Philosophy BA (Hons) Add to your prospectus

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: V500
  • Year of entry: 2018
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB / IB : 33 / BTEC : Applications considered
philosophy-1

Module details

Programme Year One

You take eight modules in total.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Ethics (PHIL101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting85:15
    Aims
    1. ​Students will become familiar with key concepts in ethics – bothmeta-ethics and normative ethics.​ 
    2. ​​Students will gain an acquaintance with the main approaches to moral theory (such as virtue ethics, deontology, consequentialism), as well as key debates in meta-ethics (subjectivism vs objectivism, naturalism vs non-naturalism).​

    3. ​Students will tackle central questions in ethics, such as ‘is a good action more about good intentions than beneficial outcomes?’, ‘does lying possess an objective property of badness?’, ‘ought different people to follow different moral codes?’ and ‘what activities lead to a good life?’.​

    Learning Outcomes​Students will be able to distinguish between some main concepts in ethical debates, past and present.​


    Students will be able to explain recent developments in ​meta-ethics and normative ethics.​Students will be able to evaluate some of the main theories in the history of moral philosophy and contemporary ethics.Students will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to ethical issues.​Students will be able to identify philosophical assumptions underlying ethical claims and judgments.Students will be able to structure a discussion of issues in ethics.​​Students will be able to speak with confidence and clarity on issues of moral philosophy.Students will be able to explain details of canonical texts in moral philosophy.​

    Students will be able to articulate and defend basic positions in classic and contemporary moral philosophy.

    Students will be able to write coherently and rigorously about abstract philosophical issues raised by ethical debates.

  • Political Philosophy (PHIL102)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
  • Students will be introduced to the theories and arguments of some of the most important philosophers and of the western tradition of political thought, such as Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Marx and Mill. 

  • Students will be introduced to some of the main concepts in political philosophy, including political obligation, democracy, community, rights, liberty, justice and property.​

  • Learning Outcomes

    Students will be able to distinguish some main concepts in political philosophical debates.

    ​Students will be able to distinguish between different ways of understanding  concepts in political philosophical debates.

    Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in the history of political philosophy.​

    Students will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to political issues.​

    Students will be able to identify philosophical assumptions underlying political claims.​

    Students will be able to structure a discussion of issues in political philosophy.​

    Students will be able to speak with confidence and clarity on issues of political philosophy​.

    Students will be able to explain details of canonical texts in political philosophy.

    Students will be able to articulate and defend basic positions in political philosophy.​

    Students will be able to write coherently and rigorously about abstract philosophical issues raised by political debates.

  • Mind, Knowledge and Reality (PHIL103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
  • To introduce students to some of the main topics in metaphysics: God, the mind/body problem, personal identity, time and free will.

  • To introduce students to the philosophical system of Rene Descartes.​

  • Learning Outcomes

    Students should be able to distinguish between sound and unsound arguments.

    Students should be able to build a case for a specific metaphysical position, by weighing theoretical virtues, such as Occam''s razor, and metaphysical principles, such as the conceivability principle and the principle of sufficient reason.​

    ​Students should be able to extract an argument from text, render put it into standard form, and critically evaluate its premises.

    ​Students should be able to explain Descartes'' philosophical system.

    Students should be able explain the basic issue, and the standard views, pertaining to five topics in contemporary metaphysics: God, personal identity, consciousness, free will and time.​

    ​Students should be able to able to argue for a specific view pertaining to five issues in contemporary metaphysics: God, personal identity, consciousness, free will and time.

    ​Students should be able to discuss reality in the partially abstract manner distinctive of metaphysical thought.

  • Reading and Writing Philosophy 1 (PHIL107)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
  • To introduce the academic skills and knowledge necessary for the critical reading and writing of philosophy.

  • ​To foster in students an appreciation of the value of philosophy.

  • ​To enable students to read effectively and to takes notes efficiently.

  • To develop students'' skill in presenting complex ideas to an audience and in practicing the intellectual virtues associated with philosophical discussion.  
  • To promote students'' skill in writing rigorously argued, well-written and well-presented philosophical essays.

  • ​To promote students'' research skills.

  • Learning Outcomes

    ​Students will be able to explain and evaluate some work relevant to a selected specialist topic in ethics. (This topic may vary from year to year. Examples include: human treatment of animals; ethics and the environment.)

    ​Students will be able to explain and evaluate some central work about political liberty.

