Philosophy, Politics and Economics BA (Hons)

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: L0V0
  • Year of entry: 2020
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB / IB : 33 / BTEC : Applications considered
philosophy-1

Module details

Programme Year One

You will take compulsory modules in each of the three subjects, which will give you the mathematical, philosophical and political foundations for the rest of you degree.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Foundations in International Politics (POLI104)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The principal objective of this module is to provide introductory foundations to the study of international politics by introducing the main theories and approaches;

    To provide an overview of the major developments of international politics since the 20th century, paying particular attention to the Cold War and its aftermath;

    To offer brief introductions to four main issues of international politics: globalisation, Europeanisation and regional integration, environmentalism and poverty and development.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students will have acquired a working knowledge of the main theories of international relations (IR) and a greater awareness of their applicability in analysing specific issues in international politics. Of equal importance, students should have acquired a familiarity with the main themes that characterise both the Cold War and the post Cold War period. More specifically, students will have acquired the following: An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the major IR theories.  

    (LO2) Students should have developed the ability to compare and contrast the various theories when discussing questions and issues affecting international politics.

    (LO3) Students will be familiar with the main events, issues and themes in international relations.

    (S1) Students will be able to access and make effective use of bibliographical and electronic sources of knowledge and information.

    (S2) Students will be able to demonstrate that they are able to write arguments in a coherent and effective manner.

    (S3) Students will acquire the ability to engage and interact with the main themes in a specific body of intellectual knowledge.

  • Foundations in Politics (POLI109)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    Students will demonstrate a foundational understanding of key political concepts;  

    Students will examine democratic theory and its challenges;

    Students will analyse expressions of political power;

    Students will demonstrate a knowledge of major political theories and arguments of key political scientists, political sociologists, and political philosophers;

    Students will understand what the study of politics is, and they will be able to distinguish the different ways in which one can study politics (empirical and normative approaches);

    To give students the skills necessary to master their degree in politics and to maximise their grade potential within the Department of Politics;

    To ensure students develop the skills necessary to be active rather than passive learners;

    To enable students to link study skills and research methods with their own academic success on the modules available in the first year and beyond.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a foundational knowledge of politics and the study of politics.

    (LO2) Demonstrate an ability to relate political theory to the real world application of political power.

    (LO3) Identify the problems faced by democratic and non-democratic political systems and the means by which they can be understood.

    (LO4) Deconstruct the relationship between power, the state, democratic theory and the application of political authority.

    (LO5) Students will develop academic writing, communication, and presentation skills.

    (LO6) Students will develop exam skills and skills to reflect on critical feedback.

    (LO7) Students will develop an understanding of using sources and acquire referencing skills and awareness of plagiarism

    (S1) Enhanced research skills.

    (S2) Ability to communicate complex ideas both written and orally.

  • Mathematical Economics (ECON113)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The aims are: - to prepare students for the more advanced Year 2 Mathematical Economics II option, which is a prerequisite for certain Year 3 modules. - to prepare students for the econometrics sequence starting in Year 2. - to develop mathematical maturity and problem solving skills.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of key techniques of proof

    (LO2) An understanding of comparative statics and calculus methods including integration, multivariate optimisation and constrained optimisation

    (LO3) An ability to solve economic problems using the mathematical techniques introduced during lecture hours.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Lifelong learning skills

    (S4) Adaptability

  • Political Philosophy (PHIL102)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting90:10
    Aims

    Students will be introduced to the theories and arguments of some of the most important philosophers of the Western tradition of political thought, such as Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Marx and Mill.  Students will be introduced to some of the main concepts in political philosophy, including political obligation, democracy, community, rights, liberty, justice and property.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to distinguish some main concepts in political philosophical debates.

    (LO2) Students will be able to distinguish between different ways of understanding concepts in political philosophical debates.

    (LO3) Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in the history of political philosophy.

    (LO4) Students will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to political issues.

    (LO5) Students will be able to identify philosophical assumptions underlying political claims.

    (LO6) Students will be able to structure a discussion of issues in political philosophy.

    (LO7) Students will be able to speak with confidence and clarity on issues of political philosophy.

    (LO8) Students will be able to explain details of canonical texts in political philosophy.

    (LO9) Students will be able to articulate and defend basic positions in political philosophy.

    (LO10) Students will be able to write coherently and rigorously about abstract philosophical issues raised by political debates.

    (S1) Students will develop their skills in making appropriate use of information technology, information on the World Wide Web and reference works and databases relevant to the discipline.

    (S2) Students will enhance their capacity to participate, in a dispassionate and respectful manner, in debates about controversial and profound matters.

    (S3) Students will develop their willingness critically to evaluate and reflect upon arguments, beliefs, proposals and values, both their own and those of others.

    (S4) Students will enhance their abilities in reading and understanding texts and in comprehending abstract material.

    (S5) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

    (S6) Students will enhance their ability to identify and reflect critically upon the issues that underlie debates.

    (S7) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches.

    (S8) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

    (S9) Students will develop the ability to perform bibliographical searches, to include (to professional standard) citations and bibliographies in their work and to plan, organise and produce presentations and essays.

    (S10) Students will enhance their oral and written communications skills and develop skill in explaining complex material in a precise manner.

  • Principles of Macroeconomics (ECON123)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    The aims of this module are:
    To complement and build on Principles of Microeconomics and to provide a foundation for further studies in macroeconomics.
    To introduce concepts and theories of economics which help understand changes in the macroeconomic environment.
    To explain and analyse the formulation of government macroeconomic policy.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Explain the relationship between expenditures and national income and demonstrate how monetary and fiscal policies may be used to influence them

    (LO2) Explain the behaviour of economic aggregates such as national income, inflation and unemployment over time

    (LO3) Explain and assess government policy in a range of policy situations

    (LO4) Explain the framework of national income accounting

    (LO5) Use graphical and algebraic modelling to analyse the economy and economic policy

    (LO6) Explain the interconnections between the markets for goods, money and labour

    (LO7) Explain the principal influences on long-term growth and the short-run fluctuation in output around the long-run growth trend

    (LO8) Locate, select and analyse information relevant to assessing the state of the economy and economic policy

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Commercial awareness

    (S4) Teamwork

    (S5) Organisational skills

    (S6) Communication skills

    (S7) International awareness

    (S8) Lifelong learning skills

    (S9) Ethical awareness

  • Principles of Microeconomics (ECON121)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    This module aims to provide students with a clear foundation of the purpose, scope and topics of microeconomic analysis. Students will develop their ability to think critically and analytically, and understand how to frame real world problems in an economic model. This module forms the starting point for all future courses in Microeconomics.  
    This module also emphasizes the role of mathematics in economics.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will have the ability to understand, explain, analyse and solve core problems in microeconomics.

    (LO2) Students will be able to practice and develop their mathematical techniques and understand the role of mathematical analysis in microeconomics.

    (LO3) Students will be able to familiarise themselves with the principles of using an 'economic model' and how to model individual decision-making for both consumers and producers.

    (LO4) Students will be able to apply their understanding of economic decision-making, optimisation and equilibrium to real world situations.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) IT skills

  • Reading and Writing Practical Philosophy (PHIL107)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:10
    Aims

    To consolidate the academic skills and knowledge necessary for the critical reading and writing of philosophy. To consolidate students' appreciation of the value of philosophy. To consolidate students' ability to read and take notes effectively. To consolidate students' skill in presenting complex ideas to an audience and in practising the intellectual virtues associated with philosophical discussion. To consolidate students' skill in writing rigorously argued, well-written and well-presented essays. To consolidate students' research skills.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to explain and evaluate some work relevant to a selected specialist topic in ethics. (This topic may vary from year to year. Examples include: human treatment of animals; ethics and the environment.)

    (LO2) Students will be able to explain and evaluate some central work about political liberty.

    (LO3) Students will be able to give structured seminar presentations and to conduct discussion in a manner that displays the intellectual virtues associated with philosophy.

    (LO4) Students will be able to write essays that embody a philosophically-informed approach to argumentation.

    (LO5) Students will be able to use the Harvard referencing system.

    (LO6) Students will be able to conduct independent research in support of their work, using appropriate print and online resources (including the Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy and the Philosopher's Index).

    (LO7) Students will be able to explain and evaluate some work in aesthetics and the philosophy of art.

    (S1) Students will enhance their abilities in reading and understanding texts and in comprehending abstract material.

    (S2) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

    (S3) Students will enhance their ability to identify the issues that underlie debates.

    (S4) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches, and their ability to identify presuppositions and to reflect critically upon them.

    (S5) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

    (S6) Students will develop the ability to perform bibliographical searches, to include (to professional standard) citations and bibliographies in their work and to plan, organise and produce presentations and essays.

    (S7) Students will enhance their oral and written communications skills and develop skill in explaining complex material in a precise manner.

    (S8) Students will develop their ability to work independently.

    (S9) Students will develop their ability to sift through information, assessing the relevance and importance of the information to what is at issue.

    (S10) Students will develop their skills in making appropriate use of information technology, information on the World Wide Web and reference works and databases relevant to the discipline.

    (S11) Students will develop the ability to write to a professional standard, using word-processing software.

    (S12) Students will enhance their capacity to participate, in a dispassionate and respectful manner, in debates about controversial and profound matters.

    (S13) Students will develop their willingness critically to evaluate and reflect upon arguments, beliefs, proposals and values, both their own and those of others.

