Microbiology BSc (Hons) Add to your prospectus

  • Offers study abroad opportunities Offers study abroad opportunities
  • Opportunity to study for a year in China Offers a Year in China

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: C500
  • Year of entry: 2018
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB / IB : 33 / BTEC : DDD in relevant diploma
life-sciences-4

Module details

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Molecules and Cells (LIFE101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    After successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

    1. Recognise the basic of structure, composition and function of cells;
    2. Explain core concepts relating to the organisation and specialisation of eukaryotes, prokaryotes and viruses;
    3. Define the cellular components involved in the regulation of key functions such as the generation of energy, movement, cell growth and division and differentiation;
    4. Describe the latest techniques that are used in cell biology to determine cell structure and function;
    5. Develop in students the knowledge and understanding of the subject and the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems.
    Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

    1. Describe how cells arose and their structural features;
    2. Compare and contrast eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells;
    3. Identify the different ways cells manipulate energy;
    4. Define the molecular basis of the processes by which cells grow, replicate, communicate, interact with their environment, move and die;
    5. Describe the functional importance of cell specialisation and cooperation in tissues.
  • Evolution (LIFE103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This module aims to:

    1. Describe fundamental genetic mechanisms that are essential for the function and evolution of life;
    2. Introduce students to fundamental evolutionary concepts and theories, showing how genetic mechanisms help determine the patterns of observed evolution;
    3. Apply evolutionary concepts to a broad selection of areas of Life Sciences;
    4. Develop in students the knowledge and understanding of the subject and the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems in biology.
    Learning Outcomes

    Recall how cells evolved

    ​Identify the causes of evolutionary change in populations

    ​Recognize the consequences of evolutionary change for patterns of biological diversity within and amongst populations

    ​Recall fundamental genetic mechanisms (heredity, mutation, meiosis, sex) and show how they influence evolutionary change in populations

    Recognize the widespread applicability of evolutionary ideas across the Life Sciences

  • Grand Challenges in Biology (LIFE105)
    Level1
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
    1. To encourage students to become aware of the themes that are driving biological research in Liverpool and globally;
    2. To engage students with their programme of study;
    3. To excite student interest in their subject and the way it relates to the challenges that face us all;
    4. To foster the development of study skills that will equip students to investigate research topics and communicate their findings and views on them.
    Learning Outcomes

    To identify the grand challenges that face biological scientists

    ​To put into context the advances that science makes possible and the ethical issues associated with meeting the Grand Challenges

    ​To evaluate different approaches to the resolution of scientific questions

    ​To conduct an independent piece of research and report their findings to their peers

  • Experimental Skills in Current Biology (LIFE107)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
    Aims

    This module aims to:

    1. Introduce students to a range of practical skills and techniques that are of general use in subjects across the Life Sciences;
    2. Explain to students the importance of working safely in the laboratory and to adhere to Health and Safety protocols and good working practices;
    3. Train students how to observe and record experiments, and how to present and analyse data;
    4. Demonstrate the relevance of experimental skills across all biological disciplines and the essential relationship between quantitative skills and key skills;
    Learning OutcomesRecord, evaluate andinterpret qualitative and quantitative data, and record procedures andprotocols​

    Plan and execute a seriesof experiments​

    Use laboratory equipmentcorrectly and safely to generate data​

    Identify, formulate andtest hypotheses in relation to laboratory based experimental design​

    Apply appropriatestatistical tests for data evaluation​

    Demonstrate good laboratorypractice in relation to Health and Safety in the laboratory and good workingpractices​

    ​Demonstrate specific skills in pipetting, microscopy, weighing, serial dilution, spectrophotometer, centrifugation, aseptic technique, standard curve, biological drawing and quantitative analysis (descriptive statistics).

