Marine Biology with Oceanography BSc (Hons)

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: C1F7
  • Year of entry: 2020
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB / IB : 33 / BTEC : D*DD
Lecture

Module details

Programme Year One

The required modules in Year One provide grounding in Ocean Sciences and Marine Biology, as well as developing essential and transferrable skills. Optional modules are available in biology and ecology. There are fieldwork opportunities in Ocean Sciences and Marine Biology in Year 1.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Climate, Atmosphere and Oceans (ENVS111)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    Introduce the climate system, the atmosphere and ocean:

    Address how the climate system varies and how climate is controlled by radiative forcing;

    How the structure of the atmosphere is determined and how the atmosphere circulates;

    How the structure of the ocean is determined and how the ocean circulates;

    How the atmosphere and ocean vary together;

    How the past state of the climate system is affected by the ocean circulation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) 1. Knowledge and Understanding   a. Understand how physical processes operate within the climate system, the atmosphere and the ocean. b. Appreciate the complexity of the climate system, the effect of radiative forcing, the concept of feedbacks, how rotation affects the circulation; the differences between currents and waves. c. Gain awareness of the similarities and differences between the atmosphere and ocean.

    (LO2) 2. Intellectual Abilities a. To be able to evaluate the relative importance of different physical processes in the climate systemb. To develop critical skills in transferring insight gained from one problem to another problem, such as how the atmosphere circulates from one planet to another planet.

    (LO3) 3. Subject Based Practical Skills   a. Perform simple order of magnitude calculations and make inferences from the results. b. Understand the use of dimensions.

    (LO4) 4. General Transferable Skills   a. Application of numbers, involving order of magnitudes and dimensions. b. Time management. c. Problem solving.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

  • Laboratory and Field Techniques for [marine and Terrestial] Ecologists (ENVS171)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting20:80
    Aims

    This practical module will provide training in a range of ecological skills in a series of field exercises around Liverpool and on a residential field course to South West Wales. The skills used will have a wide application to many fields of environmental science including modern biology, ecology and physical geography. Techniques taught include identification of plants and animals, communities and measurement of selected ecological processes. You will learn quantitative skills in field ecology and how they can be used to solve fundamental and applied problems. You will also learn quite a lot of ecology at the same time.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Apply a quantitative approach to field science

    (LO2) Work safely under lab and field conditions

    (LO3) Describe plant and animal communities and relate these to environmental factors

    (LO4) Sample plant and animal communities and relate these to environmental factors

    (LO5) Appreciate landscape and ecological features

    (LO6) Measure and understand the relevance of ecological processes

    (LO7) Identify selected plants and animals

    (LO8) Investigate animal behaviour

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Numeracy

    (S4) Organisational skills

  • Marine Biology: Life in the Seas and Oceans (ENVS121)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    This module will introduce students to the main groups of organisms found in the marine environment. Students will encounter these groups in subsequent modules and field studies and gaining a familiarity with them in this module will enable them to recognise them and understand their role in marine ecosystems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire knowledge and understanding on the taxonomic and functional diversity of marine life.

    (LO2) Develop the ability to recognise the major groups of marine organisms using their key features

    (LO3) Experience how to examine marine organisms and understand their functional biology using different kinds of specimens and approaches.

    (LO4) Recognise the adaptational solutions to functional problems adopted by marine organisms

    (S1) Teamwork

    (S2) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S3) Problem solving skills

  • Marine Ecosystems: Diversity, Processes and Threats (ENVS122)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    This module aims to introduce students to the diversity of ecosystem types in the marine environment and the various threats that they face.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire knowledge and understanding of representative key ecosystems found in the marine environment.

    (LO2) Be familiar with the marine organisms that live in representative key marine ecosystems.

    (LO3) Acquire a basic knowledge of fundamental ecological principles, transferable to later marine and non-marine modules.

    (LO4) Be aware of the threats that humans may pose to marine ecosystems.

    (LO5) Appreciate how humans assess and may mitigate detrimental impacts to the environment.

    (LO6) Be introduced to the importance to their future studies of critical reading of scientific literature.

  • Essential Mathematical Skills (ENVS117)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To create a firm foundation of mathematics relating to pure maths, physics (mechanics) and statistics.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) At the end of the module a student should be able to demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of pure mathematics, mathematics mechanics, and statistical mathematics.