    (S14) Through developing their analytical and critical skills and observing good standards of academic practice, students will develop their intellectual honesty.

    (S15) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S16) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

    (S17) Improving own learning/performance - Personal action planning

    (S18) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

    (S19) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S20) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

    (S21) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience

  • Statistics for Economics and Business (ECON112)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The fundamental aim of this module is to give students an understanding of how statistics operates in Business and Economics;
    To provide both a foundation for further study and a broadly based introduction to statistics;
    To enable students to summarize, present and analyze data from a sample;
    To enable students to understand and apply the practice of statistical inference to sample data to estimate full population variable parameters;
    To enable students to work comfortably with variables as probability distributions, introducing some common and practicably useful probability distributions.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The basis of data analysis

    (LO2) The fundamental notion of statistical inference

    (LO3) Summarise,describe and present raw data

    (LO4) Estimate the mean of a population (and other statistics)

    (LO5) How to formulate and test hypotheses about values in the population based on random samples

    (LO6) How to carry out basic statistical computations and graphical analysis

    (LO7) How to identify and model relationships between two variables

    (LO8) Understand the use of probability in statistics

    (LO9) Communicating results

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Numeracy

    (S4) Commercial awareness

    (S5) Organisational skills

    (S6) Communication skills

    (S7) International awareness

    (S8) Lifelong learning skills

Programme Year Two

You will take 4 compulsory modules in Economics, and either PHIL271 or PHIL272.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Macroeconomics I (ECON223)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To extend the study of macroeconomic theory to the intermediate level.
    To analyse the classical and Keynesian macroeconomic models, and their policy implications, in order to provide a context for subsequent developments in modern macroeconomics associated with monetarism, new classical and new Keynesian economics.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to understand how employment, output, interest rate and the price level are determined in the classical model

    (LO2) Students will be able to understand the origin of economic growth in the short runand in the long run

    (LO3) Students will be able to understand the effects of fiscal and monetary policies in the IS-LM model

    (LO4) Students will be able to understand the effects of fiscal and monetary policies under different exchange-rate regimes

    (S1) Problem-solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Organisational skills

    (S4) Communication skills

    (S5) International awareness

    (S6) Lifelong learning skills

  • Macroeconomics II (ECON224)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To further extend the study of macroeconomic theory at the intermediate level by analysing business-cycle fluctuations in closed and open economies using the real business cycle model and also the new Keynesian model that are based on solid microfoundation

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand the microfoundation of modern macroeconomic models

    (LO2) Explain the implications of macroeconomic disturbances and fiscalpolicies using the real business cycle model

    (LO3) Contrast the different implications of monetary policies in thereal business cycle model and in the new Keynesian model.

    (LO4) Analyse business cycles in the open economy.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Commercial awareness

    (S4) Communication skills

    (S5) IT skills

    (S6) International awareness

    (S7) Lifelong learning skills

    (S8) Ethical awareness

    (S9) Teamwork

    (S10) Organised and able to work under pressure

  • Microeconomics 1 (ECON221)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    This module, in accordance with Microeconomics 2, aims to provide a solid foundation of intermediate level microeconomic theory. It develops and extends three of the topics introduced in Principles of Microeconomics, namely, Consumer Theory, Producer Theory and General Equilibrium. It prepares the students for the more advanced modules in the second and third year like Microeconomics 2 and Game Theory.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to demonstrate a thorough understanding of the core concepts and models used in consumer theory, producer theory and general equilibrium and an ability to apply these to arange of markets and settings.

    (LO2) Students will be able to think and apply themselves analytically to problems in the above-mentioned topics.

    (LO3) Students will be able to gain problem solving skills using verbal, diagrammatic and mathematical methods to problems in the above topics.

    (LO4) Students will be able to have a critical perspective regarding the assumptions underlying microeconomics models.

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Numeracy

    (S4) Organisational skills

    (S5) communication skills

    (S6) IT skills

    (S7) Lifelong learning skills

    (S8) Teamwork

  • Microeconomics 2 (ECON222)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    This module, following on from with Microeconomics 1, aims to provide a solid foundation of intermediate level microeconomic theory. 
    The module uses the theoretical foundations developed in the first semester and aims to extend the application of the skills acquired to more advanced topics such as welfare economics.
    This module also aims to prepare students for the more advanced modules in the third year by introducing topics such as asymmetric information and game theory.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Have a thorough understanding of the core concepts and models used in Welfare Economics, Asymmetric Information, and Game Theory.

    (LO2) To prepare students to think and apply themselves to analyse a range of problems in the three areas mentioned above.

    (LO3) To develop problem solving skills using verbal, diagrammatic and mathematical methods to problems in the above topics.

    (LO4) To deepen a critical perspective regarding the assumptions underlying microeconomics models.

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Numeracy

    (S4) Organisational skills

    (S5) Communication skills

    (S6) Lifelong learning skills

  • Business Ethics (PHIL271)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    To introduce and explain major contemporary perspectives on corporate behaviours.

    To introduce moral perspectives as they relate to managerial decision-making and corporate structures.

    To make students familiar with a range of recurrent ethical problems arising in business. To improve students' skills in identifying and analyzing ethical issues that managers and employees face.

    To give students practice in formulating, defending, and planning the implementation of action plans managing ethical dilemmas.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to discuss the main theories concerning the place of ethics in business.

    (LO2) Student will be able to explain assess the main approaches to normative ethics.

    (LO3) Students will be able to state and discuss the broad ethical principles concerning costs and benefits, the challenge posed by uncertainty, professional roles, profits and the right of shareholder interests, and affirmative action.

    (LO4) Students will be able to state and discuss the broad ethical principles concerning the obligations of complex organizations with respect to loyalty and whistle-blowing, insider trading, customer responsibility, and corporate responsibility.

    (LO5) Students will be able to state and discuss the broad ethical principles concerning social justice and executive compensation.

    (LO6) Students will be able to consider an ethical approach as a basis for sustainable marketing.

    (S1) Students will enhance their ability to identify the issues that underlie debates.

    (S2) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches, and their ability to identify presuppositions and to reflect critically upon them.

    (S3) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

    (S4) Students will develop their ability to work in groups.

    (S5) Students will develop their ability to sift through information, assessing the relevance and importance of the information to what is at issue.

    (S6) Students will develop their problem-solving skills.

    (S7) Students will enhance their capacity to participate, in a dispassionate and respectful manner, in debates about controversial and profound matters.

    (S8) Students will develop their willingness critically to evaluate and reflect upon arguments, beliefs, proposals and values, both their own and those of others.

    (S9) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S10) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S11) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S12) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – persuading

    (S13) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills

    (S14) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S15) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S16) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S17) Working in groups and teams - Negotiation skills

    (S18) Skills in using technology - Information accessing

    (S19) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

  • Business Ethics (PHIL272)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    To introduce and explain major contemporary perspectives on corporate behaviours.

    To introduce moral perspectives as they relate to managerial decision-making and corporate structures.

    To make students familiar with a range of recurrent ethical problems arising in business.

    To improve students' skills in identifying and analyzing ethical issues that managers and employees face.

    To give students practice in formulating, defending, and planning the implementation of action plans managing ethical dilemmas.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to discuss the main theories concerning the place of ethics in business.

    (LO2) Student will be able to explain assess the main approaches to normative ethics.

    (LO3) Students will be able to state and discuss the broad ethical principles concerning costs and benefits, the challenge posed by uncertainty, professional roles, profits and the right of shareholder interests, and affirmative action.

    (LO4) Students will be able to state and discuss the broad ethical principles concerning the obligations of complex organizations with respect to loyalty and whistle-blowing, insider trading, customer responsibility, and corporate responsibility.

    (LO5) Students will be able to state and discuss the broad ethical principles concerning social justice and executive compensation.

    (LO6) Students will be able to consider an ethical approach as a basis for sustainable marketing.

    (S1) Students will enhance their ability to identify the issues that underlie debates.

    (S2) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches, and their ability to identify presuppositions and to reflect critically upon them.

    (S3) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

    (S4) Students will develop their ability to work in groups.

    (S5) Students will develop their ability to sift through information, assessing the relevance and importance of the information to what is at issue.

    (S6) Students will develop their problem-solving skills.

    (S7) Students will enhance their capacity to participate, in a dispassionate and respectful manner, in debates about controversial and profound matters.

    (S8) Students will develop their willingness critically to evaluate and reflect upon arguments, beliefs, proposals and values, both their own and those of others.

    (S9) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S10) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S11) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S12) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – persuading

    (S13) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills

    (S14) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S15) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S16) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S17) Working in groups and teams - Negotiation skills

    (S18) Skills in using technology - Information accessing

    (S19) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

Year Two Optional Modules

  • American Politics and Society (POLI205)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To acquaint students with the US constitutional system;

    To help students explore how actors and institutions residing outside the state influence the governing processes;

    To help students explore how actors and institutions residing outside the state influence the governing processes.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the Federal Government.

    (LO2) An understanding of how federal institutions interact with those residing at the state level (via the Federalist nature of the US Constitutional system) to shape the character of the US political system.

    (LO3) An understanding of the relationships between the branches of the federal government.

    (LO4) An understand of the power of the federal judiciary, particularly in relation to civil rights and civil liberties.

    (LO5) An understanding of how public opinion, political parties, and the media interact with governing institutions to shape the overall governing processes found in the United States.

    (LO6) Understand the role of the states in the electoral process.

