Medicinal Chemistry BSc (Hons) Add to your prospectus

  • Offers study abroad opportunities Offers study abroad opportunities
  • Opportunity to study for a year in China Offers a Year in China
  • This degree is accreditedAccredited

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: F1B2
  • Year of entry: 2018
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB / IB : 33 / BTEC : D*DD
chemistry-1

Module details

Programme Year One

Within Chemistry, you will take modules that cover the fundamentals of Inorganic, Organic and Physical Chemistry, plus necessary key skills, totalling 90 credits. Four Chemistry modules combine theoretical and practical aspects and one Chemistry module develops Quantitative and General Key Skills. You will spend three to six hours per week in the Chemistry laboratory and so will receive a comprehensive training in practical aspects of the subject. Instead of optional modules you will be required to take 30 credits of compulsory modules from Biomedical/Biological Sciences covering Anatomy, Molecular Biology, Pharmacology and Physiology.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Introductory Inorganic Chemistry (CHEM111)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to give students an understanding of the underlying principles of the chemistry of the main group elements and to give them an appreciation of the importance of this chemistry in everyday life.

    Learning Outcomes

    By the end of this module a student will have an understanding of:

    • The periodic table as an underlying framework for understanding the chemistry of the main group elements
    • The crystal structures of metals and simple ionic solids
    • Lewis acid-Lewis base interactions
    • Systematic chemistry of halides and hydrides of the main group elements
    • Systematic chemistry of halides and hydrides of the main group elements
    • The basic techniques required for the preparation and analysis of simple inorganic compounds

    A student will also have developed the following skills:

    • Planning and time-management associated with practical work
    • Report writing
  • Introductory Organic Chemistry (CHEM130)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to ensure that students are aware of fundamental principles of organic chemistry, including nomenclature, structure and bonding, and the basic principles of static and dynamic stereochemistry. The major reactions associated with the common functional groups will be covered with emphasis on reaction mechanisms. In addition, this module will provide an introduction to the basic techniques associated with practical synthetic chemistry.

    Learning Outcomes

    By the end of this module students will know:

    • Structures and shapes of major classes of organic compounds
    • Principles of bonding in major classes of organic compounds
    • Basic principles of stereochemistry
    • Important reactions of a range of functional groups
    • An understanding of the major classes of reaction mechanisms
    • The basic techniques of synthetic chemistry (isolation, purification, identification, and design and work-up of reactions) and will have experience of characterisation using spectroscopic techniques and chemical methods.
  • Foundations of Medicinal Chemistry (CHEM141)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    AimsThe aim of this module is to provide students with and understanding of :1. The key components of cells that act as the building blocks for the key macromolecular structures that are essential in medicinal chemistry.2. How macromolecules interact with each other to allow for natural cellular processes (such as gene expression) that can be exploited by medicinal chemists3. The key drug targets in medicinal chemistry
    Learning Outcomes

    ​Upon successful completion of this module, a student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the chemical components of cells.

    ​Upon successful completion of this module, a student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the structure, chemical bonding and interactions of a range of cellular macromolecules that allow natural cellular processes to occur

    ​​Upon successful completion of this module, a student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the key drug targets in medicinal chemistry, including enzymes, receptors and nucleic acids

  • Introductory Physical Chemistry (CHEM152)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    The main aim of this module is to equip students with an understanding of basic kinetics and thermodynamics as they relate to chemical reactions.

    Learning Outcomes

    By the end of the module students should be familiar with, and be able to make appropriate use of:

    • Basic ideas of energy changes in chemical reactions
    • Ideas relating to the rates of chemical reactions
    • Basic laboratory skills and report writing, including data and error analysis
  • Introductory Spectroscopy (CHEM170)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

     

    The aim of this module is to introduce modern spectroscopic methods in chemistry. Students will understand
    • the importance of quantum mechanics in understanding atomic structure
    • the interaction of light with matter
    • atomic and molecular spectroscopy
    • information obtained from different spectroscopic techniques
    • the interpretation of spectroscopic data
    • deduction of molecular structure from spectroscopic data

    Learning Outcomes

    By the end of this module, students should have achieved the following learning outcomes:

    • An understanding of atomic structure.
    • The fundamental principles behind rotational, vibrational, electronic spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, andnuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.  
    • Application of spectroscopic techniques to elucidate moecular structure.
    • Be abble to apply this knowledge to real spectroscopic problems.
  • Key Skills for Chemists 1 (CHEM180)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is:

    (i) to equip students with the basic quantitative transferable skills required for the first year of a Chemistry degree programme. (60% of module)

    (ii) to broaden a student''s perspective of chemistry whilst developing their general transferable skills with a focus on communication and employability. (40% of module)

    Learning Outcomes

    The overarching leaning outcome is for students to have the key skills that will equip them to perform well in the rest of their chemistry degree programme.