    (LO2) At the end of the module the student should be able to;

    - Demonstrate skills in the application of mathematical methods to the solution of problems.

    - Use dimensional analysis and apply it to real world problems.

    (LO3) At the end of the module a student should be able to;

    - Do simple estimations by hand

    - Rearrange algebraic formulae to make the required quantity the subject

    - Insert values in a formula and calculate the correct answer

    - Basic calculus.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

  • Study Skills (ocean Sciences) (ENVS103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To train students to make observations, collect and record data using basic oceanographic equipment.
    To train students to carry out analytical work in laboratory conditions.
    To improve students' oral and written communication skills, including their ability to reference correctly.
    To improve students' numerical skills, specifically in statistics.
    To enthuse students about ocean sciences through reading and discussing topics selected for oral presentation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Write an essay and reference correctly

    (LO2) Quantitatively summarise, synthesise and interpret data collected during fieldwork

    (LO3) Communicate effectively to their peers

    (LO4) Perform analytical tasks (e.g. measurement of oxygen, chlorophyll, iron) in laboratory conditions.

    (S1) Numeracy/computational skills - Confidence/competence in measuring and using numbers

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

Year One Optional Modules

  • Ecology and Conservation (ENVS157)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The module aims to introduce students to the key principles that govern the interactions between organisms and their environment, and how these can be used as the basis for conservation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understandand explain fundamental principles of how ecological systems are structured andhow they function at the scale of individuals, populations and communities

    (LO2) Tounderstand the effects of human activities on communities and ecosystems at arange of timescales

    (LO3) Developan ability to critically evaluate how ecological understanding and data can beused to inform conservation policy

    (S1) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

    (S2) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

    (S3) Learning skills online studying and learning effectively in technology-rich environments, formal and informal

    (S4) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

  • Ecology and the Global Environment (LIFE120)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This module aims to:

    Describe the physical and chemical contexts of the biosphere, the cycling of important elements at different scales, the distribution of biomes and the ecosystem concept;

    Discuss ecological concepts such as succession, niche, food web theory, ecosystem stability and the impact of human activities;

    Explain conservation of biodiversity at a range of scales;

    Develop knowledge and understanding in ecology, and ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:Identify a range of global problems facing mankind that have ecological origins;

    (LO2) Link each of these problems to key ecological concepts;

    (LO3) Recognize how interactions of individuals, populations and communities with the physico-chemical environment contribute to determining species distributions and abundance, and to the flows of energy and nutrients;

    (LO4) Identify the demographic forces underlying the growth and size of populations and the determination of biodiversity.

    (S1) Students will also develop independent learning and self-evaluation skills.

  • Environmental Chemistry (ENVS153)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting55:45
    Aims

    To provide a basic understanding of chemistry relevant for environmental sciences.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) a. describe the structure of an atom, its electronic configuration and predict some of its chemical behaviour based on its position in the periodic table;

    (LO2) b. understand the inter andintramolecular forces that bond molecules and atoms together to form "matter", and thusexplain why for instance water is a liquid atroom temperature while oxygen is a gas;

    (LO3) c. name chemical compounds, write balanced chemical reactions and understand howthe amount of products and reactants can be predicted;

    (LO4) d. understand what redox reactions are and be able to work them out;

    (LO5) e. understand basics of aquatic chemistry such aspH, concentration, dilution; understand energy changes in chemical reactions;

    (LO6) f. know the basics of organic biogeochemistry.

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S2) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

  • Evolution (LIFE103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This module aims to:
    Describe fundamental genetic mechanisms that are essential for the function and evolution of life;

    Introduce students to fundamental evolutionary concepts and theories, showing how genetic mechanisms help determine the patterns of observed evolution;

    Apply evolutionary concepts to a broad selection of areas of Life Sciences;

    Develop in students the knowledge and understanding of the subject and the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems in biology.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Recall how cells evolved

    (LO2) Identify the causes of evolutionary change in populations

    (LO3) Recognize the consequences of evolutionary change for patterns of biological diversity within and amongst populations

    (LO4) Recall fundamental genetic mechanisms (heredity, mutation, meiosis, sex) and show how they influence evolutionary change in populations

