and services

    (S4) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S5) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S6) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Evolution (LIFE103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to:
    Describe fundamental genetic mechanisms that are essential for the function and evolution of life;

    Introduce students to fundamental evolutionary concepts and theories, showing how genetic mechanisms help determine the patterns of observed evolution;

    Apply evolutionary concepts to a broad selection of areas of Life Sciences;

    Develop in students the knowledge and understanding of the subject and the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems in biology.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Recall how cells evolved

    (LO2) Identify the causes of evolutionary change in populations

    (LO3) Recognize the consequences of evolutionary change for patterns of biological diversity within and amongst populations

    (LO4) Recall fundamental genetic mechanisms (heredity, mutation, meiosis, sex) and show how they influence evolutionary change in populations

    (LO5) Recognize the widespread applicability of evolutionary ideas across the Life Sciences

    (S1) Lifelong learning skills

  • Experimental Skills in Current Biology (LIFE107)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
    Aims

    1.       Introduce students to a range of practical skills and techniques that are of general use in subjects across the Life Sciences; 2.  Demonstrate the relevance of experimental skills across all biological disciplines and explain the importance of observing good laboratory practice 3. Train students how to observe and record experiments, and how to present and analyse data  

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Record procedures and protocols for experiments relating to current biology and generate, evaluate and interpret qualitative and quantitative data

    (LO2) Identify, formulate and test hypotheses in relation to laboratory- based experiments in current biology

    (LO3) Use laboratory equipment correctly and safely according to good laboratory practice and observing Health and Safety rules

    (LO4) Demonstrate a range of laboratory skills when undertaking experiments in current biology

    (S1) Organisational skills

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) Information technology (application of) adopting, adapting and using digital devices, applications and services

    (S4) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

    (S5) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S6) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S7) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

    (S8) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

  • Grand Challenges in Biology (LIFE105)
    Level1
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To encourage students to become aware of the themes that are driving biological research in Liverpool and globally;
    To engage students with their programme of study;
    To excite student interest in their subject and the way it relates to the challenges that face us all;
    To foster the development of study skills that will equip students to investigate research topics and communicate their findings and views on them.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To identify the grand challenges that face biological scientists

    (LO2) To put into context the advances that science makes possible and the ethical issues associated with meeting the Grand Challenges

    (LO3) To evaluate different approaches to the resolution of scientific questions

    (LO4) To conduct an independent piece of research and report their findings to their peers

    (S1) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S2) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

    (S3) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S4) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S5) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

    (S6) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

  • Molecules and Cells (LIFE101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    After successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

    Recognise the basic of structure, composition and function of cells;

    Explain core concepts relating to the organisation and specialisation of eukaryotes, prokaryotes and viruses;

    Define the cellular components involved in the regulation of key functions such as the generation of energy, movement, cell growth and division and differentiation;

    Describe the latest techniques that are used in cell biology to determine cell structure and function;

    Develop in students the knowledge and understanding of the subject and the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

    Describe how cells arose and their structural features;

    (LO2) Compare and contrast eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells;

    (LO3) Identify the different ways cells manipulate energy;

    (LO4) Define the molecular basis of the processes by which cells grow, replicate, communicate, interact with their environment, move and die;

    (LO5) Describe the functional importance of cell specialisation and cooperation in tissues.

    (S1) Skills in using technology - Information accessing

Year One Optional Modules

  • Developmental Biology: Embryology and Mechanisms of Development (LIFE114)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This module aims to:

    Describe the processes that regulate development and the general properties of stem cells;

    Explain the mechanisms of germ line development and early development from fertilisation to gastrulation;

    Provide students with an understanding of how the major organ systems of the body form;

    Highlight the experimental evidence underpinning this knowledge;

    Develop knowledge and understanding in human biology, and ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Explain the fundamental mechanisms that regulate development;

    (LO2) Describe the general properties of stem cells and their role in development;

    (LO3) Explain the developmental processes that form the three layered embryo and the experimental evidence that underpins our understanding;

    (LO4) Describe the formation of the main organs of the body from the ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm;

    (LO5) Explain the basic mechanisms that regulate the development of the major organ systems and the experimental models used to investigate these mechanisms.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

  • Introduction to Animal Husbandry (LIFE118)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This module aims to develop knowledge and understanding of:

    The present day structure of the agriculture industry including topics such as seasonality of production of the various domesticated animal species, the breeds used and which management  strategies are employed;

    The role of various crops and crop by-products as food sources; their evaluation as suitable foods for animals; how the nutritional requirements of animals are met;  and how to assess and formulate rations to prevent poor performance, metabolic disease and toxicities.