    ​Students will be able to give structured seminar presentations and to conduct discussion in a manner that displays the intellectual virtues associated with philosophy.

    ​Students will be able to write essays that embody a philosophically-informed approach to argumentation.

    Students will be able to use the Harvard referencing system. ​

    Students will be able to conduct independent research in support of their work, using appropriate print and online resources (including the Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy and the Philosopher''s Index). ​
  • Reading and Writing Philosophy 2 (PHIL108)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
  • To consolidate the academic skills and knowledge necessary for the critical reading and writing of philosophy.

  • To consolidate students'' appreciation of the value of philosophy.​

  • To consolidate students'' ability to read and take notes effectively.​

  • To consolidate students'' skill in presenting complex ideas to an audience and in practising the intellectual virtues associated with philosophical discussion.​

  • ​To consolidate students'' skill in writing rigorously argued, well-written and well-presented essays.

  • To consolidate students'' research skills. ​

  • Learning Outcomes

    Students will be able to explain and evaluate some central work from the early modern period, covering the following topics: (i) perception; (ii) personal identity; (iii) freedom and determinism.

    Students will develop greater skill and confidence in giving structured seminar presentations and in conducting discussion in a manner that displays the intellectual virtues associated with philosophy.

    Students will develop greater skill and confindence in writing essays that embody a philosophically-informed approach to argumentation.

    ​Students will be able to use the Harvard system of referencing.

    ​Students will be able to conduct independent research in support of their work, using appropriate print and online resources (including the Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy and the Philosopher''s Index).

  • Philosophy and the Arts (PHIL110)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
  • ​​​​To consider philosophically relevant questions and concepts pertaining to the scope of art and the evaluation of artworks.

  • To enable students to reflect philosophically about their intuitions regarding the arts and about their appreciation of particular artistic media.​

  • Learning Outcomes

    Students will be able to examine whether the concept of art may apply to objects and activities from different historical periods and cultural contexts.​

    Students will be able to consider critically the impact that cultural institutions and their practices may have on philosophical theorising concerning the arts.​

    Students will be able to assess the view that artistic value is a matter of subjective response to it.

    Students will be able to analyse the character of self-expression through art, and assess its significance in evaluating artworks.​

    Students will be able to evaluate the argument that artistic intentions must inform our appreciation of works of art.​

    Students will be able to define and expound the conception of beauty in a narrow and in a wide sense.​

    Students will be able to outline and discuss the significance of the distinction between artistic and aesthetic properties.​

    Students will be able to argue for or against the view that artworks are unrepeatable.​

    Students will be able to interpret the ways in which content and meaning is attributed to art that does not seem to represent anything.​

    Students will be able to provide a critical account of the possible links between seeking truth and creating good art.​

    Students will be able to discuss whether art can function as a vehicle for demonstrating what is morally good.

  • Critical, Analytical and Creative Thinking (PHIL112)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
  • To introduce students to the concepts and methods of informal logic and to enable students to use these concepts and methods in assessing arguments both within and outside philosophy.

  • ​To help students to think more logically themselves, and to locate and remove inconsistencies in their own thoughts.

  • ​To introduce students to methods of causal, statistical and probabilistic reasoning and to enable students to identify and avoid causal, statistical and probabilistic fallacies.

  • ​To enable students to think creatively about problems and to come up with rational solutions to them, and to make logical decisions in the light of available evidence.

  • Learning Outcomes

    ​Students will able to explain and apply the basic concepts of logic.

    ​Students will be able to identify conclusions and premises in arguments, including hidden premises.

    Students will be able to reconstruct and evaluate arguments. ​

    Students will be able to distinguish between reasoning and rhetoric and to identify fallacies and rhetorical ploys in arguments. ​

    Students will be able to distinguish between deductive and inductive infererence, including distinguishing between different types of inductive inference (enumerative, statistical, causal, analogical).

    ​Students will be able to tell when a given set of statements is logically consistent and when it is not.

    ​Students will be able to explain some of the problems with relativism about truth.

    Students will be able to explain and apply some of the basic principles of statistics and of probablity theory. ​

    ​Students will be able to demonstrate creative thinking by spotting possibilities missed by less creative thinkers.

  • Introduction to Logic (PHIL127)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
  • To introduce students to the concepts, language and methods of classical sentential logic.