  • Essential Skills for the Life Sciences I (LIFE109)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to:

    1. Develop in students the essential skills that they will require to be competent life scientists;
    2. Enhance the employability prospects of students.
    Learning Outcomes

    Use a range of mathematical and numerical tools to address biological problems

    Structure and communicate ideas effectively, both orally and in writing

    ​Manage time, work to deadlines and prioritise workloads 

    ​Actively participate in groups but be capable of independent work

    ​Find relevant information and use IT effectively

    ​Address the relevance and ideas of others 

    ​Evaluate own performance and working standards 

  • Biochemical Methods (LIFE122)
    Level1
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

      This module aims to:

    1. Introduce students to a range of practical skills and analytical techniques that are applicable to many fields of modern biology;
    2. Explain to students the importance of working safely in the laboratory in accord with Health and Safety protocols and good working practices;
    3. Train students how to observe and record experiments, and how to present and analyse data;
    4. Demonstrate the relevance of experimental skills across all biological disciplines and the essential relationship between quantitative skills and key skills;
    5. Develop knowledge and understanding in biochemistry, biotechnology and biomedicine, and ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems.
    Learning Outcomes

    Record, evaluate and interpret qualitative and quantitative data, and record procedures and protocols;

    Plan and execute a series of experiments;​

    ​Use laboratory equipment correctly and safely to generate data;​

    ​Identify, formulate and test hypotheses in relation to laboratory based experimental design;​

    ​Demonstrate good laboratory practice in relation to Health and Safety in the laboratory and good working practices.​

Year One Optional Modules

  • Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences (LIFE102)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    After successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

    1. Describe the major dietary components for humans and other organisms, and the processes that result in their digestion and absorption;
    2. Explain the mechanisms and processes that regulate carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism;
    3. Define how imbalances in nutrition can lead to lifestyle diseases and how genetic or infectious diseases can result in impaired ability to generate energy;
    4. Develop knowledge and understanding in biochemistry and biomedicine, and ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems.
    Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this module, the students should be able to:

    1. Describe the important groups of diseases affecting humans and other organisms;
    2. Explain the processes involved in the control and regulation of metabolism and how their dysfunction results in lifestyle diseases;
    3. Identify the genetic mechanisms that underlie inherited diseases affecting oxygen transport and storage;
    4. Define the processes involved in bacterial and viral infectious disease and the mechanisms that protect organisms from infection.
  • Applied Genetic and Molecular Technologies (LIFE108)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    AimsThis module aims to:
    1. Provide students with the knowledge and understanding of the structure of nucleic acids and how these molecules encode the properties of cells;
    2. Develop knowledge and understanding of the mechanisms that lead to inheritance in offspring;
    3. Equip students tobe able to describe the basic techniques that are used to experimentally clone genes and analyse their structure and function;
    4. Develop students'' knowledge and understanding in genetics and molecular biology, and their ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems, in these disciplines. 
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    Learning Outcomes

    Explain the molecular processes that occur to produce variation in the offspring;

    and how to interpret Mendelian and non-Mendelian patterns of inheritance;

    ​Explain how to apply molecular technologies to isolate and characterise nucleic acids and design and interpret basic experiments to clone and analyse genes;

    ​Show how molecular biology technologies might be used to solve problems in biology, food security, veterinary science and medicine;

    ​Develop an appreciation of the ethical issues associated with genetic and molecular technologies.

  • Introduction to Animal Infectious Diseases, Epidemiology and Public Health (LIFE126)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
    1. To develop students'' knowledge in the major veterinary animal infectious diseases specifically bacterial, viral and parasitic diseases.

    2. To introduce students to the basic measures of diseases including epidemiological principles, the control, spread and treatment of diseases.

