Psychology BSc (Hons) Add to your prospectus

  • Offers study abroad opportunities Offers study abroad opportunities
  • Opportunity to study for a year in China Offers a Year in China
  • This degree is accreditedAccredited

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: C800
  • Year of entry: 2019
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB / IB : 33 /
psychology-4

Module details

Programme Year One

Students take six modules that provide an introduction to the principal topic areas and basic methods of research in Psychology. You will be required to pass all modules (120 CAT points) to progress into Year Two. The curriculum is delivered in a range of formats and supported by online resources through the University’s virtual interactive teaching environment (VITAL). In addition to lectures there are also class based practical sessions and other types of small group work. From the beginning of Year One a member of the academic staff is appointed as the students’ Academic Advisor. You will have regular meetings with them during term time covering general skills along with academic topics linked to the curriculum and postgraduate careers. In Year One you will have your first opportunity to begin developing a specialist portfolio.

Psychology modules on offer include: Social Psychology and Individual Differences; Developmental Psychology; Cognitive Psychology; Biological Psychology; Research Methods and Statistics.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Developmental Psychology (PSYC130)
    Level1
    Credit level22.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    ​Build students’ critical understanding of the psychological concepts, theories, and methods that are relevant to the study of developmental psychology. 

    Provide students with an understanding of the range and relative merits of research conducted in developmental psychology and its relevance for real world issues.

    Enable students to demonstrate their ability to produce a written summary and evaluation of an area of research in developmental psychology

    Learning Outcomes

    ​Explain foundational theory and research evidence relating to cognitive, social and emotional development in childhood.

    Summarise key developmental theory and research findings.

    ​Discuss key controversies in the study of human development

  • Brain and Cognition (PSYC131)
    Level1
    Credit level22.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    1. To give students an overview of important topics in cognitive psychology.

    2. To identify how evidence from behavioural, neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies with healthy  individuals  and neurological or psychiatric patients can be combined to advance our understanding of the workings of the mind and its neuronal substrates. 

    3. To illustrate ​how research in different areas of cognition and cognitive neuroscience is conducted.​

    Learning Outcomes

    ​Explain theories and empirical findings in different areas of cognitive psychology.  

    ​Discuss the difficulties often experienced in cognitive psychology in achieving a theoretical consensus about the interpretation of empirical data. 

    ​Examine the different methodologies used in cognitive psychology and discuss methodological issues relating to research conducted in a particular area of cognition.

  • Social Psychology and Individual Differences (PSYC132)
    Level1
    Credit level22.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
    • Provide a general introduction to research and theory in the domains of social psychology and individual differences. 
    • Support critical interpretation of empirical findings in the area of social psychology and individual differences.
    • Demonstrate the application of psychology in ''''real world'''' settings.
    Learning Outcomes

    ​Describe important research in the relevant fields of individual differences and social psychology.

    Analyse key debates in social psychology and individualdifferences.  ​

    Evaluate theoretical models and concepts in individual differences and social psychology

    ​Apply appropriate research methods to the study of social psychology and individual differences. 

  • Biological Psychology (PSYC133)
    Level1
    Credit level22.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    ​Introduce the basic concepts and principles associated with the neural underpinnings of human behaviour

    Apply the research strategies and methods of investigation in Biological Psychology

    Demonstrate the relationship between biological processes and behaviour

    Learning Outcomes

    Define and discuss the basic structure and function of the human nervous system.

    ​Define and discuss the basic concepts of cell anatomy, neural transmission, and endocrine signalling.

    ​Explain how brain structure and function affects psychological function.

    ​Discuss the brain mechanisms involved in a range of goal directed behaviours, such as sleep, eating, and aggression.

  • Research Methods and Statistics 1 (PSYC134)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    • ​Introduce the basic theoretical issues involved in designing and analysing empirical investigations in psychology. 
    • Support students to explore and analyse data using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software.
    • Enable students to present in written form the results of statistical analyses in accordance with the American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines.​​
    • Introduce students to the concept of replication and reproducibility when critiquing results.
    Learning Outcomes

    Describe basic empirical design and theappropriate application of these methods.​

    Distinguish between different types of data and theappropriate methods for analysing and reporting them.

    Explain null hypothesis significance testing and carry out basic probabilistic analysis of data in SPSS.


    ​Explain hypotheses and choose an appropriate experimental design to test them.

  • Research Methods and Statistics 2 (PSYC135)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    ​Introduce students to more complex quantitative data analysis using SPSS

    Introduce students to basic qualitative data collection and analysis. 

