Philosophy, Politics and Economics BA (Hons) Add to your prospectus

  • Offers study abroad opportunities Offers study abroad opportunities
  • Opportunity to study for a year in China Offers a Year in China

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: L0V0
  • Year of entry: 2019
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB / IB : 33 / BTEC : Applications considered
philosophy-1

Module details

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Reading and Writing Practical Philosophy (PHIL107)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
    1. Tointroduce the academic skills and knowledge necessary for the critical readingand writing of philosophy.
    2. ​Tofoster in students an appreciation of the value of philosophy.
    3. Toenable students to read effectively and to takes notes efficiently.
    4. Todevelop students'' skill in presenting complex ideas to an audience and inpracticing the intellectual virtues associated with philosophical discussion.
    5. Topromote students'' skill in writing rigorously argued, well-written andwell-presented philosophical essays.
    6. To developstudents'' research skills.
    7. Toincrease students'' awareness of the importance of feedback, review andreflection and to encourage them to use feedback, review and reflection toshape their approach to future work. 

     

      Learning Outcomes

      ​Students will be able to explain and evaluate some work relevant to a selected specialist topic in ethics. (This topic may vary from year to year. Examples include: human treatment of animals; ethics and the environment.)

      ​Students will be able to explain and evaluate some central work about political liberty.

      ​Students will be able to give structured seminar presentations and to conduct discussion in a manner that displays the intellectual virtues associated with philosophy.

      ​Students will be able to write essays that embody a philosophically-informed approach to argumentation.

      Students will be able to use the Harvard referencing system. ​

      Students will be able to conduct independent research in support of their work, using appropriate print and online resources (including the Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy and the Philosopher''s Index). ​

      ​Students will be able to explain and evaluate some work in aesthetics and the philosophy of art. 

    1. Foundations in International Politics (POLI104)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      The principal objective of this module is to provide introductory foundations to the study of international politics by introducing the main theories and approaches

      To provide an overview of the major developments of international politics since the 20th century, paying particular attention to the Cold War and its aftermath. ​

      To offer brief introductions to four main issues of international politics: globalisation, Europeanisation and regional integration, environmentalism and poverty and development. ​

      Learning OutcomesBy the end of the module, students will have acquired a working knowledge of the main theories of International Relations and a greater awareness of their applicability in analysing specific issues in international politics. Of equal importance, students should have acquired a familiarity with the main themes that characterise both the Cold War and the post-Cold War period. 
      More specifically, students will have acquired the following:
      An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the major IR theories. 


       

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      Students should have developed the ability to compare and contrast the various theories when discussing questions and issues affecting international politics;Students will be familiar with the main events, issues and themes in international relations;
    2. Foundations in Politics (POLI109)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
      AimsStudents will demonstrate a foundational understanding of key political concepts; Students will examine democratic theory and its challenges; Students will analyse expressions of political power; Students will demonstrate a knowledge of major political theories and arguments of key political scientists, political sociologists, and political philosophers; Students will understand what the study of politics is, and they will be able to distinguish the different ways in which one can study politics (empirical and normative approaches); To give students the skills necessary to master their degree in politics and to maximise their grade potential within the Department of Politics; To ensure students develop the skills necessary to be active rather than passive learners; To enable students to link study skills and research methods with their own academic success on the modules available in the first year and beyond.
      Learning OutcomesDemonstrate a foundational knowledge of politics and the study of politics.Demonstrate an ability to relate political theory to the real world application of political power.Identify the problems faced by democratic and non-democratic political systems and the means by which they can be understood.

      Deconstruct the relationship between power, the state, democratic theory and the application of political authority.

      ​Students will develop academic writing, communication, and presentation skills.

      ​Students will develop exam skills and skills to reflect on critical feedback.

      ​Students will develop an understanding of using sources and acquire referencing skills and awareness of plagiarism

    3. Political Philosophy (PHIL102)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting90:10
      AimsTo introduce students to the theories and arguments of some of the most important philosophers and of the western tradition of political thought, such as Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Marx and Mill. 

      To introduce students to some of the main concepts in political philosophy, including political obligation, democracy, community, rights, liberty, justice and property.
      Learning Outcomes

      Students will be able to distinguish some main concepts in political philosophical debates.

      ​Students will be able to distinguish different ways of understanding  concepts in political philosophical debates.

      Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in the history of political philosophy.​

      Students will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to political issues.​

      Students will be able to identify philosophical assumptions underlying political claims.​

      Students will be able to structure a discussion of issues in political philosophy.​

      Students will be able to speak with confidence and clarity on issues of political philosophy​.

      Students will be able to explain details of canonical texts in political philosophy.

      Students will be able to articulate and defend basic positions in political philosophy.​

      Students will be able to write coherently and rigorously about abstract philosophical issues raised by political debates.

    4. Principles of Macroeconomics (ECON123)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
      Aims

      The aims of this module are:

      • To complement and build on Principles of Microeconomics and to provide a foundation for further studies in macroeconomics
      • To introduce concepts and theories of economics which help understand changes in the macroeconomic environment
      • to explain and analyse the formulation of government macroeconomic policy
      Learning Outcomes

      Explain the relationship between expenditures and national income and demonstrate how monetary and fiscal policies may be used to influence them

      Explain the behaviour of economic aggregates such as national income, inflation and unemployment over time

      Explain and assess government policy in a range of policy situations

      Explain the framework of national income accounting

      Use graphical and algebraic modelling to analyse the economy and economic policy

       Explain the interconnections between the markets for goods, money and labour

      Explain the principal influences on long-term growth and the short-run fluctuation in output around the long-run growth trend

      Locate, select and analyse information relevant to assessing the state of the economy and economic policy

    5. Principles of Microeconomics (ECON121)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      This module aims to provide students with a clear foundation of the purpose, scope and topics of microeconomic analysis. Students will develop their ability to think critically and analytically, and understand how to frame real world problems in an economic model. This module forms the starting point for all future courses in Microeconomics. 

      This module also emphasizes the role of mathematics in economics.

      Learning Outcomes

      ​Students will have the ability to understand, explain, analyse and solve core problems in microeconomics.

      ​Students will be able to practice and develop their mathematical techniques and understand the role of mathematical analysis in Microeconomics.

      ​Students will be able to familiarise themselves with the principles of using an ''economic model'' and how to model individual decision-making for both consumers and producers.

      ​Students will be able to apply their understanding of economic decision-making, optimisation and equilibrium to real world situations.

    6. Statistics for Economics and Business (ECON112)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims
    7. The fundamental aim of this module is to give students an understanding of how statistics operates in Business and Economics;

    8. ​To provide both a foundation for further study and a broadly based introduction to statistics;

    9. To enable students to summarize, present and analyze data from a sample;
    10. ​To enable students to understand and apply the practice of statistical inference to sample data to estimate full population variable parameters;

    11. To enable students to ​work comfortably with variables as probability distributions, introducing some common and practicably useful probability distributions.

    12. Learning OutcomesThebasis of data analysis

      ​Thefundamental notion of statistical inference

      ​Summarise,describe and present raw data

      ​Estimatethe mean of a population (and other statistics)

      ​Howto formulate and test hypotheses about values in the population based on randomsamples

      Howto carry out basic statistical computations and graphical analysis

      Howto identify and model relationships between two variables

      Understandthe use of probability in statistics

      Communicatingresults

    13. Mathematical Economics (ECON113)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      ​The aims are:

      - to prepare students for the more advanced Year 2 Mathematical Economics II option, which is a prerequisite for certain Year 3 modules. 

      - to prepare students for the econometrics sequence starting in Year 2.

      - to develop mathematical maturity and problem solving skills.

      Learning Outcomes

      ​An understanding of key techniques of proof

      ​An understanding of comparative statics and calculus methods including integration, multivariate optimisation and constrained optimisation

      ​An ability to solve economic problems using the mathematical techniques introduced during lecture hours.

    Year Two Compulsory Modules

    • Macroeconomics I (ECON223)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims

      To extend the study of macroeconomic theory to the intermediate level. To analyse the classical and Keynesian macroeconomic models, and their policy implications, in order to provide a context for subsequent developments in modern macroeconomics associated with monetarism, new classical and new Keynesian economics.

      Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to understand how employment, output, interest rate and the price level are determined in the classical model

      ​Students will be able to understand the origin of economic growth in the short runand in the long run

      ​Students will be able to understand the effects of fiscal and monetary policies in the IS-LM model

      ​Students will be able to understand the effects of fiscal and monetary policies under different exchange-rate regimes

    • Macroeconomics II (ECON224)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      To further extend the study of macroeconomic theory at the intermediatelevel by analysing business-cycle fluctuations in closed and open economiesusing the real business cycle model and also the new Keynesian model that arebased on solid microfoundation

      Learning Outcomes

      Understand the microfoundation of modern macroeconomic models

      ​Explain the implications of macroeconomic disturbances and fiscalpolicies using the real business cycle model

      Contrast the different implications of monetary policies in thereal business cycle model and in the new Keynesian model.

      Analyse business cycles in the open economy.
    • Microeconomics 1 (ECON221)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
      Aims

      This module, in accordance with Microeconomics 2, aims to provide a solid foundation of intermediate level microeconomic theory. It develops and extends three of the topics introduced in Principles of Microeconomics, namely, Consumer Theory, Producer Theory and General Equilibrium. It prepares the students for the more advanced modules in the second and third year like Microeconomics 2 and Game Theory.

      Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to demonstrate a thorough understanding of the core concepts and models used in consumer theory, producer theory and general equilibrium and an ability to apply these to arange of markets and settings.

      ​Students will be able to think and apply themselves analytically to problems in the above-mentioned topics.

      ​Students will be able to gain problem solving skills using verbal, diagrammatic and mathematical methods to problems in the above topics.  

      ​Students will be able to have a critical perspective regarding the assumptions underlying microeconomics models.

    • Microeconomics 2 (ECON222)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
      Aims
      1. This module, following on from with Microeconomics 1, aims to provide a solid foundation of intermediate level microeconomic theory. 
      2. ​The module uses the theoretical foundations developed in the first semester and aims to extend the application of the skills acquired to more advanced topics such as welfare economics.
      3. This module also aims to prepare students for the more advanced modules in the third year by introducing topics such as asymmetric information and game theory.
      Learning OutcomesHave a thorough understanding of the core concepts and models used in Welfare Economics, Asymmetric Information, and Game Theory. 

      ​To prepare students to think and apply themselves to analyse a range of problems in the three areas mentioned above.

      ​To develop problem solving skills using verbal, diagrammatic and mathematical methods to problems in the above topics.  

      ​To deepen a critical perspective regarding the assumptions underlying microeconomics models.

    Year Two Optional Modules

    • Uk General Elections Since 1945 (POLI204)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims

      ​​To introduce students to key theoretical accounts of electoral behaviour and electoral competition;

      ​​To equip students with a foundation knowledge of key changes and developments in the UK electoral and party systems since 1945;

      ​​To introduce students to a variety of statistical data sources relating to UK General Elections;

      ​To furnish students with basic skills to analyse and visualise electoral statistics using Microsoft Excel and SPSS.

      Learning Outcomes​You will be able to summarise the evidence relating to both trends in turnout over time and to differences in levels of turnout geographically and among key social groups, and to assess the relative merits of competing theoretical and empirical explanations of these trends and patterns.

      ​You will be able to compare and contrast the principal theories of voting behaviour associated with the alignment and de-alignment debates in British electoral studies, including the application of theoretical assumptions to specific examples of voting behaviour.

      ​You will be able to compare andcontrast notions of ''issue voting'' and ''valence voting'', and debate the extentto which there is evidence to support the contention that the Britishelectorate responds, rationally or otherwise, to the positioning andperformance of parties in relation to key issues.

      ​You will be able to evaluatehow far evidence supports the proposition that perceptions of party image and partyleaders are increasingly important determinants of voting behaviour in Britain andassess the implications of these developments for theories of electoralcompetition and for the practice of running successful election campaigns.     

      You will be able to summarise how campaigning and media coverage at UK general elections have changed since 1945 and analyse the reasons for these changes, as well as their consequences for election campaigns and outcomes.​

      ​You will be able to outline and apply appropriate criteria for assessing the performance of the electoral system for UK General Elections since 1945 and evaluate the arguments for and against electoral reform.

      ​You will be able to describe in broad terms how the social composition of the House of Commons has changed since 1945, analyse the possible reasons for these trends, and evaluate the case for taking action to make the House of Commons more socially representative.

      ​​​You will be able to outline the key changes to electoral law and administration since 1945 and discuss the reasons why such reforms have frequently been the subject of intense partisan controversy​.

      ​You will be able to discuss the outcomes of the 1983, 1997 and 2010 General Elections in relation to debates about a) dealignment, issue voting and party image/leadership and b) the operation of the electoral system and the case for electoral reform.

      ​​You will acquire a knowledge of the key statistical datasets​ and techniques used in the study of UK general elections, including how to locate such data, and be able to apply a range of basic statistical techniques to compile, analyse and visualise electoral data. 
    • American Politics and Society (POLI205)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
      Aims

      ​​To help students understand how governmental actors and institutions interact to shape the nature and outcomes of the US political process;

      ​To help students explore how actors and institutions residing outside the state influence the governing processes

      To acquaint students with the US constitutional system

      Learning Outcomes

      ​An understanding of how the institutional relationships occurring at the federal level shape the overall political process​

      An understanding of how public opinion, political parties, and the media interact with governing institutions to shape the overall governing processes found in the United States.​

      An understanding of how institutions interact with those residing at the individual state level (via the Federalist nature of the US Constitutional system) to shape the character of the US political system;​

    • Comparative Politics of the Middle East and North Africa (POLI215)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims

      ​To introduce students to the history of state-society relations since the emergence of Middle Eastern states in the early 20th century.

      To enable students to compare different cases within the region.

      To provide students with knowledge of other regions to explain outcomes such as authoritarian resilience or the rise of political Islam.

      Learning Outcomes

      ​The ability to apply theories of comparative politics to Middle Eastern and North African cases and critically assess these theories in the light of the Middle Eastern experience.

      ​A knowledge of key debates in Middle Eastern and North African politics including the role of oil in politics, political Islam, and authoritarian resilience.  

      ​Acquire knowledge of the political history of key Middle Eastern states, including Iran, Egypt and Saudi Arabia.

      ​The ability to write a cogent, well-argued research paper that deals with a significant aspect of these debates and theories.

    • Regimes and Their Consequences (POLI222)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims

      Examine the reasons for state-building and their implications for contemporary political developments around the world;Analyse the establishment, durability and overthrow of authoritarian regimes using historical and contemporary case studies;Examine the process of democratization in countries transitioning from authoritarian regimes and the conditions determining its success or failure;Consider the issue of support for democracy in developed and developing countries and its potential decline;Explore the potential of social movements to effect change in a variety of different political regimes;Relate changes and developments in regional contexts to the theoretical literature on comparative politics.
      Learning OutcomesIdentify and describe the historical factors that have shaped political institutions and structures;Describe the evolution of cultural norms, attitudes, ideologies and traditions that affect how politics is viewed and conducted;Outline and be able to classify political forms, including the ways in which leaders are chosen and power is distributed and restrained;Compare and contrast countries using comparative models, with regard to each of the above;

      Apply differing models in political structures and policy approaches, and evaluate their effectiveness and usefulness

      Evaluate one’s own political system, its strengths and its weaknesses, by comparing it to others.

    • International Organisations (POLI225)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
      Aims
    •  

    • To provide an understanding of the nature of modern state system and the role of international organisations within it;To explore central concepts and theories in International Relations and apply these in analyses of the challenges and conflicts faced by the international system; To explore mechanisms and policy instruments that International Institutions possess in managing the new world order; To assess critical arguments as to the limits of international institutions and the likely future developments; To assess interpretations of international law Within global governance debates;​To develop students'' skills in synthesis and analysis, and in the presentation of clear and cogent arguments (both orally and in writing) of issues and controversies surrounding international system and its organisations.
        Learning Outcomes

        ​Ability to understand the role of international organisations in the in the international system. Ability to apply core theories of international relations to major international organisations.  

        ​Awareness of the role of global governance in the new world order.

        Ability to explore powers and limits of international organisations and the role of international law and human rights.

      • Devolution in the Uk (POLI227)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
        Aims

        ​To analyse the impact of devolution in the UK upon its different parliaments and assemblies, assessing how politics in the different parts of the UK has changed;

        To assess how the Parliaments and assemblies in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland were introduced and have developed;

        To explore what has been the impact of these parliaments and assemblies for the party system in each country;

        ​To examine how do devolved institutions address societal divisions within each country;

        ​To assess what are the implications for the future of the United Kingdom of devolution.

        Learning Outcomes

        ​​​Upon completion of the module, students should be able to:

        Identify the key conceptual principles of integration, federalism and devolution and their application to the UK.

        ​Understand the historical attempts to devolve parliaments.

        ​Comprehend the different powers of each devolved institution in the UK and assess the distinctive aspects of the Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish politics and society that have shaped devolved institutions.

        ​Analyse how devolution has impacted upon England.

      • Security in A Globalised World (POLI231)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
        Aims

        To provide an overview of how security has been affected by globalisation;

        ​​To explore how the understandings of security and globalisation have developed over time.;

        ​To develop a theoretical focus on security in global politics;

        ​To explore the main themes, issues, and political debates around security in a globalised world.

        Learning Outcomes​​​​​​By the end of the module, students will have acquired knowledge of the main debates around security and globalisation.

        ​The ability to critically discuss these issues.

        ​The ability to write a cogent, well-argued research paper that deals with a significant aspect of these debates and theories.​

        ​The ability to engage and interact with the main themes in a specific body of intellectual knowledge.

        ​An ability to access and make effective use of bibliographical and electronic sources of information.

        ​An ability to deliver short, small-group presentations where they convey information and ideas succinctly and effectively.

        ​How to make arguments in a coherent and effective manner.​

      • Democratisation: From Ancient Athens to Southeast Asia (POLI235)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
        Aims

        ​Through participating in the lectures, seminar discussions and by completing assessments students will gain: 

        Awareness of the course of historical struggles over civil and political rights, as well as the main approaches to explaining the process of democratisation in comparative political science.

        A solid grasp of the debates over the most important factors associated with democratisation and democratic endurance.  

        Knowledge of some of the classic cases of democratisation and democratic breakdown, as well as some of the important hybrid regimes of the modern world. 

