Ocean Sciences MOSci (Hons) Add to your prospectus

  • Offers study abroad opportunities Offers study abroad opportunities
  • Opportunity to study for a year in China Offers a Year in China
  • This degree is accreditedAccredited

Key information


  • Course length: 4 years
  • UCAS code: F710
  • Year of entry: 2019
  • Typical offer: A-level : AAB / IB : 35 / BTEC : Not accepted
Lecture

Module details

Programme Year One

All routes are required to take the following modules:
ENVS103: Study Skills
ENVS111: Climate, Atmosphere & Oceans
ENVS158: Introduction to Marine Biogeochemistry
Oceanography route
Required Modules:
ENVS117: Maths and Physics for Environmental Scientists
ENVS120: Experiments in Physical Geography 1
ENVS153: Environmental Chemistry
ENVS122: Marine Ecosystems: Diversity, processes and threats
Optional Modules:
ENVS118: Introduction to sediment ary, rocks and fossils
ENVS119: Living with Environmental Change
ENVS121: Marine Biology: Life in the Seas and Oceans
ENVS157: Ecology and Conservation
PHYS107/PHYS108: Mathematics for Physicists 1 and 2
Physics route
Required Modules:
PHYS107: Maths for Physicists I
PHYS101: Newtonian Dynamics
PHYS102: Thermal PhysicsPHYS108: Maths for Physicists II
PHYS103: Wave Phenomena
Chemistry route
Required modules:
CHEM130: Introductory Organic Chemistry
CHEM170: Introductory Spectroscopy
CHEM111: Introductory Inorganic Chemistry
CHEM152: Introductory Physical Chemistry

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Study Skills (ocean Sciences) (ENVS103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
    1. To train students to make observations, collect and record data using basic oceanographic and meterological equipment.

    2. ​To improve students'' oral and written communication skills, including their ability to reference correctly. 
    3. ​To improve students'' numerical skills, specifically in statistics.
    4. To enthuse students about ocean sciences through reading and discussing topics selected for oral presentation.
    Learning Outcomes​ Write an essay and reference correctly.​Quantitatively summarise, synthesise and interpret data collected during fieldwork.  ​Communicate effectively to their peers
  • Climate, Atmosphere and Oceans (ENVS111)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    Introduce the climate system, the atmosphere and ocean:

    • Address how the climate system varies and how climate is controlled by radiative forcing;
    • How the structure of the atmosphere is determined and how the atmosphere circulates;
    • How the structure of the ocean is determined and how the ocean circulates;
    • How the atmosphere and ocean vary together.
    • How the past state of the climate system is affected by the ocean circulation
    Learning Outcomes

    1. Knowledge and Understanding
     

    a. Understand how physical processes operate within the climate system, the atmosphere and the ocean.

    b. Appreciate the complexity of the climate system, the effect of radiative forcing, the concept of feedbacks, how rotation affects the circulation; the differences between currents and waves.

    c. Gain awareness of the similarities and differences between the atmosphere and ocean.​

    2. Intellectual Abilities
     

    a. To be able to evaluate the relative importance of different physical processes in the climate system

    b. To develop critical skills in transferring insight gained from one problem to another problem, such as how the atmosphere circulates from one planet to another planet.​

    3. Subject Based Practical Skills
     

    a. Perform simple order of magnitude calculations and make inferences from the results.

    b. Understand the use of dimensions.​

    ​​​​​​

    4. General Transferable Skills
     

    a. Application of numbers, involving order of magnitudes and dimensions.

    b. Time management.

    c. Problem solving.​

  • Introduction to Marine Biogeochemistry (ENVS158)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims
    1. To introduce students to marine chemistry of the major and trace elements.
    2. To demonstrate the dynamic relationship between the chemical ocean environment and biological processes.
    3. To identify the main ocean basins and main oceanic transport routes of chemical species
    4. To teach the necessary practical skills for oceanographic sampling and measurement of chemical species.
    Learning Outcomes1. Students will be able to identify ocean basins, their major characteristics and transport pathways.

    2. Students will gain knowledge of the sources and distributions of major and minor elements in the ocean, including dissolved gases, nutrients and carbon.​

    3. Students will understand the chemical and biological processes that control the distribution of major and minor elements including dissolved gases, nutrients and carbon.​

    ​3. Students will recognize the form and function of different components of the marine ecosystem including viruses, bacteria, phytoplankton and zooplankton. ​

    ​4. Students will be able to synthesis knowledge of key biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus to understand how they are linked in the modern and past ocean environment. 

    5. Students will know how to measure key properties of the ocean and interpret why they vary in space and time

  • Mathematics and Physics for Environmental Scientists (ENVS117)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To provide students with   

    1) A grounding in the basic physics relevant to processes in the atmosphere, ocean and solid earth.

    2) Practical experience in the application of mathematical methods to the solution of problems in physical processes in the environment.

    Learning Outcomes

    ​At the end of the module a student shoudl be able to demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the basic physics relevant to processes in the atmosphere, ocean and solid earth.

    ​At the end of the module the student should be able to      

    a) judge which is the correct formula or equation to use under particular circumstances.

    b) demonstrate skills in the application of mathematical methods to the solution of problems in physical processes in the environment

    At the end of the module a student should be able to      

    a) do simple estimations by hand

    b) do arithmetic using a calculator

    c) rearrange algebraic formulae to make the required quantity the subject

    d) insert values in a formula and calculate the correct answer

    e) sketch simple mathematical curves by inspection of the formula

    f) differentiate and integrate simple mathematical functions

  • Experiments in Physical Geography I (ENVS120)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    For students to learn:-

    • Careful observation, appropriate handing of liquid and solid samples, and correct use of analytical instruments.
    • Approaches to measurement quality control via replication and reference materials.
    • Appropriate use of descriptive and inferential statistics using MINITAB.
    • Succinct and clear presentation of experimental results in poster form (Powerpoint)
    Learning Outcomes

    A deeper understanding of processes that underlie the interaction between people and the physical environment.  

    ​Specific knowledge in the use of selected important analytical instrument; and general knowledge about the principles and practice of accurate and precise measurement.  

    ​Appropriate treatment of data, including quality control, graphical representation, and statistical analysis.  

  • Marine Ecosystems: Diversity, Processes and Threats (ENVS122)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    This module aims to introduce students to the diversity of ecosystem types in the marine environment and the various threats that they face. 

    Learning Outcomes

    Acquire knowledge and understanding of representative key ecosystems found in the marine environment.

      ​Be familiar with the marine organisms that live in representative key marine ecosystems.

      ​Acquire a basic knowledge of fundamental ecological principles, transferable to later marine and non-marine modules.

      ​Be aware of the threats that humans may pose to marine ecosystems.

      ​Appreciate how humans assess and may mitigate detrimental impacts to the environment.

      ​Be introduced to the importance to their future studies of critical reading of scientific literature.

    • Environmental Chemistry (ENVS153)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting55:45
      Aims

      This module aims to provide a basic understanding of chemistry relevant for environmental sciences.


      Learning Outcomes

      a. describe the structure of an atom, its electronic configuration and predict some of its chemical behaviour based on its position in the periodic table;​

      ​b. understand the inter andintramolecular forces that bond molecules and atoms together to form "matter", and thusexplain why for instance water is a liquid atroom temperature while oxygen is a gas;​

      ​c. name chemical compounds, write balanced chemical reactions and understand howthe amount of products and reactants can be predicted;​

      ​d. understand what redox reactions are and be able to work them out;

      ​e. understand basics of aquatic chemistry such aspH, concentration, dilution; understand energy changes in chemical reactions;​

      ​f. know the basics of organic biogeochemistry.​

    • Newtonian Dynamics (PHYS101)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims
      • To introduce the fundamental concepts and principles of classical mechanics at an elementary level.
      • To provide an introduction to the study of fluids.
      • To introduce the use of elementary vector algebra in the context of mechanics.
      Learning Outcomes

      Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the laws of classical mechanics, and understand physical quantities with magnitudes, directions (where applicable), units and uncertainties.

      • understand physical quantities with magnitudes, directions (where applicable), units and uncertainties.
      • apply the laws of mechanics to statics, linear motion, motion in a plane, rotational motion, simple harmonic motion and gravitation.

      Apply the laws of mechanics to unseen situations and solve problems.

      Develop a knowledge and understanding of the analysis of linear and rotational motion.

      ​Develop a knowledge and understanding of the analysis of orbits, gravity, simple harmonic motion and fluid flow.

    • Thermal Physics (PHYS102)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims

      The module aims to make the student familiar with

      • The concepts of Thermal Physics
      • The zeroth, first and second laws of Thermodynamics
      • Heat engines
      • The kinetic theory of gasses
      • Entropy
      • The equation of state
      • Van der Waals equation
      • States of matter and state changes
      • The basis of statistical mechanics
      Learning Outcomes

      Construct a temperature scale and understand how to calibrate a thermometer with that scale

      ​Calculate the heat flow into and work done by a system and how that is constrained by the first law of Thermodynamics

      ​Analyse the expected performance of heat engines, heat pumps and refrigerators

      ​Relate the second law of thermodynamics to the operation of heat engines, particularly the Carnot engine

      ​Understand the kinetic theory of gases and calculate properties of gases including the heat capacity and mean free path

      ​Use the theory of equipartition to relate the structure of the molecules to the measured heat capacity

      ​Calculate the linear and volume thermal expansions of materials

      ​Understand the basis of entropy and relate this to the second law of thermodynamics andcalculate entropy changes

      ​Relate the equation of state for a material to the macroscopic properties of the material

      ​Understand the PV and PT diagrams for materials and the phase transitions that occur when changing the state variables for materials

      ​​​Be able to link the microscopic view of a system to its macroscopic state variables

      ​Be able to demonstrate the equivalence of the Clausius and Kelvin-Planck statements of the second law of thermodynamics.

      ​Be able to derive and use Maxwell''s equations

    • Wave Phenomena (PHYS103)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims
      • To introduce the fundamental concepts and principles of wave phenomena.
      • To highlight the many diverse areas of physics in which an understanding of waves is crucial.
      • To introduce the concepts of interference and diffraction.
      Learning Outcomes

      Demonstrate an understanding of oscillators.

      Understand the fundamental principles underlying wave phenomena.

        Apply those principles to diverse phenomena.

          Understand wave reflection and transmission, superposition of waves.

          Solve problems on the behaviour of electromagnetic waves in vacuo and in dielectric materials.

            Understand linear and circular polarisation.