    3. To introduce students to basic concepts in food security, safety, impact on the environment and veterinary public health

    Learning Outcomes

    ​Describe a variety of veterinary animal infectious diseases including bacterial, viral and parasitic diseases

    ​Explain the basic measures of disease including the control and transmission of specific diseases

    ​Explain basic epidemiological concepts and their application

    ​Discuss the basic concepts of Veterinary public health including food safety, specific zoonoses, their biology and control.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Biotechnology (LIFE210)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims
    1. ​Introduce students to the ways in which biology is utilised for commercial purposes;

    2. ​Develop knowledge and understanding of the production of antibiotics, biomass, single cell protein, biopolymers and vaccines;

    3. Develop knowledge and understanding in biotechnology, and the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems in biotechnology.​

    Learning Outcomes

    Identify the stages required for commercial production of microbial products;

    ​Discuss the problems inherent in isolation, strain improvement and growth of microorganisms on a large scale;

    Explain specific commercial processes via studies of such processes as antibiotic production, large-scale manufacture of enzymes and brewing;​Discuss how understanding of protein structure can lead to the generation of therapeutic   compounds; ​ Interpret how proteins and antibodies may be engineered and produced on an industrial scale for commercial applications;Discuss how useful activities of enzymes may be manipulated and exploited;
  • Virology (LIFE209)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims
  • This module aims to develop in students:  The ability to explain the fundamental features and properties of viruses and viral infections;​
  • Knowledge and understanding of the use and development of molecular biology technologies in virology;
  • The capacity to describe problems associated with viruses and their control, and identify positive applications of viruses;​
  • Knowledge and understanding in virology, and the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems in virology.​
  • Learning OutcomesExplain basic terms and terminologies used in virology and describe virus particle structure;​
    Identify different virus infection life cycles in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, describing the role of key viral proteins in viral life cycles;

    Describe impact of viruses on public health, explain how viruses may spread between different species and the concept of species-barrier;

    Describe the use of diagnostic tools to detect, quantify, and monitor viruses;​Explain the role of immune system in combating viral infections in plants, invertebrates and mammals;​

    Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the principles of virology, and how this knowledge has been applied to solve problems.​

  • Essential Skills for the Life Sciences 2 (LIFE223)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
    Aims
    1. To further develop the essential life science skills that students will require to succeed in their studies and future careers;

    2. To enhance the career awareness and employability prospects of students;

    3. To enable students to analyse and interpret scientific data and communicate results to a range of audiences.

    Learning Outcomes

    ​Structure and communicate ideas effectively, both orally and in writing;

    Find information through literature searches and use IT effectively to analyse and report findings;​Competently utilise a range of mathematical and numerical skills relevant to all biologists;​Summarise and interpret advanced data using graphs and tables;​Develop and test hypotheses;​Within the context of experimental design and within a range of biological fields, select appropriate quantitative methods to answer questions;​Apply appropriate statistical and other analysis packages to analyse data;​Interpret and evaluate quantitative terms and approaches used in the scientific literature;​

    ​Effectively communicate a biological subject to a lay audience

    Recognise the moral and ethical issues of scientific investigations and discuss ethical standards and professional codes of conduct. ​​

    ​​

  • Techniques in Cell Biology (LIFE227)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    1. Provide students with practical training in theuse of equipment and techniques routinely used in cell biology. 

    2. Enhancestudents acquisition of fundamental research skills; including,information gathering, scientific drawing, report writing andstatistical analyses. 

    3. Provide students with an understanding of theprocesses involved in the collection, interpretation and presentation ofbiological data. ​


    Learning Outcomes​​​​​

    Present, critically evaluate and interpret qualitative and quantitative data, and record procedures and protocols;

    Manage time effectively to plan and execute a series of experiments​Use microscopes and other lab equipment correctly to efficiently andsafely conduct a series of experiments​

    Analyse data, interpret validity and apply statistical analyses;

    Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the principles of biotechnology, biomedicine and molecular cell biology

  • Advanced Microbiological Techniques (LIFE228)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
  • ​This module aims to:

    Provide students with a practical experience in a number of techniques used in microbiology;
  • ​Develop research skills in microbiology by illustrating key concepts in microbiology;

  • ​Develop knowledge and understanding in microbiology, and ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve microbiological problems.