        An empathetic understanding of the difficult choices that those living under undemocratic political systems face, and the continuing challenges of maintaining a democratic society. 

        In addition, the course is designed to augment student skills, providing 

        Experience applying social-scientific theories to particular cases, augmenting students'' analytical skills. 

        Familiarity with the techniques of qualitative research in comparative government and political sociology. 

        Experience using elementary techniques of data analysis and data visualisation to engage in cross-sectional and longitudinal comparison of democratising countries.​

        Learning Outcomes

        ​You will be able to summarise the development and spread of representative democracy across the world, and identify the key events in this process.

        ​You will be able to compare and contrast the three most important theoretical perspectives on democratisation: modernisation theory, transition theory and the social forces tradition. 

        ​You will be able to identify the strengths and weaknesses of theories of democratisation, and to evaluate them against the empirical evidence.


        You will be able to conduct paired qualitative case studies in order to identify factors and processes that relate to democratic transition and breakdown.​


        ​You will be able to use simple quantitative techniques in order to identify potential correlations between democratisation and socio-economic change. 

        ​You will be able to explain the relevance of key pieces of quantitative evidence for debates about democratisation.

        ​You will be able to explain what is meant by a hybrid regime, describe the characteristic features of hybrid regime types such as competitive authoritarianism and discuss problems associated with these concepts.​

        ​You will be able to give an account of the progress of democratisation in Southeast Asia, accounting for the successes and failures of pro-democracy movements in at least two states​.

      • British Party Politics (POLI239)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting25:75
        Aims

        Students will have a critical awareness of the origins and history of the British party system;

        Students will demonstrate an understanding of political competition within party structures;

        Students will be able to engage with theories of party organisation and how these relate to internal party democracy;

        Students will analyse the role of political parties in the UK, and the challenges they face.

        Learning Outcomes

        Demonstrate an in depth knowledge of the organisational structure that parties develop.

        Demonstrate an understanding of developments in party ideology.

        Identify the problems of power structures both within parties and within their operational environment.

        Identify the relationships between political parties, elected representatives, members/activists, and voters.

      • Politics of International Human Rights (POLI251)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting45:55
        Aims

        ​To provide an overview of the philosophical foundations and debates on human rights;

        To introduce the history and institutions of human rights in international politics;

        To enable students to critically assess different political efforts to protect human rights;

        To familiarize students with contemporary human rights problems and the types of actors who undermine and/or promote human rights.

        Learning Outcomes

        ​To critique the central philosophical perspectives on human rights

        ​​To describe the historical development and institutions of human rights in international politics.

        ​To compare and contrast policy approaches for the realization of human rights

        ​To identify and explain how various actors contribute to the violation and protection of human rights.

        ​To analyse contemporary human rights problems and reflect on possible policy solutions.

      • Politics in Action (POLI200)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        ​To develop materials and/or undertake tasks within a practical or vocational context;

        To apply within that context pedagogical and other theoretical or practical knowledge relevant to the development and delivery of those materials and/or tasks;

        To apply academic and/or theoretical knowledge within a practical context and to reflect and report on the relationship between the two;

        To develop and identify a range of personal/employability skills and to reflect and report on this. 

        Learning Outcomes

        Students should be able to demonstrate an ability to develop materials and/or undertake tasks, according to a given specification and requirement, within a practical or vocational context.

        Students should be able to reflect on and evaluate the efficacy of the materials developed and/or the tasks undertaken.

        Students should be able to identify the connection between academic and/or theoretical knowledge and its practical or vocational application.

        Students should be able to identify, reflect and report on a range of personal/employability skills.

      • Aspects of Media and Politics (POLI208)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
        Aims

        ​To give students an appreciation of the relationship between the mass media, politicians and the public;

        ​To make students aware of the way the different aspects of the communication process act, react and interact, and with what political and social implications;

        ​To familiarise students with the manner in which the mass media respond to political pressure and spin, and with the way coverage affects those exposed to it;

        ​To explore the way the media contribute to (or compromise) democracy.

        Learning Outcomes

        ​Students will be able to place the mass media''s political role in theoretical, empirical, moral and legal context

        ​Students will be able to appreciate the role of economic pressure, public relations and political lobbying on the way journalists cover politics

        Students should have a grasp ​of how far the media trivialise politics, or inflects it in a biased fashion 

        ​Students should be able to understand how, in a variety of contexts, the media relates to the health, or otherwise, of contemporary democracy

      • International Political Economy (POLI209)
        Level2
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
        Aims

        This module aims to examine the interplay between politics and economics and the way this relationship is influenced by domestic and international forces. 

         

        Learning Outcomes​​​ Basic appreciation of the dynamic processes of international politics and economics.

          An understandiung of a range of IPE theories, and why and how they evolved in response to developments

          Familiarity with recent developments in IPE (globalisation, regionalism, economic crises, etc.), and how they relate to IPE theories.​ 

          Ability to compare and contrast theories and examine how they ‘fit’ with different periods of time and national and international circumstances.​ 

          ​The ability to use technical vocabulary fluently.

        • Politics of State Hegemony (POLI217)
          Level2
          Credit level15
          SemesterSecond Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
          Aims

          ​This module will develop understanding of: texts, case studies and hegemonic practice in a global context law-making within social, sectarian, ethnic, philosophical and political contexts problems and ambiguities of state hegemony both in conceptual and practical delivery terms the complex legal relationship between past and inheritor regimes the use of evidence-based research in challenging laws of lustration/vetting conflicting ''moral'' discourses and politics of exclusion.

          Learning Outcomes

          Students will understand the meaning, construction and  impact of state hegemony.

          Students will have gained an insight as to how state hegemony can be guided by negative as well as positive strategies.

          Students will understand state hegemony is practiced through, de-barring and vetting across different legal systems.

          Students will understand the complex legal relationship between past and inheritor regimes.

          Students will understand vetting, disbarring and lustration processes and the their construction and impact.

          Students will achieve inter-disciplinary learning between politics, social policy, law and criminology.

          Students will study relationships of power and how these affect power-making and its delivery.

          Students will learn how to read the social, political and cultural context of law making.

        • Contemporary Populist Politics: Britain in Comparative Perspective (POLI223)
          Level2
          Credit level15
          SemesterSecond Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting25:75
          Aims

          To introduce students to the distinctive character of contemporary populist political parties and movements in Britain and other established democracies;

          To equip students with an understanding of the factors which have driven the rise of political populism in Britain and other established democracies;

          To enable students to identify and debate the potential consequences of populism for mainstream party politics and for established democratic norms and institutions;

          To engage students with some of the most important questions in contemporary western political science.

          Learning Outcomes

          Students will be able to identify and discuss the common and distinctive features of left- and right-wing populism in a range of established democracies.

          Students will be able to compare and contrast the character of contemporary populist political parties and movements in Britain with those in other established democracies.

          Students will be able to demonstrate a sound understanding of the factors which have driven the rise of political populism in Britain and other established democracies.

          Students will be able to outline and discuss the potential consequences of populism for mainstream party politics and for established democratic norms and institutions.

        • Varieties of Democracy (POLI232)
          Level2
          Credit level15
          SemesterSecond Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
          Aims

          ​To introduce students to a range of classic texts in democratic theory;

          To equip students with an understanding of the diverse forms which democracy found both historically and in contemporary global politics;

          To enable students to identify and debate the rival merits and shortcomings of different models of democracy, including their adherence of core democratic principles and their scope to provide for political stability and legitimacy;

          To provide students with an understanding of the contemporary threats to democracy internationally and of the tools that can be used to assess the extent to which democracy is advancing or regressing.

          Learning Outcomes

          Students will be able to summarise and evaluate the contrasting conceptions of democracy advanced by political theorists.

          Students will be able to demonstrate a clear understanding of the diverse forms which democracy has taken historically and how it has evolved in a range of democratic models in the modern world.

          Students will be able to describe the contrasting models of participatory, direct, representative and associative democracy and debate the rival merits and shortcomings.

          Students will be able to assess the extent to which a range of existing political systems adhere to core democratic principles and their future scope to provide for democratic political stability and legitimacy.

          Students will be able to evidence knowledge of the contemporary threats to democracy internationally and be able to evaluate and apply tools suitable for the task of assessing the extent to which democracy is advancing or regressing.

        • British Political Ideologies (POLI237)
          Level2
          Credit level15
          SemesterSecond Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
          Aims

            To examine several theoretical issues relating to political ideologies in Britain. These include what meanings can be attached to the concept of ideology itself and the relationship between political debate and ideology;

            To examine the range of ideologies present within British politics, looking in particular at the differences between and within each ideology in historical and contemporary contexts.

          Learning Outcomes

          Students will gain an understanding of the nature of political ideologies.

          Students will gain knowledge of the content of ideologies in Britain.

          ​Students will be able to understand the nature of debates within British political ideologies.

