Politics and International Business BA (Joint Hons) Add to your prospectus

  • Offers study abroad opportunities Offers study abroad opportunities
  • Opportunity to study for a year in China Offers a Year in China

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: LN21
  • Year of entry: 2019
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB / IB : 33 / BTEC : Applications considered
politics-3

Module details

Programme Year One

You will take a total of eight complusory modules (worth 120 credits), four in Politics and four in International Business.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Foundations in International Politics (POLI104)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The principal objective of this module is to provide introductory foundations to the study of international politics by introducing the main theories and approaches

    To provide an overview of the major developments of international politics since the 20th century, paying particular attention to the Cold War and its aftermath. ​

    To offer brief introductions to four main issues of international politics: globalisation, Europeanisation and regional integration, environmentalism and poverty and development. ​

    Learning OutcomesBy the end of the module, students will have acquired a working knowledge of the main theories of International Relations and a greater awareness of their applicability in analysing specific issues in international politics. Of equal importance, students should have acquired a familiarity with the main themes that characterise both the Cold War and the post-Cold War period. 
    More specifically, students will have acquired the following:
    An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the major IR theories. 


     

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    Students should have developed the ability to compare and contrast the various theories when discussing questions and issues affecting international politics;Students will be familiar with the main events, issues and themes in international relations;
  • European Politics I (POLI107)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    To provide an introduction to European politics by focusing on key contemporary issues while introducing some basic concepts of political science encountered in studying this subject;

    To examine key challenges encountered when attempting to define and conceptualise Europe;​

    To develop understanding of key debates around status of democracy and crisis of the nation-state in the European context​;

    To examine salient transversal themes encountered in the politics of Europe, such as integration, international migration​ and security.

    Learning Outcomes

    An understanding of the historical development and contemporary practice of European politics.

    A working knowledge of the principles underlying political processes and systems (electoral systems and party systems) and how they operate in the European political space.​

    An understanding of the political importance of different government structures (parliaments, the executive) at national and regional (EU) levels.

    A knowledge of the challenges posed by contemporary political trends to European nation-states and European integration​.

  • European Politics II (POLI108)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    Aims

    To introduce students to the distinctive characteristics of political institutions in selected European states;

    To introduce the main features of political development in a range of European countries;​

    To provide a basis for comparison between different European political systems.​

    Learning Outcomes

    Knowledge of key features of contemporary European political systems in a range of countries.

    Analytical understanding of processes of democratisation in southern and eastern Europe.​

    Ability to compare and contrast forms of executive leadership, party systems, state institutions and the political evolution of European political systems since the latter half of the nineteenth century​.

  • Foundations in Politics (POLI109)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    AimsStudents will demonstrate a foundational understanding of key political concepts; Students will examine democratic theory and its challenges; Students will analyse expressions of political power; Students will demonstrate a knowledge of major political theories and arguments of key political scientists, political sociologists, and political philosophers; Students will understand what the study of politics is, and they will be able to distinguish the different ways in which one can study politics (empirical and normative approaches); To give students the skills necessary to master their degree in politics and to maximise their grade potential within the Department of Politics; To ensure students develop the skills necessary to be active rather than passive learners; To enable students to link study skills and research methods with their own academic success on the modules available in the first year and beyond.
    Learning OutcomesDemonstrate a foundational knowledge of politics and the study of politics.Demonstrate an ability to relate political theory to the real world application of political power.Identify the problems faced by democratic and non-democratic political systems and the means by which they can be understood.

    Deconstruct the relationship between power, the state, democratic theory and the application of political authority.

    ​Students will develop academic writing, communication, and presentation skills.

    ​Students will develop exam skills and skills to reflect on critical feedback.

    ​Students will develop an understanding of using sources and acquire referencing skills and awareness of plagiarism

  • Fundamentals of Marketing (MKIB153)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to provide a grounded appreciation of the utility and universality of a marketing orientation as the process by which organisations align themselves to their operating environment, customers/stakeholders and markets

    Learning Outcomes

    Understand the nature of the marketing environment and its relevance for the organisation and marketing practice

    ​Specifically, to be able to undertake an analysis of customer and competitive environments

    ​Understand the fundamental philosophy of marketing and its application in both business and not-for-profit organisations

    ​Identify and be able to apply key marketing concepts to aid marketing and business decisions

    ​Be able to demonstrate an understanding of the pratical aspects and processes of marketing

  • Organisations and Management (ULMS151)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to provide a comprehensive foundation to the study of management theory and its application in practice. It seeks to consider the conceptual frameworks relevant to the behaviour of individuals and groups in organisations, and the issues which are raised in their management.

    Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to identify relevant characteristics of organisations in terms of structure​Students will be able to consider the nature of differences between individuals and the implications this has in organisation Students will be able to outline and evaluate theoretical approaches to motivation, job satisfaction and work design Students will be able to distinguish between management and leadership functions in organisations

    ​Students will be able to examine the role and functions of groups and teams in organisations 

  • The European Economic Environment (ECON159)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to introduce students to:

    1. the theoretical basis of global economic integration

    2. the main economic features of the global environment

    3. the workings and interaction of different global institutions

    4. the major current policy issues.

     

    Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to describe the main economic aspects of the global economic and business environment in recent years.
    Students will be able to identify major economic issues experienced by nations and institutions.Students will be able to use appropriate economic analysis to examine such issues.Students will be able to develop cognitive skills of analysis and synthesis.Students will be able to identify major themes and issues relating to the global economic and business environment.Students will be able to develop the ability to conduct individual study by drawing on multiple data sources. Students will be able to develop the ability to discuss current policy issues, particularly as they affect the UK.

    Identify ethical issues in the interactions of global business networks.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • International Finance (ECON914)
    LevelM
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This module focuses on the fundamental principles of international finance, especially on the financial management of multinational enterprises (MNE). The groundwork for this is laid by extensive discussion of:

    a) the global financial environment

    b) the agency problems within an MNE

    c) the foreign exchange exposure and its management and

    d) the financing choice of an MNE

    Learning Outcomes

    Examine how the process of Globalization extends to a MNE and the implications for risk and returns of a business.

    ​Discuss the causes and consequences of the separation between ownership and control that characterizes an MNE.

    ​Analyze the importance for MNES to be able to raise external financing.

    ​Explain the importance of establishing financial flexibility.

    ​Explore the main approaches to exchange rate determination.

    ​Develop a critical perspective on the choice of exchange rate regimes.

    ​Analyze the use of foreign currency derivatives for speculation purposes.

    ​Define and classify foreign investment risks.

  • Theory of the Firm (ECON254)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To equip students with the knowledge and skills necessary to understand and evaluate the internal and external factors that influence the strategic decisions made by business organisations. The module will support the analysis of the operation of business organisations within national and international markets.

    Learning OutcomesApply the tools and concepts of microeconomics toanalyse the behaviour of firms

     

    Explain how market structure influences thebehaviour of firms and the levels of profit they can achieve

    Explain and evaluate the growth strategies used byfirms ​ Explain and evaluate alternative theories of firmbehaviour

    ​Explain theinfluence of internal organisation on firm behaviour and performance.

  • International Management (MKIB253)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    This module aims to introduce students to key issues in international business and management from the perspective of the multinational enterprise.

    Learning OutcomesExplain trends in foreign investment and the growth of the multinational enterprise (MNE) in different home economies
    Analyse key issues in the governance and decision-making processes of MNEs

    Evaluate the major considerations to be taken into account in MNEs in determining investment decisons

    Evaluate the reasons for the success and failure of MNEs including an understanding of the problems that may arise between foreign MNEs and host governments

    Appreciate the importance of and analyse the inter-cultural issues that managers of MNEs face

  • International Development (MKIB261)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module is concerned with the theoretical and practical implications of international development in the global economy. The module will enable an in-depth analysis of the central issues associated with the economics and policies of international development. The module also provides an insight into problems, challenges and recent trends in international development as well as identifies future directions.