  • Learning Outcomes

    ​On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

    Apply a range of techniques for the identification of microorganisms;

    ​Assay cell components of biotechnology interest;

    ​Produce and modify media for production and maintenance of microorganisms;

    ​Work in a group to present data to an educated audience;

    ​Demonstrate problem-solving skills in practical microbiology.

Year Two Optional Modules

  • Biotechnology (LIFE210)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims
    1. ​Introduce students to the ways in which biology is utilised for commercial purposes;

    2. ​Develop knowledge and understanding of the production of antibiotics, biomass, single cell protein, biopolymers and vaccines;

    3. Develop knowledge and understanding in biotechnology, and the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems in biotechnology.​

    Learning Outcomes

    Identify the stages required for commercial production of microbial products;

    ​Discuss the problems inherent in isolation, strain improvement and growth of microorganisms on a large scale;

    Explain specific commercial processes via studies of such processes as antibiotic production, large-scale manufacture of enzymes and brewing;​Discuss how understanding of protein structure can lead to the generation of therapeutic   compounds; ​ Interpret how proteins and antibodies may be engineered and produced on an industrial scale for commercial applications;Discuss how useful activities of enzymes may be manipulated and exploited;
  • The Immune System in Health and Disease (LIFE221)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    AimsThis module aims to:
    1. ​Develop students’ knowledge of the immune system and its role in protection against disease
    2. Develop in students an appreciation of the importance of different immune mechanisms in different circumstances, and how these can be evaded.
    3. Enable students to evaluate and appreciate the consequences of immune system dysfunctions in disease.​
    Learning Outcomes

    ​Identify the main components of the mammalian immune system

    ​Assess the contribution of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms to host defences

    Assess the mechanisms that permit recognition of an infinitely diverse microflora Discuss the impact of malfunction of immune processes on human health, and explain the bases of autoimmunity and allergy together with the mechanisms by which these can be minimised 

    ​Discuss how dysfunction of immune system constituents can cause disease

  • Cell Signalling in Health and Disease (LIFE202)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims
    ​This module aims to: 1. Provide students with knowledge and understanding of the molecular mechanisms that allow cells to communicate with each other
    ​2. Explain the general principles of these signalling mechanisms and then describe some of these in more detail;
    3. Illustrate how defects in these signalling processes can result in a variety of diseases;
    4. Outline the techniques that are used to investigate and define these pathways and to describe how these techniques are used in drug discovery programmes of research;
    5. Develop in students the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge and understanding, to solve problems in molecular cell biology
      Learning Outcomes

      ​On successful completion of this module, the students should be able to:

       Describe the fundamental features of a range of common cell signalling mechanisms;

      ​Explain how cell signalling processes may be defective, or modified, in a variety of different diseases;

      ​Demonstrate knowledge of the molecular and biochemical nature and role of the different components of intracellular signalling pathways;

      ​Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the principles of cell signalling, and how this knowledge has been applied to solve problems in biological science.

    1. Molecular and Medical Genetics (LIFE208)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims
    2. ​This module aims to:

       Introduce students with an interest in genetics and molecular biology to the range of biological mechanisms that control the structure and stability of the genetic material;
    3. ​Describe how changes in the structure and stability of DNA can impact on health and disease;

    4. ​Use examples from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes to develop principles that help explain problems associated with medical/clinical genetics;

       
    5. Develop knowledge and understanding in genetics and molecular biology, and ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems.

    6. Learning Outcomes

      ​On successful completion of this module, the students should be able to:

       Describe the principles of DNA replication, DNA damage and mutation, DNA repair, DNA recombination, genetic transfer systems and transposition, cell cycle control and cell division, genetic mapping and cytogenetics;

      ​Explain how these processes underpin an understanding of the genetic basis of human health and disease;

      ​Demonstrate that they can solve problems by applying the above knowledge to identify genes underlying disease and the likely causes of DNA mutations;

      ​Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the principles of genetics and molecular biology, and how this knowledge has been applied to solve problems.