    Introductory theory of practical animal breeding; and to apply, evaluate and interpret problems in veterinary animal husbandry.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Describe the role of the agricultural industry in the UK and to explain the seasonality of the production cycle and the interaction between crop and animal production and to identify the industries that pertain to a variety of farm and companion animal species.

    (LO2) Demonstrate how to assess and formulate nutritional rations and describe the causes of metabolic conditions and toxicities;

    (LO3) Define how animals grow, develop and breed, and the factors that influence these processes, such as inherited diseases;

    (LO4) Explain an animal's responses to changes in the climatic environment and how these influence efficiency and productivity outcomes.

    (S1) Teamwork

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Organisational skills

    (S4) Communication skills

    (S5) Ethical awareness

  • Marine Ecosystems: Diversity, Processes and Threats (ENVS122)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    This module aims to introduce students to the diversity of ecosystem types in the marine environment and the various threats that they face.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire knowledge and understanding of representative key ecosystems found in the marine environment.

    (LO2) Be familiar with the marine organisms that live in representative key marine ecosystems.

    (LO3) Acquire a basic knowledge of fundamental ecological principles, transferable to later marine and non-marine modules.

    (LO4) Be aware of the threats that humans may pose to marine ecosystems.

    (LO5) Appreciate how humans assess and may mitigate detrimental impacts to the environment.

    (LO6) Be introduced to the importance to their future studies of critical reading of scientific literature.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Advanced Experimental Design and Analysis (LIFE238)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    Raise students’ competence and confidence in formulating and testing hypotheses and choosing the appropriate statistical analyses;

    Improve student abilities in analysing and interpreting experimental data;

    Improve student abilities in the design and execution of scientific experiments

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Design experiments to answer specific questions/test hypotheses;

    (LO2) Design the statistical analysis of a given set of data, associated with a specific question/hypothesis;

    (LO3) Recognise the breadth of statistical tools available;

    (LO4) Execute experiments to investigate a specific question;

    (LO5) Analyse data, interpret validity and apply statistical analyses.

    (LO6) Understand the principles of statistical analysis using multiple explanatory variables

    (S1) Students will also develop independent learning, teamworking, and self-evaluation skills.

  • Advanced Techniques in Zoology (LIFE230)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To provide students with practical experience of a number of techniques used in zoology;

    To develop students’ ability to plan and execute experiments and to use appropriate controls;

    To develop knowledge and understanding in zoology, and ability to apply, evaluate, and interpret this knowledge to solve zoological problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To present, critically evaluate, and interpret qualitative and quantitative zoological data, and record procedures and protocols;

    (LO2) To plan and execute a series of experiments employing techniques used in zoology, use laboratory equipment correctly and safely to generate data;

    (LO3) To analyse data, interpret validity, and apply statistical analyses.

    (S1) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts, eg measuring, weighing, estimating, and applying formulae;

    (S2) Problem solving, critical thinking, and creativity: analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions;

    (S3) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others.

  • Animal Behaviour (LIFE211)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Introduce students to the fundamental evolutionary principles that explain a wide range of animal behaviours

    Develop in students and understanding of the evolution of co-operative societies, as well as conflict and conflict resolution

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Apply the principles of behavioural ecology to explain human behaviour

    (LO2) Analyse and interpret examples of behavioural data

    (LO3) Apply fundamental evolutionary principles to explain a wide range of animal behaviours

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

  • Biodiversity Practical Skills (LIFE233)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop in students the ability to acquire, present, critically evaluate and interpret qualitative and quantitative data related to biological specimens ;  To develop in students practical skills and the ability to accurately record procedures and protocols ;  To  provide students with the opportunity to execute a series of experiments, and to use laboratory and field equipment correctly and safely to generate data.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) map taxonomic and evolutionary relationships in order to understand large scale evolutionary processes.