    (LO5) Recognize the widespread applicability of evolutionary ideas across the Life Sciences

    (S1) Lifelong learning skills

  • Molecules and Cells (LIFE101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    After successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

    Recognise the basic of structure, composition and function of cells;

    Explain core concepts relating to the organisation and specialisation of eukaryotes, prokaryotes and viruses;

    Define the cellular components involved in the regulation of key functions such as the generation of energy, movement, cell growth and division and differentiation;

    Describe the latest techniques that are used in cell biology to determine cell structure and function;

    Develop in students the knowledge and understanding of the subject and the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

    Describe how cells arose and their structural features;

    (LO2) Compare and contrast eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells;

    (LO3) Identify the different ways cells manipulate energy;

    (LO4) Define the molecular basis of the processes by which cells grow, replicate, communicate, interact with their environment, move and die;

    (LO5) Describe the functional importance of cell specialisation and cooperation in tissues.

    (S1) Skills in using technology - Information accessing

Programme Year Two

In Year 2, there is an emphasis on the development of practical, analytical and numerical skills through training in fieldwork, laboratory skills and practical oceanography. There is an opportunity for students to be trained in the industry standard software used in Ocean Sciences, Matlab. There are fieldwork opportunities in Ocean Sciences and Marine Biology in Year 2.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Life in A Dynamic Ocean (ENVS265)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    To gain an appreciation of how ecosystems in the ocean are intricately linked to their physical fluid environment;
    To understand how microbial life is affected by molecular diffusion and turbulence;
    To understand the challenges faced by microscopic life in the viscous fluid of the ocean;
    To address how mean flows in the ocean can be vital in the life stages of larger marine organisms;
    To appreciate the global differences in plankton communities, and the underlying reasons for those differences;
    To understand the problem of how community diversity is maintained in the ocean, and the current theories attempting to explain this diversity.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain a broad understanding of how different plankton communities arise in different oceanic regimes, and how that ultimately structures food chains to larger marine animals.

    (LO2) Students will be able to compare quantitatively the scales of different processes, and critically assess their relative importance for life in the ocean.

    (LO3) Students will strengthen, and acquire new, skills in quantifying physical-biological drivers of ecosystems.

    (LO4) Students will learn the important of a multi-disciplinary approach on marine biology and gain experience in solving novel problems.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S4) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Marine Biology: Year 2 Field Course (ENVS241)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to increase students' knowledge of how to sample and identify a broad range of taxonomic groups common to inshore and coastal marine ecosystems. It will build knowledge and confidence in the ability to go on and undertake field-based marine research and give students the experience of boat-based sampling required to enhance their prospects of gaining employment in the marine sectors. Field-based studies allow students to develop and enhance many of the generic skills (for example, team working, problem solving, and interpersonal relationships) which are of value to the world of work and active citizenship. This module will therefore widen access to a range of professions that require these core skills, increasing the overall employability of our students. Finally, students will learn how to communicate their findings through a range of techniques commonly used in workplaces (e.g. oral presentations and handouts, accessible information guides) to complement other writing and communication techniques (e.g. papers, essays) emphasized elsewhere in the relevant programmes.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will learn how to sample and identify a broad range of coastal and inshore marine taxa

    (LO2) Students will enhance their ability to communicate through a range of formats to audiences with different levels of prior knowledge

    (LO3) Students will develop a better understanding of how the biodiversity of marine species is adapted to different habitats and environmental conditions

    (LO4) Students will become confident at working on a marine research vessel through repeat trips utilising a range of sampling techniques

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Teamwork

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) Lifelong learning skills

    (S5) Organisational skills

    (S6) Problem solving skills

    (S7) Leadership

  • Marine Ecology Field Studies (ENVS278)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to increase students' knowledge of how to study a broad range of coastal habitats and species. It will build knowledge and confidence in the ability to go on and undertake both field-based and laboratory based marine ecological research in their careers going forward. This module relies heavily on active learning, with students completing their own data collection and working together, with guidance from academics, on how to generate useful outcomes. It will build on core skills developed earlier in tutorial modules - communication, research skills etc, as well as application of subjects previously explored only through lecture-based theory modules. Field and laboratory-based studies allow students to develop and enhance many generic skills, for example, team working, problem solving, and interpersonal relationships, which are of value to the world of work and active citizenship. This module will therefore widen access to a range of professions that require these core skills, increasing the overall employability of our students.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Gain further knowledge of higher level taxonomy and biodiversity of key groups of European marine species

    (LO2) Understand further the physical factors that drive the distributions of species within an estuarine environment and the behavioral and eco-physiological adaptations of animals to this.