              Understand inteference and diffraction effects.

               

              Understand lenses and optical instruments.

              Apply Fourier techniques and understand their link to diffraction patterns.

              Understand the basic principles of lasers

            • Mathematics for Physicists I (PHYS107)
              Level1
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
              Aims

              To ensure all students possess a common level of knowledge and skills irrespective of background.

              To provide a foundation for the mathematics required by physical scientists.

              To assist students in acquiring the skills necessary to use the mathematics developed in the module.

              Learning Outcomes
            • A good working knowledge of differential and integral calculus

            • Familiarity with some of the elementary functions common in applied mathematics and science 

            • An introductory knowledge of functions of several variables

              Manipulation of complex numbers and use them to solve simple problems involving fractional powers

              ​An introductory knowledge of series

              A good rudimentary knowledge of simple problems involving statistics: binomial and Poisson distributions, mean, standard deviation, standard error of mean

            • Mathematics for Physicists II (PHYS108)
              Level1
              Credit level15
              SemesterSecond Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
              Aims
              • To consolidate and extend the understanding of mathematics required for the physical sciences.
              • To develop the student’s ability to apply the mathematical techniques developed in the module to the understanding of physical problems.
              Learning OutcomesAbility to manipulate matrices with confidence and use matrix methods to solve simultaneous linear equations.

              ​Familiarity with methods for solving first and second order differential equations in one variable.

              ​A basic knowledge of vector algebra.

              A basic understanding of Fourier series and transforms.

              ​A basic understanding of series methods for the solution of differential equations

            • Introductory Inorganic Chemistry (CHEM111)
              Level1
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting65:35
              Aims

              The aim of this module is to give students an understanding of the underlying principles of the chemistry of the main group elements and to give them an appreciation of the importance of this chemistry in everyday life.

              Learning Outcomes

              By the end of this module a student will have an understanding of:

              • The periodic table as an underlying framework for understanding the chemistry of the main group elements
              • The crystal structures of metals and simple ionic solids
              • Lewis acid-Lewis base interactions
              • Systematic chemistry of halides and hydrides of the main group elements
              • Systematic chemistry of halides and hydrides of the main group elements
              • The basic techniques required for the preparation and analysis of simple inorganic compounds  
            • Introductory Organic Chemistry (CHEM130)
              Level1
              Credit level30
              SemesterWhole Session
              Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
              Aims

              The aim of this module is to ensure that students are aware of fundamental principles of organic chemistry, including nomenclature, structure and bonding, and the basic principles of static and dynamic stereochemistry. The major reactions associated with the common functional groups will be covered with emphasis on reaction mechanisms. In addition, this module will provide an introduction to the basic techniques associated with practical synthetic chemistry.

              Learning Outcomes

              By the end of this module students will know:

              • Structures and shapes of major classes of organic compounds
              • Principles of bonding in major classes of organic compounds
              • Basic principles of stereochemistry
              • Important reactions of a range of functional groups
              • An understanding of the major classes of reaction mechanisms
              • The basic techniques of synthetic chemistry (isolation, purification, identification, and design and work-up of reactions) and will have experience of characterisation using spectroscopic techniques and chemical methods.
            • Introductory Physical Chemistry (CHEM152)
              Level1
              Credit level15
              SemesterSecond Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
              Aims

              The main aim of this module is to equip students with an understanding of basic kinetics and thermodynamics as they relate to chemical reactions.

              Learning Outcomes

              By the end of the module students should be familiar with, and be able to make appropriate use of:

              • Basic ideas of energy changes in chemical reactions
              • Ideas relating to the rates of chemical reactions
              • Basic laboratory skills and report writing, including data and error analysis
            • Introductory Spectroscopy (CHEM170)
              Level1
              Credit level15
              SemesterWhole Session
              Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
              Aims

              The aim of this module is to introduce modern spectroscopic methods in chemistry. 

               Students will understand and be able to apply: 
              • the importance of quantum mechanics in understanding atomic structure
              • the interaction of light with matter
              • atomic and molecular spectroscopy
              • information obtained from different spectroscopic techniques
              • the interpretation of spectroscopic data for deduction of molecular structure
              Learning Outcomes

              By the end of this module, students should have achieved the following learning outcomes:

              • An understanding of atomic structure underpinned by a detailed explanation of quantum mechanical theory.
              • The fundamental principles behind rotational, vibrational, electronic spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, andnuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.  
              • Application of spectroscopic techniques to elucidate moecular structure.
              • Be able to apply this knowledge to real spectroscopic problems.

            Year One Optional Modules

            • Introduction to Sedimentary Rocks and Fossils (ENVS118)
              Level1
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
              Aims
              • The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to the study of sediments and sedimentary rocks and to introduce the main groups of common fossil.
              • The module aims to cover the basic language used to describe sediments and fossils and gives an introduction to a range of physical, chemical and biological concepts.   
              • The students are introduced to the economic significance of sediments and sedimentary rocks and how fossils provide information on geological time, evolutionary history and ancient environments.
              Learning Outcomes

              ​1. On successful completion of this module, a student will be able to describe sediments and sedimentary rocks at outcrop, hand specimen and thin section scales, identifying and naming key structures and fabrics.

              ​2. On successful completion of this module, a student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the relationships between process and product for both depositional and diagenetic features and be able to discuss the utility of sedimentary rocks to determine processs and, to a lesser extent, environment.

              ​3. On successful completion of this module, a student will be able to describe, name and identify and interpret the main features of common fossils.

              4. On successful completion of this module, a student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of how organisms are preserved as fossils, and of the utility of fossils to identify ancient modes of life, environments and relative ages of rocks.
            • Living With Environmental Change (ENVS119)
              Level1
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
              Aims

              The over-arching aim of thismodule is to introduce students to the so-called ‘Grand Challenges’ facingsociety and what is being done to address them. Living with Environmental Change is a key interdisciplinaryresearch theme currently being addressed worldwide; from tackling climatechange and carbon emissions to promoting sustainable resource use and energyefficiency. This module illustrates that an interdisciplinary approach iscrucial to identifying the underlying problems faced by humanity and to findingholistic and sustainable solutions.

              ​ 

              Learning Outcomes

              ​Obtain an understanding of the Grand Challenges facing society;

              ​Develop an appreciation of the significance of interdisciplinary working in addressing the Grand Challenges;

              ​Understand that Geography plays a key role in the Living With Environmental Change (LWEC) research agenda;

              ​Become familiar with the linkages between research, policy and sustainability.

            • Marine Biology: Life in the Seas and Oceans (ENVS121)
              Level1
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
              Aims

              This module will introduce students to the main groups of organisms found in the marine environment. Students will encounter these groups in subsequent modules and field studies and gaining a familiarity with them in this module will enable them to recognise them and understand their role in marine ecosystems. 


              Learning Outcomes​Acquire knowledge and understanding on the taxonomic and functional diversity of marine life.

              ​Develop the ability to recognise the major groups of marine organisms using their key features

              ​Experience how to examine marine organisms and understand their functional biology using different kinds of specimens and approaches. 

              ​Recognise the adaptational solutions to functional problems adopted by marine organisms

            • Ecology and Conservation (ENVS157)
              Level1
              Credit level15
              SemesterSecond Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
              Aims

              The module aims tointroduce students to the key principles that govern the interactions betweenorganisms and their environment, and how these can be used as the basis forconservation.​ 

              Learning OutcomesUnderstandand explain fundamental principles of how ecological systems are structured andhow they function at the scale of individuals, populations and communities​Tounderstand the effects of human activities on communities and ecosystems at arange of timescales​

              Developan ability to critically evaluate how ecological understanding and data can beused to inform conservation policy​

            • Mathematics for Physicists I (PHYS107)
              Level1
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
              Aims

              To ensure all students possess a common level of knowledge and skills irrespective of background.

              To provide a foundation for the mathematics required by physical scientists.

              To assist students in acquiring the skills necessary to use the mathematics developed in the module.

              Learning Outcomes
            • A good working knowledge of differential and integral calculus

            • Familiarity with some of the elementary functions common in applied mathematics and science 

            • An introductory knowledge of functions of several variables

              Manipulation of complex numbers and use them to solve simple problems involving fractional powers

              ​An introductory knowledge of series

              A good rudimentary knowledge of simple problems involving statistics: binomial and Poisson distributions, mean, standard deviation, standard error of mean

            • Mathematics for Physicists II (PHYS108)
              Level1
              Credit level15
              SemesterSecond Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
              Aims
              • To consolidate and extend the understanding of mathematics required for the physical sciences.
              • To develop the student’s ability to apply the mathematical techniques developed in the module to the understanding of physical problems.
              Learning OutcomesAbility to manipulate matrices with confidence and use matrix methods to solve simultaneous linear equations.

              ​Familiarity with methods for solving first and second order differential equations in one variable.

              ​A basic knowledge of vector algebra.

              A basic understanding of Fourier series and transforms.

              ​A basic understanding of series methods for the solution of differential equations

            Programme Year Two

            Compulsory modules on the Oceanography route:

            ENVS202:  Key Skills for Environmental Data AnalysisENVS220:  Sampling the Ocean
            ENVS265: Life in a Dynamic Ocean
            ENVS266: Oceanography of estuaries and shelf seas
            ENVS232:  Marine Pollution
            ENVS231: Climatology

             

            Students on the Oceanography route can choose two of the following optional modules:

            ENVS222: Statistics for Environmental Scientists
            ENVS217: Catchment Hydrology
            ENVS219: Sedimentary Processes and Depositional Environments
            ENVS283: Palaeobiology and evolution
            ENVS271: Marine Biology Practical Skills
            ENVS251: Human Impacts on Marine Ecosystem
            MATH266: Numerical Methods
            MATH225: Vector Calculus with  Applications in Fluid Mechanics

             

            Compulsory modules on the Physics route:

            ENVS220:  Sampling the Ocean
            ENVS265: Life in a Dynamic Ocean
            ENVS266: Oceanography of estuaries and shelf seas
            PHYS201: Electromagnetism
            PHYS207: Maths for Physicists III
            PHYS208: Maths for Physicists IV
            ENVS202: Key Skills for Environmental Data Analysis

             

            Students on the physics route can choose one of the following optional modules

            ENVS231: Climatology
            ENVS232: Marine Pollution
            PHYS202: Condensed matter physics
            PHYS204: Nuclear and Particle Physics

             

            Compulsory modules on the Chemistry route:

            ENVS202:  Key Skills for Environmental Data Analysis
            ENVS220:  Sampling the Ocean
            CHEM260: Physical Chemistry II
            ENVS232:  Marine Pollution
            ENVS266: Oceanography of estuaries and shelf seas
            CHEM231: Organic Chemistry II
            CHEM245: Preparative Chemistry: Synthesis and Characterisation
            CHEM214: Metals and Metalloids of the P and D Blocks

            Year Two Compulsory Modules

            • Key Skills for Environmental Data Analysis (ENVS202)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
              Aims

              To develop skills in environmental data analysis by applying the Matlab computing package to process, analyse and plot data.