    The learning outcomes can be divided into two areas: Quantitative and General Key Skills.

    Quantitative key skills:

    By the end of this module a successful student should be able to handle:

    • Simple volumetric calculations as required for titrations in analytical chemistry;
    • Basic algebraic manipulation and functions needed for kinetics, thermodynamics and quantum mechanics;
    • Elementary geometry required for the understanding of molecular shapes and solid state chemistry;
    • The representation of data via graphs, particularly straight line graphs, and the manipulation of data in spreadsheet programs for data analysis;
    • The basic idea of a derivative and an integral for use in physical chemistry;
    • The physical concepts of energy, momentum and angular momentum;

      ​​General key skills:

       

      By the end of this module a sucessful student will understand:

      • basic aspects of working safely in a chemistry laboratory;
      • aspects of chemical research;
      • the importance of chemistry in the development of our society;
      • chemical databases;
      • the need for academic integrity;
      • how chemistry can contribute to their transferable skills;

      In addition successful students will have developed their:

      • investigative, critical, writing and presentation skills;
      • chemical database skills;
      • employability skill.;
    • Introduction to Physiology and Pharmacology (LIFE106)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      This module aims to:

      1. Provide students with a grounding in the concepts and principles that underlie human systems biology;
      2. Introduce the concepts of interactions of drugs and other exogenous chemicals on biological processes;
      3. Develop concepts of drug absorption and the relationship between chemical structure and drug action;
      4. Develop knowledge and understanding in physiology and pharmacology, and ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems in these disciplines.
      Learning Outcomes

      On successful completion of this module, the students will be able to:

      1.  Describe homeostasis and its maintenance;
      2.  Define osmosis and hydrostatic pressure;
      3.  Outline the fundamentals of membrane potentials and how they are influenced;
      4.  Explain the roles played in various body systems in organism maintenance;
      5.  Distinguish how body systems interact in response to external stressors;
      6.  Define the way in which pharmacology is studied and drugs are developed;
      7.  Describe the properties of receptors;
      8.  Identify the chemical interactions between drugs and receptors;
      9.  Define and use the terms absorption, distribution and metabolism of drugs.

    Programme Year Two

    You will learn more advanced topics within all the main branches of chemistry and continue to develop your quantitative and general key skills, taking the same core chemistry modules as the BSc Chemistry (F100) students. Practical Chemistry skills will be developed through stand-alone modules and you will have the opportunity to spend between six and nine hours per week in the chemical laboratories. You will also take 22.5 credits of Pharmacology modules that will involve both theoretical and practical aspects of the subject.

    Year Two Compulsory Modules

    • Metals and Metalloids of the P and D-blocks (CHEM214)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      Aims:

      This module is an introduction to the co-ordination and organometallic chemistry of 3d transition metals, and will encompass theory, physical methods and descriptive chemistry.

      The aims of the module are:

      • To outline how bonding theories (valence bond, crystal field, ligand field) have been developed by chemists to rationalise important properties of the d–block elements, many of which distinguish them from organic and main group compounds
      • To illustrate the chemistry of the transition elements by a detailed study of three groups, Ti/Zr/Hf, Fe/Ru/Os and Ni/Pd/Pt, including:
        • Discovery, isolation and technological importance of the elements and their compounds
        • A survey of the chemistry of the different oxidation states and a comparison of the 3d elements with their heavier 4d and 5d relatives
        • Brief comparisons/contrasts with neighbouring groups of elements.
      • To introduce the theory underlying the use of appropriate physical and spectroscopic techniques for characterising d–block complexes, and examples of their application.
      • To introduce the chemistry, and some applications, of complexes in low oxidation states, including:
        • CO as an examplar of a p-acceptor ligand
        • 3d Metal carbonyl complexes
        • Analogous ligands, e.g. NO, RNC
        • The 18-electron rule; what it is, and why it applies to these complexes.
      • To introduce the chemistry, and some applications, of p-block elements and compounds.         