    (LO7) Understand the role of the media in the electoral process.

    (LO8) To understand how contemporary policy reflects the interaction of politics, political institutions, and society.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – persuading

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S7) Skills in using technology - Information accessing

    (S8) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills

    (S9) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

  • Aspects of Media and Politics (POLI208)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    T o give students an appreciation of the relationship between the mass media, politicians and the public; To make students aware of the way the different aspects of the communication process act, react and interact, and with what political and social implications; To familiarise students with the manner in which the mass media respond to political pressure and spin, and with the way coverage affects those exposed to it; To explore the way the media contribute to (or compromise) democracy.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to place the mass media's political role in theoretical, empirical, moral and legal context.

    (LO2) Students will be able to appreciate the role of economic pressure, public relations and political lobbying on the way journalists cover politics.

    (LO3) Students should have a grasp of how far the media trivialise politics, or inflects it in a biased fashion.

    (LO4) Students should be able to understand how, in a variety of contexts, the media relates to the health, or otherwise, of contemporary democracy.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking.

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written.

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral.

  • British Party Politics (POLI239)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting25:75
    Aims

    Students will have a critical awareness of the origins and history of the British party system;

    Students will demonstrate an understanding of political competition within party structures;

    Students will be able to engage with theories of party organisation and how these relate to internal party democracy;

    Students will analyse the role of political parties in the UK, and the challenges they face.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate an in depth knowledge of the organisational structure that parties develop.

    (LO2) Demonstrate an understanding of developments in party ideology.

    (LO3) Identify the problems of power structures both within parties and within their operational environment.

    (LO4) Identify the relationships between political parties, elected representatives, members/activists, and voters.

    (S1) Time management, organisation and adaptability

    (S2) Communicate complex ideas both written and orally.

    (S3) Teamwork

    (S4) Ability to apply topic-specific knowledge and concepts; critical and analytical thinking

    (S5) Information gathering, evaluation and synthesis

    (S6) Ability to work under pressure

    (S7) Enhanced research skills.

  • British Political Ideologies (POLI237)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To examine several theoretical issues relating to political ideologies in Britain. These include what meanings can be attached to the concept of ideology itself and the relationship between political debate and ideology; To examine the range of ideologies present within British politics, looking in particular at the differences between and within each ideology in historical and contemporary contexts.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain an understanding of the nature of political ideologies.

    (LO2) Students will gain knowledge of the content of ideologies in Britain.

    (LO3) Students will be able to understand the nature of debates within British political ideologies.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

  • Comparative Politics of the Middle East and North Africa (POLI215)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the history of state society relations since the emergence of Middle Eastern states in the early 20th century;

    To enable students to compare different cases within the region;

    To provide students with knowledge of other regions to explain outcomes such as authoritarian resilience or the rise of political Islam.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The ability to apply theories of comparative politics to Middle Eastern and North African cases and critically assess these theories in the light of the Middle Eastern experience.

    (LO2) A knowledge of key debates in Middle Eastern and North African politics including the role of oil in politics, political Islam, and authoritarian resilience.

    (LO3) Acquire knowledge of the political history of key Middle Eastern states, including Iran, Egypt and Saudi Arabia.

    (LO4) The ability to write a cogent, well-argued research paper that deals with a significant aspect of these debates and theories.

    (S1) Experience applying social-scientific theories to particular cases, augmenting students' analytical skills.

    (S2) Familiarity with the techniques of qualitative research in comparative government and political sociology.

    (S3) Experience in critically analysing primary sources (e.g. wikileaks cables or local media reports).

  • Gender and Feminist Politics: Core Concepts and Theories (POLI257)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To convey core concepts and ideas in gender politics; To compare and contrast gender and feminist approaches to understanding politics; To encourage the application of theoretical gender debates to practical political issues; To evaluate various strategies for encouraging gender equality and justice; To c ritically present theories of identity and their role in politics.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of concepts and debates about gender and feminist politics.

    (LO2) A detailed knowledge of a variety of key issues and case studies in gender politics.

    (LO3) An ability to apply theoretical and normative frameworks to evaluate the above.

    (LO4) An ability to give effective oral presentations to one’s peers.

    (LO5) An ability to write clearly and analytically, making use of the relevant material.

    (LO6) An ability to research political events by analysing information from different sources.

    (S1) Development of critical thinking skills

    (S2) Presentation skills.

    (S3) Ability to link concepts and ideas to contemporary political issues.

    (S4) Research skills

  • Democratisation and Political Change in Southeast Asia (POLI235)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    Through participating in the lectures, seminar discussions and by completing assessments students will gain:

    Awareness of the modern history of the struggle for democracy, as well as the main approaches to explaining the process of democratisation in comparative political science;

    A solid grasp of the debates over the most important factors associated with democratisation and democratic endurance;

    Knowledge of the political systems of Southeast Asia and some of the key cases of democratic transition and authoritarian endurance in the region;

    An empathetic understanding of the difficult choices that those living under undemocratic political systems face, and the continuing challenges of maintaining a democratic society.

    In addition, the course is designed to augment student skills, providing:

    Experience applying social-scientific theories to particular cases;

    Familiarity with conducting qualitative comparisons between cases;

    Experience using elementary techniques of data analysis and data visualisation to engage in cross-sectional and longitudinal comparison of democratising countries.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) You will be able to summarise the development and spread of representative democracy across the world, and identify the key events in this process.

    (LO2) You will be able to compare and contrast the three most important theoretical perspectives on democratisation: modernisation theory, transition theory and the social forces tradition.

    (LO3) You will be able to identify the strengths and weaknesses of theories of democratisation, and to evaluate them against the empirical evidence.

    (LO4) You will be able to conduct paired qualitative case studies in order to identify factors and processes that relate to democratic transition and breakdown.

    (LO5) You will be able to use simple quantitative techniques in order to identify potential correlations between democratisation and socio-economic change.

    (LO6) You will be able to explain the relevance of key pieces of quantitative evidence for debates about democratisation.

    (LO7) You will be able to describe the main regional patterns of democracy in Southeast Asia and how they have been influenced by historical processes.

    (LO8) You will be able to give an account of the progress of democratisation in Southeast Asia, accounting for the successes and failures of pro-democracy movements in at least two states.

    (S1) Communication skills (speaking, listening and debating)

    (S2) IT skills

    (S3) Numeracy

    (S4) Ethical awareness

    (S5) Problem solving skills

    (S6) Communication Skills (written)

  • Institutions and Political Actors (POLI253)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    To develop an understanding of research methods in comparative research through the examination of key methodological issues including: Large versus small N studies, “most-different versus most-similar” research design, external versus internal validity, inferences and “causality” in case selection;

    To understand how and to which extent political phenomena can be operationalized, measured and tested in empirical analyses;

    To review the procedural and substantive factors accounting for the variation of democracies and autocracies around the world;

    To examine the differences across democratic institutions and critically assess the impact of democratic institutions on policy making and policy stability;

    To investigate the origins of different electoral systems and their variety;

    To analyse the effect of the electoral design on policy choices and the performances of political representatives;

    To analyse voters’ behaviour and the processes of preferences’ aggregation and electoral choices;

    To analyse the conditions under which political leaders are more likely to be held responsible for political outcomes;

    To understand the rationale of political parties’ formation and their role in democratic settings;

    To investigate the influence of special interest groups and the effects of lobbying on political accountability.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Identify the differences and similarities between the institutional and political structures across countries.

    (LO2) Understand the functioning of institutions and their effects on both the types of political actors present in a country and the likely policy outcomes resulting from the chosen institutional design.

    (LO3) Grasp the logic of social science research methods and critically; understand the strengths and limitations of empirical research.

    (LO4) Interpret the findings of the empirical literature on institutional and partisan constraints and their implication for policy outcomes.

    (S1) Ability to interpret critically the validity and generalizability of research claims and findings.

    (S2) Ability to produce a review of the literature summarizing the status of the research on a given subject.

    (S3) Ability to carry out descriptive data analysis and familiarity with basic statistical techniques using statistical software packages

    (S4) Ability to advance arguments in a logically consistent way and to understand the flows of scientific research that is not based on a rigorous research design.

  • International Organisations (POLI225)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    To provide an understanding of the nature of modern state system and the role of international organisations within it;

    To explore central concepts and theories in International Relations and apply these in analyses of the challenges and conflicts faced by the international system;

    To explore mechanisms and policy instruments that International Institutions possess in managing the new world order;

    To assess critical arguments as to the limits of international institutions and the likely future developments;

    To assess interpretations of international law within global governance debates;

    To develop students' skills in synthesis and analysis, and in the presentation of clear and cogent arguments (both orally and in writing) of issues and controversies surrounding international system and its organisations.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Ability to understand the role of institutions in the international system.

    (LO2) Awareness of the role of global governance in the new world order.

    (LO3) Ability to explore powers and limits of international organisations and the role of international law and human rights.

    (LO4) Ability to apply core theories of international relations to major international organisations.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual)

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation

  • International Political Economy (POLI209)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This module aims to examine the interplay between politics and economics and the way this relationship is influenced by domestic and international forces.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1)  Basic appreciation of the dynamic processes of international politics and economics.

    (LO2) An understandiung of a range of IPE theories, and why and how they evolved in response to developments

    (LO3) Familiarity with recent developments in IPE (globalisation, regionalism, economic crises, etc.), and how they relate to IPE theories.

