Philosophy, Politics and Economics BA Add to your prospectus

  • Offers study abroad opportunities Offers study abroad opportunities
  • Opportunity to study for a year in China Offers a Year in China

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: L0V0
  • Year of entry: 2018
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB / IB : 33 / BTEC : Applications considered
philosophy-1

Module details

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Ethics (PHIL101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting85:15
    Aims
    1. ​Students will become familiar with key concepts in ethics – bothmeta-ethics and normative ethics.​ 
    2. ​​Students will gain an acquaintance with the main approaches to moral theory (such as virtue ethics, deontology, consequentialism), as well as key debates in meta-ethics (subjectivism vs objectivism, naturalism vs non-naturalism).​

    3. ​Students will tackle central questions in ethics, such as ‘is a good action more about good intentions than beneficial outcomes?’, ‘does lying possess an objective property of badness?’, ‘ought different people to follow different moral codes?’ and ‘what activities lead to a good life?’.​

    Learning Outcomes​Students will be able to distinguish between some main concepts in ethical debates, past and present.​


    Students will be able to explain recent developments in ​meta-ethics and normative ethics.​Students will be able to evaluate some of the main theories in the history of moral philosophy and contemporary ethics.Students will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to ethical issues.​Students will be able to identify philosophical assumptions underlying ethical claims and judgments.Students will be able to structure a discussion of issues in ethics.​​Students will be able to speak with confidence and clarity on issues of moral philosophy.Students will be able to explain details of canonical texts in moral philosophy.​

    Students will be able to articulate and defend basic positions in classic and contemporary moral philosophy.

    Students will be able to write coherently and rigorously about abstract philosophical issues raised by ethical debates.

  • Foundations in International Politics (POLI104)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The principal objective of this module is to provide introductory foundations to the study of international politics by introducing the main theories and approaches

    To provide an overview of the major developments of international politics since the 20th century, paying particular attention to the Cold War and its aftermath. ​

    To offer brief introductions to four main issues of international politics: globalisation, Europeanisation and regional integration, environmentalism and poverty and development. ​

    Learning OutcomesBy the end of the module, students will have acquired a working knowledge of the main theories of International Relations and a greater awareness of their applicability in analysing specific issues in international politics. Of equal importance, students should have acquired a familiarity with the main themes that characterise both the Cold War and the post-Cold War period. 
    More specifically, students will have acquired the following:
    An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the major IR theories. 


     

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    Students should have developed the ability to compare and contrast the various theories when discussing questions and issues affecting international politics;Students will be familiar with the main events, issues and themes in international relations;
  • Foundations in Politics (POLI109)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting20:80
    Aims·         Students will demonstrate a foundational understanding of key political concepts.·         Students will examine democratic theory and its challenges. ·         Students will analyse expressions of political power.·         Students will demonstrate a knowledge of major political theories and arguments of key political scientists, political sociologists, and political philosophers. ·         Students will understand what the study of politics is, and they will be able to distinguish the different ways in which one can study politics (empirical and normative approaches).
    Learning OutcomesDemonstrate a foundational knowledge of politics and the study of politics.Demonstrate an ability to relate political theory to the real world application of political power.Identify the problems faced by democratic and non-democratic political systems and the means by which they can be understood.

    Deconstruct the relationship between power, the state, democratic theory and the application of political authority.

  • Political Philosophy (PHIL102)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
  • Students will be introduced to the theories and arguments of some of the most important philosophers and of the western tradition of political thought, such as Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Marx and Mill. 

  • Students will be introduced to some of the main concepts in political philosophy, including political obligation, democracy, community, rights, liberty, justice and property.​

  • Learning Outcomes

    Students will be able to distinguish some main concepts in political philosophical debates.

    ​Students will be able to distinguish between different ways of understanding  concepts in political philosophical debates.

    Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in the history of political philosophy.​

    Students will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to political issues.​

    Students will be able to identify philosophical assumptions underlying political claims.​

    Students will be able to structure a discussion of issues in political philosophy.​

    Students will be able to speak with confidence and clarity on issues of political philosophy​.

    Students will be able to explain details of canonical texts in political philosophy.

    Students will be able to articulate and defend basic positions in political philosophy.​

    Students will be able to write coherently and rigorously about abstract philosophical issues raised by political debates.

  • Principles of Macroeconomics (ECON123)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    The aims of this module are:

    • To complement and build on Principles of Microeconomics and to provide a foundation for further studies in macroeconomics
    • To introduce concepts and theories of economics which help understand changes in the macroeconomic environment
    • to explain and analyse the formulation of government macroeconomic policy
    Learning Outcomes

    ·        Explainthe relationship between expenditures and national income and demonstrate howmonetary and fiscal policies may be used to influence them

    ·        Explainthe behaviour of economic aggregates such as national income, inflation andunemployment over time

    ·        Explainand assess government policy in a range of policy situations

    ·        Explainthe framework of national income accounting

    ·        Usegraphical and algebraic modelling to analyse the economy and economic policy

    ·        Explainthe interconnections between the markets for goods, money and labour

    ·        Explainthe principal influences on long-term growth and the short-run fluctuation inoutput around the long-run growth trend

    ·        Locate,select and analyse information relevant to assessing the state of the economyand economic policy

  • Principles of Microeconomics (ECON121)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This module aims to provide students with a clear foundation of the purpose, scope and topics of microeconomic analysis. Students will develop their ability to think critically and analytically, and understand how to frame real world problems in an economic model. This module forms the starting point for all future courses in Microeconomics. 

    This module also emphasizes the role of mathematics in economics.

    Learning Outcomes

    ​Students will have the ability to understand, explain, analyse and solve core problems in microeconomics.

    ​Students will be able to practice and develop their mathematical techniques and understand the role of mathematical analysis in Microeconomics.

    ​Students will be able to familiarise themselves with the principles of using an ''economic model'' and how to model individual decision-making for both consumers and producers.

    ​Students will be able to apply their understanding of economic decision-making, optimisation and equilibrium to real world situations.

Year One Optional Modules

  • British Politics (POLI101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    ​To analyse the context of British Politics

    To understand the key ideological and policy approaches of British political parties

    ​​To examine the basis of British electoral choice

    ​To explore the wider context of British politics, in terms of Atlanticist and European relationships


    Learning Outcomes

    ​To encourage students to think analytically about the British political system and engage with the academic literature

    ​To analyse the major British political events and how they have affected or been shaped by the political system.

    ​To develop students'' written and oral skills.

  • British Politics II (POLI102)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    ​To examine the distribution of power in Britain and the operation of power within the contemporary British state.

    ​To outline the traditional conception of the British political system as the ‘Westminster Model’ and consider the extent to which this conception has been undermined  in recent decades.​

    ​​To introduce the principal ''theories of the state'' and illustrate their application to the study of the British political system.​

    ​​To provide an overview of the key institutional components of the British political system (such as the Prime Minister and Cabinet, Parliament, the civil service, local government and devolved institutions)

    To highlight key currents in political participation and accountability in Britain. ​

    ​To illustrate how economic and political decision making ‘outside’ the UK nation state impacts on political power in Britain.

    Learning Outcomes​You will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the key controversies associated with the distribution of power in Britain.
    ​You will be able to discuss the formal and informal structure and operation of power both within and beyond the contemporary British state.
    ​​You will be able to outline the key elements of the ''Westminster Model’ and debate its validity as a description of the location and structuring of power in the British political system today.

    ​You will be able to explain the primary ''theories of the state'' and apply them in discussing the operation of a range of British political institutions and processes.

    ​You will be able to show an understanding of the role of the key institutions making up the British political system, their relative power and the relationships between them. 


    You will be able to debate how political participation and accountability impact on the exercise of power in British politics.


    You will be able to discuss the ways in which economic and political decision making ‘outside’ the UK nation state impacts on political power in Britain. ​

  • Critical, Analytical and Creative Thinking (PHIL112)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
  • To introduce students to the concepts and methods of informal logic and to enable students to use these concepts and methods in assessing arguments both within and outside philosophy.

  • ​To help students to think more logically themselves, and to locate and remove inconsistencies in their own thoughts.

  • ​To introduce students to methods of causal, statistical and probabilistic reasoning and to enable students to identify and avoid causal, statistical and probabilistic fallacies.

  • ​To enable students to think creatively about problems and to come up with rational solutions to them, and to make logical decisions in the light of available evidence.

  • Learning Outcomes

    ​Students will able to explain and apply the basic concepts of logic.

    ​Students will be able to identify conclusions and premises in arguments, including hidden premises.

    Students will be able to reconstruct and evaluate arguments. ​

    Students will be able to distinguish between reasoning and rhetoric and to identify fallacies and rhetorical ploys in arguments. ​

    Students will be able to distinguish between deductive and inductive infererence, including distinguishing between different types of inductive inference (enumerative, statistical, causal, analogical).

    ​Students will be able to tell when a given set of statements is logically consistent and when it is not.

    ​Students will be able to explain some of the problems with relativism about truth.

    Students will be able to explain and apply some of the basic principles of statistics and of probablity theory. ​

    ​Students will be able to demonstrate creative thinking by spotting possibilities missed by less creative thinkers.