    (LO3) Learn how to collect data from a range of different habitats and also develop skills to complete relevant field and/or laboratory experiments

    (LO4) Experience preparation and analysis of different types of quantitative data from different sampling regimes.

    (LO5) Further develop important research skills including record-keeping from fieldwork and laboratory work, and communication of results in different media.

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Teamwork

    (S4) Organisational skills

    (S5) Communication skills

    (S6) IT skills

    (S7) Lifelong learning skills

  • Marine Ecophysiology, Ecology and Exploitation (ENVS251)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting55:45
    Aims

    This module aims to provide students with essential background in marine ecology, ecophysiology and resource exploitation required for study at higher levels. Students will also develop the ability to evaluate and critique the scientific literature, as well as the ability to draw in relevant information from multiple topics areas to address this module aims to provide students with essential background in marine ecology, ecophysiology and resource exploitation required for study at higher levels. Students will also develop the ability to evaluate and critique the scientific literature, as well as the ability to draw in relevant information from multiple topics areas to address multi-disciplinary topics.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Be familiar with some key physiological adaptations necessary to survive in the marine environment

    (LO2) Understand the imporance of some key ecological concepts that underpin the stucturing of marine communities

    (LO3) Develop a basic understanding of key human activities that can affect individuals, populations and communities of marine animals

    (LO4) Develop the ability to read and critically evaluate scientific papers

    (LO5) Develop the ability to research, plan and write essay questions that tackle multi-disciplinary issues (using material from across the module as necessary)

    (S1) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S2) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S3) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

    (S4) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S5) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S6) Learning skills online studying and learning effectively in technology-rich environments, formal and informal

    (S7) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

  • Marine Pollution (ENVS232)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To introduce students to the main anthropogenic stressors, their effects and importance on the marine system

    To develop an awareness of the current problems

    To train students in literature search and reading of scientific papers

    To enhance writing and communication skills

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the main anthropogenic stressors of the marine system, their causes, functioning, effects and their remediation/regulation;

    (LO2) An awareness of current problems (news + scientific papers)

    (LO3) To enhance communication skills

    (LO4) To learn how to use Web of Science

    (S1) Communication skills

    (S2) International awareness

  • Ocean Environments (ENVS266)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    Provide students with a quantitative understanding of some key oceanographic concepts, applied to coastal seas. Provide students with knowledge of how the oceanography of a coastal sea supports biological production. Allow students to gain experience in the use of a simple computer model to design and carry out experiments on coastal oceanography. Provide students with practical experience of making basic, useful calculations applied to coastal oceanography.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire knowledge of key concepts in oceanography

    (LO2) Students will learn to appreciate the need to consider a theory's underlying assumptions when testing its appropriateness as an explanation for a phenomenon

    (LO3) Students will develop skills in framing testable hypotheses.

    (LO4) Students will acquire experience in the use of a simple computer model in testing a hypothesis.

    (LO5) Students will gain experience in reaching quantified answers to problems in the coastal and open ocean.

    (LO6) Students will develop an understanding of how the physics and biology of the ocean are linked

    (LO7) Students will acquire skills in writing a structured scientific report.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Communication skills

  • Practical Skills for Ocean Scientists (ENVS220)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with

    Knowledge of the scope of graduate jobs available to a graduate in ocean science, along with an understanding of how to present a portfolio of skills and respond to the different methods used in assessment of job applicants.

    Understanding of the practical methods used to measure and analyse physical and biogeochemical quantities in the ocean, in both the context of ocean research and in the commercial world.

    The skills to be able to the process and analyse oceanographic data in order to understand processes in the ocean.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge and Understanding:

    Careers-related:

    The scope of graduate-level jobs available to someone with the skills learnt on an oceans-related degree;
    The routes into further study at post-graduate level;
    The importance of developing an on-line profile for today's job market;
    The different techniques (e.g. on-line, video) used in assessment of job applicants.