       

      Learning Outcomes

      By the end of the module students should:

      • Show an understanding of the concepts, applications and limitations of the different bonding theories relevant to transition-metal complex chemistry, and be aware of their relative relevance in different chemical contexts.
      • Be able to identify key elements of the structures of transition-metal complexes, and apply their knowledge of spectroscopic and physical techniques to work out the correct structure for a complex, given relevant chemical and spectroscopic information.
      • Be able to describe the social, economic and technological importance of selected transition elements.
      • Understand and be able to describe the significance of the syntheses, characterisation and chemistry of 3d metal complexes encountered in the practical module, CHEM245.
      • Understand the origin of the18-electron rule, its application and the sort of complexes to which it applies.
    • Organic Chemistry II (CHEM231)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      The aim of this module is to introduce important carbon-carbon bond forming reactions within a mechanistic and synthetic framework, together with exposure to a selection of stereochemical issues.

      Learning Outcomes

      Students should be able to solve problems featuring:

      Scope and mechanisms of basic reactions (nucleophilic and electrophilic substitutions, addition and elimination reactions)

      Basic carbonyl chemistry (alkylation, acylation, aldol, conjugate additions).

      Structure, reactivity and synthesis of simple heterocycles (including pyridines, pyrroles, furans)

      Functional group interconversions and stereochemistry.

    • Preparative Chemistry: Synthesis and Characterisation (CHEM245)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      The module aims to present a unified approach to the synthesis and characterisation of organic and inorganic compounds and will build on techniques introduced in the first year laboratory courses.

      Learning OutcomesStudents will complete a number of different experiments and synthetic techniques across synthetic, organic and inorganic chemistry.

      ​Students will appreciate how spectroscopic techniques can be used in the characterisation of organic and inorganic compounds and will be able to use analytical and spectroscopic methods to characterise their synthesised compounds.

      ​Students will make use of scientific databases during some assignments and an electronic report.

      ​Students will assess the risks inolved in chemical lab work and handle chemical materials in a safe manner.

      ​Students should be able to organise and plan their time effectively

      ​Students will experience working collaboratively with others in multiple learning environments

    • Measurements in Chemistry (CHEM246)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      The aim of this module is to instruct students in the practice of taking physical measurements, the critical analysis and evaluation of experimental data, the application of measurements to the study of chemical phenomena and the dissemination of results.

      Learning Outcomes
      By the end of the module, students should be able to
      1.      take physical measurements of varying complexity using a wide range of experimental techniques;
      2.      assess the risks involved in chemical lab work and handle chemical materials in a safe manner;
      3.      choose appropriate methods for the analysis of data;
      4.      analyse experimental data using graphs, spreadsheets and linear regression;
      5.      assess the accuracy and significance of experimental results;
      6.      apply the results of physical measurement to the interpretation of chemical phenomena;
      7.      combine units and perform a dimensional analysis;
      8.      have experience of the application of spectroscopic techniques (UV, IR, NMR and mass spectrometry) in the characterization of organometallic and inorganic compounds;
      9.      organise and plan their time effectively.
    • An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry (CHEM248)
      Level2
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting90:10
      Aims

      The aim of this module is to introduce students to the fundamental principles that underpin modern medicinal chemistry, including an introduction to targets for drug action, methods of administration, qualitative and quantitative SAR, computer aided molecular design, solid phase chemistry /combinatorial chemistry.   The course also aims to describe in detail the chemical mechanisms of antitumour agents and will also include two lectures on carbohydrate chemistry.

      Learning Outcomes

      By the end of this module students are expected to have acquired an understanding of

      • The principle bonding interactions in drug receptor interactions
      • The basic concepts of structure activity relationships (SAR) and quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR)
      • The principles behind computer aided molecular design and 3-D QSAR
      • Peptide synthesis, protecting groups and combinatorial chemistry
      • Chemical mechanisms of drugs that target DNA
      • Basic carbohydrate chemistry

      and will be able to use these concepts and principles to solve simple problems in medicinal chemistry.