    Introduce students  to reporting data analysis in accordance with American Psychological Association guidelines. 

    Develop student''s skills in replication and reproducibility.

    Promote understanding of ethical research issues.

    Learning Outcomes

    ​Describe basic qualitative analysis techniques and report them in an internationally accepted format.

    ​Recognise the most approproate statistical test in the context of specific research methods and data types.

    ​Produce a coherent research project report including the analysis of quantitative data.

    ​Reflect and evaluate the ethical and methodological issues influencing the practice of psychological research.

Programme Year Two

Students undertake four modules that expand extent and depth of coverage in core topics of Psychology (eg. Biological Psychology, Behavioural Neuroscience, Developmental, etc). All modules must be passed in order to progress to Year Three and assessments contribute 30% to the overall degree classification. The majority of modules are compulsory to ensure the students achieve the basic curriculum necessary for accreditation by the British Psychological Society.

There are also a further two modules (15 CATS points each) which are focused upon developing the students’ research skills to complete the training in psychological methods necessary for the third year research project. These modules include a small group project under the supervision of the Academic Advisor. During year two students also have the opportunity to apply for ‘internships’ within some of the Faculty’s research laboratories.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Lifespan Development, Health and Wellbeing (PSYC230)
    Level2
    Credit level22.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    ​Introduce students to key lifespan transitions and their impact on health and wellbeing across the adult life course. 

    Enable students to apply theory relating to adult lifespan, health and wellbeing to real-world issues, problems and contexts. 

    Enable students to examine the research strategies and methods of investigation used in the areas of adult lifespan, health and wellbeing. 

    Learning Outcomes

    Appraise key theory and research evidence relating to the impact of major lifespan transitions on health and wellbeing across the adult life course. 

    Prepare a qualitative report examining the impact of a key adult lifespan transition on health and wellbeing.

    Discuss the personal and socio-cultural relevance of theory relating to adult lifespan transitions, health and wellbeing. 
  • Cognition and Cognitive Neuroscience (PSYC231)
    Level2
    Credit level22.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    1. Provide students with a more detailed overview of important topics in the areas of perception, memory, emotion, language and reasoning via lectures and research seminars.

    2. Illustrate how evidence from behavioural, neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies with healthy individuals and neurological or psychiatric patients can be combined to advance our understanding of the workings of the mind and its neuronal substrates. 

    3. Illustrate ​how research in different areas of cognition and cognitive neuroscience is conducted.

    Learning Outcomes

    Critically discuss important themes and debates in core areas of cognition and cognitive neuroscience

    ​Evaluate the extent to which different research methodologies on healthy and impaired populations inform the study of cognition.

    ​Present research results succinctly and accurately in scientific poster format. 

  • Clinical and Forensic Psychology (PSYC232)
    Level2
    Credit level22.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    Provide students with an overview of key issues relating to Clinical and Forensic Psychology both in the UK and across the world via lectures and seminars

    Provide an opportunity to engage in research-led teaching 

    Encourage students to explore current empirical research in Clinical and Forensic Psychology

    Demonstrate applications of psychology in a ''real world setting''


    Learning Outcomes

    ​Evaluate key debates within Clinical and Forensic Psychology

    ​Critically appraise the central theoretical models and concepts in Clinical and Forensic Psychology

    ​Analyse the utility of a range of research methods in Clinical and Forensic Psychology

    ​Utilise the findings from Clinical and Forensic Psychology to support a position

  • Psychobiology & Motivation (PSYC233)
    Level2
    Credit level22.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    ​Expand on the basic concepts and principles of Biological Psychology 

    Further examine the research strategies and methods of investigation in Biological Psychology 

    Explore additional examples of Biological processes covered during the course and their relationship to behaviour

    Learning Outcomes

    ​Discuss how the structure and functions of the brain determines psychological (dys)function. 

    Consider the utlity of animal models of human behaviour.

    ​Evaluate how altering the structure and function of the brain can be used to treat psychological dysfunction.

    Identify and recommend appropriate evidence based practice​

  • Research Methods and Statistics 3 (PSYC234)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    • Introduce students to regression and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) methods.
    • ​​Enable students to perform quantitative statistical analyses on a computer using the SPSS software. 
    • Provide students with the opportunity to present the results of statistical analyses in accordance with the APA guidelines
      Develop student''s understanding of ethical issues.
    • Develop an ability to identify and review empirical literature.
    Learning Outcomes

    ​Explain the theoretical concepts that underlie regression and ANOVA, different methods, strengths and limitations, and appropriate application in the context of specific research methods in psychology.