    (LO2) conduct field sampling of plants and invertebrates in order to measure biodiversity and describe a range of habitats.

    (LO3) use keys for taxonomy in order to measure biodiversity. 

    (LO4) dissect and observe the morphology of specific organ systems in order to compare physiologies.

    (LO5) utilise basic Geographic Information Systems in order to map habitats spatially.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Adaptability

    (S3) IT skills

    (S4) Teamwork

    (S5) Organisational skills

    (S6) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S7) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

  • Comparative Animal Physiology (LIFE212)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    To introduce students to the physiological problems encountered by animals in their natural environments;

    To encourage students to relate lifestyle and physiology to habitat and to potentially hostile environments;

    To explain how increasing complexity of bodily organisation can lead to greater levels of bodily homeostasis;

    To develop in students an understanding of physiological mechanisms at all levels of organisation, in relation to energetics, temperature, respiration, osmoregulation, and nitrogen excretion. 

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To apply the general principles underlying physiological adaptation

    (LO2) To analyze relationships between animal lifestyle, increasing complexity of bodily organisation and ability to maintain homeostasis

    (LO3) To identify the physiological mechanisms operating at all levels of organisation in relation to the control of temperature, oxygen, osmoregulation, energetics, and nitrogen excretion

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S2) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

  • Essential Skills for the Life Sciences 2 (LIFE223)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
    Aims

    Enhance the development of the essential life science skills that students will require to improve their study skills;

    Enable students to analyse and interpret scientific data and communicate results;

    Enhance the employability prospects of students and career awareness.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Use a range of mathematical and numerical skills relevant to all biologists to summarise and interpret real-world data using graphs and tables.

    (LO2) Develop and test hypotheses within the context of experimental design and within a range of biological fields, select appropriate quantitative methods to answer questions;

    (LO3) To develop programming skills relevant for statistical analysis and apply appropriate statistical and other analysis packages to analyse data;

    (LO4) Recognise the moral and ethical issues of scientific investigations and discuss ethical standards and professional codes of conduct. 

    (LRE1) Structure and communicate ideas effectively, both orally and in writing;

    (LRE2) Discuss and appropriately use relevant literature

    (LRE3) Time management

    (S1) Communication, listening and questioning and respecting others by contributing to discussions.

    (S2) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

    (S3) Independent working and readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning.

    (S4) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Evolutionary Biology (LIFE213)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This modules aims to:

    Provide students with a modern framework for understanding how organisms evolve and the major transitions in evolution;

    Explain where heritable phenotypic variation comes from, how it shapes the evolutionary process within species (microevolution) and el ucidate the link between micro- and macro-evolution;

    Describe the factors influencing the genetic constitution of a population;

    Explain how evolution and ecology are linked OR explain how gene sequence data can be used to study evolutionary processes;

    Equip students with knowledge and understanding in evolutionary biology, and the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve biological problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Discuss the origins of heritable phenotypic variation;

    (LO2) Describe the main factors that cause changes in the genetic constitution of populations including the basic principles of studying molecular evolution; 

    (LO3) Explain the difference between microevolution and macroevolution and how the two processes are linked;

    (LO4) Explain patterns of biodiversity from an evolutionary perspective;

    (LO5) Describe the major evolutionary transitions;

    (LO6) Explain how ecology influences evolution and evolution influences ecology (Elective option 1) OR Explain the basic principles of studying molecular evolution and interpret genetic sequence data (Elective option 2);

    (LO7) Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the principles of evolutionary biology, and how this knowledge has been applied to solve problems.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

  • Population and Community Ecology (LIFE214)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    Introduce students to the concepts and principles underlying the dynamic interactions between species within communities and populations; Describe examples taken from across the globe that illustrate the importance of population ecology, pressures on fish stocks, and use of natural predators for biological control processes Describe how mutualistic interactions benefit communities, such as coral reefs and leguminous plants; Explore how knowledge and understanding of species- and community- interactions can help to develop plans for ecological restoration; Develop students’ ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge and understanding to solve problems in zoology.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Analyze the demographic forces acting on populations of single and multiple interacting species, and their consequences;

    (LO2) Explain the development of community patterns in time (succession) and in space;

    (LO3) Explain the relationships between structure and function operating at the level of the ecological community;

    (LO4) Interpret biological patterns in terms of their dynamics and underlying processes.