    Subject-specific:

    Navigation;
    Measurements of temperature, salinity;
    Measurements of currents – both direct and indirect methods;
    Remote sensing;
    Chlorophyll analysis;
    Nutrient Analysis;

    Oxygen Analysis) Analysis of Particles) Data quality/analysis techniques including:          
    Manipulation of CTD and current data;      
    Calculation of water column properties from discrete sampling;         
    Calibration of instrumentation using discrete samples.

    (LO2) IntellectualAbilities:

    At the end of themodule a student should be able toevaluate the quality and significance of oceanographic data, and understand how data is used in both commercial and research environments.

    (LO3) Subject Based ractical Skills:

    At the end of themodule a student should be able to apply skills in:
    Processing and analysing hydrographic data;
    Processingand analysing current meter data;
    Calculatingcurrents from indirect measurements and hydrographic data;
    Analysis of nutrient, oxygen and particulate samples;
    Interpreting nutrient, oxygen and particulate data;
    Planning cruise tracks.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) IT skills

  • Research Skills (ecology) (ENVS204)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module develops students' understanding and appreciation of Ecology and Marine Biology by developing subject-specific research and employability skills. The module focusses on four specific aims:

    Devleop capacity to conduct research projects, through training in research methods, data analysis and transferable skills.

    Teach and practice critical thinking and writing skills to prepare students for subsequent years of study.

    Plan for summer vacation activity.

    Plan for future careers and enhance employability.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Build knowledge of the fields of ecology and marine biology

    (LO2) Develop experience in planning, executing and completing a research project

    (LO3) Understand how to evaluate scientific literature

    (LO4) Improve personal employability skills

  • Statistics for Environmental Scientists (ENVS222)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This module provides training in statistics for environmental scientists. We emphasize the use of software to analyze real environmental data. We do not assume extensive prior knowledge. We will teach the essential theory alongside the practical components.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Make sense of the statistical terms that appear in scientific papers and the media

    (LO2) Summarize data using graphs, tables, and numerical summaries

    (LO3) Choose appropriate statistical methods to answer research questions

    (LO4) Use statistical software to apply these methods, and interpret the output

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) IT skills

  • Understanding Marine and Terrestrial Spatial Ecology Using Gis (ENVS255)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to introduce students to the nature, operation and application of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) relevant to ecologists and marine biologists. Through a series of workshops student will learn how to conduct complex tasks in GIS and how to apply these to real-world scientific questions. Through an essay addressing the use of GIS in conservation, students will review published literature to examine how the advent of GIS has changed marine and terrestrial ecology.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Be able to critically review selected applications of GIS in areas of ecology, environmental management and marine biology in order to appreciate its role in decision support.

    (LO2) Understand the nature and sources of spatial data by correct analysis of a variety of datasets provided (particuarly with respect to remotely sensed information) used within GIS, have practised the input of these data into a GIS and have developed a critical awareness of the importance of error and quality with respect to spatial data.

    (LO3) Demonstrate the ability to accurately deploy a variety of GIS functions (such as measurement, queries, neighbourhood analyses, overlay, interpolation, etc.) available within a GIS package to integrate manipulate and analyse spatial datasets.

    (LO4) Apply selected GIS functions with respect to solving a problem based exercise.

    (LO5) Communicate the results from GIS operations by outputting results in the appropriate format.

Programme Year Three

In Year 3, there is an emphasis on the development of skills in research and critical analysis through the independent research project and tutorials covering current hot topics in Ocean and Climate Sciences. Students are introduced to the fundamentals of ocean circulation and the carbon cycle. There are fieldwork opportunities in Ocean Sciences and Marine Biology in Year 3.