    ​​

    Report in an accurate, complete, and internationally recognised format the results of quantitative ​analyses in psychology.

    ​Independently and efficiently use SPSS to analyse research data using different regression and ANOVA methods and accurately interpret the statistical output.​

    ​Create an ethics research application in an area of psychological research, taking into account key ethical issues and considerations.

    ​Identify and review empirical literature relating to research in psychology.

  • Research Methods and Statistics 4 (PSYC235)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    • ​Build on qualitative knowledge (obtained in year one) and ANOVA knowledge from further research methods and statistics in semester one. 
    • ​Introduce students to psychometrics including factor analysis and reliability. 
    • Enable students to perform quantitative statistical analyses on a computer using SPSS software.
    • Introduce students to American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines for the presentation of the results of statistical analyseis.

    Learning Outcomes

    Produce qualitative analyses of data using appropriate qualitative software (NVIVO) and report results in a complete and internationally accepted format​ in psychology.

    ​Critically appraise the theoretical concepts of psychometric data analysis and their role in psychological research​. 

    Analyse psychometric data independently andefficiently using SPSS to conduct factor and reliability analyses andaccurately interpret the statistical output.​

    ​Relate data obtained through psychometric testing to experimental design and apply appropriate analysis techniques​ on psychological data.

    ​Produce a complete and coherent research project report​ in psychology.

Programme Year Three

Students take eight modules (120 CATS points) in areas relating to Psychology and assessments contribute the remaining 70% to the overall degree classification. Central to the year is the ‘Research Project’ (two of the eight modules or 30 CAT points). This is a piece of empirical work designed as a platform for students to display the application of their prior learning to a research topic that can be related to their chosen specialisation. The project can act as an important precursor to careers or postgraduate study. The topic is chosen in collaboration with a member of the academic staff and students often work closely with a research group of postgraduates and research assistants. Given their close links to research expertise in the various Institutes data from projects are sometimes published in scientific journals providing additional contributions to a graduate’s curriculum vitae. In addition, students are free to choose six optional modules (15 CATS points each) from various ‘pathways’ to complete their chosen specialism portfolios. At this level all modules are taught by a member of staff from the Research Institutes who are actively researching the area under discussion and are often world leaders in their respective fields. This ensures that study in Year Three will provide an unparalleled opportunity to take the students to the cutting edge of research on a variety of topics. Also the high level of choice available allows students to tailor their module choice toward their chosen careers or taught programme of postgraduate study.

Year Three Compulsory Modules

  • Research Project (PSYC340)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The research project is an empirical investigation in some area of psychology, leading to the production of a written report resembling research published in a psychology journal.

    The main aims are:

    • To develop in students in the skills and knowledge to design, execute and write up a piece of empirical research under the guidance of a supervisor.
    • To make students aware of the ethical issues underlying psychological experimentation.
    • To develop students'' skills and knowledge of statistics and psychological methodology.
    • To gain experience of and feedback on oral presentation.
    Learning Outcomes

    The main learning outcomes are to show evidence of the above through

    • oral presentation of aspects of the project
    • preparation of a 6000 word project report
    • preparation of a research protocol to allow judgement the ethical implications of the proposed reesearch.

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Great Debates in Psychology (PSYC301)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    This module has a single overarching aim: To engage students with the most fundamental questions in psychology.

     

    Learning Outcomes

    Demonstrate an understanding of opposing views in relation to the effects of nature and nurture on human behaviour, consciousness and free will and belief formation 

    Critically evaluate different views and theories in relation to the key topics of debate.

    ​​​​Appreciate the contribution of different disciplines and scientific methodologies in examining complex issues in psychology. Critically discuss opinions and arguments based on information from different disciplines.
  • Understanding and Learning About the World (PSYC306)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To develop knowledge and understanding of the theoretical concepts which underpin how humans find out about and make sense of the physical world.

    To develop skills in communicating and evaluating ongoing theoretical debates in high-level cognition
    Learning Outcomes​​Communicate knowledge of the different methodological approaches used to understand and learn about the world
    Critically evaluate the empirical evidence available to test accounts of recognition and categorisation and its theoretical implications​Critically examine how knowledge, concepts and categories are thought to be acquired and represented in humans, the processing involved and the implications for human behaviour.​​​
  • Visual Intelligence (PSYC309)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    The main aim of Visual Intelligence is to focus on the current knowledge of the link between sensory stimulation (the human senses) and responses (perception, action, but also conscious experience). 