    7. E-biology: Informatics for Life Sciences (LIFE225)
      Level2
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims
      • Provide students with a practical appreciation of the nature and significance of digital data.
      • Expose students to bioinformatics tools used in the analysis of data from areas such as genome sequencing, gene expression and protein structure studies
      • ​Enable students to utilize digital data for understanding higher order phenomena within cells such as metabolism, gene regulation and protein-protein interaction
      • Develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the subject and the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems in biotechnology, biomedicine and molecular cell biology. ​​

        Learning Outcomes

        ​·         Apply informatics tools in the discovery, evaluation and acquisition of biological data.

        ​​

        ·         Analyse and evaluate datasets of broad biological relevance, using tasks and workflows that will prepare them for third-year projects.​


        ·         Use local and web-based tools for data analysis, management and collaborative working.​ ​ ​

        ​·         ​Design research methods in bioinformatics to solve biological problems.​​
      1. Molecular Science (LIFE237)
        Level2
        Credit level7.5
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
        Aims
      2. ​This module aims to:

        Provide students with practical experience in a number of techniques used in molecular biology;

         
      3. ​Equip student to perform analysis of DNA fragments by agarose gel electrophoresis and restriction mapping;

      4. ​Introduce students to PCR based-assays for gene cloning and demonstrate methods used for cloning, and analysing genes

      5. ​Develop in students knowledge and understanding in biomedicine, biotechnology and molecular cell biology, and the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve biomolecular problems.

         
      6. Learning Outcomes

        ​Present, evaluate critically and interpret qualitative and quantitative molecular biological data, and record procedures and protocols accurately;

        ​Plan and execute a series of molecular biology experiments to demonstrate practical skills in molecular biology, use laboratory equipment correctly and safely to generate data and manage their time effectively;

         

        ​Analyse and interpret the validity of experimental data

         
      7. Advanced Genetics Techniques (LIFE226)
        Level2
        Credit level7.5
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
        Aims
        1. Provide students with a practical training that will help them to carry our projects in genetics;

        2. ​Train students in the production and characterisation of specific deletion mutants, mutagen screening, cytogenetics and karyotype analysis, population studies, molecular analysis of genomes and bioinformatics;

        3. ​Develop knowledge and understanding in genetics, and ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems.

        Learning Outcomes

        Present, critically evaluate and interpret qualitative and quantitative data, and record procedures and protocols

        ​Plan and safely execute a series of laboratory experiments to produce and characterise deletion mutants, screen mutagens, analyse karotypes, carry out population studies and molecular analysis of genomes and interogate bioinformatic databases 

        ​Analyse data, interpret validity and apply statistical analyses

      8. Practical Skills in Tropical Medicine (LIFE236)
        Level2
        Credit level7.5
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
        Aims
      9. Enhance knowledge and understanding of the biology and control of parasites of medical importance, and their vectors;
      10. Describe the diagnosis and pathology of parasitic infections; interactions between the environment, humans, mosquitoes and their parasites; techniques for the control of vectors, including susceptibility to insecticides;
      11. Enhance data handling skills and interpretation of experiments; 
      12. ​Develop knowledge and understanding in tropical disease biology, and ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems.

      13. Learning Outcomes

        ​Detect the presence or absence of parasites in blood and faeces and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the methods used;

        ​Identify the interaction between mosquitoes, their hosts and the environment through a range of experimental approaches;

         Assess the susceptibility to insecticides in larval and adult mosquitoes and unerstand the relevance to the monitoring of control campaigns;

        ​Evaluate the techniques used for understanding the biology and control of selected parasites and their vectors;

        Assimilate, analysis and graphically summarise quantitative data generated by experiments in an accurate and timely manner.