        • Institutions and Political Actors (POLI253)
          Level2
          Credit level15
          SemesterSecond Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
          Aims

          To develop an understanding of research methods in comparative research through the examination of key methodological issues including: Large vs small N studies, “most-different vs most-similar” research design, external vs internal validity, inferences and “causality” in case selection;

          To understand how and to which extent political phenomena can be operationalized, measured and tested in empirical analyses;

          To review the procedural and substantive factors accounting for the variation of democracies and autocracies around the world. To examine the differences across democratic institutions and critically assess the impact of democratic institutions on policy making and policy stability;

          To investigate the origins of different electoral systems and their variety. To analyse the effect of the electoral design on policy choices and the performances of political representatives;

          To analyse voters’ behaviour and the processes of preferences’ aggregation and electoral choices. To analyse the conditions under which political leaders are more likely to be held responsible for political outcomes;

          To understand the rationale of political parties’ formation and their role in democratic settings. To investigate the influence of special interest groups and the effects of lobbying on political accountability.

          Learning Outcomes

          Identify the differences and similarities between the institutional and political structures across countries.

          Understand the functioning of institutions and their effects on both the types of political actors present in a country and the likely policy outcomes resulting from the chosen institutional design.

          Grasp the logic of social science research methods and critically; understand the strengths and limitations of empirical research.

          Interpret the findings of the empirical literature on institutional and partisan constraints and their implication for policy outcomes.

        • Gender and Feminist Politics: Core Concepts and Theories (POLI257)
          Level2
          Credit level15
          SemesterSecond Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
          Aims

          To convey core concepts and ideas in gender politics;

          To compare and contrast gender and feminist approaches to understanding politics;

          To encourage the application of theoretical gender debates to practical political issues;

          To evaluate various strategies for encouraging gender equality and justice;

          To critically present theories of identity and their role in politics.

          Learning Outcomes

          ​An understanding of concepts and debates about gender and feminist politics.

          ​A detailed knowledge of a variety of key issues and case studies in gender politics.

          ​An ability to apply theoretical and normative frameworks to evaluate the above.

          ​An ability to give effective oral presentations to one’s peers.

          ​An ability to write clearly and analytically, making use of the relevant material.

          ​An ability to research political events by analysing information from different sources.

        • Public Ethics (POLI260)
          Level2
          Credit level15
          SemesterSecond Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          Aims

          To introduce students to a range of ethical issues in public policy;

          To provide students with an understanding of different moral approaches;

          To enable students to critique the philosophical and moral merits of competing positions in the academic literature and public debate;

          To develop the ability of students to communicate their ideas in an analytical and persuasive way.

          Learning Outcomes

          Students will be able to understand and analyse challenging texts in political and moral theory.

          Students will be able to outline competing moral positions on key public policy issues.

          Students will be able to defend and critique moral positions on key public policy issues.

          Students will understand the role ethics and moral philosophy play in helping us to understand and evaluate public policy.

        • Moral Philosophy (PHIL239)
          Level2
          Credit level15
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          AimsStudents will consider the theories and arguments of some of the most important contemporary moral philosophers focused on normative and applied ethics.

          Students will discuss some of the main concepts in moral philosophy.

          Students will appreciate the variety of philosophical issues raised by morality and a range of controversial social practices.
          Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to distinguish some of the main concepts in moral philosophical debates.

          Students will be able to distinguish between different ways of understanding  concepts in moral philosophical debates.

          Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in contemporary moral philosophy​.

          Students will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to ethical issues.​

          Students will be able to identify philosophical assumptions underlying ethical claims.​

          Students will be able to structure a discussion of issues in moral philosophy​.

          Students will be able to speak with confidence and clarity on issues of moral philosophy​.Students will be able to explain details of influential texts in recent moral philosophy.

          Students will be able to articulate and defend positions in moral philosophy.​

          Students will be able to write coherently and rigorously about abstract philosophical issues raised by ethical controversies.
        • Liberty, Justice and the Good Society (PHIL219)
          Level2
          Credit level15
          SemesterSecond Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
          Aims​Students will be invited to consider the theories and arguments of thinkers who have shaped contemporary political philosophy, such as John Rawls, Robert Nozick and Michael Walzer.
           
          Students will be asked to consider some of the main concepts in political philosophy, including freedom, equality and justice.​

          Students will be invited to appreciate the variety of philosophical issues raised by contemporary political debates around controversial topics, such as feminism and multiculturalism.​
          Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to distinguish some of the main concepts in debates within contemporary political philosophy.​Students will be able to explain different ways of understanding concepts employed in debates in contemporary political philosophy.Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in contemporary political philosophy.​Students​ will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to contemporary political issues.Students will be able to identify philosophical assumptions underlying political questions and claims.Students will be able to speak with confidence and clarity on issues of contemporary political philosophy.Students will be able to explain details of influential texts in recent political philosophy.​Students will be able to articulate and defend positions on issues in contemporary political philosophy.​Students​ will be able to write coherently and rigorously about philosophical issues raised by current political controversies.

          ​Students will be able to structure a discussion of issues in contemporary political philosophy.

        • Uses, Misuses and Abuses of Language (PHIL276)
          Level2
          Credit level15
          SemesterSecond Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          Aims

          ​To introduce students to key concepts and figures in the project of understanding natural language.

          To introduce students to the distinction between semantics and pragmatics and to speech-act theory.

          To introduce students to some contemporary applications of speech-act theory to topics in political philosophy.

          Learning Outcomes

          ​Students will be able to explain different accounts of the meaning and function of referring expressions.

          ​Students will be able to understand and apply the distinction between semantics and pragmatics.

          ​Students will be able to discuss competing philosophical accounts of the relation between meaning and use.

          ​Students will be able to explain and critically assess Grice’s theory of meaning and/or Austin’s speech-act theory.

          ​Students will be able to apply theoretical tools from philosophy of language to questions about free speech and harm in political philosophy.

        • Business Ethics (PHIL271)
          Level2
          Credit level15
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
          Aims

          To introduce and explain major contemporary perspectives on corporate behaviours. 

          To introduce moral perspectives as they relate to managerial decision-making and corporate
          structures.

          To make students familiar with a range of recurrent ethical problems arising in business.

          To improve students'' skills in identifying and analyzing ethical issues that managers and employees face.

          To give students practice in formulating, defending, and planning the implementation of action plans managing ethical dilemmas.

            Learning Outcomes

            Studentswill be able to discuss the main theories concerning the placeof ethics in business.

            Student will be able to explain assess the main approaches to normative ethics.​Students will be able to state and discuss the broad ethical principles concerning costs and benefits, the challenge posed by uncertainty, professional roles, profits and the right of shareholder interests, and affirmative action.

            ​Students will be able to state and discuss the broad ethical principles concerning the obligations of complex organizations with respect to loyalty and whistle-blowing, insider trading, customer responsibility, and corporate responsibility.

            Students will be able to state and discuss the broad ethical principles concerning social justice and executive compensation.

            ​Students will be able to consider an ethical approach as a basis for sustainable marketing.

          1. Business Ethics (PHIL272)
            Level2
            Credit level15
            SemesterSecond Semester
            Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
            Aims

            To introduce and explain major contemporary perspectives on corporate behaviours. 

            To introduce moral perspectives as they relate to managerial decision-making and corporate
            structures.

            To make students familiar with a range of recurrent ethical problems arising in business.

            To improve students'' skills in identifying and analyzing ethical issues that managers and employees face.

            To give students practice in formulating, defending, and planning the implementation of action plans managing ethical dilemmas.

              Learning Outcomes

              Studentswill be able to discuss the main theories concerning the placeof ethics in business.

              Student will be able to explain assess the main approaches to normative ethics.​Students will be able to state and discuss the broad ethical principles concerning costs and benefits, the challenge posed by uncertainty, professional roles, profits and the right of shareholder interests, and affirmative action.

              ​Students will be able to state and discuss the broad ethical principles concerning the obligations of complex organizations with respect to loyalty and whistle-blowing, insider trading, customer responsibility, and corporate responsibility.

              Students will be able to state and discuss the broad ethical principles concerning social justice and executive compensation.

              ​Students will be able to consider an ethical approach as a basis for sustainable marketing.

            Year Three Compulsory Modules

              Year Three Optional Modules

              • Political Broadcasting (radio) (POLI339)
                Level3
                Credit level30
                SemesterWhole Session
                Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
                Aims

                To develop students’ skills in a range of journalistic tasks required for political broadcasting on radio, including planning, research, writing, interviewing, reporting, producing, social media usage and blogging;

                To enable students to plan, prepare and deliver different forms of political broadcasting, including news bulletins, expert interviews and special reports, both in a studio environment and on location;

                To engage students in a simulation of real world broadcasting that will enable them to apply and develop their academic knowledge of politics through the demands of responding rapidly and authoritatively to political events as they unfold, in Britain, Europe and the world;

                To provide students with an understanding of the range and inter-dependencies of roles in a broadcasting environment and of the responsibilities of journalists, including ethical and regulatory considerations;

                To equip students with a range of advanced transferable skills of relevance to professional contexts beyond journalism, including communication, teamwork, problem-solving and time-management skills;

                To enable students to understand the significance of the audience in political broadcasting and to develop the skills require to expand and engage audiences;

                To develop students’ confidence in engaging in critical self-reflection and peer-review as a means of improving the quality of their work, both individually and collectively.

                Learning Outcomes

                Students will develop skills in a range of journalistic tasks required for political broadcasting on radio, including planning, research, writing, interviewing, reporting, producing, social media usage and blogging.

                ​Students will be able to plan, prepare and deliver different forms of political broadcasting, including news bulletins, expert interviews and special reports, both in a studio environment and on location.

                ​Students will demonstrate a capacity to apply and develop their academic knowledge of politics through the demands of responding rapidly and authoritatively to political events as they unfold, in Britain, Europe and the world.