    The module aims to demonstrate by argument and by examples the constructive nature of perception focusing on aspects in the human perception of shape, colour, and motion. 

    In addition to vision, examples will be drawn from the study of the somatic senses. The module also aims to place the argument in its proper historical and multidisciplinary context.

    Learning Outcomes​​By the end of the module you will:

     have discovered the active role of perception in making sense of the world before us. In particular, students will be able to compare and contrast direct and constructive approaches.


    ​​​​​be able to produce many examples in support of the constructive argument, in particular with respect to vision.​

    be able to explain why some of our experiences appear paradoxical.​

    be able to demonstrate a systematic understanding of bayesian inference​

    be able to identify similarities and differences between the traditional definition of intelligence, emotional intelligence, and visual intelligence.​

    be able to produce a poster presentation of an aspect of the syllabus.​
  • Appetite Regulation and Obesity: Health and Neuroscience Perspectives (PSYC310)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting85:15
    Aims

    The aim of the module is to review psychological, physiological and pharmacological aspects of the control of appetite for food. The module will first examine the nature, causes and consequences of the world obesity pandemic. Social, psychological, developmental and nutritional factors will also be examined. The module will then focus on the neuroscience of appetite regulation exploring the role of cephalic triggers, gut hormones and nutrients. The relationship between regulatory controls and food liking (palatability) will also be considered. The surge in interest in obesity will be described in light of (i) the discovery of leptin - a body fat signal, and (ii) developments in the understanding of various hypothalamic novel neuropeptide circuits critical in energy regulation.

    Learning Outcomes

    By the end of the module students will demonstrate:

    A systematic understanding of key aspects of the psychology of appetite, nutrition and eating behaviour, including: methodology of appetite research in animals and humans, innate and learnt factors determining food choice and phenomena and implication of the current obesity epidemic.

     

    ​A conceptual understanding of the psychology of appetite, nutrition and eating behaviour allowing them to devise and sustain arguments. In doing so students will acquire the ability to evaluate and assess theories and to critically debate issues in appetite research.

    ​A conceptual understanding of the psychology of appetite, nutrition and eating behaviour allowing them to describe and comment upon particular aspects of current and previous key research (i.e. to critically evaluate research methodologies and findings).

    ​An ability to create  distinctive written work such as blogposts that are interesting andpersonally relevant whilst demonstrating mastery of the core academic content.

  • Forensic and Investigative Psychology (PSYC311)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    Forensic psychology covers all aspects of psychology as they relate to the legal process.  This is a growth area in psychology, for example the BPS now has its own division of Forensic Psychology and specialist journal, Legal and Criminological Psychology.  The aim of this module is to examine a number of specialist areas in Forensic Psychology that illustrate the wide range of psychological issues that can inform various aspects of the legal process.  By examining these issues students should develop an understanding of how theories and empirical findings from a variety of areas of psychology can be brought together to help us illuminate various problems in the legal arena.  The approach, however, will be critical and innovative and students will be encouraged to challenge both popularist and professional views on the various topics.

    Learning Outcomes

    The students will be able to:

    ¨      Detail important theories and research in some key areas of forensic psychology

    ¨      Appreciate the need to integrate theory and research from a variety of areas of psychology in order to understand these key areas

    ¨      Understand the limitations and benefits of opposing theoretical positions and methodologies within the field

    ¨      Critically evaluate the relevant empirical research within the areas identified

    ¨      Take a reasoned and informed position in relation to the forensic issues on the module

  • Psychobiology of Pain (PSYC317)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The module aims to develop students'' critical understanding of the psychology of pain. The module will provide students with comprehensive information about acute and chronic pain ranging from pain sensors to higher-order cognitive modulation of pain. Students will understand the physiological and psychological changes related to the progression of chronic pain in pain patients. The module also aims to introduce students to cognitive-behavioural and other methods of pain treatment such as hypnosis or mindfulness. 


    Learning Outcomes

    ​Describe the neurophysiological mechanisms mediating acute and chronic pain states. 

    ​Apply psychodiagnostic tools to assess pain in healthy people and chronic pain patients.

    ​​

    Appreciate the applicability of cognitive-behavioural therapies for pain relief.

    Compare the importance of individual biological and psycho-social predictors in the development of chronic pain.

    ​Explain the brain mechanisms participating in inhibitory control of pain and their roles in pain therapy.