    (LO4) Ability to compare and contrast theories and examine how they ‘fit’ with different periods of time and national and international circumstances.

    (LO5) The ability to use technical vocabulary fluently.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) The ability to apply abstract ideas to real world contexts.

    (S3) The appreciation of complexity, diversity of situations, events and distinguish the most relevant information.

    (S4) To engage with new ideas and perspectives and develop that information into a presentable format.

    (S5) Basic critical skills, including testing validity of statements and the operating the rules of evidence.

    (S6) Intellectual and research independence, derived from setting tasks and solving problems, exercising bibliographic skills, organising information, formulating appropriate questions, understanding the nature of the discipline.

    (S7) Marshalling of argument in written and/or oral form.

  • Knowledge and Epistemic Justice (PHIL212)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To introduce students to contemporary epistemology and to prepare them for more advanced study in this area.

    To enable students to address traditional issues in epistemology, such as the nature and sources of
    knowledge.

    To enable students to engage with cutting-edge research in contemporary epistemology, including on topics (e.g., bias, epistemic justice, fake news) that are of wide social significance.

    To enable students to critically reflect on their own practices and methods of enquiry, in particular on how they access information online.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to discuss some of the main traditional philosophical questions concerning knowledge and its sources.

    (LO2) Students will be able to discuss some topics in contemporary epistemology that are of wide social significance.

    (LO3) Students will be able to discuss some philosophical issues relating to scientific and social-scientific knowledge.

    (LO4) Students will be able to explain, and competently to employ, key terminology and concepts from traditional and contemporary epistemology.

    (LO5) To enable students to critically reflect on their own practices and methods of enquiry, in particular how they access information online.

    (S1) Students will enhance their abilities in reading and understanding texts and in comprehending abstract material.

    (S2) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

    (S3) Students will enhance their ability to identify the issues that underlie debates.

    (S4) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches, and their ability to identify presuppositions and to reflect critically upon them.

    (S5) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

    (S6) Students will develop their ability to work independently.

    (S7) Students will develop their ability to sift through information, assessing the relevance and importance of the information to what is at issue.

    (S8) Students will develop their problem-solving skills.

    (S9) Students will enhance their capacity to participate, in a dispassionate and respectful manner, in debates about controversial and profound matters.

    (S10) Students will develop their willingness critically to evaluate and reflect upon arguments, beliefs, proposals and values, both their own and those of others.

  • Liberty, Justice and the Good Society (PHIL219)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    Students will be invited to consider the theories and arguments of thinkers who have shaped contemporary political philosophy, such as John Rawls, Robert Nozick and Michael Walzer. Students will be asked to consider some of the main concepts in political philosophy, including freedom, equality and justice. Students will be invited to appreciate the variety of philosophical issues raised by contemporary political debates around controversial topics, such as feminism and multiculturalism.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to distinguish some of the main concepts in debates within contemporary political philosophy.

    (LO2) Students will be able to explain different ways of understanding concepts employed in debates in contemporary political philosophy.

    (LO3) Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in contemporary political philosophy.

    (LO4) Students will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to contemporary political issues.

    (LO5) Students will be able to identify philosophical assumptions underlying political questions and claims.

    (LO6) Students will be able to speak with confidence and clarity on issues of contemporary political philosophy.

    (LO7) Students will be able to explain details of influential texts in recent political philosophy.

    (LO8) Students will be able to articulate and defend positions on issues in contemporary political philosophy.

    (LO9) Students will be able to write coherently and rigorously about philosophical issues raised by current political controversies.

    (LO10) Students will be able to structure a discussion of issues in contemporary political philosophy.

    (S1) Students will develop their skills in making appropriate use of information technology, information on the World Wide Web and reference works and databases relevant to the discipline.

    (S2) Students will enhance their capacity to participate, in a dispassionate and respectful manner, in debates about controversial and profound matters.

    (S3) Students will develop their willingness critically to evaluate and reflect upon arguments, beliefs, proposals and values, both their own and those of others.

    (S4) Students will enhance their abilities in reading and understanding texts and in comprehending abstract material.

    (S5) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and reconstructing and evaluating arguments.

    (S6) Students will enhance their ability to identify and reflect critically upon the issues that underlie debates.

    (S7) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches.

    (S8) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

    (S9) Students will develop the ability to perform bibliographical searches, to include (to professional standard) citations and bibliographies in their work and to plan, organise and produce presentations and essays.

    (S10) Students will enhance their oral and written communications skills and develop skill in explaining complex material in a precise manner.

  • Moral Philosophy: Theory and Practice (PHIL239)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Students will consider the theories and arguments of some of the most important contemporary moral philosophers focused on normative and applied ethics. Students will discuss some of the main concepts in moral philosophy. Students will appreciate the variety of philosophical issues raised by morality and a range of controversial social practices.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to distinguish some of the main concepts in moral philosophical debates.

    (LO2) Students will be able to distinguish between different ways of understanding  concepts in moral philosophical debates.

    (LO3) Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in contemporary moral philosophy.

    (LO4) Students will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to ethical issues.

    (LO5) Students will be able to identify philosophical assumptions underlying ethical claims.

    (LO6) Students will be able to structure a discussion of issues in moral philosophy.

    (LO7) Students will be able to speak with confidence and clarity on issues of moral philosophy.

    (LO8) Students will be able to explain details of influential texts in recent moral philosophy.

    (LO9) Students will be able to articulate and defend positions in moral philosophy.

    (LO10) Students will be able to write coherently and rigorously about abstract philosophical issues raised by ethical controversies.

    (S1) Students will develop their skills in making appropriate use of information technology, information on the World Wide Web and reference works and databases relevant to the discipline.

    (S2) Students will enhance their capacity to participate, in a dispassionate and respectful manner, in debates about controversial and profound matters.

    (S3) Students will develop their willingness critically to evaluate and reflect upon arguments, beliefs, proposals and values, both their own and those of others.

    (S4) Students will enhance their abilities in reading and understanding texts and in comprehending abstract material.

    (S5) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

    (S6) Students will enhance their ability to identify and reflect critically upon the issues that underlie debates.

    (S7) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches.

    (S8) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

    (S9) Students will develop the ability to perform bibliographical searches, to include (to professional standard) citations and bibliographies in their work and to plan, organise and produce presentations and essays.

    (S10) Students will enhance their oral and written communications skills and develop skill in explaining complex material in a precise manner.

  • Politics in Action (POLI200)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop materials and / or undertake tasks within a practical or vocational context;

    To apply within that context pedagogical and other theoretical or practical knowledge relevant to the development and delivery of those materials and / or tasks;

    To apply academic and / or theoretical knowledge within a practical context and to reflect and report on the relationship between the two;

    To develop and identify a range of personal / employability skills and to reflect and report on this.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to demonstrate an ability to develop materials and/or undertake tasks, according to a given specification and requirement, within a practical or vocational context.

    (LO2) Students should be able to reflect on and evaluate the efficacy of the materials developed and/or the tasks undertaken.

    (LO3) Students should be able to identify the connection between academic and/or theoretical knowledge and its practical or vocational application.

    (LO4) Students should be able to identify, reflect and report on a range of personal/employability skills.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - report writing

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills (oral)

    (S4) Time and project management - project management

    (S5) Information skills - networking skills

    (S6) Personal attributes and qualities - willingness to take responsibility

    (S7) Commercial awareness - relevant understanding of organisations

  • Security in A Globalised World (POLI231)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To provide an overview of how security has been affected by globalisation; To explore how the understandings of security and globalisation have developed over time.; To develop a theoretical focus on security in global politics; To explore the main themes, issues, and political debates around security in a globalised world.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students will have acquired knowledge of the main debates around security and globalisation.

    (LO2) The ability to critically discuss these issues.

    (LO3) The ability to write a cogent, well-argued research paper that deals with a significant aspect of these debates and theories.

    (LO4) The ability to engage and interact with the main themes in a specific body of intellectual knowledge.

    (LO5) An ability to access and make effective use of bibliographical and electronic sources of information.

    (LO6) An ability to deliver short, small-group presentations where they convey information and ideas succinctly and effectively.

    (LO7) How to make arguments in a coherent and effective manner.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Working in groups and teams - Time management

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

  • Uses, Misuses and Abuses of Language (PHIL276)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to key concepts and figures in the project of understanding natural language . To introduce students to the distinction between semantics and pragmatics and to speech-act theory. To introduce students to some contemporary applications of speech-act theory to topics in political philosophy.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to explain different accounts of the meaning and function of referring expressions.

    (LO2) Students will be able to understand and apply the distinction between semantics and pragmatics.

    (LO3) Students will be able to discuss competing philosophical accounts of the relation between meaning and use.

    (LO4) Students will be able to explain and critically assess Grice’s theory of meaning and/or Austin’s speech-act theory.

    (LO5) Students will be able to apply theoretical tools from philosophy of language to questions about free speech and harm in political philosophy.

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S2) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S3) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S4) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S5) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S6) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

    (S7) Problem solving skills

    (S8) Organisational skills

    (S9) Communication skills

Programme Year Three

In your final year, you must complete either a work placement (HASS300) or a research project (HASS301).