    (S1) Numeracy

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

Year Two Optional Modules

  • Advanced Animal Husbandry (LIFE217)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to develop in students:  
    The ability to integrate knowledge of nutrition, reproduction, genetics and breeding, behaviour and welfare of domesticated animals, with an assessment of the environment;

    Knowledge and understanding of the feeding, housing, breeding and general management of several major species that are important in the animal industries;

    The ability to transfer knowledge and general principles between species, to develop a deep understanding of animal husbandry;

    The ability to apply knowledge and understanding in bioveterinary science and evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems in veterinary science.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of this module, the students should be able to: Describe the nutrition, reproduction, genetics and breeding, behaviour and welfare of a range of domesticated animals.

    (LO2) Integrate the aspects of animal welfare in learning outcome 1 with environmental assessment.

    (LO3) Discuss issues such as feeding, housing, breeding and management of animals of economic importance.

    (LO4) Demonstrate how information on animal husbandry of one species can be applied to other species.

    (LO5) Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the principles of animal husbandry, and how this knowledge has been applied to solve problems in veterinary science.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Teamwork

    (S3) Communication skills

  • Advanced Genetics Techniques (LIFE226)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    Provide students with a practical training that will help them to carry out projects in genetics;

    Train students in the production and characterisation of specific deletion mutants, mutagen screening, cytogenetics and karyotype analysis, population studies, molecular analysis of genomes and bioinformatics;

    Develop knowledge and understanding in genetics and the ability to apply, evaluate, and interpret this knowledge to solve problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Present, critically evaluate, and interpret qualitative and quantitative data, and record procedures and protocols;

    (LO2) Work individually and as part of a team, manage time effectively, and use laboratory equipment correctly and safely to generate data;

    (LO3) Plan and execute a series of experiments to produce and characterise deletion mutants, screen mutagens, analyse karotypes, carry out population studies and molecular analysis of genomes, and interrogate bioinformatic databases;

    (LO4) Analyse data, interpret validity and apply statistical analyses.

    (S1) Students will also develop independent learning, teamworking and self-evaluation skills

    (S2) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

  • E-biology: Informatics for Life Sciences (LIFE225)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting99:0
    Aims

    Provide students with a practical appreciation of the nature and significance of digital data;

    Expose students to bioinformatics tools used in the analysis of data from areas such as genome sequencing, gene expression, and protein structure studies;

    Enable students to utilize digital data for understanding higher order phenomena within cells such as metabolism, gene regulation, and protein-protein interaction;

    Develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the subject and the ability to apply, evaluate, and interpret this knowledge to solve problems in biotechnology, biomedicine, and molecular cell biology.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Apply informatics tools in the discovery, evaluation, and acquisition of biological data;

    (LO2) Analyse and evaluate datasets of broad biological relevance, using tasks and workflows that will prepare them for third-year projects;

    (LO3) Use local and web-based tools for data analysis, management and collaborative working; 

    (LO4) Design research methods in bioinformatics to solve biological problems.