              To develop a critical approach to the results of data analysis.


              Learning Outcomes

              1. Knowledge and Understanding
               

              At the end of the module the student should

              a) know how to write a program script in Matlab

              b) know how to process and plot ocean and climate data​ using Matlab


              2. Intellectual Abilities
               

              At the end of the module the student should be able to:

              a) know how to construct problems and use problem solving skills.

              b) analyse and interpret signals in environmental data.

              c) implement programming methods used for simple models and time-series analysis

              d) synthesise information from their own data analysis and the literature into a written report​

              3. Subject Based Practical Skills
               

              At the end of the module the student should be able to:

              a) how to synthesize concepts across environmental science

              b) write a computer program to analyse and plot environmental data​

              ​​​​


              4. General Transferable Skills
               

              At the end of the module, the student should have:

              a) Gain ability in formulating problems and acquiring order of magnitude solutions

              b) Gained computing skills and familiarity with computing methods and programming

              c) Developed written communication through the writing of reports

            • Sampling the Ocean (ENVS220)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterWhole Session
              Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
              Aims

              To provide students with 

              a) Knowledge of the scope of graduate jobs available to a graduate in ocean science, along with an understanding of how to present a postfolio of skills and respond to the different methods used in assessment of job applicants.

              b) Understanding of the practical methods used to measure and analyse physical and biogeochemical quantities in the ocean, in both the context of ocxean research and in the commercial world.

              c)The skills to be able to the process and analyse oceanographic data in order to understand processes in the ocean.
              Learning Outcomes

               

              1. Knowledge and Understanding:

              Careers-related:

              a) The scope of graduate-level jobs available to someone with the skills learnt on an oceans-related degree.

              b) The routes into further study at post-graduate level.

              c) The importance of developing an on-line profile for today''s job market.

              d) The different techniques (e.g. on-line, video) used in assessment of job applicants.


              Subject-specific:

              a) Navigation;

              b) Measurements of temperature, salinity;

              c) Measurements of currents – both direct and indirect methods;

              d) Remote sensing;

              e) Chlorophyll analysis

              f) Nutrient Analysis; 

              g) Oxygen Analysis

              h) Analysis of Particles

              i) Data quality/analysis techniques including:

                        (i) Manipulation of CTD and current data.

                        (ii) Calculation of water column propoerties from discrete sampling.

                        (iii) Calibration of instrumentation using distrete samples.

                      

              ​2. IntellectualAbilities:


              At the end of themodule a student should be able toevaluate the quality and significance of oceanographic data, and understand how data is used in both commercial and research environments.


              ​3. Subject BasedPractical Skills:


              At the end of themodule a student should be able to apply skills in:


              a) Processingand analysing hydrographic data,


              b) Processingand analysing current meter data ,


              c) Calculatingcurrents from indirect measurements and hydrographic data,


              d) Interpretingremote sensing data,


              e) Analysis ofnutrient, oxygen and particulate samples


              f) Interpretingnutrient, oxygen and particulate data


              g) Planning cruise tracks.


            • Climatology (ENVS231)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterSecond Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
              Aims

              The module aims to provide knowledge and understanding across a number of areas of meteorology and weather, covering physical processes.  These processes are covered at a detailed level and supported by an overview of the subject area. This module gives the scientific foundation for more discursive as well as process orientated final year modules.

              The practicals provide an introduction to aspects of meteorological analysis. These are supported through the general lecture programme.  The practical series add to the learning experience and skills to enable students to apply what is learnt in the lecture programme. 

                

              Learning Outcomes

              ​Evaluate appropriate theories, methods and techniques

              ​Recognise how selected environments interact with appropriate atmospheric and weather processes

              ​Understand different weather from high, mid and tropical latitudes

              Apply practical data analysis.​
            • Marine Pollution (ENVS232)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
              Aims

              ·         To introduce students to the main anthropogenic stressors, their effects and importance on the marine system;

              ·         To develop an awareness of the current problems;

              ·         To train students in literature search and reading of scientific papers;

              ·         To enhance writing and communication skills.

              Learning Outcomes​​Students will gain an understanding and awareness of the various types of stressors that affect the marine system.

              ​​Students will be trained in browsing and searching Web of science to produce a research related poster 

            • Life in A Dynamic Ocean (ENVS265)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
              Aims
              • To gain an appreciation of how ecosystems in the ocean are intricately linked to their physical fluid environment
              • To understand how microbial life is affected by molecular diffusion and turbulence
              • To understand the challenges faced by microscopic life in the viscous fluid of the ocean
              • To address how mean flows in the ocean can be vital in the life stages of larger marine organisms
              • To appreciate the global differences in plankton communities, and the underlying reasons for those differences
              • To understand the problem of how community diversity is maintained in the ocean, and the current theories attempting to explain this diversity
              Learning Outcomes

               Students will gain a broad understanding of how different plankton communities arise in different oceanic regimes, and how that ultimately structures food chains to larger marine animals.

              ​Students will be able to compare quantitatively the scales of different processes, and critically assess their relative importance for life in the ocean.

              ​Students will strengthen, and acquire new, skills in quantifying physical-biological drivers of ecosystems.

              ​Students will learn the important of a multi-disciplinary approach on marine biology and gain experience in solving novel problems.

            • Ocean Environments (ENVS266)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterSecond Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
              Aims

              Provide students with a quantitative understanding of oceanographic concepts, applied to key ocean environments.

              Provide students with knowledge of how the oceanography of the ocean supports biological production.

              Allow students to gain experience in the use of a simple computer model to design and carry out experiments on coastal oceanography.

              Provide students with practical experience of making basic, useful calculations applied to coastal oceanography.

              Learning Outcomes

              ​Students will acquire knowledge of key concepts in oceanography​​

              ​Students will learn to appreciate the need to consider a theory''s underlying assumptions when testing its appropriateness as an explanation for a phenomenon​

              ​Students will develop skills in framing testable hypotheses.​

              ​Students will acquire experience in the use of a simple computer model in testing a hypothesis.​

              ​Students will gain experience in reaching quantified answers to problems in the coastal and open ocean.​

              ​Students will develop an understanding of how the physics and biology of the ocean are linked​

            • Key Skills for Environmental Data Analysis (ENVS202)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
              Aims

              To develop skills in environmental data analysis by applying the Matlab computing package to process, analyse and plot data.

              To develop a critical approach to the results of data analysis.


              Learning Outcomes

              1. Knowledge and Understanding
               

              At the end of the module the student should

              a) know how to write a program script in Matlab

              b) know how to process and plot ocean and climate data​ using Matlab


              2. Intellectual Abilities
               

              At the end of the module the student should be able to:

              a) know how to construct problems and use problem solving skills.

              b) analyse and interpret signals in environmental data.

              c) implement programming methods used for simple models and time-series analysis

              d) synthesise information from their own data analysis and the literature into a written report​

              3. Subject Based Practical Skills
               

              At the end of the module the student should be able to:

              a) how to synthesize concepts across environmental science

              b) write a computer program to analyse and plot environmental data​

              ​​​​


              4. General Transferable Skills
               

              At the end of the module, the student should have:

              a) Gain ability in formulating problems and acquiring order of magnitude solutions

              b) Gained computing skills and familiarity with computing methods and programming

              c) Developed written communication through the writing of reports

            • Sampling the Ocean (ENVS220)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterWhole Session
              Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
              Aims

              To provide students with 

              a) Knowledge of the scope of graduate jobs available to a graduate in ocean science, along with an understanding of how to present a postfolio of skills and respond to the different methods used in assessment of job applicants.

              b) Understanding of the practical methods used to measure and analyse physical and biogeochemical quantities in the ocean, in both the context of ocxean research and in the commercial world.

              c)The skills to be able to the process and analyse oceanographic data in order to understand processes in the ocean.
              Learning Outcomes

               

              1. Knowledge and Understanding:

              Careers-related:

              a) The scope of graduate-level jobs available to someone with the skills learnt on an oceans-related degree.

              b) The routes into further study at post-graduate level.

              c) The importance of developing an on-line profile for today''s job market.

              d) The different techniques (e.g. on-line, video) used in assessment of job applicants.


              Subject-specific:

              a) Navigation;

              b) Measurements of temperature, salinity;

              c) Measurements of currents – both direct and indirect methods;

              d) Remote sensing;

              e) Chlorophyll analysis

              f) Nutrient Analysis; 

              g) Oxygen Analysis

              h) Analysis of Particles

              i) Data quality/analysis techniques including:

                        (i) Manipulation of CTD and current data.

                        (ii) Calculation of water column propoerties from discrete sampling.

                        (iii) Calibration of instrumentation using distrete samples.

                      

              ​2. IntellectualAbilities:


              At the end of themodule a student should be able toevaluate the quality and significance of oceanographic data, and understand how data is used in both commercial and research environments.


              ​3. Subject BasedPractical Skills:


              At the end of themodule a student should be able to apply skills in:


              a) Processingand analysing hydrographic data,


              b) Processingand analysing current meter data ,


              c) Calculatingcurrents from indirect measurements and hydrographic data,


              d) Interpretingremote sensing data,


              e) Analysis ofnutrient, oxygen and particulate samples


              f) Interpretingnutrient, oxygen and particulate data


              g) Planning cruise tracks.


            • Life in A Dynamic Ocean (ENVS265)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
              Aims
              • To gain an appreciation of how ecosystems in the ocean are intricately linked to their physical fluid environment
              • To understand how microbial life is affected by molecular diffusion and turbulence
              • To understand the challenges faced by microscopic life in the viscous fluid of the ocean
              • To address how mean flows in the ocean can be vital in the life stages of larger marine organisms
              • To appreciate the global differences in plankton communities, and the underlying reasons for those differences
              • To understand the problem of how community diversity is maintained in the ocean, and the current theories attempting to explain this diversity
              Learning Outcomes

               Students will gain a broad understanding of how different plankton communities arise in different oceanic regimes, and how that ultimately structures food chains to larger marine animals.