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Advanced Macroeconomics (ECON343)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To further develop understanding of macroeconomic theory, where appropriate, to integrate the theory with issues of current policy interest.
    To further develop students' analytical and problem solving abilities applied to economic principles

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of contemporary macroeconomic

    (LO2) Be able to critically appraise the relevant theory and evidence

    (LO3) Apply macroeconomic theory to analyse macroeconomic developments and evaluate their implications

    (LO4) Apply macroeconomic theory to analyse policy implications

    (LO5) Further develop their mathematical and analytical skills as applied in modern economics

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Teamwork

    (S4) Adaptability

    (S5) Lifelong Learning Skills

  • Advanced Microeconomics (ECON342)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    This module aims to provide an understanding of the market failure resulting from asymmetric information. The course covers some of the canonical models of adverse selection and moral hazard focussing on the design of optimal contracts under informational asymmetries.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Solve simple economic models

    (LO2) Understand underlying assumptions

    (LO3) Understand theorems and key proofs

    (LO4) Predict the choices of economic agents

    (S1) problem solving skills

    (S2) numeracy

    (S3) Communication skills

  • Aesthetics (PHIL316)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    Students will be introduced to arguments of some of the most important philosophers on art, aesthetics and cultural theory, including Kant, Hegel, Danto and Tolstoy. Students will consider key concepts and theories in aesthetics, including the aesthetic judgement, disinterestedness, the institutional theory of art, the nature of representation and expression and feminist and post-modern critiques. Students will be encouraged to make connections between works of art and artistic practices of the past and present.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in aesthetics.

    (LO2) Students will be able to analyse key concepts and arguments relating to aesthetics and art.

    (LO3) Students will be able to structure discussion of issues in aesthetics.

    (LO4) Students will be able to identify links between influential philosophical theories and artistic practices.

    (LO5) Students will be able to articulate and defend positions in aesthetics and philosophy of art.

    (LO6) Students will be able to present their ideas with clarity and confidence.

    (LO7) Students will be able to develop in writing coherent, structured and informative accounts on abstract philosophical issues.

    (S1) Students will develop their skills in making appropriate use of information technology, information on the World Wide Web and reference works and databases relevant to the discipline.

    (S2) Students will enhance their capacity to participate, in a dispassionate and respectful manner in debates about controversial and profound matters.

    (S3) Students will develop their willingness critically to evaluate and reflect upon arguments, beliefs, proposals and values, both their own and those of others.

    (S4) Students will enhance their abilities in reading and understanding texts and in comprehending abstract material.

    (S5) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

    (S6) Students will enhance their ability to identify and reflect critically upon the issues that underlie debates.

    (S7) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches.

    (S8) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

    (S9) Students will develop the ability to perform bibliographical searches, to include to professional standard citations and bibliographies in their work and to plan, organise and produce presentations and essays.

    (S10) Students will enhance their oral and written communications skills and develop skill in explaining complex material in a precise manner.

  • Alternative Perspectives in Economics (ECON250)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    This module aims to provide a historical and methodological basis for understanding modern economic theory.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Analyse the philosophical basis for methodology

    (LO2) Differentiate between and analyze the approach to subject matter adopted by the different schools of thought

    (LO3) Demonstrate a knowledge of the context within which different strands of economic thought developed

    (LO4) Evaluate different methodological approaches

    (S1) Communication skills

    (S2) Lifelong learning centre

    (S3) Ethical awareness

  • Classical Chinese Philosophy (PHIL367)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To investigate what is distinctive about classical Chinese approaches to questions of ontology, social harmony, personal morality and soteriology. To examine the ways in which philosophy in Classical Chinese civilisation develops in the Hundred Schools period, with particular attention to the dialogue between Confucians and Daoists.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to engage in informed discussions about the concepts and categories in which philosophical discussions were conducted in ancient China.

    (LO2) Students will develop abilities in developing and contextualising new information about other worldviews.

    (LO3) Students will be enabled to assimilate alternative cultural perspectives from which to view their own traditions.

    (LO4) Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories propounded in the classical period of Chinese thought.

    (LO5) Students will be able to discuss the problem of cultural relativism informed by an understanding of a particular alien pattern of thinking.

    (LO6) Students will be able to relate classical Chinese thought to European philosophical interests.

    (S1) Students will develop abilities to read and understand ancient texts in English translation.

    (S2) Students will improve their ability to identify the issues that underlie debates.

    (S3) Students will develop the confidence to consider previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches.

    (S4) Students will develop their ability to identify presuppositions and to reflect critically upon them.

    (S5) Students will develop a facility to compare and evaluate categories of thought from different cultures.

    (S6) Students will enhance their written and communication skills.

    (S7) Students will develop their ability to work independently.

    (S8) Students will develop an ability to write in a manner that accords with professional standards and expectations.

  • Comparative Voting Behaviour (POLI322)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module seeks to equip students with the analytical skills needed to analyse election outcomes from the perspective of both voters' behaviour and parties' strategies;

    The module also aims to enable students to analyse survey data using quantitative methods; to provide them with sufficient knowledge of the statistical package SPSS; and to prepare students to write reports and interpret data in a way that can be used to advise politicians, political parties, or any organisation concerned with public opinion and voting. By fulfilling these goals the module also aims at widening students' employability, enabling them to develop some of the main analytical and statistical skills which are demanded by employers.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) You will be able to contrast the theoretical assumptions of structural, social-psychological and rational-choice models of voting behaviour.

    (LO2) You will be able to critically analyse the potential and limitations of voting behaviour models both in general and when applied to specific elections and contexts.

    (LO3) You will be able to critically analyse how voting behaviour varies across types of party, as well as the dynamic relationship between the behaviour of voters and parties.

    (LO4) You will be able to use the statistical package SPSS to prepare datasets for data analysis.

    (LO5) You will acquire knowledge of key statistical techniques and be able to apply them to analyse specific election outcomes.

    (LO6) You will be able to apply notions of statistical inference and generalise findings based on survey data.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) IT skills

    (S4) Organisational skills

    (S5) International awareness

    (S6) Teamwork

    (S7) Communication skills

    (S8) Adaptability

  • Competition and Regulation (ECON337)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To apply the tools of microeconomics to the analysis of firms, markets, consumers and regulators in order to understand the nature and consequences of the process of competition and regulation. These tools will also be applied to the evaluation of competition and government policy.  This will extend knowledge and skills of microeconomic analysis by covering recent advances in theory as well as empirical analysis of relevant microeconomic topics.

    Learning OutcomesUse economic principles, concepts and techniques to discuss and analyse:

      -          the power and limitations of competition as a force for market regulation;

      -          government policy to regulate market power to protect firms, consumers and employees.

      Apply standard frameworks, including verbal, graphical, mathematical and statistical representations of economic concepts and models, to explain and evaluate the effects of a range of behaviours by firms and regulators and how they are influenced by economic incentives.​

      ​Identify and analyse current issues and problems in regulation and propose solutions.

      ​Compare, contrast and critically evaluate regulation of different industries and market failures.

      ​Communicate effectively orally and in writing and in accordance with project specifications

      ​Conduct independent research in applied economics

      ​Deliver a professional quality formal presentation by exhibiting: clarity and appropriate pace; logical structure; credibility; effective use of visual aids/technology

      ​Identify problems

      ​Analyse problems

      ​Offer viable solutions

      ​Use economic principles, concepts and techniques to discuss and analyse government policy and economic performance.

    • The Economics of Developing Countries (ECON306)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      This module aims to introduce students to the theoretical perspectives andempirical debates within development economics and impart an in-depthappreciation of the issues related to economic development and its determinantsin less developed countries.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) To understand the nature and determinants of economic development in the LDCs;

      (LO2) To recognise both the strengths andlimitations of various alternative models of the development process

      (LO3) To understand the determinants ofeconomic welfare in LDCs

      (LO4) To recognise the implications fordeveloping countries of international exchange, trade liberalisation andglobalisation

      (LO5) To appreciate the relationships betweenglobalisation and economic performance in low and middle income economies

      (LO6) To critically evaluate the roles,achievements and failures of various international policy initiatives in thecontext of developing country measured economic performance and domesticeconomic welfare.

      (S1) Problem solving skills

      (S2) Teamwork

      (S3) Organisational skills

      (S4) Communication skills

      (S5) International awareness

      (S6) Lifelong learning skills

      (S7) Ethical awareness

    • Eu As An International Actor (POLI328)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      Students will gain a foundational understanding of foreign policy evaluation of the EU that can be transferred to analyse other (international) organisations;

      Students will develop the ability to analyse the foreign policy system of the EU, the actors involved in it, and the main political framework such as the Common Foreign, Security and Defence Policy;

      Students will analyse the main theories for analysing foreign policy and the analytical concepts used to explain the EU’s development of its own distinct foreign, security, and defence policies;

      Students will explore the way the EU interacts with partners at a regional and a global level, particularly its partnerships with the Mediterranean area as well as the US, Russia, and China;

      Students will debate problems and challenges that face the EU as an international actor;

      Students will foster different skills of research and assessment.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) Demonstrate foundational knowledge of foreign policy evaluation and how far this applies to the EU as a foreign policy actor.

      (LO2) Relate theories on EU integration and governance to the rise and development of the European security and defence policy and the practice of civilian and military operations deployed.

      (LO3) Identify problems and challenges that face the EU as an international actor

      (LO4) Critically reflect on the challenges and consequences that emerge for third-states from the EU’s actions and policies

      (S1) Enhanced research skills.

      (S2) Enhanced skills of communication, negotiation and debating.

      (S3) Ability to communicate complex ideas both written and orally.