    • Physical Chemistry II (CHEM260)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterWhole Session
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims
    • ​To explain the application of the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics to chemical reactions.

    • ​To reinforce the basic ideas on factors affecting the rates of chemical reactions and quantify the kinetics.

    • To provide an introduction into basic concepts of quantum mechanics.​

    • ​To advance knowledge of quantitative analysis of molecular spectra.​
    • ​To make students familiar with the basic ideas of photochemistry.​

    • Learning Outcomes​Discuss the difference between ideal and real gases.

      ​Discuss the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics in the context of chemical reactions.​

      Carry out thermochemical calculations involving enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy.​
      ​Calculate equilibrium constants from thermodynamic data.

      ​Discuss the concept of the chemical potential and its application under ideal and non-ideal conditions.​
      ​Analyse experimental data for the determination of  reaction orders and rate coefficients, using appropriate methods depending on the type of data available.
      ​Derive and apply rate equations and integrated rate equations for 0th, 1st and 2nd order reactions. ​
      ​Show an understanding of activation barriers and apply the Arrhenius equation.​
      ​Describe qualitatively and quantitatively the kinetics of simple parallel, consecutive, and equilibration reactions. 
      ​Apply the pre-equilibrium and steady state approximations.​
      ​Describe different decay processes of photoexcited states and analyse them quantitatively.​
      ​Demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts of quantum mechanics, including operators and wavefunctions.​
      ​Show an understanding of molecular energy levels and the forms of spectroscopy which involve transitions between them.​

      Compute basic properties of diatomics, eg bond lengths, from molecular spectra.​

      ​Use mathematical procedures and graphs for quantitative data analysis and problem solving.​

      ​Present and discuss the solution to problems in a small-group environment.​

    • Key Skills for Chemists 2 (CHEM280)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterWhole Session
      Exam:Coursework weighting10:90
      Aims
      1. To further develop the quantitative skills of a student, through more advanced skills in the application of mathematics, physics and information technology applicable to the second year of an undergraduate degree in chemistry. (50% of module)

      2. To introduce students to the use of Molecular Modelling in Chemistry *(35% of modules

      3. To further develop a student''s  general transferable skills in oral and written communication, presentation and team working. (15% of module). ​
      Learning Outcomes

      The overarching learning outcome is that students will gain the necessary key skills to perform well in their chemistry degree programmes.

      Quantitative key skills:By the end of the module a successful student will have improved their ability to:
      • perform basic calculus (integral and differential) as applied to kinetics, thermodynamics and quantum mechanics
      • use partial differentiation in general problems and to categorise stationary points in functions of more than one variable
      • apply algebraic manipulation in kinetics, thermodynamics and quantum mechanics
      • apply the algebra of complex numbers in quantum mechanics problems
      • use basic matrix vector algebra
      • solve simple eigenvalue problems and compute determinants of small matrices
      Molecular Modeling skills By the end of this module, a successful student will have gained:
      • a qualitative understanding of ab initio, semi-empirical and empirical models, knowing which model is suitable for a particular type of problem.
      • the ability to to predict the ground state energy and structure of isolated molecules (not too complicated) and estimate equilibrium constants (ΔH = ΔE) for simple reactions
      • the ability to rationalise some aspects of reactivity (charge density, frontier orbitals).
      • some experience of modelling intermolecular forces and complexes.

      General key skills:

      By the end of this module, a successful student will have improved:
      • knowledge of methods of presenting chemical research.
      • presentation skills

    Programme Year Three

    You will study selected components from the BSc Chemistry (F100) programme plus 30 credits of modules from Pharmacology. 

    Year Three Compulsory Modules

    • Medicinal Chemistry of Anti-infectives (CHEM335)
      Level3
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting90:10
      Aims

      The aim of this module is to introduce students to the fundamental principles that underpin modern medicinal chemistry of anti-infective drugs and will include qualitative and advanced quantitative SAR techniques, computer aided molecular design, further techniques in solid phase chemistry / combinatorial chemistry.  The course will build on the principles taught in the introductory medicinal chemistry course Chem 248. 

      Learning Outcomes

      By the end of the module students will have achieved a solid foundation of modern approaches to anti-infective drug design.