  • European Politics I (POLI107)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    To provide an introduction to European politics by focusing on key contemporary issues while introducing some basic concepts of political science encountered in studying this subject

    To examine key challenges encountered when attempting to define and conceptualise Europe​

    To develop understanding of key debates around status of democracy and crisis of the nation-state in the European context​

    To examine salient transversal themes encountered in the politics of Europe, such as integration, international migration​ and security

    Learning Outcomes

    An understanding of the historical development and contemporary practice of European politics

    A working knowledge of the principles underlying political processes and systems (electoral systems and party systems) and how they operate in the European political space​

    An understanding of the political importance of different government structures (parliaments, the executive) at national and regional (EU) levels

    A knowledge of the challenges posed by contemporary political trends to European nation-states and European integration​

  • European Politics II (POLI108)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    Aims

    To introduce students to the distinctive characteristics of political institutions in selected European states

    To introduce the main features of political development in a range of European countries​

    To provide a basis for comparison between different European political systems​

    Learning Outcomes

    Knowledge of key features of contemporary European political systems in a range of countries

    Analytical understanding of processes of democratisation in southern and eastern Europe​

    Ability to compare and contrast forms of executive leadership, party systems, state institutions and the political evolution of European political systems since the latter half of the nineteenth century​

  • Introduction to Logic (PHIL127)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    AimsTo introduce students to the concepts, a language of, and the methods of, classical sentential logic.

    To introduce students to a language of classical quantificational logic.
      Learning Outcomes

      Students will be able to explain and apply the basic concepts of classical sentence logic.

      Students will be able to translate from English into sentence logic and vice versa.

      ​Students will be able to construct and use truth tables.

      ​Students will be able to construct proofs in natural deduction for sentence  logic.

      Students will be able to translate from English into quantificational logic and vice versa.​

    1. Mathematical Economics (MATH331)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      ·      To explore, from a game-theoretic point of view, models which have been used to understand phenomena in which conflict and cooperation occur.

      ·      To see the relevance of the theory not only to parlour games but also to situations involving human relationships, economic bargaining (between trade union and employer, etc), threats, formation of coalitions, war, etc..

      ·      To treat fully a number of specific games including the famous examples of "The Prisoners'' Dilemma" and "The Battle of the Sexes".

      ·      To treat in detail two-person zero-sum and non-zero-sum games.

      ·      To give a brief review of n-person games.

      ·      In microeconomics, to look at exchanges in the absence of money, i.e. bartering, in which two individuals or two groups are involved.   To see how the Prisoner''s Dilemma arises in the context of public goods.

      Learning Outcomes

      After completing the module students should:

      ·      Have further extended their appreciation of the role of mathematics in modelling in Economics and the Social Sciences.

      ·      Be able to formulate, in game-theoretic terms, situations of conflict and cooperation.

      ·      Be able to solve mathematically a variety of standard problems in the theory of games.

      ·      To understand the relevance of such solutions in real situations.

    2. Mathematics for Economics and Business (ECON111)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
      Aims

      This module introduces students to the application of mathematics to economics, management and accounting. The material will show how mathematical methods can be applied to problems in market analysis, compound interest, investment appraisal and agent optimisation (eg consumer utility maximisation and firm profit maximisation). The module design takes account of students'' differing mathematical backgrounds in conjunction with the need to prepare all students for second and third year courses.

      Learning Outcomeshave a good grasp of basic mathematical techniques in the study of supply and demand curves;

        ​be familiar with the basic techniques of calculus and their applications to economics: the analysis of profit, revenue etc;

        ​have a working knowledge of the basic mathematics of finances

    3. Mind, Knowledge and Reality (PHIL103)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims
    4. To introduce students to some of the main topics in metaphysics: God, the mind/body problem, personal identity, time and free will.

    5. To introduce students to the philosophical system of Rene Descartes.​

    6. Learning Outcomes

      Students should be able to distinguish between sound and unsound arguments.

      Students should be able to build a case for a specific metaphysical position, by weighing theoretical virtues, such as Occam''s razor, and metaphysical principles, such as the conceivability principle and the principle of sufficient reason.​

      ​Students should be able to extract an argument from text, render put it into standard form, and critically evaluate its premises.

      ​Students should be able to explain Descartes'' philosophical system.

      Students should be able explain the basic issue, and the standard views, pertaining to five topics in contemporary metaphysics: God, personal identity, consciousness, free will and time.​

      ​Students should be able to able to argue for a specific view pertaining to five issues in contemporary metaphysics: God, personal identity, consciousness, free will and time.

      ​Students should be able to discuss reality in the partially abstract manner distinctive of metaphysical thought.

    7. Philosophy and the Arts (PHIL110)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims​​​​​To consider philosophically relevant questions and concepts pertaining to the scope of art and the evaluation of artworks.

      To enable students to reflect philosophically about their intuitions regarding the arts and about their appreciation of particular artistic media.​
      Learning Outcomes

      Students will be able to examine whether the concept of art may apply to objects and activities from different historical periods and cultural contexts.​

      Students will be able to consider critically the impact that cultural institutions and their practices may have on philosophical theorising concerning the arts.​

      Students will be able to assess the view that artistic value is a matter of subjective response to it.

      Students will be able to analyse the character of self-expression through art, and assess its significance in evaluating artworks.​

      Students will be able to evaluate the argument that artistic intentions must inform our appreciation of works of art.​

      Students will be able to define and expound the conception of beauty in a narrow and in a wide sense.​

      Students will be able to outline and discuss the significance of the distinction between artistic and aesthetic properties.​

      Students will be able to argue for or against the view that artworks are unrepeatable.​

      Students will be able to interpret the ways in which content and meaning is attributed to art that does not seem to represent anything.​

      Students will be able to provide a critical account of the possible links between seeking truth and creating good art.​

      Students will be able to discuss whether art can function as a vehicle for demonstrating what is morally good.

    Year Two Compulsory Modules

    • Macroeconomics I (ECON223)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims

      To extend the study of macroeconomic theory to the intermediate level. To analyse the classical and Keynesian macroeconomic models, and their policy implications, in order to provide a context for subsequent developments in modern macroeconomics associated with monetarism, new classical and new Keynesian economics.

      Learning OutcomesUnderstand how employment, output, interest rate and the price level are determined in the classical model

      ​Understand the origin of economic growth in the short runand in the long run

      ​Understand the effects of fiscal and monetary policies in the IS-LM model

      ​Understand the effects of fiscal and monetary policiesunder different exchange-rate regimes

    • Macroeconomics II (ECON224)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      To further extend the study of macroeconomic theory at the intermediatelevel by analysing business-cycle fluctuations in closed and open economiesusing the real business cycle model and also the new Keynesian model that arebased on solid microfoundation

      Learning Outcomes

      Understand the microfoundation of modern macroeconomic models

      ​Explain the implications of macroeconomic disturbances and fiscalpolicies using the real business cycle model

      Contrast the different implications of monetary policies in thereal business cycle model and in the new Keynesian model.

      Analyse business cycles in the open economy.

    Year Two Optional Modules

    • Alternative Perspectives in Economics (ECON250)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
      Aims

      This module aims to provide a historical and methodological basis for understanding modern economic theory.

      Learning Outcomes Analyse the philosophical basis for methodology




      ​Differentiate between and analyze the approach to subject matter adopted by the different schools of thought

      ​Demonstrate a knowledge of the context within which different strands of economic thought developed

      ​Evaluate different methodological approaches

    • American Politics and Society (POLI205)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
      Aims

      ​​To help students understand how governmental actors and institutions interact to shape the nature and outcomes of the US political process;

      ​To help students explore how actors and institutions residing outside the state influence the governing processes

      To acquaint students with the US constitutional system

      Learning Outcomes

      ​An understanding of how the institutional relationships occurring at the federal level shape the overall political process​

      An understanding of how public opinion, political parties, and the media interact with governing institutions to shape the overall governing processes found in the United States.​

      An understanding of how institutions interact with those residing at the individual state level (via the Federalist nature of the US Constitutional system) to shape the character of the US political system;​

    • Ancient Philosophy (PHIL237)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims
    • To consider the theories and arguments of some of the most important ancient philosophers, in particular Plato and Aristotle.
    • To consider key ethical, epistemological and metaphysical concepts relevant to ancient philosohy, and their interconnections.

    • To analyse and practise the dialectical skills portrayed in the ancient texts.
    • Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in ancient philosophy

      Students will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to classic ethical, epistemological and/or metaphysical issues.

      Students will be able to identify points of agreement and disagreement between different philosophies.

      Students will be able to structure a discussion of central issues in ancient philosophy​.

      Students will be able to engage dialectically with positions in ancient philosophy and to articulate the implications of these positions.

      Students will be able to present their ideas with clarity and confidence.

      Students will be able to write coherent, structured and informative accounts of abstract philosophical issues.

    • Behavioural Economics (ECON251)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims
    • Introduce students to behavioural economics, its methods and its perspectives.
      • ​Provide an overview of some the main contributions which behavioural economics has made to economics as a social science.

      • ​Highlight areas where fundamental assumptions underlying economic theory have evolved in the light of behavioural economic research.

      • ​Raise awareness of related areas of development in economic theory.

      • ​Prepare students for the study of more technical modules in behavioural or experimental analysis.

    • Learning Outcomes

      ​Be prepared to independently study primary research contributions in Behavioural Economics

      Being prepared to engage in further study in related fieldssuch as behavioural finance and experimental economics

      ​Be able to critically evaluate the axioms on which mainstream economic approaches are based as well as the suggested alternatives.