                Students will have a clear understanding of the range and inter-dependencies of roles in a broadcasting environment and of the responsibilities of journalists, including ethical and regulatory considerations.

                Students will acquire a range of advanced transferable skills of relevance to professional contexts beyond journalism, including communication, teamwork, problem-solving and time-management skills.

                Students will understand the significance of the audience in political broadcasting and have acquired skills to expand and engage audiences. 

                Students will be confident in engaging in critical self-reflection and peer-review as a means of improving the quality of their work, both individually and as part of a team.

              • Alternative Perspectives in Economics (ECON250)
                Level2
                Credit level15
                SemesterFirst Semester
                Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
                Aims

                This module aims to provide a historical and methodological basis for understanding modern economic theory.

                Learning Outcomes Analyse the philosophical basis for methodology




                ​Differentiate between and analyze the approach to subject matter adopted by the different schools of thought

                ​Demonstrate a knowledge of the context within which different strands of economic thought developed

                ​Evaluate different methodological approaches

              • Game Theoretical Approaches to Microeconomics (ECON322)
                Level3
                Credit level15
                SemesterFirst Semester
                Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
                Aims

                The objective of the module is to provide an introduction to game theory. This is the study of strategic interactions ie situations where outcomes depend not only on our own actions but also how others react to our actions. This module complements those in core macro and microeconomics and offers more insight into strategic decisions and competetive behaviour in general.

                Learning OutcomesDistinguish between types of games

                ​Explain game theoretical concepts

                Conduct advanced microeconomic analysis by formulating a game and its associated solution concepts and deriving solutions to games​

                ​Apply games in a range of economic, business and social contexts

                ​Explain the importance of game theoretic approaches in economic analysis

              • International Political Economy (ECON325)
                Level3
                Credit level15
                SemesterFirst Semester
                Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
                AimsThis module aims to familiarise students with rational choice and public choice theories and arguments, and with their applications in open economies and international political economy; theoretical concepts such as the Coase theorem, the Arrow impossibility theorem, and economic populism; key concepts of the New Institutional Economics and related applications to the theory of the firm; a modern economics’ view of globalisation; and the application of international political economy concepts to Latin America.

                The module also aims to deepen students'' understanding and awareness of the meaning and importance of national cultures, the relationship between rent seeking and protectionism; corruption; essential aspects of multinational corporations, foreign direct investment, and regulation; specific characteristics of the Argentine and Mexican economic policies and institutions and Chilean ‘exceptionalism’; and the possibility of applying ideas developed in this module to other geographical, national, regional and historical contexts.




                Learning OutcomesStudents will understand the concepts of rational choice and public choice in order to study aspects of a globalised world, which is in key respects different from that of elementary textbook models


                ​Students will gain a deep understanding of international business and the international political economy, in a way compatible with rigorous approaches to economic analysis

                ​Students will become familiar with theoretical concepts from rational choice and public choice theories, with emphasis on theories and models which apply to open economies in a context of globalisation

                ​Students will be able to apply these theoretical concepts in order to study some aspects of the political economy of international business.

                ​Students will be able to apply theoretical concepts to a Latin American case study.

                ​Students will be able to produce and deliver a coherent presentation.

              • Industrial Organisation (ECON333)
                Level3
                Credit level15
                SemesterFirst Semester
                Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
                Aims

                To apply the tools of microeconomics to the analysis of firms, markets and industries in order to understand the nature and consequences of the process of competition. These tools will also be applied to the evaluation of relevant government policy.  This will extend knowledge and skills of microeconomic analysis by covering recent advances in theory as well as empirical analysis of relevant microeconomic topics.

                Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to use economic principles, concepts and techniques to discuss and analyse government policy and economic performance with reference to standard frameworks in Industrial Organisation.

                ​Students will be able to apply standard frameworks, including verbal, graphical, mathematical and statistical representations of economic concepts and models, to explain and evaluate the effects of a range of competitive behaviours by firms and how they are influenced by economic incentives.

                ​Students will be able to analyse current issues and problems in business and industry.

                ​Students will be able to compare, contrast and critically evaluate alternative schools of thought in Industrial Organisation with reference to empirical evidence.

                ​Students will be able to conduct competent applied economic research by locating, selecting and analysing information relevant to the study of Industrial Organisation.


              • ​Students will be able to communicate effectively in writing and in accordance with a report specification

              • International Trade (ECON335)
                Level3
                Credit level15
                SemesterFirst Semester
                Exam:Coursework weighting85:15
                Aims

                To develop an appreciation and understanding of basic principles determining the observed patterns of trade in the increasingly globalised world economy.

                Learning Outcomes

                After successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

                understand the role of both absolute and comparative advantage in explaining observed patterns of trade in the global economy

                ​recognise both the strengths and limitations of the basic Ricardian approach

                ​understand the determinants of the terms of trade, in both theory and practice

                ​recognise the implications of the observed behaviour of the terms of trade for both developed and less developed economies

                appreciate the relationships between globalisation, economic performance ​

                critically evaluate the roles, achievements and failures of various international institutions in the context of international economic performance ​

              • Advanced Microeconomics (ECON342)
                Level3
                Credit level15
                SemesterFirst Semester
                Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
                Aims

                This module aims to provide anunderstanding of the market failure resulting from asymmetric information. The course covers some of the canonical models of adverse selection and moral hazard focussing on the design of optimal contracts under informational asymmetries.
                Learning OutcomesSolvesimple economic models
                Understandunderlying assumptions

                ​Understandtheorems and key proofs

                Predictthe choices of economic agents​

              • The Economics of Developing Countries (ECON306)
                Level3
                Credit level15
                SemesterSecond Semester
                Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
                Aims

                This module aims to introduce students to the theoretical perspectives andempirical debates within development economics and impart an in-depthappreciation of the issues related to economic development and its determinantsin less developed countries.

                Learning OutcomesTo understand the nature and determinants of economic development in the LDCs;

                  To recognise both the strengths andlimitations of various alternative models of the development process

                  To understand the determinants ofeconomic welfare in LDCs

                  ​To recognise the implications fordeveloping countries of international exchange, trade liberalisation andglobalisation

                  To appreciate the relationships betweenglobalisation and economic performance in low and middle income economies

                  To critically evaluate the roles,achievements and failures of various international policy initiatives in thecontext of developing country measured economic performance and domesticeconomic welfare.

                • Health Economics (ECON326)
                  Level3
                  Credit level15
                  SemesterSecond Semester
                  Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
                  Aims

                  The aim of this module is to introduce third year economics students to the basic principles and tools of health economics. The module aims to show how the health care system differs from the economic textbook model of perfectly competitive markets. It will offer an overview of the issues of demand and supply for health care, supplier-induced demand, equity and inequality, health care financing and health insurance. It will emphasize the use of economic evaluation for assessing health care interventions as a way of making informed decisions in terms of costs and benefits.

                  Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to recognize the main characteristics and important questions addressed in the health care market

                  ​Students will be able to understand the main characteristics and differences of the type of studies used in economic evaluation

                  ​Students will be able to examine economic evaluation papers and be able to identify and assess the main strengths and weaknesses of published studies

                  ​Students will be able to understand the theoretical foundations of health economics

                  ​Students will be able to understand the role of health economics in Health Technology Assessment

                  ​Students will be able to assess the value of health economics in informing resource allocation decisions in both advanced and resource poor settings

                • Competition and Regulation (ECON337)
                  Level3
                  Credit level15
                  SemesterSecond Semester
                  Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
                  Aims

                  To apply the tools of microeconomics to the analysis of firms, markets, consumers and regulators in order to understand the nature and consequences of the process of competition and regulation. These tools will also be applied to the evaluation of competition and government policy.  This will extend knowledge and skills of microeconomic analysis by covering recent advances in theory as well as empirical analysis of relevant microeconomic topics.

                  Learning OutcomesUse economic principles, concepts and techniques to discuss and analyse:

                    -          the power and limitations of competition as a force for market regulation;

                    -          government policy to regulate market power to protect firms, consumers and employees.

                    Apply standard frameworks, including verbal, graphical, mathematical and statistical representations of economic concepts and models, to explain and evaluate the effects of a range of behaviours by firms and regulators and how they are influenced by economic incentives.​

                    ​Identify and analyse current issues and problems in regulation and propose solutions.

                    ​Compare, contrast and critically evaluate regulation of different industries and market failures.

                    ​Communicate effectively orally and in writing and in accordance with project specifications

                    ​Conduct independent research in applied economics

                    ​Deliver a professional quality formal presentation by exhibiting: clarity and appropriate pace; logical structure; credibility; effective use of visual aids/technology

                    ​Identify problems

                    ​Analyse problems

                    ​Offer viable solutions

                    ​Use economic principles, concepts and techniques to discuss and analyse government policy and economic performance.

                  • Advanced Macroeconomics (ECON343)
                    LevelQ6
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterSecond Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
                    Aims

                    This module will build on the intermediate macroeconomics curriculum by developing some formal models in depth and widening the topics covered. The module will commence by considering the political economy perspective of macroeconomic processes. It will then proceed with an in-depth look at the Solow growth model, which will contain a full formal treatment. This will be followed by consideration of alternative views of the business cycle and lectures on the role of exchange rates and commodity prices.