      In particular they should be able to show a clear understanding of:

      • The mechanism of action, design and synthesis of b-lactam antibiotics, cephalosporins and carbapenems.
      • Antiviral drug design
      • The importance of protease enzymes as drug targets as illustrated by examples including the falcipain 2 inhibitors (cysteine proteases) and HIV protease inhibitors (aspartate proteases).
      • Advanced techniques in computational drug design and combinatorial chemistry.
    • Heterocyclic Chemistry and Drug Synthesis (CHEM338)
      Level3
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      To present the synthesis and reactivity of the most important classes of heterocyclic compounds and to present case studies drawn from major drug classes.

      Learning Outcomes

      By the end of the module students will have achieved a solid foundation in Organic Chemistry.

      In particular they will be expected to be able to demonstrate a clear understanding of

      • The structural features and reactivity of heterocyclic compounds, including stereochemistry.
      • Some of the major synthetic pathways in heterocyclic chemistry, involving carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bond formation, functional group interconversions and ring substitution.
      • Awareness of the importance of heterocylcles as key components in major drug classes and combinatorial libraries.

      In addition they will be able to give examples of their use in modern synthetic methodology and have an awareness of the importance of three-dimensional structure in Organic Chemistry.

    • Year 3 Chemistry Project (BSc. Level) (CHEM356)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      This module is a BSc level Year 3 mini project. In this module, students will be assigned an extended experiment on a synthetic (organic or inorganic), physical (catalysis, electrochemistry,surface science, modelling, nanoparticles) or interdisciplinary theme, according to their own interests and abilities, and therefore the aims of the module will differ slightly according to topic. The topic does not necessary have to be research or laboratory based, although these would be expected to cover the majority of cases. Subject to the Module Director''s approval literature-based projects, web design projects and possibly even projects that involve interaction with a local school could be offered.

      Depending on the exact nature of the project undertaken the general aims of the module are:

      • To give the student a taste of research in a contemporary area of chemistry
      • To develop an appropriate experimental technique for the topic undertaken
      • To show the use of appropriate characterisation techniques
      • To illustrate the use of the library and other information resources as research tools or more generic tools for the appropriation of information
      • To familiarise the student with the preparation of written reports
      • To teach the skills necessary for the preparation and delivery of a short oral presentation.
      • To enable the student to apply web based design and techniques
      • To interact with outside bodies (e.g. schools) with the aim of applying or disseminating chemical based knowledge and fostering cooperation
      Learning Outcomes

      Dpending on the precise emphasis of the individually tailored project, by the end of the module, students should be able to:

      • Give a reasoned written exposition of experimental work and achievements
      • Make valid deductions from acquired data
      • Be capable of giving comprehensible written and oral accounts of experimental work
      • Demonstrate an understanding of shortcomings, experimental errors or weakness in data
      • Show that they understand the wider social and/or technological relevance of their work
    • Practical Chemistry Year 3 (BSc.) (CHEM365)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:150
      Aims

      In this module, students will spend four weeks carrying out advanced experimental work in two Chemistry subjects chosen from Organic, Inorganic and Physical Chemistry

      The general aims of the module are:

      • To give the student practical experience and understanding of advanced practical techniques for Organic, Inorganic and Physical Chemistry.
      • To develop appropriate techniques for each type of experiment
      • To show the use of appropriate characterisation techniques
      • To familiarise the student with the preparation of written reports
      • To establish a close link with aspects of the lecture material covered in the Yr 3 course
      Learning Outcomes

      By the end of the module, students should be able to

      • Carry out advanced practical techniques in the areas of Organic, Inorganic and Physical Chemistry
      • Give a reasoned written exposition of experimental work and achievements
      • Make valid deductions from acquired data
      • Be capable of giving comprehensible written accounts of experimental work
      • Demonstrate an understanding of shortcomings, experimental errors or weaknesses in data
      • Further develop their time management skills via coordination of the synthetic and analytical components of their experiments
      • Show that they understand the wider social or technological relevance of their work
    • Further Key Skills With Molecular Modelling (BSc.) (CHEM380)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterWhole Session
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      To enhance the development of student employability skills and introduce students to molecular modelling techniques using examples from inorganic and organic chemistry.

      Learning Outcomes

      By the end of the employability section of the course, students should be able to demonstrate both a familiarity with, and an understanding of, the importance of transferable skills to the work place.