    • Business Ethics S1 (PHIL271)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      1. ​To introduce and explain major contemporary perspectives on corporate behaviours.

      2. ​To introduce moral perspectives as they relate to managerial decision making and corporate structures.

      3. To make students familiar with a range of recurrent ethical problems arising in business.


      4. To improve students'' skills in identifying and analyzing ethical issues that managers and employees face.

      5. To give students practice in formulating, defending, and planning the implementation of action plans managing ethical dilemmas.


      Learning Outcomes

      Students will be able to discuss the main theories concerning the place of ethics in business. 

      ​​

      Students will be able to state the broad principles of , and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of,basic moral theories, such as consequentialism​​​​Students will  be able to state and discuss the broad ethical principles concerning  costs and benefits, the challenge posed by  uncertainty, professional roles, profits and the right of shareholder interests, and affirmative action. .

      ​​Students will be able to state and discuss the broad ethical principles concerning the obligations of complex organizations with respect to loyalty and whistle-b lowing, insider trading, customer responsibility, and corporate responsibility.

      Students will be able to state and discuss the broad ethical principles concerning social justice and executive compensation.


      ​Students will be able to consider an ethical approach as a basis for sustainable marketing.


    • Chinese Philosophy (PHIL220)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims
    • ​To examine the ways in which philosophy in Classical Chinese civilisation develops in the Hundred Schools period after the dialogue between Kongzi and Mozi, and to relate fundamental Chinese concepts to Western counterparts.

    • ​To investigate what is distinctive about classical Chinese approaches to questions of ontology, social harmony, personal morality and soteriology.

    • Learning Outcomes

      ​Students will be able to engage in informed discussions about the concepts and categories in which  philosophical discussions were conducted in ancient China.

      ​Students will develop skills in developing and contextualising new information about other worldviews.

      ​Sudents will be enabled to assimilate alternative cultural perspectives from which to view their own traditions.

      ​Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories propounded in the classical period of Chinese thought.

      ​Students will be able to discuss the problem of​ cultural relativism informed by an understanding of a particular alien pattern of thinking.

      ​Students will be able to relate classical Chinese thought to European philosophical interests.

    • Democratisation: From Ancient Athens to Southeast Asia (POLI235)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims

      ​Through participating in the lectures, seminar discussions and by completing assessments students will gain: 

      • awareness of the course of historical struggles over civil and political rights, as well as the main approaches to explaining the process of democratisation in comparative political science
      • a solid grasp of the debates over the most important factors associated with democratisation and democratic endurance  
      • knowledge of some of the classic cases of democratisation and democratic breakdown, as well as some of the important hybrid regimes of the modern world 
      • an empathetic understanding of the difficult choices that those living under undemocratic political systems face, and the continuing challenges of maintaining a democratic society 

      In addition, the course is designed to augment student skills, providing 

      • experience applying social-scientific theories to particular cases, augmenting students'' analytical skills 
      • familiarity with the techniques of qualitative research in comparative government and political sociology 
      • experience using elementary techniques of data analysis and data visualisation to engage in cross-sectional and longitudinal comparison of democratising countries​

      Learning Outcomes

      ​You will be able to summarise the development and spread of representative democracy across the world, and identify the key events in this process.

      ​You will be able to compare and contrast the three most important theoretical perspectives on democratisation: modernisation theory, transition theory and the social forces tradition. 

      ​You will be able to identify the strengths and weaknesses of theories of democratisation, and to evaluate them against the empirical evidence.


      You will be able to conduct paired qualitative case studies in order to identify factors and processes that relate to democratic transition and breakdown.​


      ​You will be able to use simple quantitative techniques in order to identify potential correlations between democratisation and socio-economic change. 

      ​You will be able to explain the relevance of key pieces of quantitative evidence for debates about democratisation.

      ​You will be able to explain what is meant by a hybrid regime, describe the characteristic features of hybrid regime types such as competitive authoritarianism and discuss problems associated with these concepts.​

      ​You will be able to give an account of the progress of democratisation in Southeast Asia, accounting for the successes and failures of pro-democracy movements in at least two states​.

    • Foreign Policy Analysis and World Politics (POLI236)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting25:75
      Aims

      ​Through participating in the lectures, seminar discussions and by completing assessments students will gain: 

      • knowledge of the main approaches to foreign policy and the classic contributions to the subfield, as well as relevant contributions from conflict studies, political psychology and historical sociology 
      • awareness of the agent-structure debate, the important question of how far human beings can consciously shape the course of world politics  
      • understanding of the various factors that shape the process of decision-making in international relations
      • appreciation of some of the most significant factors shaping overall patterns of peace and conflict, friendship and enmity in world politics

      In addition, the course is designed to augment student skills, providing 

      • experience deploying causal mechanisms theorised by scholars and developing original ''middle range'' explanations for international events 
      • familiarity with the levels of analysis issue, an important issue in empirical research across the social sciences 
      • experience gathering, analysing and synthesising empirical evidence from news reports, policy briefings and primary sources​

      Learning Outcomes

      You will be able to outline the main approaches to foreign policy and the classic contributions to the subfield, as well as describe the relevant contributions from conflict studies, political psychology and historical sociology.  ​

      ​You will improve in your abilityto think critically and rigorously about thereasons why certain foreign policies are pursued over others in world politics​.

      You will be able to explain the significance of the levels of analysis problem for the study of international relations and the social sciences more generally.

      ​You will be able to give an account of how structural factors within the international system shape foreign policy, what scholars mean by system and structure, and why scholars disagree about the nature of the international system.

      ​​You will be able to explain how ''second image'' factors such as the internal organisation of the state, competition between government bureaucracies and domestic politics may influence foreign policy.

      ​You will be able to explain how a foreign policy decision such as the initiation of war can be explained at different levels of analysis, such as the system, the dyad and/or the individual.


      ​​You will be able to locate reliable sources of information about events in world politics, and to utilise these information sources to write a cogent analysis of an event in world politics or a foreign policy decision - applying a theoretical framework to an empirical topic.

      ​You will be able to explain what the agent-structure debate is and why it is analytically, morally and politically significant for how we think about the choices available to actors in world politics.

      ​You will be able to explain how scholars combine causal mechanisms from multiple levels of analysis into theoretical explanations of foreign policy decisions and patterns of activity in international relations. You will be able to evaluate how successful these theories are in revealing the sources of foreign policy.

    • From the Ira to Isis: Understanding Political VIolence in the Contemporary World (POLI240)
      Level2
      Credit level30
      SemesterWhole Session
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims
      • To help students think critically about the world we live in today, specifically focusing on terrorism
      • To consider why and how terrorist groups come into existence and disappear
      • To examine the historical evolution of terrorism, the importance of terrorism in the contemporary world, different types of terrorism, and the responses to such threats     
      • To think about why a universal definition of terrorism has proven so elusive and what this means for the study of terrorism
      • ​To explore the controversies that have been generated by terrorism and counter-terrorism
      Learning Outcomes

      The ability to think critically about the world in which we live today, especially regarding the legitimacy of political violence

      ​An understanding of the key debates and controversies in the study of terrorism and counter-terrorism

      ​The ability to engage in critical discussion about questions relating to terrorism and counter-terrorism

      ​The ability to engage and interact with the main themes in a specific body of intellectual knowledge

      ​ An ability to access and make effective use of bibliographical and electronic sources of information

      ​Make arguments in a coherent and effective manner

      The ability to write a cogent, well-argued research paper that deals with a significant aspect of these debates

    • Governing Britain: Westminster, Whitehall and Beyond (POLI230)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims

      ​​​​​Toconsider the functions ofpolitical institutions within the British political party system.

      To examine the structures and howthey develop, both as a result of their historical circumstances and theirattempts to deal with their current roles.

      To examine the power relationshipsbetween the institutions and the political parties.

      To better understand the environment faced byBritish political institutions and their operational relevance to contemporaryUK governance.


      Learning Outcomes

      ​Demonstrate in depth knowledge and understanding of the structures and processes of the UK Parliaments and Assemblies

      Compare and contrast powers held at Westminster, Holyrood, The Welsh Assembly, the Northern Ireland Assembly, and the London Assembly.​

      Understand and engage in contemporary debates surrounding the functioning of the power structures of the UK​

      Develop research skills to allow navigation and robust research of the institutions of British governance​

    • Hellenistic, Neoplatonic, Byzantine and Medieval Philosophy (PHIL221)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims
    • To consider the theories and arguments of some of the most important philosophers of the Hellenistic, late Antique and Medieval periods.

    • To study key ethical, epistemological and metaphysical concepts and their interconnections.
    • To enable students to analyse and practise the dialectical skills portrayed in the texts examined.
    • Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in ancient and/or medieval philosophyStudents will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to classic ethical, epistemological and/or metaphysical issuesStudents will be able to structure a discussion of central issues in ancient and/or medieval philosophy​Students will be able to identify points of agreement and disagreement between different philosophiesStudents will be able to dialectically engage with positions in ancient and/or medieval philosophy and articulate their implicationsStudents will be able to present their ideas with clarity and confidenceStudents will be able to develop in writing coherent, structured and informative accounts on abstract philosophical issues
    • International Institutions (POLI225)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims
    • To provide an understanding of the nature of modern state systemand the role of institutions

      To explore central concepts and theories in International Relations andapply these in analyses of the challenges and conflicts faced by theinternational system

      To explore mechanisms and policy instruments that InternationalInstitutions possess in managing the new world order

      To assess critical arguments as to the limits of international institutions and the likelyfuture developments

      To assess interpretations of international law and main debates withinthe canon of human rights.