              ​Students will be able to compare quantitatively the scales of different processes, and critically assess their relative importance for life in the ocean.

              ​Students will strengthen, and acquire new, skills in quantifying physical-biological drivers of ecosystems.

              ​Students will learn the important of a multi-disciplinary approach on marine biology and gain experience in solving novel problems.

            • Ocean Environments (ENVS266)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterSecond Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
              Aims

              Provide students with a quantitative understanding of oceanographic concepts, applied to key ocean environments.

              Provide students with knowledge of how the oceanography of the ocean supports biological production.

              Allow students to gain experience in the use of a simple computer model to design and carry out experiments on coastal oceanography.

              Provide students with practical experience of making basic, useful calculations applied to coastal oceanography.

              Learning Outcomes

              ​Students will acquire knowledge of key concepts in oceanography​​

              ​Students will learn to appreciate the need to consider a theory''s underlying assumptions when testing its appropriateness as an explanation for a phenomenon​

              ​Students will develop skills in framing testable hypotheses.​

              ​Students will acquire experience in the use of a simple computer model in testing a hypothesis.​

              ​Students will gain experience in reaching quantified answers to problems in the coastal and open ocean.​

              ​Students will develop an understanding of how the physics and biology of the ocean are linked​

            • Electromagnetism (PHYS201)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
              Aims
              • To introduce the fundamental concepts and principles of electrostatics, magnetostatics, electromagnetism and Maxwell''s equations, and electromagnetic waves.
              • To introduce differential vector analysis in the context of electromagnetism.
              • To introduce circuit principles and analysis (EMF, Ohm''s law, Kirchhoff''s rules, RC and RLC circuits)
              • To introduce the formulation fo Maxwell''s equations in the presence of dielectric and magnetic materials.
              • To develop the ability of students to apply Maxwell''s equations to simple problems involving dielectric and magnetic materials.
              • To develop the concepts of field theories in Physics using electromagnetism as an example.
              • To introduce light as an electromagnetic wave.
              Learning Outcomes

              ​Demonstrate a good knowledge of the laws of electromagnetism and an understanding of the practical meaning of Maxwell''s equations in integral and differential forms.

              ​Apply differential vector analysis to electromagnetism.

              ​Demonstrate simple knowledge and understanding of how the presence of matter affects electrostatics and magnetostatics, and the ability to solve simple problems in these situations.

              ​Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how the laws are altered in the case of non-static electric and magnetic fields and the ability to solve simple problems in these situations.

            • Mathematics for Physicists III (PHYS207)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
              Aims
              • To re-inforce students'' prior knowledge of mathematical techniques
              • To introduce new mathematical techniques for physics modules
              • To enhance students'' problem-solving abilities through structured application of these techniques in physics
              Learning Outcomes

              At the end of the module the student should be able to:

              • Have knowledge of a range of mathematical techniques necessary for physics and astrophysics programmes
              • Be able to apply these mathematical techniques in a range of physics and astrophysics programmes
            • Mathematics for Physicists IV (PHYS208)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterSecond Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
              Aims
              • To re-inforce students'' prior knowledge of mathematical techniques
              • To introduce new mathematical techniques for physics modules
              • To enhance students'' problem-solving abilities through structured application of these techniques in physics
              Learning Outcomes

              At the end of the module the student should be able to:

              • Have knowledge of a range of advanced mathematical techniques necessary for physics and astrophysics programmes
              • Be able to apply these mathematical techniques in a range of physics and astrophysics programmes
            • Coordination and Organometallic Chemistry of the D-block Metals (CHEM214)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterSecond Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
              Aims

              The aims of the module are:

              • To outline how bonding theories (crystal field, ligand field) have been developed by chemists to rationalise important properties of the d–block elements  and to introduce the theory underlying the use of appropriate physical and spectroscopic techniques for characterising d–block complexes, and examples of their application.
              • To illustrate the chemistry of the transition elements by a detailed study of three d-block triads  and introduce the chemistry, and some applications, of complexes in low oxidation states.
              • To explain the mechanisms by which transition metal complexes exchange ligands 
              Learning Outcomes

              By the end of the module students should:

              • Demonstrate an understanding of transition-metal chemistry
              • Show an understanding of the concepts, applications and limitations of the different bonding theories relevant to transition-metal complex chemistry, and be aware of their relative relevance in different chemical contexts.
              • Be able to identify key elements of the structures of transition-metal complexes, and apply their knowledge of spectroscopic and physical techniques to work out the correct structure for a complex, given relevant chemical and spectroscopic information.
              • Be able to describe the social, economic and technological importance of selected transition elements.
              • Understand and be able to describe the significance of the syntheses, characterisation and chemistry of 3d metal complexes
              • Understand the origin of the 18-electron rule, its application and the sort of complexes to which it applies.
              • Demonstrate an understanding of the role of ligand field and other factors in determining how metal complexes undergo ligand exchange.
              • Appreciate the bonding of different organic fragments to transition metals and how a variety of physical measurements can be used to substantiate these ideas.
            • Organic Chemistry II (CHEM231)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
              Aims

              The aim of this module is to introduce important carbon-carbon bond forming reactions within a mechanistic and synthetic framework, together with exposure to a selection of stereochemical issues.

              Learning Outcomes

              Students should be able to solve problems featuring:

              Scope and mechanisms of basic reactions (nucleophilic and electrophilic substitutions, addition and elimination reactions)

              Basic carbonyl chemistry (alkylation, acylation, aldol, conjugate additions).

              Structure, reactivity and synthesis of simple heterocycles (including pyridines, pyrroles, furans)

              Functional group interconversions and stereochemistry.

            • Preparative Chemistry: Synthesis and Characterisation (CHEM245)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
              Aims

              The module aims to present a unified approach to the synthesis and characterisation of organic and inorganic compounds and will build on techniques introduced in the first year laboratory courses.

              Learning OutcomesStudents will complete a number of different experiments and synthetic techniques across synthetic, organic and inorganic chemistry.

              ​Students will appreciate how spectroscopic techniques can be used in the characterisation of organic and inorganic compounds and will be able to use analytical and spectroscopic methods to characterise their synthesised compounds.

              ​Students will make use of scientific databases during some assignments and an electronic report.

              ​Students will assess the risks inolved in chemical lab work and handle chemical materials in a safe manner.

              ​Students should be able to organise and plan their time effectively

              ​Students will experience working collaboratively with others in multiple learning environments

            • Physical Chemistry II (CHEM260)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterWhole Session
              Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
              Aims
            • ​To explain the application of the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics to chemical reactions.

            • ​To reinforce the basic ideas on factors affecting the rates of chemical reactions and quantify the kinetics.

            • To provide an introduction into basic concepts of quantum mechanics.​

            • ​To advance knowledge of quantitative analysis of molecular spectra.​
            • ​To make students familiar with the basic ideas of photochemistry.​

            • Learning Outcomes​Discuss the difference between ideal and real gases.

              ​Discuss the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics in the context of chemical reactions.​

              Carry out thermochemical calculations involving enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy.​
              ​Calculate equilibrium constants from thermodynamic data.

              ​Discuss the concept of the chemical potential and its application under ideal and non-ideal conditions.​
              ​Analyse experimental data for the determination of  reaction orders and rate coefficients, using appropriate methods depending on the type of data available.
              ​Derive and apply rate equations and integrated rate equations for 0th, 1st and 2nd order reactions. ​
              ​Show an understanding of activation barriers and apply the Arrhenius equation.​
              ​Describe qualitatively and quantitatively the kinetics of simple parallel, consecutive, and equilibration reactions. 
              ​Apply the pre-equilibrium and steady state approximations.​
              ​Describe different decay processes of photoexcited states and analyse them quantitatively.​
              ​Demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts of quantum mechanics, including operators and wavefunctions.​
              ​Show an understanding of molecular energy levels and the forms of spectroscopy which involve transitions between them.​

              Compute basic properties of diatomics, eg bond lengths, from molecular spectra.​

              ​Use mathematical procedures and graphs for quantitative data analysis and problem solving.​

              ​Present and discuss the solution to problems in a small-group environment.​

            • Key Skills for Environmental Data Analysis (ENVS202)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
              Aims

              To develop skills in environmental data analysis by applying the Matlab computing package to process, analyse and plot data.

              To develop a critical approach to the results of data analysis.


              Learning Outcomes

              1. Knowledge and Understanding
               

              At the end of the module the student should

              a) know how to write a program script in Matlab

              b) know how to process and plot ocean and climate data​ using Matlab


              2. Intellectual Abilities
               

              At the end of the module the student should be able to:

              a) know how to construct problems and use problem solving skills.

              b) analyse and interpret signals in environmental data.

              c) implement programming methods used for simple models and time-series analysis

              d) synthesise information from their own data analysis and the literature into a written report​

              3. Subject Based Practical Skills
               

              At the end of the module the student should be able to:

              a) how to synthesize concepts across environmental science

              b) write a computer program to analyse and plot environmental data​

              ​​​​


              4. General Transferable Skills
               

              At the end of the module, the student should have:

              a) Gain ability in formulating problems and acquiring order of magnitude solutions

              b) Gained computing skills and familiarity with computing methods and programming

              c) Developed written communication through the writing of reports

            • Sampling the Ocean (ENVS220)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterWhole Session
              Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
              Aims

              To provide students with 

              a) Knowledge of the scope of graduate jobs available to a graduate in ocean science, along with an understanding of how to present a postfolio of skills and respond to the different methods used in assessment of job applicants.

              b) Understanding of the practical methods used to measure and analyse physical and biogeochemical quantities in the ocean, in both the context of ocxean research and in the commercial world.

              c)The skills to be able to the process and analyse oceanographic data in order to understand processes in the ocean.
              Learning Outcomes

               

              1. Knowledge and Understanding:

              Careers-related:

              a) The scope of graduate-level jobs available to someone with the skills learnt on an oceans-related degree.

              b) The routes into further study at post-graduate level.

              c) The importance of developing an on-line profile for today''s job market.

              d) The different techniques (e.g. on-line, video) used in assessment of job applicants.


              Subject-specific:

              a) Navigation;

              b) Measurements of temperature, salinity;

              c) Measurements of currents – both direct and indirect methods;

              d) Remote sensing;

              e) Chlorophyll analysis

              f) Nutrient Analysis; 

              g) Oxygen Analysis

              h) Analysis of Particles

              i) Data quality/analysis techniques including:

                        (i) Manipulation of CTD and current data.

                        (ii) Calculation of water column propoerties from discrete sampling.

                        (iii) Calibration of instrumentation using distrete samples.