    (S1) Digital scholarship participating in emerging academic, professional, and research practices that depend on digital systems;

    (S2) Information technology (application of) adopting, adapting and using digital devices, applications, and services;

    (S3) Problem solving, critical thinking, creativity; analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • E-biology: Informatics for Life Sciences (s2) (LIFE242)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting99:0
    Aims

    Provide students with a practical appreciation of the nature and significance of digital data;

    Expose students to bioinformatics tools used in the analysis of data from areas such as genome sequencing, gene expression, and protein structure studies;

    Enable students to utilize digital data for understanding higher order phenomena within cells such as metabolism, gene regulation, and protein-protein interaction;

    Develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the subject and the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems in biotechnology, biomedicine, and molecular cell biology.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Apply informatics tools in the discovery, evaluation and acquisition of biological data.;

    (LO2) Analyse and evaluate datasets of broad biological relevance, using tasks and workflows that will prepare them for third-year projects.;

    (LO3) Use local and web-based tools for data analysis, management and collaborative working;

    (LO4) Design research methods in bioinformatics to solve biological problems.

    (S1) Digital scholarship participating in emerging academic, professional and research practices that depend on digital systems;

    (S2) Information technology (application of) adopting, adapting and using digital devices, applications, and services;

    (S3) Problem solving, critical thinking, creativity; analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Endocrine and Neuro-physiology (LIFE204)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    Explain the essential background knowledge to understand basic neuroscience;

    Describe the basic principles of operation of nervous system, systematic and sensory neurophysiology, excitotoxicity and behaviour;

    Provide an understanding of physiological homeostatic regulatory mechanisms, with particular regard to the endocrine and digestive systems;
    Develop knowledge and understanding in physiology, and ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve physiological problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the principles of physiology, and how this knowledge has been applied to solve physiological problems.

    (LO2) Demonstrate specific knowledge and critical understanding of physiological functions of the digestive tract and major endocrine glands and apply this to understand the interaction between the digestive, endocrine and nervous system;

    (LO3) Apply the above knowledge to the operation of some of these systems, through all the stages from transduction of a stimulus to conscious perception, the regulatory mechanisms employed by them, their importance in maintaining homeostasis and the consequences of malfunction;

    (LO4) Describe the basic principles of the nervous system, systematic and sensory neurophysiology, excitotoxicity and behaviour; and the characteristics of nerve cells that allow them facilitate the reception, processing and transmission of information;

    (S1) Students will also develop independent learning and self-evaluation skills

  • Molecular and Medical Genetics (LIFE208)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    This module aims to:

    Introduce students with an interest in genetics and molecular biology to the range of biological mechanisms that control the structure and stability of the genetic material;

    Describe how changes in the structure and stability of DNA can impact on health and disease;

    Use examples from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes to develop principles that help explain problems associated with medical/clinical genetics;

    Develop knowledge and understanding in genetics and molecular biology, and ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of this module, the students should be able to: Describe the principles of DNA replication, DNA damage and mutation, DNA repair, DNA recombination, genetic transfer systems and transposition, cell cycle control and cell division, genetic mapping and cytogenetics;

    (LO2) Explain how these processes underpin an understanding of the genetic basis of human health and disease;

    (LO3) Demonstrate that they can solve problems by applying the above knowledge to identify genes underlying disease and the likely causes of DNA mutations;

    (LO4) Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the principles of genetics and molecular biology, and how this knowledge has been applied to solve problems.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Record-keeping

  • Techniques in Cell Biology (LIFE227)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    1. Provide students with practical training in the use of equipment and techniques routinely used in cell biology.

    2. Enhance students acquisition of fundamental research skills; including, information gathering, scientific drawing, report writing and statistical analyses.

    3. Provide students with an understanding of the processes involved in the collection, interpretation and presentation of biological data.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Present, evaluate and interpret qualitative and quantitative data, and record procedures and protocols;

    (LO2) Manage time effectively to plan and execute a series of experiments

    (LO3) Use microscopes and other lab equipment correctly to efficiently andsafely conduct a series of experiments

    (LO4) Analyse data, interpret validity and apply statistical analyses;

    (LO5) Apply the principles of biotechnology, biomedicine and molecular cell biology  to practical experiments. 