      ​To develop students'' skills in synthesis andanalysis, and in the presentation of clear and cogent arguments (both orallyand in writing) of issues and controversies surrounding international systemand its institutions.







        Learning Outcomes

        Ability to understand role of institutions in international system.

         

        ​Ability to apply core theories of international relations to major international insitutions.

        ​Awareness of the role of international institutional policy in the new world order.

        Ability to explore limits of international insitutions and the role of international law and human rights.

      • International Political Economy (ECON325)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
        AimsThis module aims to familiarise students with rational choice and public choice theories and arguments, and with their applications in open economies and international political economy; theoretical concepts such as the Coase theorem, the Arrow impossibility theorem, and economic populism; key concepts of the New Institutional Economics and related applications to the theory of the firm; a modern economics’ view of globalisation; and the application of international political economy concepts to Latin America.

        The module also aims to deepen students'' understanding and awareness of the meaning and importance of national cultures, the relationship between rent seeking and protectionism; corruption; essential aspects of multinational corporations, foreign direct investment, and regulation; specific characteristics of the Argentine and Mexican economic policies and institutions and Chilean ‘exceptionalism’; and the possibility of applying ideas developed in this module to other geographical, national, regional and historical contexts.




        Learning OutcomesStudents will understand the concepts of rational choice and public choice in order to study aspects of a globalised world, which is in key respects different from that of elementary textbook models


        ​Students will gain a deep understanding of international business and the international political economy, in a way compatible with rigorous approaches to economic analysis

        ​Students will become familiar with theoretical concepts from rational choice and public choice theories, with emphasis on theories and models which apply to open economies in a context of globalisation

        ​Students will be able to apply these theoretical concepts in order to study some aspects of the political economy of international business.

        ​Students will be able to apply theoretical concepts to a Latin American case study.

        ​Students will be able to produce and deliver a coherent presentation.

      • Management Economics 1 (ECON233)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
        Aims

        The module provides an introduction to the rational decision-making process used to make business decisions. It introduces the students to the quantitative and analytical tools that managers use to make complex decisions.

        Learning Outcomes

        Management Economics as a pluralistic disciplinewith particular emphasis on Demand Theory.

        Use of computer packages using Regressiontechniques, to estimate demand.

        Elementary forecasting techniques.

         

        Decision-making under risk and uncertainty

         

        Sequential decision-making

      • Management Economics 2 (ECON234)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
        AimsThis moduleintroduces students to the economic approaches to the study oforganisations.  It also shows howeconomics can be applied to strategic management, mergers and acquisitions, andcorporate governance.

        Learning Outcomes Students will be able to understand how organisations achieve co-ordination;

        Students will be able to understand informational problems for markets and organisations

        Students will be able to understand goals and decision-making within the firm usingbehavioural theories;

        Students will be able to understand agency relations between owners, managers andemployees;

        Students will be able to understand the effects of transactions costs on choosing betweenmarkets and organisations and organisational forms;

          Students will be able to understand the contribution of economics to strategicmanagement, mergers and acquisitions, agency problems of corporate governance.

        ​Students will be able to understand the resource-based view of the firm.

      • Metaphysics (PHIL228)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
        Aims

        To provide an introduction to some of the most significant debates in contemporary metaphysics;  topics include:  change and persistence, objects and properties, space and time.

        Learning Outcomes​​Students will be able to identify the main issues and positions in contemporary metaphysical discussions of space, time, persistence, properties, substance, persons, modality and existence.Students will be able to explain the main strengths and weaknesses of these positions.​

        ​Students will be able to identify the historical contexts of some of these positions.​

        ​Students will be able to construct a positive case for a specific metaphysical position, by appealing to theoretical virtues (e.g. simplicity), metaphysical principles (e.g. the principle of sufficient reason) and thought experiments which evoke powerful intuitions.

        ​​Students will further develop their abilities to extract arguments from texts, render them in standard form, and assess the soundness of their premises and the validity of their structures.​

        ​Students will be able to think more creatively about metaphysical issues.​

        ​Students will be able to explain the competing positions in contemporary meta-metaphysics.​

      • Microeconomics for Business Economics (ECON227)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
        Aims

        Students should acquire the ability to reason about economic topics, and provide logical analysis of specific economic problems. Students will acquire the ability to demonstrate economic analysis of topics which start from  individual choices. Students will acquire specific knowledge regarding economic theory which will be useful when taking further courses in economic theory.
        Learning Outcomes

        ​Understand how to analyse individual consumption behaviour

        Understand the implications of profit maximization for firms.

        ​Combine the knowledge of consumption and production behaviour to provide a general equilibrium analysis of economic activities.

      • Microeconomics 1 (ECON221)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
        Aims

        This module, in accordance with Microeconomics 2, aims to provide a solid foundation of intermediate level microeconomic theory. It develops and extends three of the topics introduced in Principles of Microeconomics, namely, Consumer Theory, Producer Theory and General Equilibrium. It prepares the students for the more advanced modules in the second and third year like Microeconomics 2 and Game Theory.

        Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to demonstrate a thorough understanding of the core concepts and models used in consumer theory, producer theory and general equilibrium and an ability to apply these to arange of markets and settings.

        ​Students will be able to think and apply themselves analytically to problems in the above-mentioned topics.

        ​Students will be able to gain problem solving skills using verbal, diagrammatic and mathematical methods to problems in the above topics.  

        ​Students will be able to have a critical perspective regarding the assumptions underlying microeconomics models.

      • Microeconomics 2 (ECON222)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
        Aims
      • This module, following on from with Microeconomics 1, aims to provide a solid foundation of intermediate level microeconomic theory. 

      • ​The module uses the theoretical foundations developed in the first semester and aims to extend the application of the skills acquired to more advanced topics such as welfare economics.

      • This module also aims to prepare students for the more advanced modules in the third year by introducing topics such as asymmetric information and game theory.

      • Learning OutcomesHave a thorough understanding of the core concepts and models used in Welfare Economics, Asymmetric Information, and Game Theory. 

        ​To prepare students to think and apply themselves to analyse a range of problems in the three areas mentioned above.

        ​To develop problem solving skills using verbal, diagrammatic and mathematical methods to problems in the above topics.  

        ​To deepen a critical perspective regarding the assumptions underlying microeconomics models.

      • Moral Philosophy (PHIL239)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
        Aims
      • Students will be invited to consider the theories and arguments of some of the most important contemporary moral philosophers focused on normative and applied ethics, including James Rachels, Peter Singer and Bernard Williams.

      • Students will be asked to consider some of the main concepts in moral philosophy, including consequentialism, deontology, virtue, impartiality, agent-relativity/neutrality and speciesism.​

      • Students will be invited to appreciate the variety of philosophical issues raised by morality and a range of controversial practices such as punishment, abortion, euthanasia and the treatment of nonhuman animals.​

      • Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to distinguish some of the main concepts in moral philosophical debates.

        Students will be able to distinguish between different ways of understanding  concepts in moral philosophical debates.​

        Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in contemporary moral philosophy​

        Students will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to ethical issues.​

        Students will be able to identify philosophical assumptions underlying ethical claims.​

        Students will be able to structure a discussion of issues in moral philosophy​

        Students will be able to speak with confidence and clarity on issues of moral philosophy​.

        Students will be able to explain details of influential texts in recent moral philosophy.

        Students will be able to articulate and defend positions in moral philosophy.​

        Students will be able to write coherently and rigorously about abstract philosophical issues raised by ethical controversies.

      • Devolution in the Uk (POLI227)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
        Aims
        • ​To analyse the impact of devolution in the UK upon its different parliaments and assemblies, assessing how politics in the different parts of the UK has changed
        • To assess how the Parliaments and assemblies in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland were introduced and have developed
        • To explore what has been the impact of these parliaments and assemblies for the party system in each country
        • ​To examine how do devolved institutions address societal divisions within each country
        • ​To assess what are the implications for the future of the United Kingdom of devolution
        Learning Outcomes

        ​​​Upon completion of the module, students should be able to:

        Identify the key conceptual principles of integration, federalism and devolution and their application to the UK;

        ​Understand the historical attempts to devolve parliaments

        ​Comprehend the different powers of each devolved institution in the UK and assess the distinctive aspects of the Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish politics and society that have shaped devolved institutions.

        ​Analyse how devolution has impacted upon England

      • Philosophy of Religion (PHIL215)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
        Aims
      • ​To introduce the current state of discussion concerning the concept of God.
      • ​​To introduce the major arguments for, and the major arguments against, the existence of God.
      • ​To enable the student to clarify and develop his or her own views on whether God exists and what God is like.

      • Learning Outcomes​Students will be able to list the four main approaches to the concept of God (universal revelational theology, purely biblical theology, creation theology, and perfect-being theology), and discuss their strengths and weaknesses.

        ​Students will be able to name the main attempts at defining ‘omnipotence'', and their strengths and weaknesses, with particular reference to the paradox of the stone.