    ​​

  • Neurobiology of Emotions (PSYC319)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The module aims to develop students'' critical understanding of the neurobiology of emotions. The module will provide students with comprehensive information about the evolution of the emotional brain and will give an insight of the anatomy and functions of brain structures that process emotional information ranging from perception to higher-order cognitive processes. It also will enable students to understand the physiological and psychological changes which occur during processing of emotions.  The module also aims to introduce students to some disorders associated to emotions'' processing.

    Learning Outcomes

    Students will:

    have developed a critical understanding of the evolutionary and constructivist approaches to emotions.

    ​ critically understand the neurobiological mechanisms responsible for the proccessing of emotional information.

    ​critically understand how cognitive capacities can alter the way emotional information is proccesed. 

    be able to discuss the strenghts and limitations of the research  methods used to investigate emotion processing.


    ​​be able to manage their own learning and to make use of scholarly reviews and primary sources.
  • Addiction (PSYC320)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    Aims

    The main aims of this module are:

    1.  To introduce and critically evaluate psychological theories of addiction, including those based on learning, brain adaptations, and cognitive processes.

    2. To introduce and critically evaluate important psychosocial and pharmacological treatments for addiction, the mechanisms that underlie their effectiveness, and the potential for development of novel treatments in the future

    Learning Outcomes

    Our intention is that students will:

    1. Have gained a systematic understanding of psychological theories of addiction, and be able to critically evaluate these theories based on existing evidence.

    2. Understand the involvement of genetic, biological, cognitive and learning factors in the development of addictions, and the implications for treatment.  

    3. Be able to evaluate the theoretical basis for psychosocial and pharmacological treatments for addiction, their effectiveness and mechanisms of effectiveness, and the potential for future treatments

    4. Be able to critically evaluate research on addiction, based on recent scholarly reviews and peer-reviewed research articles and to appreciate the uncertainty, ambiguity and limits of this research.

  • Conflict Psychology (PSYC324)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting85:15
    Aims

    To develop a critical understanding of human conflict and its origins, with a focus on terrorism.

    To develop a critical understanding of intelligence analysis, open source intelligence, and the use of covert human intelligence sources.

    To demonstrate how research evidence can be used to prevent and reduce conflict.

    To expose students to practitioners in the field (intelligence analyst, counter terrorism officer, covert human intelligence source, hostage negotiator) and their academic and experiential knowledge.

    To provide the student with the skills necessary to critically evaluate interdisciplinary theories and support their evaluations with evidence from the research literature and open source intelligence.
    Learning Outcomes

    Understand and critically evaluate theories of human conflict and its origins, with a focus on terrorism.

    Understand how intelligence is gathered, analysed, and understood. These transferable skills are central to many professions that rely on information gathering to make decisions.

    Critically evaluate intelligence material. This transferable skill is essential to understanding the relevance and value of information.

  • Psychology of Expertise (PSYC325)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    Aims

    - To providea systematic coverage of the psychological factors underpinning expert performance.

    - Tosystematically present the wide range of research methods used to study expertise.

    - To discuss the role of experts in society.

    - To advise students about how to devise and sustain arguments

    - To give advice to students about how to describe and evaluate particular aspects of current research in the domain of the psychology of expertise and talent.


    Learning Outcomes

    Broad knowledge of the key aspects in the field of the psychology of expertise and talent, including (a) the mechanisms underlying the acquisition of expertise, (b) the role of perception, memory, problem solving and decision making in expert behaviour, (c) wider psychological, philosophical and societal aspects of expertise, and (d) the major theoretical approaches aiming to explain expertise and the research methods used to test these approaches.

    ​Conceptual understanding allowing students to devise and sustain arguments (i.e., to argue for one or other theoretical proposals in the exam essays) and to solve problems (i.e., to successfully answer a current theoretical question).

    ​Conceptual understanding allowing students to describe and comment upon particular aspects of current research (i.e., to critically evaluate both theoretical proposals and research methodologies) in the domain of the psychology of expertise.

    ​Evidence of additional reading beyond lecture and textbook content. 

  • Dissertation 1 (PSYC330)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    In this module, students undertake to write a dissertation on an approved topic of their choice. This should take the form of a learned review or meta-analysis of a psychological topic of theoretical or practical importance. Care should be taken not to make the work purely derivative: some original and throughtful conclusive comments should be included. Some empirical work may be included. In the case of applied topics a report of some contact in the field with specific types of clients and professionals would make a desirable complement.