                     

                    Learning Outcomes

                    Gained some proficiency in the use of formal modelling techniques. 

                    ​Developed some perspective in judging the most common macroeconomic models against some alternative approaches.

                    ​Able to discuss theoretical concepts in their political context.

                  • Law and Economics (ECON360)
                    Level3
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterFirst Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
                    Aims

                    This course does not require prior knowledge of the law, nor is itsobjective to teach students about the law. The main objective is to showstudents how they can apply the tools of economic analysis to understand thebasic structure and function of the law. The course focuses on the core commonlaw areas of torts, contracts, and property, along with a discussion of thelitigation process, the economics of crime, and antitrust law

                    Learning Outcomes

                    Students will be able to understand the use of economics to analyse the law

                    ​Students will be able to understand the importance of the law in economics

                    ​Students will be able to understand the use of model in law and economics

                    ​Students will be able to develop the ability to do a positive analysis of liability rules

                  • Public Economics (ECON361)
                    Level3
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterFirst Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
                    Aims

                    To apply the tools of microeconomics and game theory to the analysis of public economics in order to understand and characterize welfare-maximizing policies. These tools will also be applied to the evaluation of tax and expenditures policies.  This will extend knowledge and skills of microeconomic analysis by covering recent advances in theory.

                    Learning Outcomes

                    Micro economic and game theoretic tools applied to public economics

                    -          Why public goods are a source of market failure;

                    -          How externalities should be regulated.

                    -          Taxation and redistribution

                    -          Public choice

                    ​Apply standard frameworks, including verbal, graphical, mathematical and statistical representations of economic concepts and models, to explain and evaluate the effects of a range of redistribution policies by governments.

                    ​Communicate effectively orally and in writing and in accordance project specifications.

                  • Frontiers of Ethics (PHIL302)
                    Level3
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterFirst Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
                    AimsTo consider conceptual and ethical issues arising from matters of global concern, such as international justice, humanitarian intervention and the environmental crisis.​

                    To consider arguments and assumptions underlying a range of claims concerning such issues as disability, global citizenship, climate change and the ethical status of nature.

                    To examine difficulties for traditional philosophical approaches raised by such issues and recent theoretical developments relevant to them.
                    Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to distinguish between some of the main concepts involved in philosophical debates arising from matters of current global concern.

                    Students will be able to distinguish between different ways of understanding  concepts in philosophical debates arising from from matters of global concern.

                    Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in debates about matters of disability, global justice, just war, environmental justice and environmental ethics.​

                    Students will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to current ethical issues.​

                    Students will be able to identify philosophical assumptions underlying ethical claims.​

                    Students will be able to structure a philosophical discussion of current ethical issues.​Students will be able to speak with confidence and clarity on current ethical issues.​Students will be able to explain details of texts shaping current philosophical debates about matters of global concern.

                    Students will be able to articulate and defend positions in current philosophical debates about matters of global concern.​

                    Students will be able to write coherently and rigorously about abstract philosophical issues raised by current ethical controversies.
                  • Aesthetics (PHIL316)
                    Level3
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterFirst Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
                    AimsStudents will be introduced to arguments of some of the most important philosophers on art, aesthetics and cultural theory, including Kant, Hegel, Danto and Tolstoy.

                    Students will consider key concepts and theories in aesthetics, including the aesthetic judgement, disinterestedness, the institutional theory of art, the nature of representation and expression and feminist and post-modern critiques.

                    Students will be encouraged to make connections between works of art and artistic practices of the past and present.
                      Learning Outcomes

                      Students will be able to analyse key concepts and arguments relating to aesthetics and art.​

                      Students will be able to structure discussion of issues in aesthetics.​

                      Students will be able to identify links between influential philosophical theories and artistic practices.​

                      Students will be able to articulate and defend positions in aesthetics and philosophy of art.​

                      Students will be able to present their ideas with clarity and confidence.​

                      Students will be able to develop in writing coherent, structured and informative accounts on abstract philosophical issues.​

                    1. Classical Chinese Philosophy (PHIL367)
                      Level3
                      Credit level15
                      SemesterFirst Semester
                      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
                      Aims​To investigate what is distinctive about classical Chinese approaches to questions of ontology, social harmony, personal morality and soteriology.

                      To examine the ways in which philosophy in Classical Chinese civilisation develops in the Hundred Schools period, with particular attention to the dialogue between Confucians and Daoists.
                      Learning Outcomes

                      ​Students will be able to engage in informed discussions about the concepts and categories in which  philosophical discussions were conducted in ancient China.

                      ​Students will develop abilities in developing and contextualising new information about other worldviews.

                      ​Students will be enabled to assimilate alternative cultural perspectives from which to view their own traditions.

                      ​Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories propounded in the classical period of Chinese thought.

                      ​Students will be able to discuss the problem of​ cultural relativism informed by an understanding of a particular alien pattern of thinking.

                      ​Students will be able to relate classical Chinese thought to European philosophical interests.

                    2. Philosophy of the Future (PHIL312)
                      Level3
                      Credit level15
                      SemesterSecond Semester
                      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
                      Aims​To provide an introduction to debates concerning the philosophical implications of foreseeable future technological innovations.

                      To examine the relevance of metaphysical and ethical considerations to future technological and scientific developments.​
                      Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to identify the main issues and positions in contemporary philosophical discussions of issues such as human enhancement, existential risks, teleportation, time travel, the technological singularity, the simulation argument, the feasibility and desirability of uploading into virtual worlds.Students will be able to explain the main strengths and weaknesses of these positions.​​​Students will be able to explain the relevance of metaphysical and ethical considerations to debates concerning these issues. ​

                      ​Students will be able to think more creatively about philosophical issues​.

                      ​Students will be able to structure philosophical arguments relating issues raised by future technological developments.​

                      ​Students will be able to articulate and defend specific positions in current philosophical debates concerning likely future developments in science and technology.​

                      ​Students will be able to write coherently and rigourously about the philosophical issues raised by future technological developments.

                    3. Philosophical Approaches to Conflict (PHIL365)
                      Level3
                      Credit level15
                      SemesterSecond Semester
                      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
                      AimsTo introduce students to the philosophical analysis of conflict.

                      To help students to think through for themselves the just solution to various conflicts between societies and within society.

                      To help students to think through for themselves the appropriateness or otherwise of the various ways in which present-day societies solve, or attempt to solve, conflicts.

                      To help students to think through for themselves the relationship between state and individual, and between different groups in the state.  
                        Learning Outcomes​​Students will show a capacity to analyse and evaluate, from a philosophical point of view, competing legal and moral rights​.

                        ​Students will be able to form considered and philosophically defensible judgements about appropriate resolution when rights clash in the public sphere.

                        Students will be able to apply theoretical resources to conflictual issues of contemporary socio-political and/or legal concern​.

                        ​Students will be able to articulate philosophical debates emerging from analysis of complex and sensitive scenarios​.

                        ​Students will be able to defend positions in relation to competing socio-political perspectives​.

                        ​Students will be able to be able to write with philosophical rigour about socio-political and/or legal conflicts​.

                      1. Security and Intelligence (POLI303)
                        Level3
                        Credit level15
                        SemesterFirst Semester
                        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
                        Aims
                        • To provide students with the opportunity to study the particular issues and controversies surrounding intelligence in contemporary security; 
                        • To enable students to develop their analytical and research skills inexamining academic debates on intelligence.
                        Learning Outcomes

                        The student should be able to explain and assess the role of intelligence processes in contemporary security.

                        ​The student should be able to assess academic debates on intelligence.

                        ​The student should be able to evaluate the changing significance of intelligence since the Cold war.

                        ​The student should be able to assess the political and scoietal implications of current intelligence practices.

                      2. The Media, the Internet and Political Science (POLI319)
                        Level3
                        Credit level15
                        SemesterFirst Semester
                        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
                        Aims
                        • To introduce students to the ways in which contemporary notions of what constitutes Political Science have a bearing upon what we think we know about conventional and new media.​
                        • To explore the way in which conceptions of power are related to our understanding of how the old and new media function in contemporary society. ​
                        • To explore a range of themes that connect the new media to its conventional counterparts (including the political economy of journalism, web-based political mobilisation, citizen journalism and mediate elections).​
                        • To explore particularly illuminating examples of power exertion by or through the mass media ​
                        Learning Outcomes

                        Students will be able to understand what constitutes the ''canons and conventions'' of contemporary Political Science, and how these relate to research on, and evidence about, the old and new media

                        Students will be able to appreciate the role and importance of the various media in power structures of society​

                        Students will be aware of how the old and new media relate to each other, both nationally and internationally, and how both relate to contemporary political realities​

                        Students will have a grasp of the key themes and case studies that link media practice, to politics/politicians, and the principal power models​

                        Students should be able to communicate their understanding in cogent form in a varierty of non-written media​

                      3. Comparative Voting Behaviour (POLI322)
                        Level3
                        Credit level15
                        SemesterFirst Semester
                        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
                        Aims

                        ​This module seeks to equip students with the analytical skills needed to analyse election outcomes from the perspective of both voters'' behaviour and parties'' strategies. The module also aims to enable students to analyse survey data using quantitative methods; to provide them with sufficient knowledge of the statistical package SPSS; and to prepare students to write reports and interpret data in a way that can be used to advise politicians, political parties, or any organisation concerned with public opinion and voting. By fulfilling these goals the module also aims at widening students'' employability, enabling them to develop some of the main analytical and statistical skills which are demanded by employers.