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S2) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

  • The Immune System in Health and Disease (LIFE221)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to:

    Develop  students knowledge of the immune system and its role in protection against disease;

    Develop in students an appreciation of the importance of different immune mechanisms in different circumstances, and how these can be evaded;

    Enable students to evaluate and appreciate the consequences of immune system dysfunctions in disease.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Identify the main components of the mammalian immune system

    (LO2) Assess the contribution of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms to host defences

    (LO3) Assess the mechanisms that permit recognition of an infinitely diverse microflora

    (LO4) Discuss the impact of malfunction of immune processes on human health, and explain the bases of autoimmunity and allergy together with the mechanisms by which these can be minimised

    (LO5) Discuss how dysfunction of immune system constituents can cause disease

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Organisational skills

  • The Multicellular Organism: Tissues, Development, Regeneration and Aging (LIFE205)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    Extend students' knowledge of the structure and function of fundamental tissues, such as epithelial and connective tissue and of specialised tissues;

    Develop students' ability to discuss the mechanisms by which cells differentiate to form different tissues;

    Equip students to explain the processes that occur during ageing with special reference to changes in key tissues such as the brain;

    Develop knowledge and understanding in human biology, and ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems in that subject.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Describe the experimental basis underpinning the current understanding of tissue biology.

    (LO2) Explain and discuss mechanisms of ageing using selected systems as exemplars.

    (LO3) Discuss the cellular structure and organisation of different organs, and compare and contrast the molecular mechanisms involved in development and regeneration of these organs

    (LO4) Classify and compare the major types of epithelia and, explain the role of cell-cell interactions in tissue structure and the structure and function of fundamental tissues

    (S1) Students will also develop independent learning and self-evaluation skills

  • Tropical Ecology Field Course (LIFE222)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to:

    Introduce students to the ecology of tropical ecosystems and the field techniques used to study them, through staff-led field visits, seminars and student executed field studies;

    Train students in how to design, execute and present research projects conducted in the field;

    Allow students to e xplore interactions between humans and tropical ecosystems, with sustainable development, effects of forestry and human wildlife conflict and eco-tourism being addressed;

    Develop in students knowledge and understanding in tropical ecology, and the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve ecological problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of this module, the students should be able to: Explain the origin and maintenance of tropical forest ecosystems and processes influencing biodiversity and ecosystem dynamics in tropical habitats;

    (LO2) Identify the basic groups of tropical taxa, with emphasis on insects, mammals, birds, reptiles and plants and  the natural history of important plant and animal taxa;

    (LO3) Appraise conceptual issues underlying current research programmes in tropical environments including issues of human impact, conservation biology and sustainable use of tropical forests;

    (LO4) Collate, analyze and interpret field data;

    (LO5) Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the principles of ecology, and how this knowledge has been applied to solve ecological problems.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

  • Veterinary Form and Function (LIFE215)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to:

    Provide students with an understanding of the functional anatomy of the dog, and enable them to apply this knowledge to compare the anatomy and physiology with that of other species of veterinary interest;

    Enable students to apply knowledge of normal functional anatomy to understand how disruption of these systems can result in disease.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Describe and identify the development, structure and function of the major body systems in the dog, to include; reproductive/endocrine, nervous, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular/respiratory and digestive/excretory.

    (LO2) Compare and contrast the structure and function of these systems (where appropriate) with those in the major species of veterinary interest.

    (LO3) Explain relationships between gross anatomy, microanatomy (cell and tissue structure) and physiological function in the major body systems.

    (LO4) Explain and recognise how disruption of these systems might result in disease

    (S1) Students will also develop independent learning and self-evaluation skills

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Veterinary Parasitology and Public Health (LIFE216)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This module aims to:

    Describe the major parasitic diseases of companion and food producing animals and related parasites that impact on global human health;

    Outline control methods for parasitic infections;

    Develop knowledge and understanding in molecular and cellular biology, ecology and epidemiology relevant to parasitism, and the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:1.    Describe the diversity, life history, diagnosis and control of economically-important parasites of animals, and those human parasites of global importance;

    (LO2) 2.    Define fundamental concepts in parasitology, such as host-parasite interaction, life cycle, virulence, as well as the consequences of parasitism;

    (LO3) 3.    Evaluate the relative importance and the nature of different threats of parasitic infection in terms of pathogenicity and impact on socio-economics;

    (LO4) 4.    Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the principles of veterinary parasitology and public health, and how this knowledge has been applied to solve problems.