      By the end of the modelling section of the course students should have a qualitative understanding of ab initio, semi-empirical and empirical models, knowing which model is suitable for a particular type of problem.

      ​By the end of the modelling ​section of the course students should be able to predict the ground state energy and structure of isolated molecules (not too complicated) and estimate equilibrium constants (ΔH = ΔE) for simple reactions

      ​By the end of the modelling section of the course students should be able to rationalise some aspects of reactivity (charge density, frontier orbitals).

      ​By the end of the modelling section of the course students should have some experience of modelling intermolecular forces and complexes.

    • Chemical Database Skills (CHEM385)
      Level3
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      Chemical database skills and molecular modelling are becoming resouces now in common use by practicing chemical scientists. This module aims to introduce students to these skills through lectures and computer based workshop sessions. In this module, students will will attend six lectures and six practical sessions in chemical database skills and database skills. The general aims of the module are:

      • To establish a close link with aspects of the lecture material covered in the Yr 3 course
      • To introduce students to chemical database skills, including on-line searching of literature, citations, chemical reactions and structures.

      (students CANNOT take this module if they are taking CHEM375!)

      Learning Outcomes

      By the end of the module, students should be able to

      • Use scientific databases effectively for literature and citation searches.
      • Find relevant information from on-line chemical databases regarding chemical reactions and structures.
      • Be able to apply the database skills in writing a report drawing from scientific literature.
    • Antimicrobial Chemotherapy for Chemists (LIFE348)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      ​1) To reinforce the relevance and importance of the principles of chemotherapy learned in year two (antibacterial chemotherapy).

      2) To extend the   application of chemotherapy principles to diseases caused by viruses (e.g. HIV/AIDS) and parasites (i.e. malaria)

      3) To introduce novel concepts in drug design (Nanomedicine) and treatment strategy (Pharmacogenomics) in the context of chemotherapy.

      4) To illustrate the importance of chemical structure and structure-based drug design in drug action.

      Learning Outcomes

      ​​Critically evaluate how the principles of selective toxicity may be applied to the chemotherapy of infectious diseases

      ​Discuss the clinical relevance of basic pharmacological principles of chemotherapy

      ​Discuss the importance of drug resistance in the treatment and prevention of disease

      ​Evaluate the importance of structure activity relationship (SAR) in modern drug design in the context of chemotherapy 

    • Drug Action (LIFE206)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims
      1. Enable students to develop their understanding of the cardiovascular, endocrine and central nervous systems and the mechanisms by which drugs interact with physiological processes operating within each of these systems;​​
      2. Provide an insight into the mechanisms of immune function and dysfunction, and the actions of drugs that target the immune system;
      3. Give students a grounding in the fundamental principles of signal transduction from metabotropic receptors, and their significance for drug action;​
      4. Provide and overview of the overall drug development process, with a focus on the safety and efficacy tests applied during clinical trials, and the value-for-money tests applied during NICE approval;
      5. Develop knowledge and understanding in pharmacology, and ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems.
        Learning Outcomes

        ​Identify the effects of drugs on the CNS and demonstrate an understanding of how drugs may be used to treat neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders;

        ​Describe the action of drugs in the cardiovascular system and their role in the treatment of cardiovascular disease;

        Compare the effects of drugs on the kidney, the endocrine system and the gastrointestinal tract;Describe the principles underlying the effects of drugs on the immune system and the treatment of autoimmune disease;​Apply knowledge how the signal transduction pathways can be modulated to enhance cancer therapy;​

        Apply the knowledge of the regulatory framework underlying the testing and approval of drugs;

      1. Further Organic Chemistry (CHEM333)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
        Aims

        The aim of the course is to extend second year knowledge of synthetic and physical organic chemistry.

        Learning Outcomes

        By the end of the module, students should:

        • Have a good understanding of modern synthetic reactions and their mechanisms.
        • Be able to deduce mechanisms on the basis of kinetic and other evidence.

      Year Three Optional Modules

      • Chemistry for Sustainable Technologies (CHEM284)
        Level2
        Credit level7.5
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
        Aims

        This module introduces the basic concepts of sustainability and sustainable development, particularly in relation to their technological underpinnings. The module will address the role of chemistry in relation to broad societal, environmental and developmental questions. The module also gives a fundamental understanding of the principles and technologies in Green Chemistry and the generation of Renewable Energy and Chemicals.