        ​Describe the main immunological techniques for indirectly diagnosing parasite infection

      Year Three Compulsory Modules

      • Advanced Skills in Microbiology (LIFE325)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterWhole Session
        Exam:Coursework weighting35:65
        Aims
      • ​To develop the skills necessary for using databases to solve problems in microbiology

      • ​To introduce students to current scientific methodologies and topical issues within microbiology

      • ​​To develop in students enhanced presentational skills
      • Learning Outcomes

        ​To interpret microbiological databases using bioinformatics tools and analyse selected data

        ​To critically review evidence and produce well argued, accurate and properly referenced reports in the context of microbiology

      • Bacterial Disease Mechanisms (LIFE318)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
        Aims

        ​To explain to students the common themes and diversity of mechanisms used by bacteria to cause disease.

         To develop in students an understanding of virulence strategies used to achieve infection, including subversion of host immunity, expression of bacterial toxins motility and intracellular survival To develop in students an understanding of mechanisms of genetic control, its temporal nature and the contribution of specific virulence determinants to the infection process 
        Learning Outcomes

         To assess the current knowledge of the innate immune barriers to bacterial infection

         

        To contrast the bacterial pathogenesis strategies of diverse bacterial pathogens

        To appraise the ethical aspects of animal experimentation and the scientific considerations for the design of in vivo models of infection

        To summarise the molecular mode of action of key virulence determinants within a pathogen’s armoury​

        To evaluate the environmental, metabolic and temporal regulation of virulence genes and regulons and the mobilisation of virulence loci
      • Advanced Biotechnology (LIFE327)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
        Aims
      • ​​To describe currentapproaches to exploit microorganisms and microbial processes in the context ofmodern developments in biotechnology​

      • ​To evaluate economicand ethical aspects of the development of novel products and the potentialenvironmental benefits of using biotechnological processes​

      • ​To explainbiotechnological processes, such as antibiotic production, plant biomass conversion and microbial informatics biofuels

      • To develop in students the ability to critically evaluate and interpret this knowledge and understanding, and to apply this to solve complex problems in microbial biotechnology
      • Learning Outcomes

        ​To describein detail particular biotechnological applications with emphasis on theunderlying scientific principles

        To criticallydiscuss approaches to strain improvement and manipulation, including the impact of recombinant DNA technology on the biotechnology industry​

        ​To appraise the emerging importance of genomics, with reference to the development of new therapeutics, diagnostics and vaccines

        ​ To explain how microorganisms and their enzymes can compete with chemical processes for environmental and renewable energy applications

      • Viral Disease Mechanisms (LIFE320)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
        Aims

        This module aims to:

        1. Evaluate the latest research on the role of viruses as important pathogens of humans and animals;
        2. Explain in detail, viral virulence mechanisms, immune evasion and vaccine development;
        3. Develop knowledge and deep understanding in microbiology and the ability to apply, evaluate critically  and interpret this knowledge to solve complex problems.
        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, the students will be able to:

        Explain the mechanisms of replication and pathogenesis of different virus families and evaluate modern approaches to investigating virus pathogenesis and their control by immune processes, preventative measure sand treatments

        ​Critically discuss current hypotheses on the evolution of viral virulence, the contribution of virus infection to diseases in both humans and animals and current theories on the importance of globalization and climate change in the emergence and re-emergence of virus disease

        ​Synthesise information, critically review evidence to support conclusions, and define complex problems by applying appropriate knowledge and skills.

      • Microbial Diversity and Versatility (LIFE329)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
        Aims

        This module aims to:

        1. Explain the diversity of microbial life and its adaptation to environment.
        2. Describe bacteria and fungi that have interesting properties as model systems, as well as making important contributions with regard to microbiological processes, both natural and engineered;
        3. Develop knowledge and deep understanding in microbiology, and ability to apply, critically evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve complex problems.
        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, the students will be able to:

        1. Appraise the principles and practice underpinning microbial taxonomy;
        2. Critically evaluate the contribution made by modern molecular techniques in determining phylogenies and the composition of microbial communities;
        3. Explain, in detail, how microbes grow and adapt to their environment 
        4. Evaluate the contributions made by key model systems to our understanding of microbial growth and differentiation: 
        5. Synthesise information, critically review evidence to support conclusions, and define complex problems by applying appropriate knowledge and skills.
      • Research Project (LIFE363)
        Level3
        Credit level30
        SemesterWhole Session
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims
        1. ​To provide students with an insight into and experience of the process of scientific research and debate