    (S1) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S2) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S3) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

    (S4) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

Year Three Compulsory Modules

  • Advanced Skills in Zoology (LIFE331)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to develop tranferable skills in critical thinking, interpretation of data and science communication in the context of zoology

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To analyse real-world data and present the results clearly and concisely in a poster.

    (LO2) To access and critically evaluate scientific literature in the area of zoology

    (LO3) To communicate, in writing, scientific facts and data to both expert and lay audiences

    (LO4) To synthesise information on current technologies and topical issues within zoology

    (S1) Scientific communication

    (S2) Group working

    (S3) Digital fluency

    (S4) Critical Thinking

  • Research Project (LIFE363)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with an insight into and experience of the process of scientific research and debate;

    To develop in students the confidence to work independently and with others, to effectively and efficiently achieve a scientific aim;

    To further develop students' ability to communicate scientific concepts and findings in a variety of formats.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To plan and execute a piece of scientific research, in a responsible, safe and ethical manner

    (LO2) To analyse and critically evaluate data, information, literature and observations, and draw valid conclusions

    (LO3) To appropriately communicate findings, in a variety of formats (oral, written reports) to supervisor, research staff and peers

    (LO4) To maintain a clear and accurate record of work and progress

    (LO5) To critically evaluate and report upon relevant scientific literature

    (LO6) To evaluate own performance and working standards by reflection, and place work in a wider scientific context

    (LO7) FASQ Statement below
    “Students will be informed that, in exceptional circumstances (e.g. global pandemics), plans for teaching may be subject to change. Contact will be made via the VLE and an e-mail will be sent to each of the students informing them of any changes that prove to be necessary. The Health and Life Sciences FAQSC will be informed in advance of any such changes, so that approval can be given.”

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Organisational skills

    (S4) Communication skills

    (S5) IT skills

    (S6) Lifelong learning skills

    (S7) Ethical awareness

  • Zoology Field Course (LIFE333)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop students’ proficiency in a range of field techniques, as well as team-working skills such as coordinating responsibility for collecting data using diverse techniques and sampling protocols To develop an understanding of the types of data that can be collected, sampling protocols and how to perform appropriate statistical analyses To d evelop the skills necessary to synthesise information and present scientific information in the form of both an oral presentation and a written report

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To maintain a clearly-presented field notebook that documents all field course activities

    (LO2) To critically evaluate different strategies for the in-situ and ex-situ conservation of animal species

    (LO3) To design a field-based sampling programme to obtain behavioural and/or ecological data, in a responsible, safe and ethical manner

    (LO4) To analyse data arising from field observations or experiments, using appropriate statistical and presentational methods

    (LO5) To communicate and appraise aspects of field site visits and field research projects

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Teamwork

    (S4) Communication skills

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Advanced Topics in Ecology (LIFE337)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To describe modern approaches to long standing ecological issues;

    To introduce current research in the expanding areas of ecology;

    To develop students' knowledge and deep understanding in key areas of ecology and an ability to apply, critically evaluate, and interpret this knowledge to solve complex ecological problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To assess how a range of biotic and abiotic processes can act, and interact, to drive ecological dynamics and the structure and assembly of communities

    (LO2) To evaluate predictions associated with relationships between organisms and their environment at a range of spatial and trophic scales

    (LO3) To explain how current key concepts can be used to understand, and manage, ecosystems

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

    (S2) Students will develop skills in participating in group discussions to reach consensus and/or recognise where ambiguities exist in conclusions associated with addressing issues.