        The aims of the module are:

        • To explain the concepts and terminology of sustainability and sustainable development.
        • To highlight the role of science and technology in working towards sustainable development.
        • To illustrate the central role of thermodynamics and metrics in the critical and comparative assessment of the efficiency and impact of chemical technologies.
        • To exemplify new approaches to chemistry in the development of more sustainable chemical technologies.
        • To provide the student with a fundamental understanding of the principles of Green Chemistry and a fundamental knowledge in new technologies for the generation of renewable energy and chemicals.

         

        Learning Outcomes

        Students should be be able to demonstrate understanding of the:

        1. basic terminology of sustainable development and ''green'' chemistry

        2. non-rigorous nature of this terminology and its consequences

        3. importance of thermodynamic principles in judgements about what may be considered sustainable.

        4. strengths and weaknesses of ''green'' chemistry

        5. importance of catalysis in developing sustainable chemical technologies and the challenges associated with their implementation

        6. basics of new technologies in the generation of renewable energy and chemicals.

      • Inorganic Applications of Group Theory (CHEM316)
        Level3
        Credit level7.5
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
        Aims

        This module aims to demonstrate the underlying importance of symmetry throughout Chemistry, with particular applications to spectroscopic selection rules and bonding.

        Learning Outcomes

        By the end of the module, students should be able to:

        • Identify symmetry elements in molecules
        • Assign molecules to their correct point groups
        • Use character tables to solve a variety of problems in spectroscopy and bonding
      • Introduction to Chemical Engineering for Chemists (CHEM396)
        Level3
        Credit level7.5
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
        Aims

        Chemical engineering is a branch of engineering that typically deals with the large-scale manufacturing processes for converting raw materials into useful products. The main topics and even the language of chemical engineering are entirely foreign to most chemists. The main aim of this module is to give chemistry students an insight into the world of chemical engineering and to develop an understanding of the main topics of chemical engineering in a practical manner. This module will enable chemistry students to study and to understand interdisciplinary topics at the interface between chemistry and chemical engineering, and it will enable them to engage successfully in dialogue with chemical engineers about chemical problems. The students will also learn extensions of concepts that are familiar to them, typically from thermodynamics and kinetics, but from a very different angle. They will learn about the types of data needed by engineers and why such data are required. This module will certainly help the employability prospects  of chemistry students who intend to work in industry after graduation.

        Learning Outcomes

        By the end of the module students should be able to demonstrate a clear understanding of:

        ·         Mass and energy balances as fundamental operations in a process analysis procedure

        ·         Detailed process flowsheets

        ·         Mass, heat and momentum transfer

        ·         Chemical reaction kinetics and chemical reactor design

        ·         Fluid mechanics and measurement of flow rates

        ·         The calculation of design parameters, such as heat and mass transfer coefficients

        ·         Process control and project economics

        ·         Characteristics of separation processes

        ·         pumps and heat exchangers

        ·         Hazard studies and risk assessments

        In addition the students will gain the skills required to apply their knowledge to process information, solve problems and evaluate outcomes related to reaction engineering, transport processes and separation process.

      The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


      Teaching and Learning

      Laboratory classes in Years One and Two prepare you for independent laboratory work in Years Three and Four. In Year Three you will carry out mini research projects, while in Year Four you will carry out research alongside PhD and postdoctoral researchers on cutting-edge projects, often leading to a first scientific publication. Computational modelling and molecular visualisation are introduced as interactive animated models from Year One, reinforced as a key skill in later years and by Year Four of MChem programmes you will be able to perform your own calculations to underpin final year research projects.


      Assessment

      You are assessed by examination at the end of each semester (January and May/June) and by continuous assessment of laboratory practicals, class tests, workshops, tutorials and assignments. You have to pass each year of study before you are allowed to progress to the following year. Re-sit opportunities are available in September at the end of Years One and Two. If you take an industrial placement, a minimum standard of academic performance is required before you are allowed to embark on your placements. You are expected to perform at a 2:1 level if you wish to continue on a MChem programme. All years of study (with the exception of Year One) contribute to the final degree classification.