  • To introduce students to a language of classical quantificational logic.

  • Learning Outcomes

    Students will be able to explain and apply the basic concepts of classical sentence logic.

    Students will be able to translate from English into sentence logic and vice versa.

    ​Students will be able to construct and use truth tables.

    ​Students will be able to construct proofs in natural deduction for sentence  logic.

    Students will be able to translate from English into quantificational logic and vice versa.​

Programme Year Two

In Year Two you will be able to choose modules from the Year Two programme listed below.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Logic (PHIL207)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
  • To introduce students to the language and methods of classical quantificational logic.

  • To enable students to use trees for both sentence logic and quantificational logic.​

  • To relate quantificational logic to the philosophy of language. ​

  • Learning Outcomes

    Students will be able to explain and apply the basic concepts of classical quantificational logic.

    Students will consolidate their skill in ​translating from English into quantificational logic and vice versa.

    Students will be able to construct proofs in natural deducation for valid sequents of quantificational logic.

    Students will be able to test sets of formulas for consistency using trees and to assess sequents of sentence logic and sequents of quantificational logic for validity using trees.

    ​Students will be able to explain Russell''s theory of definite descriptions and formally to represent sentences that use definite descriptions in a Russellain manner using the notation of quantificational logic.

    Students will be able to define, both formally and informally, some formal properties of relations (i.e., reflexivity, symmetry, transitivity and related properties)​ and to represent these properties using diagrams.

  • Theory of Knowledge (PHIL212)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
  • To introduce students to the main philosophical questions concerning the concept of knowledge. 
  • To introduce students to the main views taken by historical and contemporary philosophers concerning the concept of knowledge.
  • ​To enable students to form and defend their own views concerning the concept of knowledge.
  • Learning Outcomes​Students will be able to discuss the main philosophical questions concerning perception.
    ​​Students will be able to name and discuss direct realism, indirect realism, and anti-realism concerning perception.
    Students will be able to discuss the main philosophical questions concerning memory.​Students will be able to name and discuss realism and anti-realism about the memory.​

    ​Students will be able to discuss the main philosophical questions concerning introspection.​Students will be able to name and discuss realism and anti-realism about the self.
    ​​Students will be able to discuss the main philosophical questions concerning reason.​​​Students will be able to name and discuss Kripke''s views and the traditional view concerning a priority, necessity, and analyticity.​Students will be able to discuss the main philosophical questions concerning testimony.​​​Students will be able to name and discuss both the direct-source and the indirect-source view of testimony.Students will be able to discuss the main philosophical questions concerning the structure of knowledge.​​
    ​​​​Students will be able to name and discuss foundationalism and coherentism, and various views on which beliefs are suitable to be in the foundations (strong classical foundationalism, weak classical foundationalism, and theistic foundationalism).

    ​Students will be able to discuss the main philosophical questions concerning the definition of ‘knowledge''.

    Students will be able to deploy Gettier-style examples, and name and discuss the tripartite definition of ''knowledge'', internalism, conclusive justificationism, externalism, reliabilism, and proper functionalism.​

    ​​​Students will be able to discuss Hume''s doubts concerning induction.

    ​​Students will be able to discuss the main philosophical questions concerning scepticism.
    ​​Students will be able to name and discuss global scepticism, 1st-order scepticism, 2nd-order scepticism, the verity principle, the necessity principle, and the infallibility principle, and various responses such as contextualism.
    ​​Students will be familiar with, and able to discuss, scepticism concerning induction.
  • Philosophy of Religion (PHIL215)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
  • ​To introduce the current state of discussion concerning the concept of God.
  • ​​To introduce the major arguments for, and the major arguments against, the existence of God.
  • ​To enable the student to clarify and develop his or her own views on whether God exists and what God is like.

  • Learning Outcomes​Students will be able to list the four main approaches to the concept of God (universal revelational theology, purely biblical theology, creation theology, and perfect-being theology), and discuss their strengths and weaknesses.

    ​Students will be able to name the main attempts at defining ‘omnipotence'', and their strengths and weaknesses, with particular reference to the paradox of the stone.

    ​Students will be able to discuss the main attempts at defining ''omniscience'', and discuss their strengths and weaknesses, with particular reference to the problem of freedom and foreknowledge.​

    ​​Students will be able to discuss the main attempts at defining divine goodness, and discuss their strengths and weaknesses, with particular reference to the problem of whether God can be good if he is unable to sin.
    ​​Students will be able to discuss and evaluate the ontological argument in its versions by Anselm, Descartes, and Plantinga.