    • Frontiers of Ethics (PHIL302)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      To consider conceptual and ethical issues arising from matters of global concern, such as international justice, humanitarian intervention and the environmental crisis. To consider arguments and assumptions underlying a range of claims concerning such issues as disability, global citizenship, climate change and the ethical status of nature. To examine difficulties for traditional philosophical approaches raised by such issues and recent theoretical developments relevant to them.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) Students will be able to distinguish between some of the main concepts involved in philosophical debates arising from matters of current global concern.

      (LO2) Students will be able to distinguish between different ways of understanding  concepts in philosophical debates arising from from matters of global concern.

      (LO3) Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in debates about matters of disability, global justice, just war, environmental justice and environmental ethics.

      (LO4) Students will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to current ethical issues.

      (LO5) Students will be able to identify philosophical assumptions underlying ethical claims.

      (LO6) Students will be able to structure a philosophical discussion of current ethical issues.

      (LO7) Students will be able to speak with confidence and clarity on current ethical issues.

      (LO8) Students will be able to explain details of texts shaping current philosophical debates about matters of global concern.

      (LO9) Students will be able to articulate and defend positions in current philosophical debates about matters of global concern.

      (LO10) Students will be able to write coherently and rigorously about abstract philosophical issues raised by current ethical controversies.

      (S1) Students will develop their skills in making appropriate use of information technology, information on the World Wide Web and reference works and databases relevant to the discipline.

      (S2) Students will enhance their capacity to participate, in a dispassionate and respectful manner, in debates about controversial and profound matters.

      (S3) Students will develop their willingness critically to evaluate and reflect upon arguments, beliefs, proposals and values, both their own and those of others.

      (S4) Students will enhance their abilities in reading and understanding texts and in comprehending abstract material.

      (S5) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

      (S6) Students will enhance their ability to identify and reflect critically upon the issues that underlie debates.

      (S7) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches.

      (S8) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

      (S9) Students will develop the ability to research a philosophical topic, perform bibliographical searches, to include (to professional standard) citations and bibliographies in their work and to plan, organise and produce presentations and essays.

      (S10) Students will enhance their oral and written communications skills and develop skill in explaining complex material in a precise manner.

    • Game Theoretical Approaches to Microeconomics (ECON322)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      The objective of the module is to provide an introduction to game theory. This is the study of strategic interactions ie situations where outcomes depend not only on our own actions but also how others react to our actions. This module complements those in core macro and microeconomics and offers more insight into strategic decisions and competetive behaviour in general.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) Distinguish between types of games

      (LO2) Explain game theoretical concepts

      (LO3) Conduct advanced microeconomic analysis by formulating a game and its associated solution concepts and deriving solutions to games

      (LO4) Apply games in a range of economic, business and social contexts

      (LO5) Explain the importance of game theoretic approaches in economic analysis

      (S1) Problem Solving Skills

      (S2) Numeracy

      (S3) Commercial Awareness

      (S4) Teamwork

      (S5) Organisational Skills

      (S6) Communication skills

      (S7) IT skills

      (S8) International awareness

      (S9) Lifelong learning skills

      (S10) Ethical awareness

    • Gender and Global Politics: Women, Peace and Security (POLI349)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims

      To illustrate what feminist approaches contribute to our understanding of world politics; To understand the implications of identity and difference in the practice of global politics; To encourage the application of theoretical gender debates to practical political issues; To critically engage with feminist approaches to policy making.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) The ability to deploy gender as a category of analysis in relation to issues in global politics.

      (LO2) Knowledge of literature applying feminist theory and concepts to the study of global politics.

      (LO3) Ability to understand and critically analyse gendered issues and policy responses within global politics.

      (LO4) Ability to synthesise and present key issues on a particular topic.

      (S1) Critical thinking and reasoning

      (S2) Presentation skills

      (S3) Policy analysis

      (S4) Enhanced research skills

    • Health Care, Economics and Justice (PHIL366)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      To introduce students to the main normative issues surrounding the delivery of health care in modern societies.

      To discuss the purpose of health care, the notions of health and disease, just allocation of medical resources, issues of inequity in health dispositions, and problems of prioritising and rationing in health care.

      To acquaint students with the main theories of health care justice and also covers problems in public health and global health inequalities.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in debates about matters of health care justice.

      (LO2) Students will be able to distinguish some of the main concepts involved in philosophical debates about medicine and health care.

      (LO3) Students will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to current issues of social justice.

      (LO4) Students will be able to identify philosophical assumptions underlying ethical claims.

      (LO5) Students will be able to structure a philosophical discussion of current ethical issues.

      (LO6) Students will be able to speak with confidence and clarity on current ethical issues.

      (LO7) Students will be able to articulate and defend positions in current philosophical debates about matters of global concern.

      (LO8) Students will be able to write coherently and rigorously about abstract philosophical issues raised by current ethical controversies.

      (S1) Students will develop their skills in making appropriate use of information technology, information on the World Wide Web and reference works and databases relevant to the discipline.

      (S2) Students will enhance their capacity to participate, in a dispassionate and respectful manner, in debates about controversial and profound matters.

      (S3) Students will develop their willingness critically to evaluate and reflect upon arguments, beliefs, proposals and values, both their own and those of others.

      (S4) Students will enhance their abilities in reading and understanding texts and in comprehending abstract material.

      (S5) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

      (S6) Students will enhance their ability to identify and reflect critically upon the issues that underlie debates.

      (S7) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches.

      (S8) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

      (S9) Students will develop the ability to perform bibliographical searches, to include (to professional standard) citations and bibliographies in their work and to plan, organise and produce presentations and essays.

      (S10) Students will enhance their oral and written communications skills and develop skill in explaining complex material in a precise manner.

    • Immigration and the State (POLI302)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims

      To provide an overview of the contemporary politics of immigration in liberal democratic states in Europe, the US and beyond; To explore how the politics and policy of immigration have developed over time, and in relation to globalisation and changes in actual patterns and flows, from an historical and regional perspective (Europe, the US, global); To develop a theoretical focus on the politics of the state in relation to how state-based forms of organisation process the international movement of persons; To explore the main policy issues and political debates around immigration from the perspective of the state.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) Knowledge of the main debates around immigration and immigration policy in the context of the politics of the state.

      (LO2) Knowledge of the main debates around the integration of migrants in receiving states.

      (LO3) An understanding of the key ideas which inform political responses to immigration and the integration of migrants.

      (LO4) An understanding of the key theories which attempt to explain the politics and policy of immigration in liberal democratic states.

      (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

      (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

      (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

      (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

      (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    • Industrial Organisation (ECON333)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims

      To apply the tools of microeconomics to the analysis of firms, markets and industries in order to understand the nature and consequences of the process of competition. These tools will also be applied to the evaluation of relevant government policy.  This will extend knowledge and skills of microeconomic analysis by covering recent advances in theory as well as empirical analysis of relevant microeconomic topics.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) Students will be able to use economic principles, concepts and techniques to discuss and analyse government policy and economic performance with reference to standard frameworks in Industrial Organisation.

      (LO2) Students will be able to apply standard frameworks, including verbal, graphical, mathematical and statistical representations of economic concepts and models, to explain and evaluate the effects of a range of competitive behaviours by firms and how they are influenced by economic incentives and the ethical issues enveloped within this.

      (LO3) Students will be able to analyse current issues and problems in business and industry from domestic, international and cross-border perspectives.

      (LO4) Students will be able to compare, contrast and critically evaluate alternative schools of thought in Industrial Organisation with reference to empirical evidence.

      (LO5) Students will be able to conduct competent applied economic research by locating, selecting and analysing information relevant to the study of Industrial Organisation from domestic and global perspectives.

      (LO6) Students will be able to communicate effectively in writing and in accordance with a report specification

      (S1) Problem solving skills

      (S2) Numeracy

      (S3) Commercial awareness

      (S4) Communication skills

      (S5) IT skills

      (S6) Ethical awareness

    • International Political Economy (ECON325)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      AimsThis module aims to familiarise students with rational choice and public choice theories and arguments, and with their applications in open economies and international political economy; theoretical concepts such as the Coase theorem, the Arrow impossibility theorem, and economic populism; key concepts of the New Institutional Economics and related applications to the theory of the firm; a modern economics’ view of globalisation; and the application of international political economy concepts to Latin America.

      The module also aims to deepen students'' understanding and awareness of the meaning and importance of national cultures, the relationship between rent seeking and protectionism; corruption; essential aspects of multinational corporations, foreign direct investment, and regulation; specific characteristics of the Argentine and Mexican economic policies and institutions and Chilean ‘exceptionalism’; and the possibility of applying ideas developed in this module to other geographical, national, regional and historical contexts.




      Learning OutcomesStudents will understand the concepts of rational choice and public choice in order to study aspects of a globalised world, which is in key respects different from that of elementary textbook models


      ​Students will gain a deep understanding of international business and the international political economy, in a way compatible with rigorous approaches to economic analysis

      ​Students will become familiar with theoretical concepts from rational choice and public choice theories, with emphasis on theories and models which apply to open economies in a context of globalisation

      ​Students will be able to apply these theoretical concepts in order to study some aspects of the political economy of international business.

      ​Students will be able to apply theoretical concepts to a Latin American case study.

      ​Students will be able to produce and deliver a coherent presentation.