    Within this context, and under the individual guidance of a supervisor, the aims are:

    • To develop in students the skills necessary to conduct a wide literature search in an area in psychology.
    • To develop the skills necessary to conduct a critical review of an issue or set of issues within a chosen area of psychology.
    • To develop the skills necessary to develop original evidence based arguments within a chosen area of psychology.
    • To develop skills of writing a scientific review.
    Learning Outcomes

    Under the individual guidance of a supervisor the student should have:

    • Demonstrated the skills necessary to conduct a wide literature search in an area in psychology.
    • Demonstrated the skills necessary to conduct a critical and original review of an issue or set of issues within a chosen area of psychology.
    • Demonstrated a capacity to develop original evidence based arguments within a chosen area of psychology.
    • Demonstrated the skills of writing a scientific review by writing such a review.
  • Dissertation 2 (PSYC343)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    In this module, students undertake to write a dissertation on an approved topic of their choice. This should take the form of a learned review or meta-analysis of a psychological topic of theoretical or practical importance. Care should be taken not to make the work purely derivative: some original and throughtful conclusive comments should be included. Some empirical work may be included. In the case of applied topics a report of some contact in the field with specific types of clients and professionals would make a desirable complement.

    Within this context, and under the individual guidance of a supervisor, the aims are:

    • To develop in students the skills necessary to conduct a wide literature search in an area in psychology.
    • To develop the skills necessary to conduct a critical review of an issue or set of issues within a chosen area of psychology.
    • To develop the skills necessary to develop original evidence based arguments within a chosen area of psychology.
    • To develop skills of writing a scientific review.
    Learning Outcomes

    Under the individual guidance of a supervisor the student should have:

    • Demonstrated the skills necessary to conduct a wide literature search in an area in psychology.
    • Demonstrated the skills necessary to conduct a critical and original review of an issue or set of issues within a chosen area of psychology.
    • Demonstrated a capacity to develop original evidence based arguments within a chosen area of psychology.
    • Demonstrated the skills of writing a scientific review by writing such a review.
  • The Psychology of Severe Mental Illness (PSYC334)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The module will:

    1. Introduce the student to the clinical phenomena associated with diagnoses such as ‘schizophrenia’ and ‘bipolar disorder’.
    2. Discuss the historical origins of contemporary approaches to diagnosing, explaining and treating these conditions.
    3. Provide a critical appraisal of biomedical models of severe mental illness.
    4. Describe contemporary neuropsychological models of specific symptoms such as hallucinations and paranoid delusions.
    5. Discuss the role of genes, environments and interactions between genetic and environmental factors in the development of severe mental illness.
    6. Discuss the value and limitations of pharmacological and psychological interventions for psychosis.
    Learning OutcomesWill acquire a systematic knowledge of the main historical developments in the study and treatment of severe mental illness

    ​Will develop a systematic understanding of contemporary theories of psychosis and approaches to the assessment and diagnosis of psychotic disorders

    Will develop an understanding of the strengths and limitations of a range of treatments for people with severe mental illness

    Will be able to critically evaluate a range of biological and psychological accounts of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder and associated treatments.

  • Phytopharmacology (PSYC338)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The module will examine the evolution of human exploitation of plants and fungi for their psychoactive properties, with a view to understanding: (i) the different classes of plant-derived drugs (phytochemicals); (ii) the history and uses of phytochemicals in human societies; (iii) psychopharmacological actions of these substances in terms of their psychological effects and neural actions; (iv) how the behavioural actions of phytochemicals have extended scientists'' knowledge of brain neurochemistry, and (v) the implications for our understanding of human psychology and of conditions such as substance-use and addiction.

    Learning OutcomesDescribe the wide spectrum of psychologically active substances synthesised by plants and fungi.
    ​Describe the specific pharmacological and psychological actions of different classes of phytochemicals.

    Debate the development of human exploitation of plants and fungi for their various pharmacological and psychological properties.​
    ​Appraise the potential therapeutic uses of phytochemicals and their derivatives.​

    Conceptualize how scientists use knowledge of the behavioural actions of chemicals synthesised by plants has enabled scientists to better understand neurochemical processes in the human brain, particularly through the investigation of the psychopharmacological actions of cannabis and opiates.​

  • Typical and Atypical Language Development (PSYC339)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    Aims

    The module uses a mixture of theory and practical work to develop a critical understanding among students of the mechanisms and processes underlying typical and atypical language development.

    The module will cover the topics of (1) Basic theoretical approaches (introduction) (2) Syntactic Development, (3) Morphological Development, (4) Atypical Development and Neuropsychology, (5) Langauge Universals, (6) Review/Revision lectures will also cover the theoretical background to the topics studied.

    It is highly recommended that students have completed or are currently registered for the developmental psychology and/or the language and thought modules.