    ​Students will be able to discuss and evaluate the cosmological argument in its versions by Aquinas, Leibniz, and van Inwagen.

    ​Students will be able to discuss and evaluate the design argument in its versions by Aquinas, Paley, and Swinburne.​​Students will be able to discuss and evaluate the logical and evidential arguments for atheism ​from the existence of evil, and the various defences and theodicies in response to them, in particular the free-will defence and the greater-good defence.

    ​Students will be able to discuss and evaluate Plantinga''s view that we need no argument or evidence to believe in God rationally, James''s view that faith is a gamble like the leap of a mountaineer, and Pascal''s view that faith is pragmatically justified.

  • Themes in Political Philosophy (PHIL219)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
  • Students will be invited to consider the theories and arguments of thinkers who have shaped contemporary political philosophy, such as John Rawls, Robert Nozick and Michael Walzer.

     

  • Students will be asked to consider some of the main concepts in political philosophy, including freedom, equality and justice.​

  • Students will be invited to appreciate the variety of philosophical issues raised by contemporary political debates around controversial topics, such as feminism and multiculturalism.​

  • Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to distinguish some of the main concepts in debates within contemporary political philosophy.

    Students will be able to distinguish between different ways of understanding  concepts employed in debates within contemporary political philosophy.​

    Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in contemporary political philosophy​

    Students will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to contemporary issues.​

    Students will be able to identify philosophical assumptions underlying political questions and claims.​

    Students will be able to structure a discussion of issues in contemporary political philosophy​

    Students will be able to speak with confidence and clarity on issues of contemporary political philosophy​.

    Students will be able to explain details of influential texts in recent political philosophy.

    Students will be able to articulate and defend positions on issues in contemporary political philosophy.​

    Students will be able to write coherently and rigorously about abstract philosophical issues raised by current political controversies.

  • Metaphysics (PHIL228)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To provide an introduction to some of the most significant debates in contemporary metaphysics;  topics include:  change and persistence, objects and properties, space and time.

    Learning Outcomes​​Students will be able to identify the main issues and positions in contemporary metaphysical discussions of space, time, persistence, properties, substance, persons, modality and existence.Students will be able to explain the main strengths and weaknesses of these positions.​

    ​Students will be able to identify the historical contexts of some of these positions.​

    ​Students will be able to construct a positive case for a specific metaphysical position, by appealing to theoretical virtues (e.g. simplicity), metaphysical principles (e.g. the principle of sufficient reason) and thought experiments which evoke powerful intuitions.

    ​​Students will further develop their abilities to extract arguments from texts, render them in standard form, and assess the soundness of their premises and the validity of their structures.​

    ​Students will be able to think more creatively about metaphysical issues.​

    ​Students will be able to explain the competing positions in contemporary meta-metaphysics.​

  • Early Modern Philosophy (PHIL235)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To consider some central themes in the philosophies of Descartes, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume.

    Learning Outcomes

    Students will gain a good knowledge of particularly epistemological themes in early modern philosophy. The module goes well with Theory of Knowledge; it differs from that module in having a more historical approach.

  • Ancient Philosophy (PHIL237)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
  • To consider the theories and arguments of some of the most important ancient philosophers, in particular Plato and Aristotle.
  • To consider key ethical, epistemological and metaphysical concepts relevant to ancient philosohy, and their interconnections.

  • To analyse and practise the dialectical skills portrayed in the ancient texts.
  • Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in ancient philosophy

    Students will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to classic ethical, epistemological and/or metaphysical issues.

    Students will be able to identify points of agreement and disagreement between different philosophies.

    Students will be able to structure a discussion of central issues in ancient philosophy​.

    Students will be able to engage dialectically with positions in ancient philosophy and to articulate the implications of these positions.

    Students will be able to present their ideas with clarity and confidence.

    Students will be able to write coherent, structured and informative accounts of abstract philosophical issues.

  • Moral Philosophy (PHIL239)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
  • Students will be invited to consider the theories and arguments of some of the most important contemporary moral philosophers focused on normative and applied ethics, including James Rachels, Peter Singer and Bernard Williams.