    • International Trade (ECON335)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims

      To develop an appreciation and understanding of basic principles determining the observed patterns of trade in the increasingly globalised world economy.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) Students will be able to understand the role of both absolute and comparative advantage in explaining observed patterns of trade in the global economy

      (LO2) Students will be able to recognise both the strengths and limitations of the basic Ricardian approach and the Hecksher-Ohlin Theory of trade.

      (LO3) Students will be able to critically evaluate the roles, achievements and failures of various international institutions in the context of international economic performance.

      (LO4) Students will be able to critically understand and approach trade based on increasing returns to scale

      (LO5) Students will be able to recognise the implications of different types of trade barriers and why countries protect.

      (LO6) Students will develop a critical understanding of the importance and implications of different levels of economic integration in the context of NAFTA and the EU.

      (LO7) Students will be able to critically evaluate trade-oriented growth strategies for less developed economies.

      (S1) Problem solving skills

      (S2) Teamwork

      (S3) Organisational skills

      (S4) Communication skills

      (S5) IT skills

      (S6) International awareness

    • Introductory Econometrics for Business and Economics (ECON233)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
      Aims

      The aims of the module are as follows:

      To learn basic econometric concepts and the theory behind them
      To subsequently apply econometric techniques in business and economics;
      To implement econometric analysis using observed data and computer software.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) Students will be able to use of computer packages using various econometric techniques, to real and observed economic / business data.

      (LO2) Students will be able to use elementary forecasting techniques.  

      (LO3) Students will be able to understanding the theory behind the econometric concepts and their relevance to the evaluation of certain business and / or economic situations.

      (S1) Problem solving skills

      (S2) Numeracy

      (S3) Commercial awareness

      (S4) Communication skills

      (S5) IT skills

    • Law and Economics (ECON360)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims

      This course does not require prior knowledge of the law, nor is its objective to teach students about the law. The main objective is to show students how they can apply the tools of economic analysis to understand the basic structure and function of the law. The course focuses on the core common law areas of torts, contracts, and property, along with a discussion of the litigation process, the economics of crime, and antitrust law.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) Students will be able to understand the use of economics to analyse the law

      (LO2) Students will be able to understand the importance of the law in economics

      (LO3) Students will be able to understand the use of model in law and economics

      (LO4) Students will be able to develop the ability to do a positive analysis of liability rules

      (S1) Problem solving skills

      (S2) Numeracy

      (S3) Communication skills

      (S4) Lifelong learning skills

    • Media, Politics and Climate Change (POLI345)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims

      Introduce students to the political and scientific realities of climate change and energy, as they are currently understood and contested; Explore journalistic practice in the realm of climate change and energy security, and the economic and political imperatives that drive it; Investigate how a range of media (and media genres, like documentaries) cover climate change and energy security, and with what impact on those exposed;   Review the social and political implications of media (under) representations of climate change, and what this tells us about contemporary democracy.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) Students will be achieve a basic understanding of the science behind climate change and energy security, alongside an appreciation of how politics impinges on climate change address/policy and the mediation of the topic

      (LO2) Students will be able to appreciate how journalists struggle to engage with the climate change and energy security issues, and do so in an increasingly pressured environment

      (LO3) Students will become aware of how the conventional and new media cover climate change and energy security; how climate scepticism impinges on the framing of stories; and how exposure to coverage influences public perceptions

      (LO4) Students will develop a grasp of what the mediation and politicisation of climate change tell us about power and democracy in contemporary society

      (LO5) Students should be able to communicate their understanding in cogent form in a varierty of non-written media

      (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

      (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

      (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

      (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

      (S5) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

      (S6) Working in groups and teams - Negotiation skills

    • Philosophical Approaches to Conflict (PHIL365)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      To introduce students to the philosophical analysis of conflict. To help students to think through for themselves the just solution to various conflicts between  societies and within society. To help students to think through for themselves the appropriateness or otherwise of the various ways in which present-day societies solve, or attempt to solve, conflicts. To help students to think through for themselves the relationship between state and individual, and between different groups in the state.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) Students will show a capacity to analyse and evaluate, from a philosophical point of view, competing legal and moral rights.

      (LO2) Students will be able to form considered and philosophically defensible judgements about appropriate resolution when rights clash in the public sphere.

      (LO3) Students will be able to apply theoretical resources to conflictual issues of contemporary socio-political and/or legal concern.

      (LO4) Students will be able to articulate philosophical debates emerging from analysis of complex and sensitive scenarios.

      (LO5) Students will be able to defend positions in relation to competing socio-political perspectives.

      (LO6) Students will be able to be able to write with philosophical rigour about socio-political and/or legal conflicts.

      (S1) Students will enhance their abilities in reading and understanding texts and in comprehending abstract material.

      (S2) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

      (S3) Students will enhance their ability to identify the issues that underlie debates.

      (S4) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches, and their ability to identify presuppositions and to reflect critically upon them.

      (S5) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

      (S6) Students will develop their ability to work independently.

      (S7) Students will develop their ability to sift through information, assessing the relevance and importance of the information to what is at issue.

      (S8) Students will develop their problem-solving skills.

      (S9) Students will enhance their capacity to participate, in a dispassionate and respectful manner, in debates about controversial and profound matters.

      (S10) Students will develop their willingness critically to evaluate and reflect upon arguments, beliefs, proposals and values, both their own and those of others.

      (S11) Students will exercise skills in the digital sharing of their work and peer comment.

    • Philosophy of the Future (PHIL312)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims

      To provide an introduction to debates concerning the philosophical implications of foreseeable future technological innovations. To examine the relevance of metaphysical and ethical considerations to future technological and scientific developments.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) Students will be able to identify the main issues and positions in contemporary philosophical discussions of issues such as human enhancement, existential risks, teleportation, time travel, the technological singularity, the simulation argument, the feasibility and desirability of uploading into virtual worlds.

      (LO2) Students will be able to explain the main strengths and weaknesses of these positions.

      (LO3) Students will be able to explain the relevance of metaphysical and ethical considerations to debates concerning these issues. 

      (LO4) Students will be able to think more creatively about philosophical issues.

      (LO5) Students will be able to structure philosophical arguments relating issues raised by future technological developments.

      (LO6) Students will be able to articulate and defend specific positions in current philosophical debates concerning likely future developments in science and technology.

      (LO7) Students will be able to write coherently and rigorously about the philosophical issues raised by future technological developments.

      (S1) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

      (S2) Students will develop their willingness critically to evaluate and reflect upon arguments, beliefs, proposals and values, both their own and those of others.

      (S3) Students will enhance their capacity to participate, in a dispassionate and respectful manner, in debates about controversial and profound matters.

      (S4) Students will enhance their ability to identify the issues with truly underlie debates.

      (S5) Students will develop their ability to marshal arguments, and present them orally and in writing.

      (S6) Students will develop and enhance their ability to work effectively and independently.

      (S7) Students will enhance their abilities in reading and understanding texts and in comprehending abstract material.

      (S8) Students will develop their skills in making appropriate use of information technology, information on the World Wide Web and reference works and databases relevant to the discipline.

    • Political Broadcasting (radio) (POLI339)
      Level3
      Credit level30
      SemesterWhole Session
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      To develop students’ skills in a range of journalistic tasks required for political broadcasting on radio, including planning, research, writing, interviewing, reporting, producing, social media usage and blogging; To enable students to plan, prepare and deliver different forms of political broadcasting, including news bulletins, expert interviews and special reports, both in a studio environment and on location; To engage students in a simulation of real world broadcasting that will enable them to apply and develop their academic knowledge of politics through the demands of responding rapidly and authoritatively to political events as they unfold, in Britain, Europe and the world; To provide students with an understanding of the range and inter-dependencies of roles in a broadcasting environment and of the responsibilities of journalists, including ethical and regulatory considerations; To equip students with a range of advanced transferable skills of relevance to professional contexts beyond journalism, including communication, teamwork, problem-solving and time-management skills; To enable students to understand the significance of the audience in political broadcasting and to develop the skills require to expand and engage audiences; To develop students’ confidence in engaging in critical self-reflection and peer-review as a means of improving the quality of their work, both individually and collectively.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) Students will develop skills in a range of journalistic tasks required for political broadcasting on radio, including planning, research, writing, interviewing, reporting, producing, social media usage and blogging.

      (LO2) Students will be able to plan, prepare and deliver different forms of political broadcasting, including news bulletins, expert interviews and special reports, both in a studio environment and on location.

      (LO3) Students will demonstrate a capacity to apply and develop their academic knowledge of politics through the demands of responding rapidly and authoritatively to political events as they unfold, in Britain, Europe and the world.

      (LO4) Students will have a clear understanding of the range and inter-dependencies of roles in a broadcasting environment and of the responsibilities of journalists, including ethical and regulatory considerations.

      (LO5) Students will acquire a range of advanced transferable skills of relevance to professional contexts beyond journalism, including communication, teamwork, problem-solving and time-management skills.

      (LO6) Students will understand the significance of the audience in political broadcasting and have acquired skills to expand and engage audiences.

      (LO7) Students will be confident in engaging in critical self-reflection and peer-review as a means of improving the quality of their work, both individually and as part of a team.