    The module will provide students with both psychological and generic skills. At the end of the module, students will be able to outline competing theoretical accounts of phenomena in the above domains, and be able to critically evaluate these theories on the basis of empirical evidence. They will be able to conduct a complex ANOVA in SPSS and report the findings in APA Style (Poster Assessment). They will also gain an understanding of ''exam technique'' and understand the importance of writing with precision, using evidence to support each of the claims that they make. Students will be able to communicate ideas and research findings by written means, approach problem solving in a systematic way, undertake self-directed study and project management, understand the psychological and linguistic underpinnings of the discipline of develomental psycholinguistics, demonstrate a good knowledge and critical understanding of a range of influences on language functioning. Students will also demonstrate knowledge of a range of research paradigms, research methods and measurement techniques.

    Learning Outcomes

    By the end of the module students will demonstrate:

    1. A systematic understanding of the keyissues in the field oftypical and atypical language development, including (a) the mechanisms/processes underlying acquisition, (b) the major theoretical approaches/proposals, and the research methods used to test these approaches. All of this understanding will be informed by research which is at the forefront of the relevant field: The module coordinator and other lecturing staff are all leading experimental child language acquisition researchers and have based the course around two textbooks (one by Professor Rowland, one by Dr Ambridge) which summarise all of the cutting edge research, theories and methods in the discipline.

    2. Conceptual understanding allowing them to devise and sustain arguments (i.e., to argue for one or other theoretical proposal in both exam answers and the practical report poster) and to solve problems (i.e., to obtain answers to a current theoretical question in the practical study). This understanding will be based on research at the forefront of the discipline conducted by the teaching staff, all of whom are world-leading researchers in child language acquisition. In doing so, students will acquire the ability to evaluate and assess theories, and to critically debate issues in child language acquisition research

    3. Conceptual understanding allowing them to describe and comment upon particular aspects of current research (i.e., to critically evaluate both theoretical proposals and research methodologies) in the domain of typical and atypical language development. This conceptual understanding will also allow students to appreciate the uncertainty, ambiguity and limits of knowledge in this domain: Since it is impossible to observe a child''s language acquisition mechanism directly, one can only make inferences with regard to the nature of this mechanism on the basis of observable behaviour.

    4. The ability to accurately deploy established techniques of enquiry within a discipline to initiate and carry out projects. Specifically, students will participate in and report (via a poster) an empirical study addressing a current issue at the forefront of language acquisition research. In producing the poster, students will learn to communicate information, ideas, problems and solutions to both a specialist and non-specialist audience: Students are told to report their findings in the form of a poster suitable for a non-specialist psychology conference, but in such a way that it will also be informative for experts in the area.

    5. The ability to manage their own learning. Throughout the course, it is emphasised that the lecture material alone is NOT sufficient to write a good exam answer and that students must make use of scholarly reviews (including the module textbooks) and -- in particular -- refereed research articles. Students will appreciate the importance of drawing conclusions only on the basis of full peer-reviewed journal articles.

    6. The following transferable skills necessary for employment: (a) exercising of initiative and personal responsibility (as detailed above, students will be required to run their own project, and to conduct their own research for both the poster and exam answers). (b) decision making in complex and unpredictable contexts (students will have to make a decision about how to analyse complex experimental data, which is often very different to that expected). (c) the learning ability needed to undertake further training of a professional or equivalent nature (students will learn to work independently, and to carry out independent research. With regard to the particular subject matter, students will acquire learning skills and knowledge directly relevant to professional careers such as speech therapy, educational psychology and teaching).

  • Dissertation 2 (PSYC343)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    In this module, students undertake to write a dissertation on an approved topic of their choice. This should take the form of a learned review or meta-analysis of a psychological topic of theoretical or practical importance. Care should be taken not to make the work purely derivative: some original and throughtful conclusive comments should be included. Some empirical work may be included. In the case of applied topics a report of some contact in the field with specific types of clients and professionals would make a desirable complement.