  • Students will be asked to consider some of the main concepts in moral philosophy, including consequentialism, deontology, virtue, impartiality, agent-relativity/neutrality and speciesism.​

  • Students will be invited to appreciate the variety of philosophical issues raised by morality and a range of controversial practices such as punishment, abortion, euthanasia and the treatment of nonhuman animals.​

  • Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to distinguish some of the main concepts in moral philosophical debates.

    Students will be able to distinguish between different ways of understanding  concepts in moral philosophical debates.​

    Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in contemporary moral philosophy​

    Students will be able to analyse concepts and arguments relating to ethical issues.​

    Students will be able to identify philosophical assumptions underlying ethical claims.​

    Students will be able to structure a discussion of issues in moral philosophy​

    Students will be able to speak with confidence and clarity on issues of moral philosophy​.

    Students will be able to explain details of influential texts in recent moral philosophy.

    Students will be able to articulate and defend positions in moral philosophy.​

    Students will be able to write coherently and rigorously about abstract philosophical issues raised by ethical controversies.

  • School of the Arts Work Experience Module (SOTA200)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - To develop materials and/or undertake tasks within a practical or vocational context

    - To apply within that context pedagogical, professional and other theoretical or practical knowledge relevant to the development and delivery of those materials and/or tasks

    - To apply academic and/or theoretical knowledge within a practical context and to reflect and report on the relationship between the two

    - To develop and identify a range of personal/employability skills and to reflect and report on this

    Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this module students should be able:

    - to demonstrate an ability to develop materials and/or undertake tasks, according to a given specification and requirement, within a practical or vocational context

    - to reflect on and evaluate the efficacy of the materials developed and/or the tasks undertaken

    - to identify the connection between academic and/or theoretical knowledge and its practical or vocational application

    - to identify, reflect and report on a range of personal/employability skills

Programme Year Three

In Year Three, you will be able choose modules from the Year Three programme listed below. All students have the option to undertake a dissertation (10,000 words) on a topic of their choosing. The dissertation presents an opportunity for an in-depth study of an area of particular interest to you.

Year Three Compulsory Modules

  • Modal Logic (PHIL301)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To introduce students to some systems of pure and applied modal logic and to some associated philosophical issues.

    Learning Outcomes

    Students will be able to construct proofs in a system of propositional logic not studied on previous modules.

    ​Students will be able to explain the distinction between primitive and derived rules of inference and prove, of derived rules, that they are derived.

    ​Students will be able to explain the relationships between necessity, possibility, impossibility and contingency.

    ​Students will be distinguish between the systems KM, B, S4 and S5 and to construct proofs in these systems.

    ​Students will be able to explain the working of the system of deontic logic D, an applied modal logic dealing with moral/legal obligation and permissibility and to construct proofs in D.

    ​Students will be able to explain and employ concepts from model-theoretical semantics for modal logics.

    ​Students will be able to explain the the relationships between various systems in terms of the properties of the accessibility relation.

      Students will be able to assess sequents for validity in modal systems using trees, to construct counter-models for invalid sequents and to verify counter-models by appeal to model-theoretical considerations.

      Students will be able to explain the features of various systems of quantified modal logic and their semantics, including distinguishing between differing approaches to quantified modal logic (e.g., QML based on free logic, QML based on classical logic, constant and varying domain semantics, objectual and non-objectual interpretations of the quantifiers).

      Students will be able to construct proofs in natural deduction in various QMLs and to employ trees for QMLs.

    1. Philosophy Dissertation (PHIL306)
      Level3
      Credit level30
      SemesterWhole Session
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      The aim is for the student to choose a topic of special interest in philosophy and conduct research into this area of interest via reading and private study under the supervison of the supervisor to whom they have been allocated.  

      Learning Outcomes

      The student will produce a systematic piece of written work, organised in chapters/sections in the manner of professional and published work in philosophy, so as to show that the research referred to in the Aims has been mastered in a way appropriate to someone with a grasp of the practice of professional philosophy.

    2. Mind, Brain and Consciousness (PHIL309)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims
    3. To give students an understanding of the main developments in twentieth century analytic philosophy of mind: dualism, behaviourism, identity theory and functionalism.

    4. ​To give students a grasp of cutting-edge debates in philosophy of mind concerning (i) the place of consciousness in nature, (ii) the relationship between consciousness and thought, (iii) artificial intelligence.

    5. Learning Outcomes

      Students should be able to explain the history of twentieth century analytic philosophy of mind.