        ​Students will be able to discuss the main attempts at defining ''omniscience'', and discuss their strengths and weaknesses, with particular reference to the problem of freedom and foreknowledge.​

        ​​Students will be able to discuss the main attempts at defining divine goodness, and discuss their strengths and weaknesses, with particular reference to the problem of whether God can be good if he is unable to sin.
        ​​Students will be able to discuss and evaluate the ontological argument in its versions by Anselm, Descartes, and Plantinga.

        ​Students will be able to discuss and evaluate the cosmological argument in its versions by Aquinas, Leibniz, and van Inwagen.

        ​Students will be able to discuss and evaluate the design argument in its versions by Aquinas, Paley, and Swinburne.​

        ​Students will be able to discuss and evaluate Plantinga''s view that we need no argument or evidence to believe in God rationally, James''s view that faith is a gamble like the leap of a mountaineer, and Pascal''s view that faith is pragmatically justified.

        ​Students will be able to discuss and evaluate the logical and evidential arguments for atheism ​from the existence of evil, and the various defences and theodicies in response to them, in particular the free-will defence and the greater-good defence.
      • Securities Markets (ECON241)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
        Aims
      • This module seeks to provide an understanding of

        the role of securities markets in the economy

      • ​their basic mechanics and technical features

      • ​the valuation of financial assets

      • ​the operational and allocative efficiency of the market.

      • Learning Outcomes appreciate the central role of securities markets in the economy.

        ​understand and apply appropriate economic theory to market organisation

        display an understanding of the usefulness of portfolio theory and the approaches to the valuation of financial assets.​

        ​read the financial press and appreciate issues relating to the study of the securities markets.

      • Security in A Globalised World (POLI231)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
        Aims
        • To provide an overview of how security has been affected by globalisation.
        • ​​To explore how the understandings of security and globalisation have developed over time.​
        • ​To develop a theoretical focus on security in global politics.
        • ​To explore the main themes, issues, and political debates around security in a globalised world.
        Learning Outcomes​​​​​​By the end of the module, students will have acquired knowledge of the main debates around security and globalisation.

        ​The ability to critically discuss these issues

        ​The ability to write a cogent, well-argued research paper that deals with a significant aspect of these debates and theories.​

        ​The ability to engage and interact with the main themes in a specific body of intellectual knowledge.

        ​An ability to access and make effective use of bibliographical and electronic sources of information

        ​An ability to deliver short, small-group presentations where they convey information and ideas succinctly and effectively.

        ​How to make arguments in a coherent and effective manner.​

      • Themes in Political Philosophy (PHIL219)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
        Aims
      • Students will be invited to consider the theories and arguments of thinkers who have shaped contemporary political philosophy, such as John Rawls, Robert Nozick and Michael Walzer.

         

      • Students will be asked to consider some of the main concepts in political philosophy, including freedom, equality and justice.​

      • Students will be invited to appreciate the variety of philosophical issues raised by contemporary political debates around controversial topics, such as feminism and multiculturalism.​

      • Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to distinguish some of the main concepts in debates within contemporary political philosophy.

        Students will be able to distinguish between different ways of understanding  concepts employed in debates within contemporary political philosophy.​

        Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in contemporary political philosophy​

        Students will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to contemporary issues.​

        Students will be able to identify philosophical assumptions underlying political questions and claims.​

        Students will be able to structure a discussion of issues in contemporary political philosophy​

        Students will be able to speak with confidence and clarity on issues of contemporary political philosophy​.

        Students will be able to explain details of influential texts in recent political philosophy.

        Students will be able to articulate and defend positions on issues in contemporary political philosophy.​

        Students will be able to write coherently and rigorously about abstract philosophical issues raised by current political controversies.

      • Theory of Knowledge (PHIL212)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
        Aims
      • To introduce students to the main philosophical questions concerning the concept of knowledge. 
      • To introduce students to the main views taken by historical and contemporary philosophers concerning the concept of knowledge.
      • ​To enable students to form and defend their own views concerning the concept of knowledge.
      • Learning Outcomes​Students will be able to discuss the main philosophical questions concerning perception.
        ​​Students will be able to name and discuss direct realism, indirect realism, and anti-realism concerning perception.
        Students will be able to discuss the main philosophical questions concerning memory.​Students will be able to name and discuss realism and anti-realism about the memory.​

        ​Students will be able to discuss the main philosophical questions concerning introspection.​Students will be able to name and discuss realism and anti-realism about the self.
        ​​Students will be able to discuss the main philosophical questions concerning reason.​​​Students will be able to name and discuss Kripke''s views and the traditional view concerning a priority, necessity, and analyticity.​Students will be able to discuss the main philosophical questions concerning testimony.​​​Students will be able to name and discuss both the direct-source and the indirect-source view of testimony.Students will be able to discuss the main philosophical questions concerning the structure of knowledge.​​
        ​​​​Students will be able to name and discuss foundationalism and coherentism, and various views on which beliefs are suitable to be in the foundations (strong classical foundationalism, weak classical foundationalism, and theistic foundationalism).

        ​Students will be able to discuss the main philosophical questions concerning the definition of ‘knowledge''.

        Students will be able to deploy Gettier-style examples, and name and discuss the tripartite definition of ''knowledge'', internalism, conclusive justificationism, externalism, reliabilism, and proper functionalism.​

        ​​Students will be able to discuss the main philosophical questions concerning scepticism.
        ​​Students will be able to name and discuss global scepticism, 1st-order scepticism, 2nd-order scepticism, the verity principle, the necessity principle, and the infallibility principle, and various responses such as contextualism.
        ​​Students will be familiar with, and able to discuss, scepticism concerning induction.
        ​​​Students will be able to discuss Hume''s doubts concerning induction.

      Year Three Optional Modules

      • Advanced Macroeconomics (ECON343)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
        Aims

        This module will build on the intermediate macroeconomics curriculum by developing some formal models in depth and widening the topics covered. The module will commence by considering the political economy perspective of macroeconomic processes. It will then proceed with an in-depth look at the Solow growth model, which will contain a full formal treatment. This will be followed by consideration of alternative views of the business cycle and lectures on the role of exchange rates and commodity prices.

        Learning Outcomes

        gained some proficiency in the use of formal modelling techniques.


         

        ​developed some perspective in judging the most common macroeconomic models against some alternative approaches

        ​able to discuss theoretical concepts in their political context.

      • Advanced Microeconomics (ECON342)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
        Aims

        This module aims to provide anunderstanding of the market failure resulting from asymmetric information. The course covers some of the canonical models of adverse selection and moral hazard focussing on the design of optimal contracts under informational asymmetries.
        Learning OutcomesSolvesimple economic models
        Understandunderlying assumptions

        ​Understandtheorems and key proofs

        Predictthe choices of economic agents​

      • Aesthetics (PHIL316)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
        AimsStudents will be introduced to arguments of some of the most important philosophers on art, aesthetics and cultural theory, including Kant, Hegel, Danto and Tolstoy.

        Students will consider key concepts and theories in aesthetics, including the aesthetic judgement, disinterestedness, the institutional theory of art, the nature of representation and expression and feminist and post-modern critiques.

        Students will be encouraged to make connections between works of art and artistic practices of the past and present.
          Learning Outcomes

          Students will be able to analyse key concepts and arguments relating to aesthetics and art.​

          Students will be able to structure discussion of issues in aesthetics.​

          Students will be able to identify links between influential philosophical theories and artistic practices.​

          Students will be able to articulate and defend positions in aesthetics and philosophy of art.​

          Students will be able to present their ideas with clarity and confidence.​

          Students will be able to develop in writing coherent, structured and informative accounts on abstract philosophical issues.​

        1. Basic Econometrics 1 (ECON212)
          Level2
          Credit level15
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
          Aims
        2. Econometrics is concerned with the testing of economic theory using real world data. This module introduces the subject by focusing on the principles of Ordinary Least Squares regression analysis. The module will provide practical experience via regular laboratory session.

           

        3. ​This module also aims to equip students with the necessary foundations in econometrics to successfully study more advanced modules such as ECON213 Basic Econometrics II, ECON311  Methods of Economic Investigation: Time Series Econometrics and ECON312 Methods of Economic Investigation 2: Microeconometrics.