                      

              ​2. IntellectualAbilities:


              At the end of themodule a student should be able toevaluate the quality and significance of oceanographic data, and understand how data is used in both commercial and research environments.


              ​3. Subject BasedPractical Skills:


              At the end of themodule a student should be able to apply skills in:


              a) Processingand analysing hydrographic data,


              b) Processingand analysing current meter data ,


              c) Calculatingcurrents from indirect measurements and hydrographic data,


              d) Interpretingremote sensing data,


              e) Analysis ofnutrient, oxygen and particulate samples


              f) Interpretingnutrient, oxygen and particulate data


              g) Planning cruise tracks.


            • Marine Pollution (ENVS232)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
              Aims

              ·         To introduce students to the main anthropogenic stressors, their effects and importance on the marine system;

              ·         To develop an awareness of the current problems;

              ·         To train students in literature search and reading of scientific papers;

              ·         To enhance writing and communication skills.

              Learning Outcomes​​Students will gain an understanding and awareness of the various types of stressors that affect the marine system.

              ​​Students will be trained in browsing and searching Web of science to produce a research related poster 

            • Ocean Environments (ENVS266)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterSecond Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
              Aims

              Provide students with a quantitative understanding of oceanographic concepts, applied to key ocean environments.

              Provide students with knowledge of how the oceanography of the ocean supports biological production.

              Allow students to gain experience in the use of a simple computer model to design and carry out experiments on coastal oceanography.

              Provide students with practical experience of making basic, useful calculations applied to coastal oceanography.

              Learning Outcomes

              ​Students will acquire knowledge of key concepts in oceanography​​

              ​Students will learn to appreciate the need to consider a theory''s underlying assumptions when testing its appropriateness as an explanation for a phenomenon​

              ​Students will develop skills in framing testable hypotheses.​

              ​Students will acquire experience in the use of a simple computer model in testing a hypothesis.​

              ​Students will gain experience in reaching quantified answers to problems in the coastal and open ocean.​

              ​Students will develop an understanding of how the physics and biology of the ocean are linked​

            Year Two Optional Modules

            • Catchment Hydrology (ENVS217)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
              Aims

              The module aims to enable students to ​investigate and understand the main hydrological processes operating in drainage catchments in terms of their measurement, operation and controlling factors. The module will provide students with a ''hands-on'' experience of both observing hydrology and modelling hydrological systems, with an emphasis on applied learning, which might be useful in a vocational sense in the future. The module will aim to deliver excellent training for students in the knowledge required to work in a wide variety of environmentally-facing careers, including those with the EA, Natural England or DEFRA, as well as Environmental Consultancies.

              Learning Outcomes

              Describe the key hydrological components of the catchment system

              Explain the main controlling factors on hydrological processes occurring within drainage catchments​ ​​Analyse and predict the response of catchments to rainfall events ​​​Evaluate methods used to predict river flows​

              ​Review the environmental variables that control lake functioning and eutrophication

            • Sedimentary Processes and Depositional Environments (ENVS219)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
              Aims

              To address aspects of physical, chemical and biological processes of sedimentation in the context of the depositional settings in which they operate. To provide the necessary background for understanding the significance of structures and textures preserved in sedimentary rocks and the skills necessary to gather and analyse information that allows well constrained interpretations of depositional environments to be made in the rock record.

              Learning Outcomes

              ​Ability to describe how fluid flow governs sediment transport and bedform configuration 

              ​Ability to collect and analyse sedimentary information to infer sedimentary process

              ​Ability to recognise a range of depositional environments from the sedimentary record

              ​Ability to use sedimentary information to build facies models for depositional environments

              ​Ability to synthesise sedimentary datasets to demonstrate spatial and temporal evolution of depositional systems

            • Statistics for Environmental Scientists (ENVS222)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
              Aims

              This module provides training in statistics for environmental scientists. We emphasize the use of software to analyze real environmental data. We do not assume extensive prior knowledge. We will teach the essential theory alongside the practical components.

              Learning Outcomes

              make sense of the statistical terms that appear in scientific papers and the media


              ​summarize data using graphs, tables, and numerical summaries

              ​choose appropriate statistical methods to answer research questions

              use statistical software to apply these methods, and interpret the output

            • Marine Ecophysiology, Ecology and Exploitation (ENVS251)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterSecond Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting55:45
              Aims

              This module aims to provide studentswith essential background in marine ecology, ecophysiology and resourceexploitation required for study at higher levels. Students will also develop theability to evaluate and critique the scientific literature, as well as theability to draw in relevant information from multiple topics areas to address This module aims to provide studentswith essential background in marine ecology, ecophysiology and resourceexploitation required for study at higher levels. Students will also develop theability to evaluate and critique the scientific literature, as well as theability to draw in relevant information from multiple topics areas to address multi-disciplinarytopics.


              Learning Outcomes

              Be familiar with some key physiological adaptations necessary to survive in the marine environment​

              ​Understand the imporance of ​​​​​some key ecological concepts that underpin the stucturing of marine communities

              ​Develop a basic understanding of key human activities that can affect individuals, populations and communities of marine animals 

              ​Develop the ability to read and critically evaluate scientific papers

              ​Develop the ability to research, plan and write essay questions that tackle multi-disciplinary issues (using material from across the module as necessary)

            • Marine Biology Practical Skills (ENVS271)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterSecond Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
              Aims

              This module aims to provide students with an opportunity to experience and gain familiarity with a range of scientific, practical techniques that are used to study the marine environment and its biota. Particular emphasis will be placed on acquiring an understanding the applicability of a wide range of survey/analytical techniques, as well as their limitations, and also post-practical handling of data and report preparation. Skills valuable to any professions dependent on some practical or field-based experience of marine environments will be developed.

              Learning Outcomes

              Be familiar with methods used to collect oceanographic data & marine biological samples from a research vessel and using a remote-operated vehicle (ROV).

              ​Gain further knowledge of higher level taxonomy and biodiversity of key groups of European marine species. 

              Understand further the physical factors that drive the distributions of species within an estuarine environment. 

              Gain further experience in important laboratory techinques for undertaking analyses of samples collected at sea.

              ​​Experience preparation and analysis of different types of quantitative data from different sampling regimes.

              ​Further develop skills in scientific writing and communication

            • Palaeobiology and Evolution (ENVS283)
              Level2
              Credit level7.5
              SemesterSecond Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
              Aims

              1. To introduce evolutionary theory and how fossils contribute to the study of evolution.

              2. To provide an overview of the most important events in vertebrate evolution.

              3. To introduce the main groups of microfossil.

              4. To demonstrate the uses of palaeontological field data.

              Learning Outcomes

              ​1a. On successful completion of this module, students will know the characteristic features and applications of the main groups of microfossil​

              1b. On successful completion of this module, students will understand how evolution occurs and how evolutionary relationships can be deduced from fossils


              1c. On successful completion of this module, students will understand the spatial and temporal controls on biodiversity​ and corresponding patterns in the fossil record

               
              1d. On successful completion of this module, students will know some of the key events in the evolution of vertebrates​

              ​1e. On successful completion of this module, students will understand how palaeontological field data can be used to aid interpretation of palaeoecology, palaeoenvironment and geological history


              ​2a. On successful completion of this module, students will be able to explain the theory of evolution and the fossil evidence for it


              ​2b. On successful completion of this module, students will be able to evaluate the arrangement of taxa on a cladogram in terms of evolutionary relatedness

              ​2c. On successful completion of this module, students will be able to combine palaeontological with other geological data to produce a full account of the palaeoenvironment of a given area

              ​3a. On successful completion of this module, students will be able to use the binocular microscope and camera lucida to produce accurate drawings

              ​3b. On successful completion of this module, students will be able to observe and describe the characteristic features of the main microfossil groups

              ​3c. On successful completion of this module, students will be able to make a full systematic description of a common invertebrate fossil

              ​3d. On successful competion of this module, students will be able to construct a simple phylogeny

              ​3e. On successful competion of this module, students will be able to construct a stratigraphic range chart

              ​4a. On successful completion of this module, students will have developed time management skills

              ​4b. On successful completion of this module, students will have developed skills in the systematic observation and recording of data

              ​4c. On successful completion of this module, students will have developed the ability to present information in a variety of alternative formats such as spreadsheets, charts and graphs

              ​4d. On successful completion of this module, students will be able to write scientific reports effectively

              ​4e. On successful completion of this module, students will have developed the ability to search for, gather and utilise information from a variety of sources

            • Vector Calculus With Applications in Fluid Mechanics (MATH225)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting85:15
              Aims

              To provide an understanding of the various vector integrals, the operators div, grad and curl and the relations between them.

              To give an appreciation of the many applications of vector calculus to physical situations.

              To provide an introduction to the subjects of fluid mechanics and electromagnetism.

              Learning Outcomes

              After completing the module students should be able to:

              -     Work confidently with different coordinate systems.

              -     Evaluate line, surface and volume integrals.

              -     Appreciate the need for the operators div, grad and curl together with the associated theorems of Gauss and Stokes.

              -     Recognise the many physical situations that involve the use of vector calculus.

              -     Apply mathematical modelling methodology to formulate and solve simple problems in electromagnetism and inviscid fluid flow.

              All learning outcomes are assessed by both examination and course work.

            • Numerical Methods (MATH266)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterSecond Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting90:10
              Aims

              To provide an introduction to the main topics in Numerical Analysis and their relation to other branches of Mathematics

              Learning Outcomes

              After completing the module students should be able to:

              • write simple mathematical computer programs in Maple,

              • understand the consequences of using fixed-precision arithmetic,

              • analyse the efficiency and convergence rate of simple numerical methods,

              • develop and implement algorithms for solving nonlinear equations,

              • develop quadrature methods for numerical integration,

              • apply numerical methods to solve systems of linear equations and to calculate eigenvalues and eigenvectors,

              • solve boundary and initial value problems using finite difference methods.

            • Climatology (ENVS231)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterSecond Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
              Aims

              The module aims to provide knowledge and understanding across a number of areas of meteorology and weather, covering physical processes.  These processes are covered at a detailed level and supported by an overview of the subject area. This module gives the scientific foundation for more discursive as well as process orientated final year modules.

              The practicals provide an introduction to aspects of meteorological analysis. These are supported through the general lecture programme.  The practical series add to the learning experience and skills to enable students to apply what is learnt in the lecture programme. 