  • Conservation Biology (LIFE326)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To develop in students the ability to explore current thinking and research in conservation biology;

    To develop in students knowledge and understanding about patterns of biodiversity and to enable them to critically evaluate the evidence supporting alternative explanations for the extinctions or demise of many animal and some plant species;

    To develop in students knowledge and deep understanding in conservation biology, and ability to apply, critically evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve complex problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To construct justified arguments for the value of conserving biodiversity

    (LO2) To evaluate the human activities that affect biodiversity and describe how they act individually and in combination to affect individuals, populations and ecosystems

    (LO3) To evaluate, using case studies, the pros and cons of a wide range of conservation interventions, from international legal instruments to local habitat management

    (LO4) To analyze where conservation questions can be answered with scientific evidence, and where socio-economic and other types of information are more important

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) Ethical awareness

  • Current Skills and Topics in Evolutionary Biology (LIFE324)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To develop in students the skills to construct phylogenetic trees and to use them to infer the evolutionary origins of novel traits, using the latest software packages;

    To encourage students to explore key concepts in contemporary evolutionary biology;

    To develop in students knowledge and deep understanding in selected areas of evolutionary biology, providing opportunities for students to apply, critically evaluate and interpret evolutionary knowledge and ideas.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To construct, graphically display and critically evaluate phylogenetic trees from phenotypic characters and DNA sequences

    (LO2) To use phylogenetic trees to generate and test hypotheses about the evolutionary history of selected traits, and detect molecular signatures of selection within nucleotide or amino acid sequence

    (LO3) To critically evaluate theoretical frameworks and empirical evidence relating to a selection of current research themes in evolutionary biology

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) IT skills

    (S3) Communication skills

  • Current Topics in Animal Behaviour (LIFE322)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    To develop in students an understanding of the use of evolutionary theory to understand animal behaviour;

    To develop in students the ability to apply, critically evaluate and interpret this knowledge and understanding, to solve complex problems in the study of behaviour;

    To develop in students an understanding how predictive modelling, experimental, and observational approaches integrate to explain animal behaviour.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To evaluate the use of the adaptationist approach in studying behaviour

    (LO2) To critically appraise factors affecting the evolution of reproductive behaviour and the evolution of altruism and cooperation

    (LO3) To assess comparative approaches in the study of animal cognition and critically evaluate why cognitive processes of animals might not be, and often are not, analogous to human cognitive processes

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Communication skills

  • Integrative Comparative Animal Physiology (LIFE339)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Develop students’ understanding of the physiological mechanisms that underpin animal adaptations to environmental conditions;

    Develop students’ ability to solve complex physiological problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Evaluate integrative physiological mechanisms enabling animals to survive in potentially hostile environmental conditions

    (LO2) Critically discuss the evolution of air-breathing, terrestriality and endothermy in vertebrates

    (LO3) Critically review evidence to solve complex problems within the context of animal physiology

    (S1) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S2) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S3) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Life Sciences Work Based Placement (LIFE399)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To give students an opportunity to develop their skills during a placement at a commercial, research, voluntary, or similar organisation, reflect on their experiences and progress during the placement,and engage with relevant theory and research in the area of occupational psychology.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Critically reflect on the development of employability skills.

    (LO2) Appraise current work placement practice in relation to both employer and employee outcomes.

    (LO3) Designand justify work placement recommendations with reference to relevant theoryand research and student placement experience.

    (S1) Critical thinking and Problem solving skills

    (S2) Communication (written and oral)

    (S3) Interpersonal (self-management and teamworking) skills

    (S4) Effectiveness

    (S5) Organisational skills

    (S6) Digital literacy (use of VLOG, online reflective log)

    (S7) Technical skills (associated to the placement work)

Programme Year Four

Students can transfer into the C900 (MBiolSci) programme to complete a four-year integrated master’s (subject to performance). This offers 6-week internships and one-year placement opportunities in the UK or abroad (subject to availability).

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

You will experience a range of learning environments during your studies at Liverpool. These will include student-centred activities as well as lectures, tutorials, laboratory practicals, dissection classes, fieldwork, data handling sessions and computer workshops. Some of these activities will be performed individually, such as personal research projects, and others in small tutorial or project groups, in addition to formal lectures and workshops. You will have research staff as well as your own academic adviser for individual tuition on our acclaimed tutorial programme.


Assessment

As well as factual knowledge and understanding, biologists need practical and organisational skills, and an ability to work both alone and with other people. We record development of these abilities through continuous assessment during each semester and by final examination.