        4. Learning OutcomesReinforce the  understanding of fundamental principles of statistics, probability and mathematics to be used in the context of econometric analysis

            ​Estimate simple regression models with pen and paper using formulae and with the econometric software EViews7

            ​Understand the assumptions underpinning valid estimation and inference in regression models

            ​Formulate and conduct intervals of confidence and tests of hypotheses

            ​Evaluate the impact that changes in the unit of accounts of variables and changes in the functional form of equations may have upon the results of OLS and their interpretation

            ​Assess the goodness of results by means of appropriate tests and indicators

            ​Assess predictions

            ​Extend analysis to the context of multiple linear regression

            ​Use EViews7 to estimate simple linear regression models  and multiple linear regression models

        5. Behavioural Finance (ACFI311)
          Level3
          Credit level15
          SemesterSecond Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
          Aims
        6. Provide students with knowledge and understanding of theoretical and empirical limitations of and challenges to the efficient markets hypothesis
          • ​Present the psychological foundations of Behavioural Finance and how they impact upon investors’ rationality and arbitrage

          • ​Provide the opportunity for students to critically evaluate behaviourally induced market puzzles

          • ​Present key behavioural trading patterns from a theoretical perspective and outline their empirical design

        7. Learning Outcomes

          ​Possess a good command of the key theoretical and empirical literature in behavioural finance

          ​Have practiced skills of problem-solving and critical thinking

          ​Be familiar with the main implications (theoretical and empirical) of Behavioural Finance findings

          ​Construct and present critical evaluations of key academic papers in Behavioural Finance

          Development of key skills in terms of writtencommunication (e.g. by completing formative class questions and assignment;through a summative assignment and examination)​

          Developmentof key skills in oral presentation (e.g. through group work)

          ​Development of key skills in terms of classparticipation

          ​Development of key skills in terms of planning &time-management (e.g. preparing for classes; observing assignment deadlines),problem-solving, critical thinking & analysis, numeracy (e.g. by applyingtheir extant quantitative knowledge in understanding behavioural financeissues) and initiative (e.g. searching relevant literature and information inpreparation of seminars and summative assignment)

        8. Comparative Peace Processes (POLI133)
          LevelM
          Credit level15
          SemesterSecond Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
          Aims
        9. To outline the concept and components of peace processes.

        10. ​To assess the impact of peace processes within a range of polities.

        11. Learning Outcomes

          Upon completion of the module, students should be able to identify the key conceptual principles of peace process and their essential components.

          ​Understand how peace processes develop.

          ​Assess the impact of peace processes in a range of selected countries.

          ​Comprehend the key factors in shaping successful or unsuccessful peace processes in each country of study.

        12. Comparative Voting Behaviour (POLI322)
          Level3
          Credit level15
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
          Aims

          ​This module seeks to equip students with the analytical skills needed to analyse election outcomes from the perspective of both voters'' behaviour and parties'' strategies. The module also aims to enable students to analyse survey data using quantitative methods; to provide them with sufficient knowledge of the statistical package SPSS; and to prepare students to write reports and interpret data in a way that can be used to advise politicians, political parties, or any organisation concerned with public opinion and voting. By fulfilling these goals the module also aims at widening students'' employability, enabling them to develop some of the main analytical and statistical skills which are demanded by employers.

          Learning Outcomes

          ​​You will be able to contrast the theoretical assumptions of structural, social-psychological and rational-choice models of voting behaviour

          ​​You will be able to critically analyse the potential and limitations of voting behaviour models both in general and when applied to specific elections ​​and contexts

          ​You will be able to critically analyse how voting behaviour varies across types of party, as well as the dynamic relationship between the behaviour of voters and parties

          You will be able to use the statistical package SPSS to prepare datasets for data analysis

          ​You will acquire knowledge of key statistical techniques and be able to apply them to analyse specific election outcomes

          You will be able to apply notions of statistical inference and generalise findings based on survey data

        13. Competition and Regulation (ECON337)
          Level3
          Credit level15
          SemesterSecond Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
          Aims

          To apply the tools of microeconomics to the analysis of firms, markets, consumers and regulators in order to understand the nature and consequences of the process of competition and regulation. These tools will also be applied to the evaluation of competition and government policy.  This will extend knowledge and skills of microeconomic analysis by covering recent advances in theory as well as empirical analysis of relevant microeconomic topics.

          Learning OutcomesUse economic principles, concepts and techniques to discuss and analyse:

            -          the power and limitations of competition as a force for market regulation;

            -          government policy to regulate market power to protect firms, consumers and employees.

            Apply standard frameworks, including verbal, graphical, mathematical and statistical representations of economic concepts and models, to explain and evaluate the effects of a range of behaviours by firms and regulators and how they are influenced by economic incentives.​

            ​Identify and analyse current issues and problems in regulation and propose solutions.

            ​Compare, contrast and critically evaluate regulation of different industries and market failures.

            ​Communicate effectively orally and in writing and in accordance with project specifications

            ​Conduct independent research in applied economics

            ​Deliver a professional quality formal presentation by exhibiting: clarity and appropriate pace; logical structure; credibility; effective use of visual aids/technology

            ​Identify problems

            ​Analyse problems

            ​Offer viable solutions

            ​Use economic principles, concepts and techniques to discuss and analyse government policy and economic performance.

          • Corporate Governance (ACFI320)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterSecond Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
            Aims
          • The module aims to provide students with an understanding of the history and development of corporate governance and the key principles and systems that underpin corporate governance today.

          • ​It also provides the opportunity to assess the practical application of corporate governance systems across major international organisations.

          • Learning Outcomes

            ​understand the key principles within corporate governance frameworks, with specific reference to the UK Corporate Governance Code;

            ​be able to critically analyse and discuss the corporate governance arrangements for several types of organisation.

          • Dissertation (ECON912)
            LevelM
            Credit level60
            SemesterSummer (June-September)
            Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
            Aims

            The aim of this module is to enable a student to undertake an independent piece of work that demonstrates a consolidated level of thorough understanding of the student achieved by undertaking theoretical as well as empirical analysis on a particular aspect of interest. The work could be a fundamental ground for the research that is anticipated to be undertaken in due course of study to be carried on by the student.

            Learning Outcomes

            Development of skill of presenting theoretical and empirical analysis on a particular aspect of interest in the discipline. Further development of the work for further research may be considered.

          • Existentialism (PHIL332)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterFirst Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
            Aims

            To consider the theories and arguments of some of the most important existentialist philosophers, such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger and Sartre.

            ​To analyse some of the main themes of existentialist philosophy, such as the nature of subjectivity, the possibility of freedom, the death of God, time, nothingness.

            ​To relate the philosophical issues raised by existentialism to lived practice and to concrete examples.​

            Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in existentialism.

            Students will be able to analyse key concepts and arguments relating to the existentialist movement.

            Students will be able to structure discussion of issues around existentialist metaphysics and ethics.

            Students will be able to identify the relevance of existentialist philosophy to their own lives.

            Students will be able to articulate and defend positions relating to existentialist themes.​

            Students will be able to present their ideas with clarity and confidence.​

            Students will be able to writing coherent, structured and informative accounts on abstract philosophical issues.​

          • Frontiers of Ethics (PHIL302)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterFirst Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
            Aims
          • To consider conceptual and ethical issues arising from matters of global concern, such as international justice, war, and the environmental crisis.​

          • To consider arguments and assumptions underlying a range of claims concerning such issues as disability, global citizenship, climate change and the ethical status of nature.
          • To examine difficulties for traditional philosophical approaches raised by such issues and recent theoretical developments relevant to them.

          • Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to distinguish between some of the main concepts involved in philosophical debates arising from matters of current global concern.

            Students will be able to distinguish between different ways of understanding  concepts in philosophical debates arising from from matters of global concern.​

            Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in debates about matters of disability, global justice, just war, environmental justice and environmental ethics.​

            Students will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to current ethical issues.​

            Students will be able to identify philosophical assumptions underlying ethical claims.​

            Students will be able to structure a philosophical discussion of current ethical issues.​

            Students will be able to speak with confidence and clarity on current ethical issues.​Students will be able to explain details of texts shaping current philosophical debates about matters of global concern.

            Students will be able to articulate and defend positions in current philosophical debates about matters of global concern.​

            Students will be able to write coherently and rigorously about abstract philosophical issues raised by current ethical controversies.

          • Game Theoretical Approaches to Microeconomics (ECON322)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterFirst Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
            Aims

            The objective of the module is to provide an introduction to game theory. This is the study of strategic interactions ie situations where outcomes depend not only on our own actions but also how others react to our actions. This module complements those in core macro and microeconomics and offers more insight into strategic decisions and competetive behaviour in general.

            Learning Outcomes

            ​Explain game theoretical concepts

            Conduct advanced microeconomic analysis by formulating a game and its associated solution concepts and deriving solutions to games​

            ​Apply games in a range of economic, business and social contexts

            ​Explain the importance of game theoretic approaches in economic analysis

          • Health Economics (ECON326)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterSecond Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
            Aims

            The aim of this module is to introduce third year economics students to the basic principles and tools of health economics. The module aims to show how the health care system differs from the economic textbook model of perfectly competitive markets. It will offer an overview of the issues of demand and supply for health care, supplier-induced demand, equity and inequality, health care financing and health insurance. It will emphasize the use of economic evaluation for assessing health care interventions as a way of making informed decisions in terms of costs and benefits.

            Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to recognize the main characteristics and important questions addressed in the health care market

            ​Students will be able to understand the main characteristics and differences of the type of studies used in economic evaluation

            ​Students will be able to examine economic evaluation papers and be able to identify and assess the main strengths and weaknesses of published studies

            ​Students will be able to understand the theoretical foundations of health economics

            ​Students will be able to understand the role of health economics in Health Technology Assessment

            ​Students will be able to assess the value of health economics in informing resource allocation decisions in both advanced and resource poor settings

          • Identity in Contemporary International Politics (POLI332)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterSecond Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
            Aims

            • To analyse the political significance of identity in international politics
            • To examine the interrelationship between national identity, territory, sovereignty and democracy in terms of ideological foundations and in the context of international relations
            • To draw implications for the construction of stable political communities in conditions of cultural diversity

            Learning Outcomes

            By the end of the course students will be familiar with the concepts of identity - national, political and ethnic.