        2. ​To develop in students the confidence to work independently and with others, to effectively and efficiently achieve a scientific aim

        3. ​To further develop students'' ability to communicate scientific concepts and findings in a variety of formats

        Learning Outcomes

        ​To plan and execute a piece of scientific research, in a responsible, safe and ethical manner

        ​To analyse and critically evaluate data, information, literature and observations, and draw valid conclusions

        To appropriately communicate findings, in a variety of formats (oral, written reports) to supervisor, research staff and peers

        ​To maintain a clear and accurate record of work and progress

        ​To critically evaluate and report upon relevant scientific literature

        ​To evaluate own performance and working standards by reflection, and place work in a wider scientific context 

      Year Three Optional Modules

      • Parasitology (LIFE361)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
        Aims
        1. ​To provide students with knowledge of the major features of the structure and life histories of a range of protozoan and helminth parasites of humans

        2. ​To develop in students current understanding of the causes of major clinical symptoms and pathology attributable to these parasites and of the major approaches to their prevention and control

        3. ​To provide students with knowledge and deep understanding in parasitology, and ability to apply, critically evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve complex problems

        Learning Outcomes

        ​To critically discuss modern molecular methods for examining parasitic diseases

         

        ​To evaluate the modern research literature in the area of parasitology with critical insight

        To critically discuss how topical problems in parasitology are currently being addressed, and future developments in this area 

        To synthesise information, critically review evidence to support conclusions, and define complex problems by applying appropriate knowledge and skills ​

      • Topics in Global Health (LIFE340)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
        Aims

        ​1. To enhance students'' awareness of the global distribution of disease and the associated implications and inequalities.

        2. To enhance students'' awareness of the global impact of poverty and the negative and positive impacts of human activity in the spread of disease.

        3. To develop students'' knowledge and deep understanding in the tropical disease biology and their ability to apply, critically evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve complex problems.

        Learning Outcomes

        ​To critically review the distribution of disease and discuss major implications for global health

        ​To evaluate major reasons for the spread of disease and discuss approaches to control

        ​To evaluate the roles of national, international and multinational agencies in the health arena

      • Genome Biology and Technology (LIFE342)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
        Aims

        ​1.To enable students to perform an analysis of genome structure and function

         2.To familiarize student with the arguments and the evidence supporting the molecular and evolutionary processes that shape eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes 3.To develop in students an understanding of how comparative genomics can provide insights into evolutionary processes as well as biological function of genes 4.To develop in students and understanding of how modern genomic methods can be used to solve biological problems  5.To raise students'' awareness of the limitations of modern genomic methods.
        Learning Outcomes

        ​To assess eukaryotic and prokaryotic genome structure and function

        ​To evaluate both the molecular and evolutionary processes that have shaped genomes in a range of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms

        ​To evaluate modern genomic methods, their limitations and how they can be used to solve biological problems

        ​To analyse data derived using modern genomic methods

      The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


      Teaching and Learning

      You will experience a range of learning environments during your studies at Liverpool. These will include student-centred activities as well as lectures, tutorials, laboratory practicals, dissection classes, fieldwork, data handling sessions and computer workshops. Some of these activities will be performed individually, such as personal research projects, and others in small tutorial or project groups, in addition to formal lectures and workshops. You will have research staff as well as your own academic adviser for individual tuition on our acclaimed tutorial programme.


      Assessment

      As well as factual knowledge and understanding, biologists need practical and organisational skills, and an ability to work both alone and with other people. We record development of these abilities through continuous assessment during the semester and by final examination. You will also prepare posters, complete tests, analyse data, give short talks, research the scientific literature and write essays and reports. The style of examination progresses from short answers towards the essay format in the later years of each degree programme, as your understanding deepens.