      ​Students should be able to explain cutting edge contemporary debates on (i) the place of consciousness in nature, (ii) the relationship between thought and consciousness, (iii) artificial intelligence.

      Students should be able to build a case for a specific view concerning (i) the place of consciousness in nature, (ii) the relationship between thought and consciousenss, (iii) aritificial intelligence. ​

      Students should be able to explain the main strengths and weaknesses of dominent theories on these three things in the philosophical literature.

      ​Students should further develop their abilities to extract arguments from texts, render them in schematic form, and assess the soundness of their premises and the validity of their structures.

      ​Students should be able to think more creatively about the relationship between thought, consciousness and the physical world.

    6. Philosophy of Language (PHIL310)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims

      To study some of the main issues in the contemporary philosophy of language.

      Learning Outcomes​Students will be able to explain the point of compositional theories of meaning. 

      ​Students will be able to explain the nature and purpose of Frege''s sense-reference distinction.

      Students will be able to explain Russell''s Theory of Descriptions.​

      Students will be able to explain the difference between extensionality and intensionality and be able to evaluate some of the problems connected with these notions.​

      Students will be able to explain and evaluate sceptical approaches to meaning, such as Quine''s and Kripke''s.​

      Students will be able to explain and evaluate Davidson''s programme of radical interpretation.​

      Students will have be able to explain rival theories of truth and evaluate their relative merits.​

      Students will have be able to explain the connections between the notions of truth and meaning, and be able to evaluate the debate between realists and anti-realists.​

    7. Aesthetics (PHIL316)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims
    8. Students will be introduced to arguments of some of the most important philosophers on art, aesthetics and cultural theory, including Kant, Hegel, Danto and Tolstoy.
    9. Students will consider key concepts and theories in aesthetics, including the aesthetic judgement, disinterestedness, the institutional theory of art, the nature of representation and expression and feminist and post-modern critiques.
    10. Students will be encouraged to make connections between works of art and artistic practices of the past and present.
    11. Learning Outcomes

      Students will be able to analyse key concepts and arguments relating to aesthetics and art.​

      Students will be able to structure discussion of issues in aesthetics.​

      Students will be able to identify links between influential philosophical theories and artistic practices.​

      Students will be able to articulate and defend positions in aesthetics and philosophy of art.​

      Students will be able to present their ideas with clarity and confidence.​

      Students will be able to develop in writing coherent, structured and informative accounts on abstract philosophical issues.​

    12. Indian Philosophy (PHIL326)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims
    13. To examine the ways in which philosophy in Classical India develops as a dialogue between thinkers of Buddhist and Brahminical persuasions and to relate fundamental Indian metaphysical concepts to Western counterparts.

    14. ​To investigate what is distinctive about Indian approaches to questions of ontology, soteriology, social harmony, and morality.

    15. Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to engage in informed discussions identifying and evaluating the concepts and categories in which philosophical discussions were conducted in India.

      ​Students will able to be enabled to assimilate a differentview Western philosophical traditions from the perspective of Indian philosohical traditions.

      ​Students will be able to contextualise information about the Indian worldviews under discussion.

       

       

      Students will be able to think more imaginatively by empathising with unfamiliar outlooks on life.

       

      ​Students will be able to engage in debate informed by an awareness of the particularity and peculiarities of Western philosophical positions.

    16. Philosophy and Literature (PHIL327)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims
    17. Students will be introduced to arguments of some of the most important philosophers on literature, such as Plato, Aristotle, Schelling and Derrida.
    18. Students will consider key concepts and theories that deal with specific themes surrounding philosophical and literary production, such as the nature of emotion, narrative, metaphor and language.

    19. Students will be encouraged to make connections with works of literature from different historical periods and cultural contexts.

    20. Learning Outcomes​Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the theories central to philosophy and literature.

      Students will be able to analyse key concepts and arguments relating to philosophy of literature.​

      Students will be able to structure discussion of issues in philosophy and literature.​

      Students will be able to interrogate literature through philosophy and vice versa.​

      Students will be able to articulate and defend positions in philosophy of literature.​

      Students will be able to present their ideas with clarity and confidence.​

      Students will be able to develop in writing coherent, structured and informative accounts on philosophical issues.​

    21. Existentialism (PHIL332)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims

      To consider the theories and arguments of some of the most important existentialist philosophers, such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger and Sartre.