            Students will gain the understanding of the main debates within the citizenship studies and minority rights.​

            Students will be confident with transnational politics, diasporas and how they are reflected in international politics.​

            Students will be able to accompany theoretical concepts and discussions by examples and appropriate case studies.​

            Students will be familiar with the emergence of the nation-state and ethnic exclusion​

            Students will be able to analyse issues and controversies surrounding this most interdisciplinary and contested area of political science - identity and its effects on international politics.​

          • Indian Philosophy (PHIL326)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterSecond Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
            Aims
          • To examine the ways in which philosophy in Classical India develops as a dialogue between thinkers of Buddhist and Brahminical persuasions and to relate fundamental Indian metaphysical concepts to Western counterparts.

          • ​To investigate what is distinctive about Indian approaches to questions of ontology, soteriology, social harmony, and morality.

          • Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to engage in informed discussions identifying and evaluating the concepts and categories in which philosophical discussions were conducted in India.

            ​Students will able to be enabled to assimilate a differentview Western philosophical traditions from the perspective of Indian philosohical traditions.

            ​Students will be able to contextualise information about the Indian worldviews under discussion.

             

             

            Students will be able to think more imaginatively by empathising with unfamiliar outlooks on life.

             

            ​Students will be able to engage in debate informed by an awareness of the particularity and peculiarities of Western philosophical positions.

          • Industrial Organisation (ECON333)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterFirst Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
            Aims

            To apply the tools of microeconomics to the analysis of firms, markets and industries in order to understand the nature and consequences of the process of competition. These tools will also be applied to the evaluation of relevant government policy.  This will extend knowledge and skills of microeconomic analysis by covering recent advances in theory as well as empirical analysis of relevant microeconomic topics.

            Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to use economic principles, concepts and techniques to discuss and analyse government policy and economic performance with reference to standard frameworks in Industrial Organisation.

            ​Students will be able to apply standard frameworks, including verbal, graphical, mathematical and statistical representations of economic concepts and models, to explain and evaluate the effects of a range of competitive behaviours by firms and how they are influenced by economic incentives.

            ​Students will be able to analyse current issues and problems in business and industry.

            ​Students will be able to compare, contrast and critically evaluate alternative schools of thought in Industrial Organisation with reference to empirical evidence.

            ​Students will be able to conduct competent applied economic research by locating, selecting and analysing information relevant to the study of Industrial Organisation.


          • ​Students will be able to communicate effectively in writing and in accordance with a report specification

          • International Economic Relations (ECON354)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterFirst Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
            Aims

            The aim of this module is to provide a detailed coverage of the nature and determinants of the pattern of world trade and financial, capital and labour flows.  The module also aims to provide students with a critical appreciation of why conflicts arise between nations due to international economic activity and what policy options are most appropriate for countries both individually and cooperatively to adopt.  Throughout the module emphasis will be placed upon the role of theory in enhancing understanding of the patterns and nature of trade flows (in the context of both goods and services) in the context of the key issues in international economic relations.

            Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to explain why countries gain from trade and what pattern of trade flows exist using classic trade theories.Students will be able to explain why countries engage in trade protection, as well as predict and analyze the consequences that arise in case such protection is applied

            ​Students will be able to explain how key flows of goods, services, money and physical capital are valued.  They will be able to use real and nominal exchange rates, understand, explain and apply the concept of PPP.

            Students will be able to explain the reasons why trade blocs are formed and analyze and explain their costs and benefits.  They will also be able to distinguish between trade blocs among countries of similar as well as different development levels.  ​

            ​Students will be able to explain why conflicts arise in the areas of labour migration and environmental pollution and suggest policy responses which may be used to correct such problems

            ​Students will be able to explain the causes and consequences of financial crises and how financial contagion can spread from one country to another

            ​Students will be able to explain the links between trade and capital flows and economic development using examples of the Latin American and East Asian countries

          • International Political Economy (ECON325)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterFirst Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
            AimsThis module aims to familiarise students with rational choice and public choice theories and arguments, and with their applications in open economies and international political economy; theoretical concepts such as the Coase theorem, the Arrow impossibility theorem, and economic populism; key concepts of the New Institutional Economics and related applications to the theory of the firm; a modern economics’ view of globalisation; and the application of international political economy concepts to Latin America.

            The module also aims to deepen students'' understanding and awareness of the meaning and importance of national cultures, the relationship between rent seeking and protectionism; corruption; essential aspects of multinational corporations, foreign direct investment, and regulation; specific characteristics of the Argentine and Mexican economic policies and institutions and Chilean ‘exceptionalism’; and the possibility of applying ideas developed in this module to other geographical, national, regional and historical contexts.




            Learning OutcomesStudents will understand the concepts of rational choice and public choice in order to study aspects of a globalised world, which is in key respects different from that of elementary textbook models


            ​Students will gain a deep understanding of international business and the international political economy, in a way compatible with rigorous approaches to economic analysis

            ​Students will become familiar with theoretical concepts from rational choice and public choice theories, with emphasis on theories and models which apply to open economies in a context of globalisation

            ​Students will be able to apply these theoretical concepts in order to study some aspects of the political economy of international business.

            ​Students will be able to apply theoretical concepts to a Latin American case study.

            ​Students will be able to produce and deliver a coherent presentation.

          • International Trade (ECON335)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterFirst Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
            Aims

            To develop an appreciation and understanding of basic principles determining the observed patterns of trade in the increasingly globalised world economy.

            Learning Outcomes

            After successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

            understand the role of both absolute and comparative advantage in explaining observed patterns of trade in the global economy

            ​recognise both the strengths and limitations of the basic Ricardian approach

            ​understand the determinants of the terms of trade, in both theory and practice

            ​recognise the implications of the observed behaviour of the terms of trade for both developed and less developed economies

            appreciate the relationships between globalisation, economic performance ​

            critically evaluate the roles, achievements and failures of various international institutions in the context of international economic performance ​

          • Macroeconomics After the Financial Crises (ECON364)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterFirst Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
            Aims

            This module aims to equip students with the knowledge of how the economy has changed since the financial crises and what this means for business and policy environment.The module also aims to provide students with a critical appreciation of what the main policy responses by different countries were during the crisis and in its aftermath and what policy options, new and old, are available and most appropriate for countries both individually and cooperatively to adopt.  

            Learning Outcomes

            ​Students will be able to critically analyse contemporary macroeconomic issues.

            ​Students will be able to understand how the crises have reshaped our thinking of macroeconomic policies.

            ​Students will be able to understand and explain the role of macroprudential policies, monetary policy, fiscal policy and financial regulation.

            ​Students will be able to understand and explain the roles played by exchange rate systems and capital accounts of countries.

            ​Students will be able to conduct competent independent research in Economics and embody it in an appropriate paper.

            ​Students will be able to partake in informed critical discussions of the policy environment based on an analysis of journal articles and other readings.

          • Mind, Brain and Consciousness (PHIL309)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterFirst Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
            Aims
          • To give students an understanding of the main developments in twentieth century analytic philosophy of mind: dualism, behaviourism, identity theory and functionalism.

          • ​To give students a grasp of cutting-edge debates in philosophy of mind concerning (i) the place of consciousness in nature, (ii) the relationship between consciousness and thought, (iii) artificial intelligence.

          • Learning Outcomes

            Students should be able to explain the history of twentieth century analytic philosophy of mind.

            ​Students should be able to explain cutting edge contemporary debates on (i) the place of consciousness in nature, (ii) the relationship between thought and consciousness, (iii) artificial intelligence.

            Students should be able to build a case for a specific view concerning (i) the place of consciousness in nature, (ii) the relationship between thought and consciousenss, (iii) aritificial intelligence. ​

            Students should be able to explain the main strengths and weaknesses of dominent theories on these three things in the philosophical literature.

            ​Students should further develop their abilities to extract arguments from texts, render them in schematic form, and assess the soundness of their premises and the validity of their structures.

            ​Students should be able to think more creatively about the relationship between thought, consciousness and the physical world.

          • Philosophy Dissertation (PHIL306)
            Level3
            Credit level30
            SemesterWhole Session
            Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
            Aims

            The aim is for the student to choose a topic of special interest in philosophy and conduct research into this area of interest via reading and private study under the supervison of the supervisor to whom they have been allocated.  

            Learning Outcomes

            The student will produce a systematic piece of written work, organised in chapters/sections in the manner of professional and published work in philosophy, so as to show that the research referred to in the Aims has been mastered in a way appropriate to someone with a grasp of the practice of professional philosophy.

          • Philosophy of Language (PHIL310)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterSecond Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
            Aims

            To study some of the main issues in the contemporary philosophy of language.

            Learning Outcomes​Students will be able to explain the point of compositional theories of meaning. 

            ​Students will be able to explain the nature and purpose of Frege''s sense-reference distinction.

            Students will be able to explain Russell''s Theory of Descriptions.​

            Students will be able to explain the difference between extensionality and intensionality and be able to evaluate some of the problems connected with these notions.​

            Students will be able to explain and evaluate sceptical approaches to meaning, such as Quine''s and Kripke''s.​

            Students will be able to explain and evaluate Davidson''s programme of radical interpretation.​

            Students will have be able to explain rival theories of truth and evaluate their relative merits.​

            Students will have be able to explain the connections between the notions of truth and meaning, and be able to evaluate the debate between realists and anti-realists.​

          • Philosophy of Law (PHIL341)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterSecond Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
            Aims

            ​The module aims ​​to get the student thinking about our (and other) legal system, and the philosophical basis, if any, of the system, its strengths and weakeness, and how, if at all, it might be improved.