                

              Learning Outcomes

              ​Evaluate appropriate theories, methods and techniques

              ​Recognise how selected environments interact with appropriate atmospheric and weather processes

              ​Understand different weather from high, mid and tropical latitudes

              Apply practical data analysis.​
            • Marine Pollution (ENVS232)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
              Aims

              ·         To introduce students to the main anthropogenic stressors, their effects and importance on the marine system;

              ·         To develop an awareness of the current problems;

              ·         To train students in literature search and reading of scientific papers;

              ·         To enhance writing and communication skills.

              Learning Outcomes​​Students will gain an understanding and awareness of the various types of stressors that affect the marine system.

              ​​Students will be trained in browsing and searching Web of science to produce a research related poster 

            • Condensed Matter Physics (PHYS202)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterFirst Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
              Aims

              The aims of Phys202 are to introduce the most important and basic concepts in condensed matter physics relating to the different materials we commonly see in the world around us. Condensed matter physics is one of the most active areas of research in modern physics, whose scope is extremely broad. The ultimate aim of this course is to introduce its central ideas and methodology to the students.

              Condensed matter refers to both liquids and solids and all kinds of other forms of matter in between those two extremes, generally known as “soft matter". While the course will touch on liquids, the emphasis will be on crystalline solids, including some nano-materials. The reason for focusing on crystals is that the periodicity of a crystal is what allows us to make progress in developing a theory for various phenomena in solids based on first principles. Two important concepts are:

              • the electronic states of electrons in a solid and

              • the vibrations of atoms in the solid.

              The description of these ideas basically refer to the theory of electronic band structure and the theory of phonons. These concepts form the basis for understanding a wide range of phenomena including how the atoms bond together to form the crystal, what are some basic statistical properties like specific heat, how electrons move in solids and electronic transport, why are some materials metals and others semiconductors and insulators, and how do solids interact with electromagnetic fields. The course will also introduce optical and magnetic properties in solids, scattering phenomena, thermal conductivity and effect of defects in solids, semiconductors, magnetism and go beyond the free electron model to touch on intriguing effects such as superconductivity.

              Learning Outcomes

              On satisfying the requirements of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills to understand the basic concepts of bonding in solids, establish an understanding of electron configuration in atoms and in the condensed matter in terms of bonding, and relating them to band structure description.

              ​Students will be able to understand how solid structures are described mathematically and how material properties can be predicted​.

              ​Students will be able to establish a foundation in basic crystallography, using Bragg''s law, and understand the concept of the reciprocal lattice.


              ​Students will understand basic transport properties, both electronic and thermal, in solids.

              ​ Students will understand the concept of electron and hole carrier statistics, effective masses and transport in intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors

              ​Students will learn the basics of magnetism, the atomic origin and classical treatment of diamagnetism and paramagnetism, quantization of angular momentum and Hund''s rule, and introduced to weak magnetism in solids.


              ​​Students will become familiar to the general language of condensed matter physics, key theories and concepts, ultimately enebling them to read and understand research papers.


            • Nuclear and Particle Physics (PHYS204)
              Level2
              Credit level15
              SemesterSecond Semester
              Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
              Aims
              • To introduce Rutherford and related scattering.
              • To introduce nuclear size, mass and decay modes
              • To provide some applications and examples of nuclear physics
              • To introduce particle physics, including interactions, reactions and decay
              • To show some recent experimental discoveries
              • To introduce relativistic 4-vectors for applications to collision problems
              Learning Outcomes

              basic understanding of Rutherford, electron on neutron scattering

              understanding of the basic principles that determine nuclear size, mass and decay modes

                knowledge of examples and applications of nuclear physics

                  knowledge of elementary particles and their interactions

                    ​basic understanding of relativistic 4-vectors

                  Programme Year Three

                  Compulsory modules for all routes:
                  ENVS377: Ocean Sciences Research Project
                  ENVS366: Marine Science-Special Topics
                  ENVS349: Sea Practical
                  ENVS332: Ocean Dynamics
                  ENVS335: Global Carbon Cycle
                  Students on the Oceanography route can choose two of the following optional modules
                  ENVS376: Coastal Environments: spatial and temporal change
                  ENVS389: Climate change: a critical review
                  ENVS461: Evolution, Oceans and Climate
                  ENVS393: Science Communication
                  Physics route
                  Optional Modules:
                  ENVS376: Coastal Environments: spatial and temporal change
                  ENVS389: Climate Change: a critical review
                  PHYS370: Advanced Electromagnetism
                  PHYS382: Physics of Life
                  PHYS375: Nuclear Physics
                  ENVS393: Science Communication
                  Chemistry route
                  Optional Modules
                  ENVS265: Life in a Dynamic Ocean
                  ENVS376: Coastal Environments: spatial and temporal change
                  ENVS389: Climate Change: a critical review
                  CHEM316: Inorganic applications of Group Theory
                  CHEM311: Inorganic Chemistry III
                  CHEM331: Organic Chemistry III
                  CHEM385: Chemical Database Skills
                  ENVS393: Science Communication

                  Year Three Compulsory Modules

                  • Ocean Dynamics (ENVS332)
                    Level3
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterFirst Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
                    Aims

                    To gain a high level understanding of ocean and atmospheric dynamics:

                    • To understand the background state of the atmosphere and ocean;
                    • To address how tracers spread;
                    • To understand the effects of rotation and how jets and eddies form on a rotating planet;
                    • To understand how waves influence and interact with the ocean circulation;
                    • To understand why there are western boundary currents and gyres in ocean basins;
                    • To understand how topography shapes the ocean circulation over the globe.
                    Learning Outcomes

                    ​Students will acquire knowledge of key concepts in ocean and atmosphere dynamics.

                    ​Students will learn to appreciate the approximate nature of theoretical ideas, and the strengths and weaknesses of such ideas as explanations of observed phenomena.

                    ​Students will develop mathematical skills in scale analysis of differential equations to isolate the essential phenomena.

                    ​Students will acquire experience in combining quantitative and qualitative understanding of dynamics to give clear explanations of observed phenomena in the ocean and atmosphere.

                    ​Students will develop an understanding of the factors controllng fluid flows on a range of rotating planets.

                  • Global Carbon Cycle (ENVS335)
                    Level3
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterSecond Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
                    Aims

                    To provide students with a view of the ocean carbon cycle as a dynamic system.

                    To give students an appreciation of the importance of chemical and biological processes in controlling the distribution of carbon in the ocean.

                    To provide students with an in depth understanding of the carbon cycle from the surface ocean, to the deep ocean and sediments, and the impact environmental change may have on it.

                    Learning Outcomes

                    Students will learn how physical, chemical and biological process control the transfer of carbon between the atmosphere, ocean and land, and the distribution of carbon species between these environments

                    Students will understand the role and significance that the ocean plays in the global cycling of carbon

                    ​Students will understand the pathways involved in cycling of inorganic and organic carbon between land and the ocean and the surface and deep ocean, with emphasis on the solubility, carbonate and biological pumps

                    ​Students will understand how stable isotopes can be used to study the carbon cycle and how it has varied in Earth''s history

                    ​Students will understand how environmental change is perturbing the global carbon cycle in the present day. Topics covered will include ocean acidification and changes in the surface temperature

                  • Sea Practical (ENVS349)
                    Level3
                    Credit level30
                    SemesterFirst Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
                    Aims

                    The aim of this module is to teach basic field skills in laboratory work and ship work including:

                    a) safety at sea,

                    b) ship''s operation,

                    c) physical oceanographic and meteorological measurement,

                    d) chemical sampling and

                    e) analysis of water and sediment samples and

                    f) interpretation of physical, chemical and biological oceanographic data from a coastal sea.

                    Learning Outcomes
                    1. Knowledge and Understanding:
                     

                    On completion of the module students should be able to demonstrate a knowledge of

                    a) safety at sea,

                    b) ship''s operation,

                    c) how physical oceanographic and meteorological measurements are made,

                    d) how to take water and sediment samples,

                    e) how to analyse water and sediment samples,

                    f) oceanographic conditions in the study area, 




                     



                     

                     

                    ​2. Intellectual Abilities:

                    At the end of the module the student should be able to apply skills in

                    a) devising marine sampling strategies

                    b) evaluating the quality and significance of marine data

                    c) evaluating publicly available meteorological data

                    d) quality control field data,

                    e) writing a focused, question-driven scientific report/paper​



                    ​3. Subject Based Practical Skills:

                    At the end of the module students should be able to apply skills in work at sea and ashore including:

                    a) planning a boar-based survey targeted at environmental quesions,

                    b) physical oceanographic and meteorological measurement,

                    c) chemical sampling and

                    d) analysis of water and sediment samples.


                  • Marine Sciences - Special Topics (ENVS366)
                    Level3
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterWhole Session
                    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
                    Aims

                    To promote engagement, discussions and raise the overall awareness of the most topical research issues in Marine Sciences.

                    Learning Outcomes

                    Gain a broad and detailed knowledge of some of the main research issues in marine sciences.

                               

                    ​Improve critical reading of scientific literature.

                     

                     

                    ​Gain/Practice Transferable Communication Skills: Reporting the main research findings on topics (through a number of different media including oral presentation, poster presentation, essay) to an audience of their peers and academic staff.

                  • Ocean Sciences Research Project (ENVS377)
                    Level3
                    Credit level30
                    SemesterWhole Session
                    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
                    Aims

                    To develop skills in all aspects of research in ocean sciences, including

                    a) literature searching, review and appraisal,

                    b) design of experiments or models,

                    c) practical and computing skills,

                    d) collection and/or manipulation of data,

                    e) construction of scientific hypotheses,

                    f) oral communication and report writing.

                    Learning Outcomes

                    ​Plan, organise and undertake a programme of research.

                    ​Make observations of data, reflect on outcomes and adjust the research
                        design if necessary.

                    ​Interpret, critically evaluate and present the data.

                    ​Complete a scientific report of the research planned and undertaken

                  Year Three Optional Modules

                  • Coastal Environments: Spatial and Temporal Change (ENVS376)
                    Level3
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterFirst Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
                    Aims

                    This module aims to consider the response of physical processes and coastal environments to changes in sea-level and climate. Attention is given to the geomorphology of coastal environments, its response to external agents, as well as to possible coastal managment strategies. The module aims at proving students with knowledge and understanding of the physical processes acting along coastal areas, and to promote students capability to critically understand pros and cons of different managment tecniques in relation to future climate change.