    Within this context, and under the individual guidance of a supervisor, the aims are:

    • To develop in students the skills necessary to conduct a wide literature search in an area in psychology.
    • To develop the skills necessary to conduct a critical review of an issue or set of issues within a chosen area of psychology.
    • To develop the skills necessary to develop original evidence based arguments within a chosen area of psychology.
    • To develop skills of writing a scientific review.
    Learning Outcomes

    Under the individual guidance of a supervisor the student should have:

    • Demonstrated the skills necessary to conduct a wide literature search in an area in psychology.
    • Demonstrated the skills necessary to conduct a critical and original review of an issue or set of issues within a chosen area of psychology.
    • Demonstrated a capacity to develop original evidence based arguments within a chosen area of psychology.
    • Demonstrated the skills of writing a scientific review by writing such a review.
  • Psychological Issues in Adult Ageing (PSYC344)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    The module is designed to develop an understanding of the way that increasing age influences the psychological experiences of adult. These issues will address the broad spectrum of psychological experience from cognitive, social, health and wellbeing. The focus will be on non-clinical experiences. Attention will be drawn to the necessity for well-designed research to be conducted with respect to ageing. The module will drawfrom a number of perspectives including psychology, behavioural science, epidemiology and gerontology. Students will be given the opportunity to explore aspects of ageing which will not be covered during the lectures.

    Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to critically evaluate the influence that ageing has on psychological experience in adulthood.





    2. Students will have a systematic understanding of the interactions that ageing has with other individual differences such as gender, marital status, socio-econmoic status and ethnicity.​​

    3. Students will have a critical appreciation of the range of factors which contribute to the complexities inherent in understanding the psychology of ageing​

    4. Students will be able to understand and precis peer-reviewed literature from the syllabus.

     5. Students will be able to debatecurrent issues in human ageing.​
  • Brain and Behaviour: Current Models and Controversies (PSYC345)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims
  • ​To provide students with an overview of key models andcontroversies in Cognitive Neuroscience

  • ​To develop the theoretical and analytical skillsnecessary to evaluate current research

  • ​To develop research and presentation skills

  • To provide an opportunity to engage in research-based learning


  • Learning Outcomes

    ​On successful completion of the module studentswill be able to

    understand selected current models in cognitive neuroscience

    ​Have an ability to evaluate research methodologies andoutcomes in cognitive neuroscience

    ​Use critical evaluation in analysing a current models and methodologies 

    ​Develop skills to design novel experiments

  • Evolutionary Psychology- Introduction and Applications (PSYC346)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    ​The aims of this module are to:

    Provide students with a broad understanding of Evolutionary Psychology, and how it relates to other sub-disciplines of psychology

    Explain how Evolutionary Theory principles andfindings can be applied to everyday problems and can influence decisionmaking  ​

    Introduce the diversity of research methods in Evolutionary Psychology research


    Learning Outcomes

    ​On completion of this module, students will be able to:

    1. Apply evolutionary theory to human behaviour through critical evaluation of contemporary research

    2. Demonstrate an ability to critically evaluate methodological issues in Evolutionary Psychology research through an understanding of a wide range of research methods in this field

    ​​​​​3. Understand and recognise the importance of contemporary debates on Evolutionary Psychology, including criticism for the theories.

    ​4. Apply knowledge from other sub-diciplines of psychology (e.g., cognitive, social, developmental, biological) in understanding evolutionary bases of behaviour

  • Topics in Applied Social Psychology (PSYC348)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims


    To introduce students to an in depth, detailed knowledge and critical understanding of contemporary theories, models, principles and research in social psychology and how these are used in applied contexts to resolve a variety of social concerns. 

       

    To develop students'' ability to communicate the outcomes of the aim above.   

       




    Learning Outcomes

    ​​​Demonstrate the ability to engage in independent enquiry into specific aspects of applied social psychology and evaluate these in relation to theories and models used in current research. 

    ​​​Show the ability to apply underlying concepts and principles outside the context in which they were first studied and to synthesise and apply concepts both within and across sub-topics within applied social psychology. 

    ​​Demonstrate knowledge of the main methods of enquiry, and the ability to critically evaluate the appropriateness of employing different approaches and methodologies for resolving problems in applied social psychology research. 

    ​Demonstrate a critical understanding of the limits of knowledge in the field of applied social psychology and how these limits influence our broad interpretations of the discipline. 

    Demonstrate detailed knowledge of contemporary research in applied social psychology. 

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

Our programmes are taught using a balanced mix of lectures, workshops, seminars and tutorials and practical laboratory sessions. Students are encouraged to work in small groups from the beginning of the programme. The Year Three research project is done either individually or in small groups. 


Assessment

The modules in each year must be passed in order to progress to the next year of study. The  final degree classification is calculated from grades obtained in Years Two and Three. The weighting between second and third years is 30/70%. For C804 the final degree classification is calculated from grades obtained in Years Two, Three and Four. The weighting between second, third and fourth years is 20/40/40%. Assessed work, including essays, presentations, group work, and qualitative and experimental reports, together with examination results contribute to the final degree classification.