    Learning OutcomesUnderstand in some depth alternative theoretical perspectives associated with international development;

      ​Describe and critically assess major economic and social issues that persist in
      developing world;

      ​Suggest remedies and define obstacles associated with international development;

      ​Critique remedies and policies using some of the contrasting viewpoints
      associated with development studies;

      ​Improve students'' citation and referencing skills;

      ​Show an awareness of the relationships between economic and policy concepts and actual policies;

      ​Critically assess the role of international trade strategy and regional trade blocks in the development process;

      ​Critically assess the international role of the Global Governance Institutions;

      ​Understand other issues central to international development

  • International Organisations (POLI225)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims
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  • To provide an understanding of the nature of modern state system and the role of international organisations within it;To explore central concepts and theories in International Relations and apply these in analyses of the challenges and conflicts faced by the international system; To explore mechanisms and policy instruments that International Institutions possess in managing the new world order; To assess critical arguments as to the limits of international institutions and the likely future developments; To assess interpretations of international law Within global governance debates;​To develop students'' skills in synthesis and analysis, and in the presentation of clear and cogent arguments (both orally and in writing) of issues and controversies surrounding international system and its organisations.
      Learning Outcomes

      ​Ability to understand the role of international organisations in the in the international system. Ability to apply core theories of international relations to major international organisations.  

      ​Awareness of the role of global governance in the new world order.

      Ability to explore powers and limits of international organisations and the role of international law and human rights.

    • International Political Economy (POLI209)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims

      This module aims to examine the interplay between politics and economics and the way this relationship is influenced by domestic and international forces. 

       

      Learning Outcomes​​​ Basic appreciation of the dynamic processes of international politics and economics.

        An understandiung of a range of IPE theories, and why and how they evolved in response to developments

        Familiarity with recent developments in IPE (globalisation, regionalism, economic crises, etc.), and how they relate to IPE theories.​ 

        Ability to compare and contrast theories and examine how they ‘fit’ with different periods of time and national and international circumstances.​ 

        ​The ability to use technical vocabulary fluently.

      Programme Year Three

      You will take eight optional modules (worth 120 credits), four in Politics and four in International Business.

      Year Three Compulsory Modules

      • International Economic Relations (ECON354)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
        Aims

        The aim of this module is to provide a detailed coverage of the nature and determinants of the pattern of world trade and financial, capital and labour flows.  The module also aims to provide students with a critical appreciation of why conflicts arise between nations due to international economic activity and what policy options are most appropriate for countries both individually and cooperatively to adopt.  Throughout the module emphasis will be placed upon the role of theory in enhancing understanding of the patterns and nature of trade flows (in the context of both goods and services) in the context of the key issues in international economic relations.

        Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to explain why countries gain from trade and what pattern of trade flows exist using classic trade theories.Students will be able to explain why countries engage in trade protection, as well as predict and analyze the consequences that arise in case such protection is applied

        ​Students will be able to explain how key flows of goods, services, money and physical capital are valued.  They will be able to use real and nominal exchange rates, understand, explain and apply the concept of PPP.

        Students will be able to explain the reasons why trade blocs are formed and analyze and explain their costs and benefits.  They will also be able to distinguish between trade blocs among countries of similar as well as different development levels.  ​

        ​Students will be able to explain why conflicts arise in the areas of labour migration and environmental pollution and suggest policy responses which may be used to correct such problems

        ​Students will be able to explain the causes and consequences of financial crises and how financial contagion can spread from one country to another

        ​Students will be able to explain the links between trade and capital flows and economic development using examples of the Latin American and East Asian countries

      • International Marketing (MKIB356)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims
        1. To introduce students to the international environment for marketing and marketers

        2. ​To analyse the political, cultural, regulatory and economic drivers for international marketing

        3. To achieve a robust and well-informed understanding of how marketing managers and firms manage these dynamic factors successfully in order to achieve marketing objectives

        4. To build an appreciation of how they might go about building international activities

        5. To introduce students to the concept of global marketing management;

        6. ​To develop an understanding of the key types of international transitions

        Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to identify the major changes in the international trading environment and their impact on the marketing activities of global businesses.

        ​Students will be able to develop marketing strategies appropriate to industrialised, developing and lesser developed economies, and identify and explain the relevant sources of information and analysis necessary to support the appropriate strategy.

        ​Students will be able to critically evaluate the mix decisions that need to be taken to support global marketing activity.

      The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


      Teaching and Learning

      All students are taught study skills, including essay writing and information literacy, as part of their first year programme.


      Assessment

      Assessment in Politics is through a mixture of coursework, examinations, in-class tests, presentations and other innovative ways. Most modules are assessed on the basis of an examination (worth 50% of the module mark) and a 2,000 to 3,000 words coursework essay (worth 50% of the module mark). Year Three students can undertake a dissertation in place of two of their taught course modules. The dissertation option is a piece of independent research pursued under the direction of a supervisor.