                    Learning Outcomes

                    Knowledge and understanding of physical aspects of coastal environments

                    ​​Knowledge and understanding of the concept of spatial and temporal variation: physical processes and landforms, and the importance of spatial and temporal scales

                    ​​Knowledge and understanding of environments as a result of process and form interaction

                    ​​Knowledge and understanding of methodologies of analysis and interpretation

                    ​Development of an informed concern for the Earth and its people

                    ​Capability to critically analyze real case studies in the context of previously acquired knowledge

                  • Climate Change - A Critical Review (ENVS389)
                    Level3
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterSecond Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
                    Aims

                    The module aims to provide students with the knowledge to evaluate likely outcomes climate change and climate variability over the next 100 years, to understand policy decisions at different levels, to obtain a critical understanding of climate predictions, and to understand the importance of reference to past and present climates.

                    Learning Outcomes

                    Evaluate a range of future climate change projections.​

                    ​Recognise the likely impacts of climate change to a range of sectors.


                    ​Learn how to engage with stakeholder communities with regard to climate change. 


                    Produce effectively targeted report writing and visual communication​.

                    ​Consider the multiple sector impact of climate change on societies

                  • Evolution, Oceans and Climate (ENVS461)
                    LevelM
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterSecond Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
                    Aims

                    The module aims to develop

                    Skills -the manipulation and interpretation of numerical, stratigraphic and geochemical data, the synthesis of data and literature information and coherent scientific argument.

                    Knowledge and understanding of the major controls on the behaviour of the Earth''s oceans and climates and the interaction of climate and the evolution of life on Earth. An appreciation of the role of physical, geochemical, palaeontological and sedimentological techniques in the study of ancient oceans and climates, and the relationships between changes in the physical environment and the development of life on Earth.

                    Learning Outcomes

                    ​Students will develop an understanding of the key changes that have affected life on earth and the evolution of climate, atmosphere and oceans. 

                    ​Students will develop an understanding of the use of geochemical, palaeontological and sedimentological data to determine and monitor past changes. 

                    ​Through data analysis and dicussion students will develop skills to analyse and criticise the methodology and conclusions in published work. 

                    ​Students will develop their core skills in data analysis, verbal and written comunication

                  • Coastal Environments: Spatial and Temporal Change (ENVS376)
                    Level3
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterFirst Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
                    Aims

                    This module aims to consider the response of physical processes and coastal environments to changes in sea-level and climate. Attention is given to the geomorphology of coastal environments, its response to external agents, as well as to possible coastal managment strategies. The module aims at proving students with knowledge and understanding of the physical processes acting along coastal areas, and to promote students capability to critically understand pros and cons of different managment tecniques in relation to future climate change.

                    Learning Outcomes

                    Knowledge and understanding of physical aspects of coastal environments

                    ​​Knowledge and understanding of the concept of spatial and temporal variation: physical processes and landforms, and the importance of spatial and temporal scales

                    ​​Knowledge and understanding of environments as a result of process and form interaction

                    ​​Knowledge and understanding of methodologies of analysis and interpretation

                    ​Development of an informed concern for the Earth and its people

                    ​Capability to critically analyze real case studies in the context of previously acquired knowledge

                  • Climate Change - A Critical Review (ENVS389)
                    Level3
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterSecond Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
                    Aims

                    The module aims to provide students with the knowledge to evaluate likely outcomes climate change and climate variability over the next 100 years, to understand policy decisions at different levels, to obtain a critical understanding of climate predictions, and to understand the importance of reference to past and present climates.

                    Learning Outcomes

                    Evaluate a range of future climate change projections.​

                    ​Recognise the likely impacts of climate change to a range of sectors.


                    ​Learn how to engage with stakeholder communities with regard to climate change. 


                    Produce effectively targeted report writing and visual communication​.

                    ​Consider the multiple sector impact of climate change on societies

                  • Advanced Electromagnetism (PHYS370)
                    Level3
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterSecond Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
                    Aims
                    • To build on first and second year modules on electricity, magnetism and waves by understanding a range of electromagnetic phenomena in terms of Maxwell''s equations.
                    • To understand the properties of solutions to the wave equation for electromagnetic fields in free space, in matter (non-dispersive and dispersive dielectrics, and conductors).
                    • To understand the behaviour of electromagnetic waves at boundaries.
                    • To understand the behaviour of electromagnetic waves in cavities, waveguides and transmission lines.
                    • To understand the properties of electric dipole radiation.
                    • To introduce an explicity covariant formulation of electromagnetism in special relativity.
                    • To further develop students'' problem-solving and analytic skills.
                    Learning Outcomes

                    ​Students should have an understanding of the properties of solutions to the wave equation for electromagnetic fields in free space and in matter (non-dispersive and dispersive dielectrics, and conductors).

                    ​Students should have an understanding of the behaviour of electromagnetic waves at boundaries.

                    ​Students should have an understanding of the behaviour of electromagnetic waves in cavities, waveguides and transmission lines.

                    ​Students should have an understanding of the properties of electric dipole radiation.

                    ​Students should have the ability to explain an explicity covariant formulation of electromagnetism in special relativity.

                  • Nuclear Physics (PHYS375)
                    Level3
                    Credit level7.5
                    SemesterFirst Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
                    Aims
                    • To build on the second year module involving Nuclear Physics
                    • To develop an understanding of the modern view of nuclei, how they are modelled and of nuclear decay processes
                    Learning Outcomes

                    At the end of the module the student should have:

                    • Knowledge of evidence for the shell model of nuclei, its development and the successes and failures of the model in explaining nuclear properties

                    ​Knowledge of the collective vibrational and rotational models of nuclei

                    ​Basic knowledge of nuclear decay processes, alpha decay and fission, of gamma-ray transitions and internal conversion

                    ​Knowledge of electromagnetic transitions in nuclei

                  • Physics of Life (PHYS382)
                    Level3
                    Credit level7.5
                    SemesterSecond Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
                    Aims

                    To introduce students to the physical principles needed to address important problems such as climate change, the loss of biodiversity, the understanding of ecological systems, the growth of resistance to antibiotics, the challenge of sustainable development and the study of disease. These problems offer excellent opportunities for rewarding careers.​

                    Learning Outcomes

                    ​An understanding of the conditions necessary for life to evolve in a universe.​

                    ​An understanding of the thermodynamics and organization of living things.​

                    ​​​​Familiarity with physical techniques used in the study of biological systems. ​

                  • Inorganic Chemistry III (CHEM311)
                    Level3
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterFirst Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting65:35
                    Aims

                    The aims of the module are:

                    • To rationalise the vast range of pseudo-first order rate constants found for ligand exchange among metal ions from across the Periodic Table.
                    • To outline key mechanisms by which transition and non-transition metal ions undergo ligand exchange in solution.
                    • To outline and rationalise the chemistry of complexes with metal-alkyl and metal-carbene bond.
                    • To outline and rationalise the chemistry of transition-metal complexes containing metal to carbon s-bonds, eg metal-alkyl, metal-acetylide, metal-vinyl, and metal-carbene complexes.
                    • To show how metals coordinate to compounds such as alkenes, alkynes, allyls and conjugated p-systems CnHn (n = 5 to 8) via interactions with the C-C multiple bonds.
                    • To provide an introduction to the structures of solid state materials and the role of diffraction in studying these structures.
                    • To explain how electrons behave in extended structures, with particular reference to the distinction between metals and insulators, and the behaviour of doped semiconductors. 
                    Learning Outcomes

                    By the end of the module, students should be able to:

                    • Demonstrate an understanding of how ligand field and other factors help determine both the rate and the mechanism of ligand exchange for a given metal ion.
                    • Critically assess the role of a prominent scientist in the history of inorganic reaction mechanism investigations.
                    • Appreciate the bonding of different organic fragments to transition metals and how a variety of physical measurements can be used to substantiate these ideas.
                    • Demonstrate an understanding of the concepts of infinite solids and their diffraction of X-rays.
                    • Appreciate the factors affecting the electronic properties of solids.
                  • Inorganic Applications of Group Theory (CHEM316)
                    Level3
                    Credit level7.5
                    SemesterSecond Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
                    Aims

                    This module aims to demonstrate the underlying importance of symmetry throughout Chemistry, with particular applications to spectroscopic selection rules and bonding.

                    Learning Outcomes

                    By the end of the module, students should be able to:

                    • Identify symmetry elements in molecules
                    • Assign molecules to their correct point groups
                    • Use character tables to solve a variety of problems in spectroscopy and bonding
                  • Organic Chemistry III (BSc.) (CHEM331)
                    Level3
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterFirst Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting65:35
                    Aims

                    The aim of the course is to consolidate and extend second year knowledge of synthetic and physical organic chemistry, and introduce some aspects of biological chemistry.

                    Learning Outcomes

                    By the end of the module, students should:

                    • Demonstrate a good understanding of modern synthetic reactions and their mechanisms.
                    • Demonstrate familiarity with some of the more important aspects of biological chemistry
                  • Key Skills for Chemists 3 (CHEM385)
                    Level3
                    Credit level7.5
                    SemesterFirst Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
                    Aims

                    This module aims to help Chemistry students develop skills needed for further educational opportunities or employment in a wide range of chemical and non-chemical based sectors. 

                    Learning Outcomes

                    By the end of the employability section of the module, students should be able to demonstrate both a familiarty with, and an understanding of, the importance of transferable skills to the workplace 

                    ​By the end of the module, students should be able to use scientific databases effectively for literature and citation searches.

                    ​​By the end of the module, students should be able to find relevant information from on-line chemical databases regarding chemical reactions and structures

                    ​​By the end of the module, students should be able to apply the database skills in writing a report drawing from scientific literature.

                  • Life in A Dynamic Ocean (ENVS265)
                    Level2
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterFirst Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
                    Aims
                    • To gain an appreciation of how ecosystems in the ocean are intricately linked to their physical fluid environment
                    • To understand how microbial life is affected by molecular diffusion and turbulence
                    • To understand the challenges faced by microscopic life in the viscous fluid of the ocean
                    • To address how mean flows in the ocean can be vital in the life stages of larger marine organisms
                    • To appreciate the global differences in plankton communities, and the underlying reasons for those differences
                    • To understand the problem of how community diversity is maintained in the ocean, and the current theories attempting to explain this diversity
                    Learning Outcomes

                     Students will gain a broad understanding of how different plankton communities arise in different oceanic regimes, and how that ultimately structures food chains to larger marine animals.

                    ​Students will be able to compare quantitatively the scales of different processes, and critically assess their relative importance for life in the ocean.

                    ​Students will strengthen, and acquire new, skills in quantifying physical-biological drivers of ecosystems.

                    ​Students will learn the important of a multi-disciplinary approach on marine biology and gain experience in solving novel problems.