            Learning Outcomes

            ​Students will familiarize themselves with the rudiments of the English-and-Welsh legal system.

            ​Students will acquaint themselves with the chief questions in the philosophy of law.

            ​Students ​​​​​will acquaint themselves with the main views on the chief questions in the philosophy of law.

            ​Students will develop their own views on the chief questions in the philosophy of law.

          • Philosophy of Play and the VIrtual (PHIL343)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterFirst Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
            Aims

            ​To introduce students to the main contemporary issues around play and games.

            To develop students'' understanding of the relationships between play, labour and virtuality.

            To enable students to reflect on their own preconceptions of play and value.

            Learning Outcomes

            ​Students will be able to explain the importance of play as a topic for study.

            Students will be able to analyse common topics of discourse around play and games, especially digital games: violence, addiction, therapeutic and educational effects, and gamification.​

            Students will be able to identify philosophical issues ariding from specific games/instances of play.​

            Students will be able to explain some of the philosophical literature around play, make-believe, choice and responsibility, and virtual worlds.​

            Students will be able to trace connections between surface controversies and deeper philosophical concerns.​

            ​Students will develop their ability to reflect on their own preconceptions and how these contribute to both philosophical and popular discourse.​
          • Philosophy of the Future (PHIL312)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterSecond Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
            Aims
          • ​To provide an introduction to debates concerning the philosophical implications of foreseeable future technological innovations. 

          • To examine the relevance of metaphysical and ethical considerations to future technological and scientific developments.​

          • Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to identify the main issues and positions in contemporary philosophical discussions of issues such as human enhancement, existential risks, teleportation, time travel, the technological singularity, the simulation argument, the feasibility and desirability of uploading into virtual worlds.  ​

            ​​

            Students will be able to explain the main strengths and weaknesses of these positions.​

            ​​Students will be able to explain the relevance of metaphysical and ethical considerations to debates concerning these issues. ​

            ​Students will be able to think more creatively about philosophical issues​.

            ​Students will be able to structure philosophical arguments relating issues raised by future technological developments.​

            ​Students will be able to articulate and defend specific positions in current philosophical debates concerning likely future developments in science and technology.​

            ​Students will be able to write coherently and rigourously about the philosophical issues raised by future technological developments.

          • Public Policy: An Advanced Introduction (POLI310)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterSecond Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
            Aims
            • ​To introduce students to concepts such as ‘the public’, ‘the private’, ‘power’;
            • To introduce studetns to the core ideas that explain societies acceptance of and/or desire for state intervention in the form of a public policy
            • ​To introduce studetns to the ways state theory can be used to explain how decisions are reached in the policy process
            Learning Outcomes

            ​Students will understand the key theoretical ideas underpinning public policy

            ​Students will understand the frameworks that have been developed to inform our understanding of the policy and decision-making processes

            ​Students will understand the difficulties policymakers encounter while engaged in policymaking

          • Rhetoric in British Politics (POLI323)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterFirst Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
            Aims

            ​Understand, describe, ad critique the role of rhetoric and oratory in British politics.

            Understand, analyse, and evaluate the theory and practices of rhetoric with a focus on the modes of persuasion.

            Understand, analyse, and evaluate political performance with an awareness of social impact.

            Understand how to craft a political speech for delivery by high profile political figures.

            Learning Outcomes

            ​The ability to understand, describe and critique the role of oratory and rhetoric in British politics.

            An understanding of the key theories underscoring political rhetoric.​

            The ability to construct a political speech using the outlined rhetorical theories.​

            To compare and contrast how different political figures use oratorical devices.​

            The ability to demonstrate their awareness of political speechwriting and delivery.​

          • Securities Markets (ECON241)
            Level2
            Credit level15
            SemesterSecond Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
            Aims
          • This module seeks to provide an understanding of

            the role of securities markets in the economy

          • ​their basic mechanics and technical features

          • ​the valuation of financial assets

          • ​the operational and allocative efficiency of the market.

          • Learning Outcomes appreciate the central role of securities markets in the economy.

            ​understand and apply appropriate economic theory to market organisation

            display an understanding of the usefulness of portfolio theory and the approaches to the valuation of financial assets.​

            ​read the financial press and appreciate issues relating to the study of the securities markets.

          • Security and Intelligence (POLI303)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterFirst Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
            Aims
            • To provide students with the opportunity to study the particular issues and controversies surrounding intelligence in contemporary security.
            • To enable students to develop their analytical and research skills in examining academic debates on intelligence
            Learning Outcomes

            The student should be able to explain and assess the role of intelligence processes in contemporary security.

            ​The student should be able to assess academic debates on intelligence.

            ​The student should be able to evaluate the changing significance of intelligence since the Cold war.

            ​The student should be able to assess the political and scoietal implications of current intelligence practices.

          • The Economics of Developing Countries (ECON306)
            Level3
            Credit level15
            SemesterSecond Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
            Aims

            This module aims to introduce students to the theoretical perspectives andempirical debates within development economics and impart an in-depthappreciation of the issues related to economic development and its determinantsin less developed countries.

            Learning OutcomesTo understand the nature and determinants of economic development in the LDCs;

              To recognise both the strengths andlimitations of various alternative models of the development process

              To understand the determinants ofeconomic welfare in LDCs

              ​To recognise the implications fordeveloping countries of international exchange, trade liberalisation andglobalisation

              To appreciate the relationships betweenglobalisation and economic performance in low and middle income economies

              To critically evaluate the roles,achievements and failures of various international policy initiatives in thecontext of developing country measured economic performance and domesticeconomic welfare.

            • The Media, the Internet and Political Science (POLI319)
              Level3
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
              Aims
              • To introduce students to the ways in which contemporary notions of what constitutes Political Science have a bearing upon what we think we know about conventional and new media.​
              • To explore the way in which conceptions of power are related to our understanding of how the old and new media function in contemporary society. ​
              • To explore a range of themes that connect the new media to its conventional counterparts (including the political economy of journalism, web-based political mobilisation, citizen journalism and mediate elections).​
              • To explore particularly illuminating examples of power exertion by or through the mass media ​
              Learning Outcomes

              Students will be able to understand what constitutes the ''canons and conventions'' of contemporary Political Science, and how these relate to research on, and evidence about, the old and new media

              Students will be able to appreciate the role and importance of the various media in power structures of society​

              Students will be aware of how the old and new media relate to each other, both nationally and internationally, and how both relate to contemporary political realities​

              Students will have a grasp of the key themes and case studies that link media practice, to politics/politicians, and the principal power models​

              Students should be able to communicate their understanding in cogent form in a varierty of non-written media​

            • Theories of Poverty and Wealth (POLI316)
              Level3
              Credit level15
              SemesterSecond Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
              Aims
            • ​To help Students understand the relationship that exists between poor/poverty/wealth in relation to the functions/purposes of the welfare state.

            • ​​To help students understand how the core theories of the welfare state interpret the relationship between those considered as living in poverty/poor/wealthy
            • To help Students feel comfortable and capable of undertaking positive and constructive interactions in large and small group environments
            • To help students understand How different theories interpret the development and use of welfare-to-work programmes.​
            • Learning OutcomesAn ability to make reasoned arguments linking the core theories of the welfare state to contempory issues

              ​An ability to make reasoned arguents relating to the connecton between poverty/poor/welath and how these help inform a range of different theories of the welfare state​

              ​​An ability to make reasoned arguments about how welfare-to-work and workfare are changing the nature and shape of the contemporary welfare state and how a number of different theories of the welfare state understand these moves
            • Wittgenstein (PHIL340)
              Level3
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
              Aims

              To study the later Wittgenstein. Topics will include: background in the Tractatus - the limits of language and the nature of ethical and religious discourse; rule-following and the private - the limits of language and the nature of ethical and religious discourse; rule-following and the private language argument; the nature and prospects of philosophy; epistemology and certainty.

              Learning Outcomes

              Students will be able to explain how the Tractatus influenced Wittgenstein''s later philosophy.

              Students will be able to explain and assess both the Augustinian picture of language and Wittgenstein''s criticism of it​.

              Students will be able to explain the rule-following considerations and their importance to Wittgenstein and contemporary philosophy of language​.

              Students will be able to explain and assess the private language argument and its importance to contemporary philosophy of mind​.

              Students will be able to explain and assess Wittgenstein''s technical notion of ''criterion'' and its philosophical significance​.

              Students will be able to explain and assess Wittgenstein''s later epistemology​.

            The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


            Teaching and Learning

            In studying Philosophy you will learn how to defend your views with reasoned arguments, and to assess the arguments of others. Argumentative skills are learned through attending lectures and reading philosophical texts, developed by group seminar discussions, and formally assessed through essays and exams. You complete modules to the value of 120 credits per year, from a wide range of options available. Most modules employ a blend of lectures, seminars and online support materials. You will learn by reading and studying outside class time, by attending and participating in classes, by doing coursework and, for dissertations, via one-to-one meetings with a supervisor. There is also scope, both formally in the placement module and informally, for you to develop practical skills by volunteering.


            Assessment

            Philosophy employs a mixture of modes of assessment: exams and coursework in many different varieties including essays, oral presentations, dissertations, exercises, and supported independent work (eg in the placement module).