      (S1) Adaptability

      (S2) Problem solving

      (S3) Numeracy

      (S4) Commercial awareness

      (S5) Teamwork

      (S6) Organisational skills

      (S7) Communication skills

      (S8) IT skills

      (S9) International awareness

      (S10) Lifelong learning skills

      (S11) Ethical awareness

      (S12) Leadership

      (S13) Business and customer awareness basic understanding of the key drivers for business success – including the importance of innovation and taking calculated risks – and the need to provide customer satisfaction and build customer loyalty

      (S14) Career and identity management online managing digital reputation and online identity

      (S15) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

      (S16) Communication and collaboration online participating in digital networks for learning and research

      (S17) Digital scholarship participating in emerging academic, professional and research practices that depend on digital systems

      (S18) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

      (S19) Information technology (application of) adopting, adapting and using digital devices, applications and services

      (S20) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

      (S21) Learning skills online studying and learning effectively in technology-rich environments, formal and informal

      (S22) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

      (S23) Media literacy online critically reading and creatively producing academic and professional communications in a range of media

      (S24) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

      (S25) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

      (S26) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions

      (S27) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

      (S28) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

      (S29) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

    • Politics of Development (POLI314)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims

      The module will familiarise students with the historical development of the state in the global south, and the developmental trajectories, of key states in Asia, Latin America, Africa and the Middle East. The module will teach students how to compare country cases within and across regions. Students will compose a policy paper, which challenges them to marshal empirical evidence to translate academic debates they encoutered during the module into a coherent analysis of policy options and clear policy.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) The ability to critically engage with institutional theories of development.

      (LO2) A knowledge of key debates in the politics of development including the role of the state, democracy, good governance and the "resource curse".

      (LO3) To acquire knowledge of the developmental pathways of key countries in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East.

      (LO4) The ability to write a cogent, well-argued policy paper that deals with a significant aspect of these debates and theories.

      (S1) Experience in applying social-scientific theories to particular cases, augmenting students' analytical skills.

      (S2) Familiarity with the techniques of qualitative research in comparative government and political sociology.

      (S3) Experience interpreting socio-economic development indicators.

    • Public Policy: An Advanced Introduction (POLI310)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims

      To introduce students to concepts such as ‘the public’, ‘the private’, ‘power’; To introduce students to the core ideas that explain societies acceptance of and/or desire for state intervention in the form of a public policy; To introduce students to the ways state theory can be used to explain how decisions are reached in the policy process.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) Students will understand the key theoretical ideas underpinning public policy.

      (LO2) Students will understand the frameworks that have been developed to inform our understanding of the policy and decision-making processes.

      (LO3) Students will understand the difficulties policymakers encounter while engaged in policymaking.

      (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

      (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

      (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

      (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

      (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

      (S6) Skills in using technology - Information accessing

      (S7) Information skills - Evaluation

    • Styles, Languages and Rhetoric in Britain (POLI323)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      Understand, describe, and critique the role of rhetoric and oratory in British politics;

      Understand, analyse, and evaluate the theory and practices of rhetoric with a focus on the modes of persuasion;

      Understand, analyse, and evaluate political performance with an awareness of social impact;

      Understand how to craft a political speech for delivery by high profile political figures.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) The ability to understand, describe and critique the role of oratory and rhetoric in British politics.

      (LO2) An understanding of the key theories underscoring political rhetoric.

      (LO3) The ability to construct a political speech using the outlined rhetorical theories.

      (LO4) To compare and contrast how different political figures use oratorical devices.

      (LO5) The ability to demonstrate their awareness of political speechwriting and delivery.

      (S1) Develop a more critical understanding of how political elites communicate with the electorate/audience directly and through the media.

      (S2) The ability to absorb and examine complex theoretical models and apply them to contemporary politics

      (S3) Provide an advanced understanding of the ethical dimensions faced during the communication process.

      (S4) Produce political speeches as a way of appreciating how arguments can be constructed.

      (S5) Through seminar debates develop persuasive speaking skills

      (S6) Develop broader research skills such as the ability to identify relevant political and intellectual information and organise it into a cohesive argument.

      (S7) A more sophisticated approach when examining political and academic texts.

      (S8) Gain marketable skills that can be applied to a diverse range of career options.

    • Strategic Studies in Conflicts and Terrorism (POLI347)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
      Aims

      Examine which factors are more likely to trigger the outbreak of wars within a country and the evidence in favour and against the advanced theoretical arguments;

      Analyse the strength and shortcomings of the advanced theories by looking at recent empirical contributions in the field;

      Understand how and to which extent wars, terrorism and conflicts can be operationalized, measured and tested in empirical analyses;

      Investigate the effect of peacekeeping operations on peace conditions and peace duration by a review of cases of success and failure of peacekeeping activities;

      Examine the likely effects of terrorism on governments’ responses and the domestic and international factors leading to “suboptimal” counterterrorist policies;

      Analyse the relationship between terrorism and public opinion and investigate the mechanisms advanced by selected theories on public responses and the empirical strategies used to test them.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) Understand the main theoretical puzzles in the areas of conflicts and terrorism and how empirical research can address some of these puzzles while others are remain still open.

      (LO2) Interpret the findings advanced by the empirical literature against or in line with the theoretical predictions advanced by the literature and students’ own pre-theoretical intuitions on the determinants of wars and conflicts.

      (LO3) Become familiar with some of the empirical techniques used in conflict and terrorism studies.

      (LO4) Reach a critical evaluation of the likely domestic and international triggers of wars, conflicts and terrorism and extrapolate recommendations for policy making.

      (S1) Acquire solid knowledge of the main theoretical puzzles in the areas of conflicts and the main obstacles to conflict resolution.

      (S2) Interpret the empirical findings advanced by the literature and familiarity with the main methodological tools used to estimate the determinants and effects of conflicts and terrorism.

      (S3) Carry out descriptive data analysis and basic statistical exercises using statistical software packages (Stata).

      (S4) Grasp the importance of research design in social science research and assess the validity of the arguments, hypotheses and findings in conflict and terrorism studies.

    • The Changing Faces of African Politics (POLI329)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      Broaden students comparative understanding of political models and approaches beyond Western political thought;

      Encourage students to engage with and overcome personal biases when thinking about ‘African politics’;

      Empower students to use different approaches to disseminating political knowledge and understanding;

      Encourage students to engage with a range of source materials beyond journal articles and books.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) Engage reflectively with the biases associated with the study of African politics and African political theory.

      (LO2) Apply their understanding of different approaches to sharing academic knowledge to the creation of innovative outputs.

      (LO3) Relate the history of the colonial period to the political decision making processes of post-colonial leaders.

      (LO4) Evaluate and apply research of both academic and non-academic source material to deepen their knowledge and understanding of the influence of colonialism on African politics.

      (S1) Ability to disseminate research through the use of podcasts- employability skills

      (S2) Critical thinking

      (S3) Self-reflection

      (S4) Research skills

    • The Media, the Internet and Political Science (POLI319)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims

      To introduce students to the ways in which contemporary notions of what constitutes political science have a bearing upon what we think we know about conventional and new media. To explore the way in which conceptions of power are related to our understanding of how the old and new media function in contemporary society. To explore a range of themes that connect the new media to its conventional counter parts (including the political economy of journalism, web-based political mobilisation, citizen journalism and mediate elections). To explore particularly illuminating examples of power exertion by or through the mass media. 

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) Students will be able to understand what constitutes the 'canons and conventions' of contemporary Political Science, and how these relate to research on, and evidence about, the old and new media.

      (LO2) Students will be able to appreciate the role and importance of the various media in power structures of society.

      (LO3) Students will be aware of how the old and new media relate to each other, both nationally and internationally, and how both relate to contemporary political realities.

      (LO4) Students will have a grasp of the key themes and case studies that link media practice, to politics/politicians, and the principal power models.

      (LO5) Students should be able to communicate their understanding in cogent form in a varierty of non-written media.

      (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

      (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

      (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

      (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

      (S5) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

      (S6) Working in groups and teams - Negotiation skills

    • Toleration, Multiculturalism and Secularism (POLI350)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      To introduce students to a range of moral issues concerning cultural, religious, national and other identities;

      To provide students with different normative approaches for tackling those moral issues;

      To enable students to critique normative theories and their policy implications;

      To develop the ability of students to communicate their ideas in an analytical and persuasive way.

      Learning Outcomes

      (LO1) Students will have an understanding of various moral issues related to cultural, religious, national diversity within contemporary society and politics.

      (LO2) Students will have an understanding of various approaches in political theory to cultural, religious, national issues in contemporary politics.

      (LO3) Students will be able to critically assess normative theories about toleration, multiculturalism, and secularism.

      (LO4) Students will be able construct logical, coherent, and persuasive philosophical arguments.

      (S1) Communication (oral and written)

      (S2) Information (identifying, locating, and accessing relevant material)

      (S3) Critical thinking (critiquing arguments using common tools in analytical political theory)

    The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


    Teaching and Learning

    In studying Philosophy you will learn how to defend your views with reasoned arguments, and to assess the arguments of others. Argumentative skills are learned through attending lectures and reading philosophical texts, developed by group seminar discussions, and formally assessed through essays and exams. You will complete modules to the value of 120 credits per year, from a wide range of options available. Most modules employ a blend of lectures, seminars and online support materials. You will learn by reading and studying outside class time, by attending and participating in classes, by doing coursework and, for dissertations, via one-to-one meetings with a supervisor. There is also scope, both formally in the placement module and informally, for you to develop practical skills by volunteering.


    Assessment

    Philosophy employs a mixture of modes of assessment: exams and coursework in many different varieties including essays, oral presentations, dissertations, exercises, and supported independent work (eg in the placement module).