                         

                        Learning Outcomes

                        ​​You will be able to contrast the theoretical assumptions of structural, social-psychological and rational-choice models of voting behaviour.

                        ​​You will be able to critically analyse the potential and limitations of voting behaviour models both in general and when applied to specific elections ​​and contexts.

                        ​You will be able to critically analyse how voting behaviour varies across types of party, as well as the dynamic relationship between the behaviour of voters and parties.

                        You will be able to use the statistical package SPSS to prepare datasets for data analysis.

                        ​You will acquire knowledge of key statistical techniques and be able to apply them to analyse specific election outcomes.

                        You will be able to apply notions of statistical inference and generalise findings based on survey data.

                      4. Labour Thinkers (POLI326)
                        Level3
                        Credit level15
                        SemesterFirst Semester
                        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
                        Aims

                        To introduce students to a more in depth-focus on political ideas than was available in earlier years of study;

                        To facilitate students with the capacity to evaluate political ideas and their application;

                        To develop writing skills in terms of module assessments.


                        Learning Outcomes

                        Students will acquire a critical understanding of a selection of key LabourParty thinkers by examining their arguments.


                        Gain a sophisticated understanding of how Labour’s ideologicaldivisions are constructed.

                        Position Labour’s contemporary difficulties within their historicalcontext.


                        ​Critically examine the political and intellectual significance ofLabour thought over the course of recent history.

                        ​Analyse therelationship between Labour thinkers, economic capital, social justice, and theelectoral performance of the Party over the course of the 20thCentury.

                      5. Conservative Thinkers (POLI327)
                        Level3
                        Credit level15
                        SemesterFirst Semester
                        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
                        Aims

                        To introduce students to a more in depth-focus on political ideas than was available in earlier years of study;

                        To facilitate students with the capacity to evaluate political ideas and their application;

                        To develop writing skills in terms of module assessments.

                        Learning OutcomesStudents will acquire a critical understanding of a selection of key Conservative Party thinkers by examining their arguments.

                         

                        Develop anunderstanding of how Conservative thinkers have contributed to the success ofthe Party over the course of the 20th Century.

                        Explore thetenets of various strands of conservatism such as One Nation, Traditional,Liberal, and New Right Conservatives.

                             


                        ​Discuss thelinks between Conservative thought and the flows of economic capital, socialconservatism, and the promotion of the individual as an autonomous actor.

                      6. Eu As An International Actor (POLI328)
                        Level3
                        Credit level15
                        SemesterFirst Semester
                        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
                        Aims

                        Students will gain a foundational understanding of foreign policy evaluation of the EU that can be transferred to analyse other (international) organisations.

                        Students will develop the ability to analyse the foreign policy system of the EU, the actors involved in it, and the main political framework such as the Common Foreign, Security and Defence Policy.

                        Students will analyse the main theories for analysing foreign policy and the analytical concepts used to explain the EU’s development of its own distinct foreign, security, and defence policies.

                        Students will explore the way the EU interacts with partners at a regional and a global level, particularly its partnerships with the Mediterranean area as well as the US, Russia, and China. 

                        Students will debate problems and challenges that face the EU as an international actor.

                        Students will foster different skills of research and assessment.

                        Learning Outcomes

                        Demonstrate foundational knowledge of foreign policy evaluation and how far this applies to the EU as a foreign policy actor.

                        Relate theories on EU integration and governance to the rise and development of the European security and defence policy and the practice of civilian and military operations deployed.

                        Identify problems and challenges that face the EU as an international actor

                        ​Critically reflect on the challenges and consequences that emerge for third-states from the EU’s actions and policies

                      7. The Changing Faces of African Politics: From the Colonial Period to the Present Day (POLI329)
                        Level3
                        Credit level15
                        SemesterFirst Semester
                        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
                        Aims

                        Broaden students comparative understanding of political models and approaches beyond Western political thought;

                        Encourage students to engage with and overcome personal biases when thinking about ‘African politics’;

                        Empower students to use different approaches to disseminating political knowledge and understanding;

                        Encourage students to engage with a range of source materials beyond journal articles and books.

                        Learning Outcomes

                        Engage reflectively with the biases associated with the study of African politics and African political theory.

                        Apply their understanding of different approaches to sharing academic knowledge to the creation of innovative outputs.

                        Relate the history of the colonial period to the political decision making processes of post-colonial leaders.

                        Evaluate and apply research of both academic and non-academic source material to deepen their knowledge and understanding of the influence of colonialism on African politics.

                      8. Local Government in the Uk… and Beyond! (POLI337)
                        Level3
                        Credit level15
                        SemesterFirst Semester
                        Exam:Coursework weighting25:75
                        Aims

                        ​Students will be able to identify and critically discuss the changing scope of powers of local government in Britain, with particular focus on England’s local government;

                        Students will be able to demonstrate a sound understanding of the factors which have driven the relationship between local and national government;

                        Students will be able to demonstrate a sound understanding of the relationship between different levels of local government;

                        Students will be able to comprehend the major debates, themes and issues pertaining to the contemporary system of local government, and show awareness of the problems confronted by local government in meeting the various demands placed upon it;

                        Students will be able to demonstrate a sound understanding of the role of party politics, elections, and electoral campaigning in relation to local government.

                        Learning Outcomes

                        Students will be able to identify and critically discuss the changing scope of powers of local government in British, with particular focus on England’s local government.

                        Students will be able to demonstrate a sound understanding of the factors which have driven the relationship between local and national government.

                        Students will be able to demonstrate a sound understanding of the relationship between different levels of local government.

                        Students will be able to comprehend the major debates, themes and issues pertaining to the contemporary system of local government, and show awareness of the problems confronted by local government in meeting the various demands placed upon it.

                      9. Strategic Studies in Conflicts and Terrorism (POLI347)
                        Level3
                        Credit level15
                        SemesterSecond Semester
                        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
                        Aims

                        Examine which factors are more likely to trigger the outbreak of wars within a country and the evidence in favour and against the advanced theoretical arguments;

                        Analyse the strength and shortcomings of the advanced theories by looking at recent empirical contributions in the field;

                        Understand how and to which extent wars, terrorism and conflicts can be operationalized, measured and tested in empirical analyses;

                        Investigate the effect of peacekeeping operations on peace conditions and peace duration by a review of cases of success and failure of peacekeeping activities;

                        Examine the domestic and international factors leading to “suboptimal” counterterrorist policies and analyse the relationship between regime type and terrorism;

                        Investigate the mechanisms advanced by selected theories on regime change and the empirical strategies used to test them.

                        Learning Outcomes

                        Understand the main theoretical puzzles in the areas of conflicts and terrorism and how empirical research can address some of these puzzles while others are remain still open.

                        Interpret the findings advanced by the empirical literature against or in line with the theoretical predictions advanced by the literature and students’ own pre-theoretical intuitions on the determinants of wars and conflicts.

                        Become familiar with some of the empirical techniques used in conflict and terrorism studies.

                        Reach a critical evaluation of the likely domestic and international triggers of wars, conflicts and terrorism and extrapolate recommendations for policy making.

                      10. Gender and Global Politics: Women, Peace and Security (POLI349)
                        Level3
                        Credit level15
                        SemesterFirst Semester
                        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
                        Aims

                        To illustrate what feminist approaches contribute to our understanding of world politics;

                        To understand the implications of identity and difference in the practice of global politics;

                        To encourage the application of theoretical gender debates to practical political issues;

                        To critically engage with feminist approaches to policy making.

                        Learning Outcomes

                        ​The ability to deploy gender as a category of analysis in relation to issues in global politics.

                        ​Knowledge of literature applying feminist theory and concepts to the study of global politics.

                        ​Ability to understand and critically analyse gendered issues and policy responses within global politics.

                        ​Ability to synthesise and present key issues on a particular topic.

                      11. Immigration and the State (POLI302)
                        Level3
                        Credit level15
                        SemesterSecond Semester
                        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
                        Aims

                        To provide an overview of the contemporary politics of immigration in liberal democratic states in Europe, the US and beyond;

                        To explore how the politics and policy of immigration have developed over time, and in relation to globalisation and changes in actual patterns and flows, from an historical and regional perspective (Europe, the US, global)​;

                        To develop a theoretical focus on the politics of the state in relation to how state-based forms of organisation process the international movement of persons​;

                        To explore the main policy issues and political debates around immigration from the perspective of the state.​

                        Learning Outcomes

                        Knowledge of the main debates around immigration and immigration policy in the context of the politics of the state.

                        Knowledge of the main debates around the integration of migrants in receiving states.

                        An understanding of the key ideas which inform political responses to immigration and the integration of migrants.​

                        An understanding of the key theories which attempt to explain the politics and policy of immigration in liberal democratic states.​

                      12. Public Policy: An Advanced Introduction (POLI310)
                        Level3
                        Credit level15
                        SemesterSecond Semester
                        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
                        Aims

                        To introduce students to concepts such as ‘the public’, ‘the private’, ‘power’;

                        To introduce students to the core ideas that explain societies acceptance of and/or desire for state intervention in the form of a public policy;

                        To introduce students to the ways state theory can be used to explain how decisions are reached in the policy process.