                  • Coastal Environments: Spatial and Temporal Change (ENVS376)
                    Level3
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterFirst Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
                    Aims

                    This module aims to consider the response of physical processes and coastal environments to changes in sea-level and climate. Attention is given to the geomorphology of coastal environments, its response to external agents, as well as to possible coastal managment strategies. The module aims at proving students with knowledge and understanding of the physical processes acting along coastal areas, and to promote students capability to critically understand pros and cons of different managment tecniques in relation to future climate change.

                    Learning Outcomes

                    Knowledge and understanding of physical aspects of coastal environments

                    ​​Knowledge and understanding of the concept of spatial and temporal variation: physical processes and landforms, and the importance of spatial and temporal scales

                    ​​Knowledge and understanding of environments as a result of process and form interaction

                    ​​Knowledge and understanding of methodologies of analysis and interpretation

                    ​Development of an informed concern for the Earth and its people

                    ​Capability to critically analyze real case studies in the context of previously acquired knowledge

                  • Climate Change - A Critical Review (ENVS389)
                    Level3
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterSecond Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
                    Aims

                    The module aims to provide students with the knowledge to evaluate likely outcomes climate change and climate variability over the next 100 years, to understand policy decisions at different levels, to obtain a critical understanding of climate predictions, and to understand the importance of reference to past and present climates.

                    Learning Outcomes

                    Evaluate a range of future climate change projections.​

                    ​Recognise the likely impacts of climate change to a range of sectors.


                    ​Learn how to engage with stakeholder communities with regard to climate change. 


                    Produce effectively targeted report writing and visual communication​.

                    ​Consider the multiple sector impact of climate change on societies

                  • Science Communication (ENVS393)
                    Level3
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterWhole Session
                    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
                    Aims
                  • Provide key transferable skills​ to undergraduates, including: communication, presentation, practical classroom skills and team working.

                  • ​Provide classoom based experience for undergraduates who are considering teaching as a potential career

                  • ​Encourage a new generation of STEM teachers.

                  • Provide role models for pupils within schools located in areas of high deprivation.​

                  • Increase University of Liverpool widening participation activites within merseyside.​

                  • Learning Outcomes

                    ​Have an understanding of the UK educational system and relevant teaching and learning styles.

                    ​Have an understanding of the Widening Participation Agenda

                    Have an understanding of relevant STEM subjects and activities that would link into the National Curriculum

                    ​Develop appropriate STEM activities for KS2 and KS3 school groups that link with the National Curriculum

                    ​Reflect on and evaluate the effectiveness of the outreach acivities and their delivery

                    ​Be able to apply the relevant protocols and safeguarding practice ​when delivering within a school setting

                    ​Be able to apply practical knowledge of effective delivery styles when engaging with primary or secondary aged pupils

                    ​Have experience of planning the delivery of a project

                    ​Have experience of team working

                    ​Have experience of science communication in a variety of situations

                  Year Four Compulsory Modules

                  • Integrated Masters Research Project (ENVS402)
                    LevelM
                    Credit level60
                    SemesterWhole Session
                    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
                    Aims
                  • ​Carry out a critical and focused survey of relevant scientific literature.
                  • ​Be able to articulate clearly, both written and orally, the state of knowledge in a wider field of science around the planned research, showing the relevance and timeliness of the planned research.
                  • ​Write coherent scientific prose in the format of a scientific paper targetted at a specific journal.
                  • ​Produce a concise, well-designed poster suitable for a scientific conference.

                  • ​Carry out independent research, with a clear focus on the research questions and using appropriate methods.
                  • Learning Outcomes

                    ​Be able to provide a critical and focused assessment of an area of scientific literature, including keeping records of key points made in the literature.

                    ​Be able to articulate the importance of a research question within the broader scientific context.​Be able to write scientific prose in typical formats used in science.​Be able to formulate testable hypotheses, and along with the methods and approach required to test them.

                    ​Be able to produce a poster for a scientific conference, and to recognise what makes a good (and a bad) poster.

                  • From Sampling to Models in Ocean Biogeochemistry (ENVS413)
                    LevelM
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterSecond Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
                    Aims
                    1. ​Develop an appreciation of how models are constrained by observation and the uncertainties in observations. 
                    2. ​Provide an integrated view from laboratory analyses, field experiments and models for the cycling of carbon, nutrients and trace metals in the ocean
                    3. ​Develop analogue models based on laboratory experiments
                    4. ​Acquire skills in error analysis, calibration and experimental design
                    5. ​Receive training in research and industry standard analytical instruments including nutrient analysers, spectrofluorometric, voltammetric and chromatographic systems.  
                    Learning Outcomes

                    Students should be able to design and carry out an experiment to measure key biogeochemical processes and write a concise and informative report

                    ​​Students should be able to critically analyse and interpret a biogeochemical data set and calculate key parameters to be used in models (.e.g growth rates, nutrient assimilation rates)
                    Students should develop an appreciated of how models are constrained by observations and the uncertainties in observations

                    Students should develop skills in error analysis, calibration and experimental design​

                  • Modelling Processes in Oceans and Climate (ENVS414)
                    LevelM
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterFirst Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
                    Aims
                  • ​To allow the students to undertake independant work using the tools developed during each of the four phases of the course towards testing hypotheses quantitatively.

                  • To develop written communication skills​

                  • To develop the ability to dissect numerical experiments towards providing process insight​
                  • Learning Outcomes

                    ​By the end of this module a student will be able to use a range of different simple models to conduct quantitative assessments of the importance of different processes

                    By the end of this module a student will be able to communicate the results of numerical modelling in a short illustrated report that draws general conclusions ​

                  Year Four Optional Modules

                  • Advanced Ecology (ENVS412)
                    LevelM
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterFirst Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
                    Aims

                    The aim of this module is to provide students with:

                    • A clear and critical appreciation of ecological theory.
                    • Information on statistical methods appropriate to community ecology.
                    • The ability to apply scientific rigour when critically assessing the options available for conservation action in any given case.
                    • The ability to present balanced, critical written accounts on scientific issues.
                    Learning Outcomes

                    On successful compeltion of this module students should have a knowledge and critical understanding of community ecology, specifically below:    

                    Have understanding of aspects of macro-ecology.

                    ​Discuss current scientific approaches and their uses

                    ​Access, understand and summarise scientific information

                    ​Have a knowledge of communtiy analysis using multivariate tools

                  • Analysing Climate Processes and Variablity (ENVS475)
                    LevelM
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterSecond Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
                    Aims
                    • To outline the modes of operation, timescales of variation and drivers of the global climate system
                    • To introduce major research themes in the global climate system    
                    • To introduce the techniques and approaches for the analysis of ocean, atmopshere and paleoclimate data sets 
                    • To learn to discuss and present key findings from data analysis of large data sets

                    Learning Outcomes

                    ​Knowledge of how the Earth’s atmospheric and oceanic system operates, including the various spatial and temporal scales of the processes​

                    The external and internals drivers of climate change​

                    Basic techniques and research themes in ocean, atmospheric and paleoclimate research

                    Knowledge of the methods of data collection and production in ocean and atmospheric science.

                    ​Knowledge of the techniques of reconstruction of past climatic conditions​

                  • Research in Anthropocene Environments (ENVS485)
                    LevelM
                    Credit level15
                    SemesterFirst Semester
                    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
                    Aims

                    The aim of this module is to provide students with:

                    • The opportunity to conduct in depth piece of research on a chosen topic within the broad theme of anthropocene environments.
                    • Provide students with training in research methods and critical analysis techniques
                    • Teach them to write a short concise abstract (in a conference format)
                    • To present the results in the form of a high impact, high quality poster and present it in front of a large group.

                    Learning Outcomes1. Demonstrate an understanding of anthropocene environments;




                      ​2. Knowledge of a series of key case studies illustrating interactions between human activities and terrestrial and marine ecosystems;

                      ​3. Critically analyse and assess previously published materials and synthesize into an appropriate case study;

                      ​4. Write a concise abstract;

                      ​5. Demonstrate knowledge of poster development and construction;

                      ​6. Present a poster in a professional manner.

                    • Politics of the Environment (ENVS525)
                      LevelM
                      Credit level15
                      SemesterFirst Semester
                      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
                      Aims

                      This unit is designed to critically evaluate the political responses to the growing impact that environmental issues and the concept of sustainability are having on decision making at all levels of governance, (international, national and local). More specifically the unit aims to: 

                      1)         develop a critical understanding of the growing importance of environmental and sustainable development thinking in political decision-making processes; 

                      2)         explore different environmental attitudes, values and perspectives and examine the impact on various political perspectives;  

                      3)         develop a critical understanding of the opportunities and limitations of environmental decision making international dimension of environmental politics and its impact on nation states; 

                      4)         understand the role that environmental pressure groups have in shaping political decisions at the international, national and local levels of governance; 

                      5)         critically evaluate the policy responses at national and local levels to the new emerging environmental agenda

                      Learning Outcomes

                            a critical appreciation of how environmental issues are being addressed at all levels of governance;       

                       

                      ​ a critical understanding of different environmental values and attitudes and the way that these impact upon political philosophy and decision-making;

                      ​a critical understanding of the way that various environmental interest groups impact on political and other decision making processes.

                    The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


                    Teaching and Learning

                    Teaching takes place through lectures, practicals, workshops, seminars, tutorials and computer based learning, with an emphasis on learning through doing. The award-winning £23 million Central Teaching Laboratories provides a state-of-the-art facility for undergraduate practical work.

                    Students value the learning opportunities provided by field classes, including the rapid feedback on performance. You will typically receive at least 15 hours of formal teaching each week. Between 30 and 100 hours of fieldwork and hands-on activities are provided each year depending on the discipline.

                    A typical module might involve two or three one-hour lectures each week, and often a three- hour laboratory or computer-based practical as well. Tutorials typically involve groups of 4-7 students meeting with a member of staff at least every two weeks in Year One and Two. In Year Three, you will undertake an Honours project, which is a piece of independent research (field, laboratory or data analysis) on a topic of your choice, supervised by a member of staff. In Years Three and Four students meet with their project supervisor on a weekly or more frequent basis. As you progress through your degree, you will be increasingly challenged to engage with current debates, to think critically and to study independently.

                    A number of the School’s degree programmes involve laboratory and field work. The field work is carried out in various locations, ranging from inner city to coastal and mountainous environments. We consider applications from prospective students with disabilities on the same basis as all other students, and reasonable adjustments will be considered to address barriers to access.