      ​To analyse some of the main themes of existentialist philosophy, such as the nature of subjectivity, the possibility of freedom, the death of God, time, nothingness.

      ​To relate the philosophical issues raised by existentialism to lived practice and to concrete examples.

      Learning OutcomesStudents will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in existentialism.

      Students will be able to analyse key concepts and arguments relating to the existentialist movement.

      Students will be able to structure discussion of issues around existentialist metaphysics and ethics.

      Students will be able to identify the relevance of existentialist philosophy to their own lives.

      Students will be able to articulate and defend positions relating to existentialist themes.​

      Students will be able to present their ideas with clarity and confidence.​

      Students will be able to writing coherent, structured and informative accounts on abstract philosophical issues.​

    22. Philosophical Approaches to Conflict (PHIL365)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims
    23. To introduce students to the philosophical analysis of conflict.

    24. To help students to think through for themselves the just solution to conflicts between conscientious objectors to war and the armed forces.

    25. ​To help students to think through for themselves the just solution to conflicts between those with conscientious objection to same-sex practices and homosexual couples.​

       

    26. To help students to think through for themselves the just solution to conflicts between those wishing to wear religious symbols and an employer wishing to impose a uniform code.

    27. ​To help students to think through for themselves the just solution to conflicts between ​those with conscientious objection to abortion and women desiring an abortion.
    28. ​To help students think through for themselves how conflict between rich and poor is manifested in society.

       

    29. ​To help students think through for themselves how confluct between races is manifested in society.

    30. To help students think through for themselves how conflict between the sexes is manifested in society.
    31. To help students think through for themselves how forgiveness and conflict transformation are manifested in society.

    32. To help students to think through for themselves the just solution to conflicts between those wishing to speak freely and those offended by the content of some examples of free speech.

    33. Learning Outcomes​Students will be able to analyse the philosophical concept of, and explanation for, conflict.
      ​Students will be able to relate the concept of social justice to social exclusion and social conflict and be familiar with arguments concerning competing rights and duties.​Students will be able to name, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of, philosophical approaches to conflict resolution.​​

      ​Students will be able to state the broad principles of, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of, the law and leading judgments concerning the solution of conflicts between free speech and those offended by its content.

      ​Students will be able to state the broad principles of, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of, the solution of conflicts between those with conscientious objections to same-sex activities and same-sex couples.
      ​Students will be able to state the broad principles of, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of, the solution of conflicts between those with conscientious objections to abortions and women desiring abortions.​Students will be able to state the broad principles of, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of, the solution of conflicts between those wishing to wear religious symbols and employers wishing to impose a uniform.​​Students will be able to state the broad principles of, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of, the solution of conflicts between those with a conscientious objection to military service and the armed forces.​​Students will be able to state the broad principles of, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of, the leading theories concerning the clash of the sexes in society.​Students will be able to state the broad principles of, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of,  the leading theories concerning the clash of  races in society.​
      ​Students will be able to state the broad principles of, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of, the leading theories concerning the clash between rich and poor in society.​

      ​StuStudents will be able to state the broad principles of, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of, the leading philosophical theories concerning forgiveness and conflict transformation.

       

       

      ​Students will be able to state the main positions, and their strengths and weaknesses, taken concerning the nature of moral dilemma.​
      Students will be able to state the main positions, and their strengths and weaknesses,​ taken concerning whether real moral dilemmas actually exist.
      ​​Students will be able to state the main positions, and their strengths and weaknesses,​ taken concerning the relationship between dilemmas and conflict.

    The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


    Teaching and Learning

    In studying Philosophy you will learn how to defend your views with reasoned arguments, and to assess the arguments of others. Argumentative skills are learned through attending lectures and reading philosophical texts, developed by group seminar discussions, and formally assessed through essays and exams. You complete modules to the value of 120 credits per year, from a wide range of options available. Most modules employ a blend of lectures, seminars and online support materials. You will learn by reading and studying outside class time, by attending and participating in classes, by doing coursework and, for dissertations, via one-to-one meetings with a supervisor. There is also scope, both formally in the placement module and informally, for you to develop practical skills by volunteering.


    Assessment

    Philosophy employs a mixture of modes of assessment: exams and coursework in many different varieties including essays, oral presentations, dissertations, exercises, and supported independent work (eg in the placement module).