                        Learning Outcomes

                        ​Students will understand the key theoretical ideas underpinning public policy.

                        ​Students will understand the frameworks that have been developed to inform our understanding of the policy and decision-making processes.

                        ​Students will understand the difficulties policymakers encounter while engaged in policymaking.

                      13. Politics of Development (POLI314)
                        Level3
                        Credit level15
                        SemesterSecond Semester
                        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
                        Aims

                        ​The module will familiarise students with the historical development of the state in the global south, and the developmental trajectories, of key states in Asia, Latin America, Africa and the Middle East.

                        The module will teach students how to compare country cases within and across regions.

                        Students will compose a policy paper, which challenges them to marshal empirical evidence to translate academic debates they encoutered during the module into a coherent analysis of policy options and clear policy.

                        Learning Outcomes

                        ​The ability to critically engage with institutional theories of development.

                        A knowledge of key debates in the politics of development including the role of the state, democracy, good governance and the "resource curse".

                        ​To acquire knowledge of the developmental pathways of key countries in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East.

                        ​The ability to write a cogent, well-argued policy paper that deals with a significant aspect of these debates and theories.

                      14. Theories of Poverty and Wealth (POLI316)
                        Level3
                        Credit level15
                        SemesterSecond Semester
                        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
                        Aims

                        To help Students understand the relationship that exists between poor/poverty/wealth in relation to the functions/purposes of the welfare state;

                        ​​To help students understand how the core theories of the welfare state interpret the relationship between those considered as living in poverty/poor/wealthy;

                        To help Students feel comfortable and capable of undertaking positive and constructive interactions in large and small group environments;

                        To help students understand How different theories interpret the development and use of welfare-to-work programmes.​

                        Learning OutcomesAn ability to make reasoned arguments linking the core theories of the welfare state to contemporary issues

                        ​An ability to make reasoned arguments relating to the connection between poverty/poor/wealth and how these help inform a range of different theories of the welfare state​

                        ​​An ability to make reasoned arguments about how welfare-to-work and workfare are changing the nature and shape of the contemporary welfare state and how a number of different theories of the welfare state understand these moves
                      15. International Intervention (POLI321)
                        Level3
                        Credit level15
                        SemesterSecond Semester
                        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
                        Aims

                        ​Students will gain a foundational understanding of the law, theory, and practice of international intervention, international peace and security.

                        Students will develop the ability to analyse critically the gap between the laws and the practice of international interventions.

                        Students will explore the way how intervention practices have changed over time and how norms surrounding interventions have shifted.

                        Students will debate problems and challenges that face states intervening in third-states including issues of sovereignty, and the UN Charter articles on non-intervention and non-use of force.

                        Learning Outcomes

                        Demonstrate foundational knowledge of the law, politics, and practice of international intervention.

                        Relate the role and framework of international institutions such as the UN to the practice and laws surrounding international intervention.

                        Identify problems and challenges that face the international community of states regarding the practice of (unregulated) intervention in third-states.

                        Critically reflect on the challenges and consequences that emerge from interventions that alter the practice and understanding of state sovereignty.

                      16. Identity in Contemporary International Politics (POLI332)
                        Level3
                        Credit level15
                        SemesterSecond Semester
                        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
                        Aims

                        • To analyse the political significance of identity in international politics
                        • To examine the interrelationship between national identity, territory, sovereignty and democracy in terms of ideological foundations and in the context of international relations
                        • To draw implications for the construction of stable political communities in conditions of cultural diversity

                        Learning Outcomes

                        By the end of the course students will be familiar with the concepts of identity - national, political and ethnic.

                        Students will gain the understanding of the main debates within the citizenship studies and minority rights.​

                        Students will be confident with transnational politics, diasporas and how they are reflected in international politics.​

                        Students will be able to accompany theoretical concepts and discussions by examples and appropriate case studies.​

                        Students will be familiar with the emergence of the nation-state and ethnic exclusion​

                        Students will be able to analyse issues and controversies surrounding this most interdisciplinary and contested area of political science - identity and its effects on international politics.​

                      17. Contemporary Russian Politics (POLI335)
                        Level2
                        Credit level15
                        SemesterSecond Semester
                        Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
                        Aims

                        ​Students will acquire a detailed knowledge and understanding of the key issues relating to Russia''s political and social development;

                        Students will critically engage with Russia''s position in international relations and comparative political theory and practice;

                        Students will Identify and debate the role of different actors and processes involved in Russia''s domestic politics and foreign policy;

                        Students will articulate persuasive arguments which integrate theoretical and empirical material and contribute to constructive and critical discussion;

                        Students will synthesise information from a range of different sources to develop structured and coherent arguments.

                        Learning Outcomes

                        Demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of the key issues relating to Russia''s political and social development.

                        ​Demonstrate an ability to critically evaluate ideas and theories in political contexts.

                        Identify the problems faced by a non-democratic political system and the means by which they can be understood.

                        Articulate persuasive arguments which integrate theoretical and empirical material and contribute to constructive and critical discussion.

                      18. Comparative Peace Processes (POLI336)
                        Level3
                        Credit level15
                        SemesterSecond Semester
                        Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
                        Aims

                        To outline the concept and components of peace processes;

                        ​To assess the development and impact of peace processes within a range of polities;

                        ​To understand the range of political solutions available in divided societies;​​

                        To critically evaluate the validity of comparative approaches to peace processes.

                        Learning Outcomes

                        Upon completion of the module, students should be able to identify the key conceptual principles of peace process and their essential components.

                        ​Understand how peace processes develop.

                          

                        Assess the impact of peace processes in a range of selected countries.   

                        ​Comprehend the key factors in shaping successful or unsuccessful peace processes in each country of study and judge whether a comparative approach to conflict management is viable.

                      19. Media, Politics and Climate Change (POLI345)
                        Level3
                        Credit level15
                        SemesterSecond Semester
                        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
                        Aims

                        Introduce students to the political and scientific realities of climate change and energy, as they are currently understood and contested;

                        Explore journalistic practice in the realm of climate change and energy security, and the economic and political imperatives that drive it;

                          ​Investigate how a range of media (and media genres, like documentaries) cover climate change and energy security, and with what impact on those exposed;

                           

                          Review the social and political implications of media (under) representations of climate change, and what this tells us about contemporary democracy.

                            Learning Outcomes

                            ​ Students will be achieve a basic understanding of the science behind climate change and energy security, alongside an appreciation of how politics impinges on climate change address/policy and the mediation of the topic

                            ​Students will be able to appreciate how journalists struggle to engage with the climate change and energy security issues, and do so in an increasingly pressured environment

                            ​Students will become aware of how the conventional and new media cover climate change and energy security; how climate scepticism impinges on the framing of stories; and how exposure to coverage influences public perceptions

                            ​Students will develop a grasp of what the mediation and politicisation of climate change tell us about power and democracy in contemporary society

                            ​Students should be able to communicate their understanding in cogent form in a varierty of non-written media​

                          • Toleration, Multiculturalism and Secularism (POLI350)
                            Level3
                            Credit level15
                            SemesterSecond Semester
                            Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
                            Aims

                            To introduce students to a range of moral issues concerning cultural, religious, national and other identities;

                            To provide students with different normative approaches for tackling those moral issues;

                            To enable students to critique normative theories and their policy implications;

                            To develop the ability of students to communicate their ideas in an analytical and persuasive way.

                            Learning Outcomes

                            Students will have an understanding of various moral issues related to cultural, religious, national diversity within contemporary society and politics.

                            Students will have an understanding of various approaches in political theory to cultural, religious, national issues in contemporary politics.

                            Students will be able to critically assess ​normative theories about toleration, multiculturalism, and secularism.

                            Students will be able construct logical, coherent, and persuasive philosophical arguments.

                          • Rhetoric in British Politics (POLI323)
                            Level3
                            Credit level15
                            SemesterSecond Semester
                            Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
                            Aims

                            ​Understand, describe, ad critique the role of rhetoric and oratory in British politics;

                            Understand, analyse, and evaluate the theory and practices of rhetoric with a focus on the modes of persuasion;

                            Understand, analyse, and evaluate political performance with an awareness of social impact;

                            Understand how to craft a political speech for delivery by high profile political figures.

                            Learning Outcomes

                            ​The ability to understand, describe and critique the role of oratory and rhetoric in British politics.

                            An understanding of the key theories underscoring political rhetoric.​

                            The ability to construct a political speech using the outlined rhetorical theories.​

                            To compare and contrast how different political figures use oratorical devices.​

                            The ability to demonstrate their awareness of political speechwriting and delivery.​

                          The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


                          Teaching and Learning

                          In studying Philosophy you will learn how to defend your views with reasoned arguments, and to assess the arguments of others. Argumentative skills are learned through attending lectures and reading philosophical texts, developed by group seminar discussions, and formally assessed through essays and exams. You complete modules to the value of 120 credits per year, from a wide range of options available. Most modules employ a blend of lectures, seminars and online support materials. You will learn by reading and studying outside class time, by attending and participating in classes, by doing coursework and, for dissertations, via one-to-one meetings with a supervisor. There is also scope, both formally in the placement module and informally, for you to develop practical skills by volunteering.


                          Assessment

                          Philosophy employs a mixture of modes of assessment: exams and coursework in many different varieties including essays, oral presentations, dissertations, exercises, and supported independent work (eg in the placement module).