Year Three Compulsory Modules

  • Global Carbon Cycle (ENVS335)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To provide students with a view of the ocean carbon cycle as a dynamic system;
    To give students an appreciation of the importance of chemical and biological processes in controlling the distribution of carbon in the ocean;
    To provide students with an in depth understanding of the carbon cycle from the surface ocean, to the deep ocean and sediments, and the impact environmental change may have on it.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will learn how physical, chemical and biological process control the transfer of carbon between the atmosphere, ocean and land, and the distribution of carbon species between these environments

    (LO2) Students will understand the role and significance that the ocean plays in the global cycling of carbon

    (LO3) Students will understand the pathways involved in cycling of inorganic and organic carbon between land and the ocean and the surface and deep ocean, with emphasis on the solubility, carbonate and biological pumps

    (LO4) Students will understand how stable isotopes can be used to study the carbon cycle and how it has varied in Earth's history

    (LO5) Students will understand how environmental change is perturbing the global carbon cycle in the present day. Topics covered will include ocean acidification and changes in the surface temperature

    (S1) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S2) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S3) Communication, listening and questioning, respecting others, contributing to discussions, influencing, presentations

  • Marine Sciences - Special Topics (ENVS366)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To promote engagement, discussions and raise the overall awareness of the most topical research issues in Marine Sciences.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Gain a broad and detailed knowledge of some of the main research issues in marine sciences.

    (LO2) Improve critical reading of scientific literature.

    (LO3) Gain/Practice Transferable Communication Skills: Reporting the main research findings on topics (through a number of different media including oral presentation, poster presentation, essay) to an audience of their peers and academic staff.

    (S1) research skills

    (S2) communication skills

  • Sea Practical (ENVS349)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to teach basic field skills in laboratory work and ship work including: a) safety at sea, b) ship's operation, c) physical oceanographic and meteorological measurement, d) chemical sampling and e) analysis of water and sediment samples and f) interpretation of physical, chemical and biological oceanographic data from a coastal sea.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) 1. Knowledge and Understanding:   On completion of the module students should be able to demonstrate a knowledge of a) safety at sea, b) ship's operation, c) how physical oceanographic and meteorological measurements are made, d) how to take water and sediment samples, e) how to analyse water and sediment samples, f) oceanographic conditions in the study area,

    (LO2) 2. Intellectual Abilities: At the end of the module the student should be able to apply skills ina) devising marine sampling strategies b) evaluating the quality and significance of marine data c) evaluating publicly available meteorological data d) quality control field data,e) writing a focused, question-driven scientific report/paper

    (LO3) 3. Subject Based Practical Skills: At the end of the module students should be able to apply skills in work at sea and ashore including: a) planning a boar-based survey targeted at environmental quesions,b) physical oceanographic and meteorological measurement, c) chemical sampling and d) analysis of water and sediment samples.

    (S1) time management (setting and achieving objectives through a day at sea and producing a report by a deadline),

    (S2) teamwork (organising themselves to achieve the objectives and sharing data),

    (S3) laboratory work (through practical analysis of samples),

    (S4) data handling (setting up scripts and spreadsheets and processing data with them)

    (S5) report writing (through the final report)

    (S6) ethics

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Evolution, Oceans and Climate (ENVS461)
    LevelM
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The module aims to develop

    Skills - the manipulation and interpretation of numerical, stratigraphic and geochemical data, the synthesis of data and literature information and coherent scientific argument.

    Knowledge and understanding - of the major controls on the behaviour of the Earth's oceans and climates and the interaction of climate and the evolution of life on Earth. An appreciation of the role of physical, geochemical, palaeontological and sedimentological techniques in the study of ancient oceans and climates, and the relationships between changes in the physical environment and the development of life on Earth.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will develop an understanding of the key changes that have affected life on earth and the evolution of climate, atmosphere and oceans.

    (LO2) Students will develop an understanding of the use of geochemical, palaeontological and sedimentological data to determine and monitor past changes.

    (LO3) Through data analysis and dicussion students will develop skills to analyse and criticise the methodology and conclusions in published work.

    (LO4) Students will develop their core skills in data analysis, verbal and written comunication

    (S1) Communication skills through active participation in debates and the presentation of material in oral, written and graphical forms using traditional and electronic media. Problem solving skills through assignments.

    (S2) Students will gain practical skills in the interpretation of physical, chemical and biological data and in the graphical presentation of such data;

    (S3) Students are expected to develop an ability to synthesize and evaluate information from a variety of sources to be able to construct a coherent argument based on the available evidence.

  • Marine Ecology: Theory and Applications (ENVS383)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    Aims

    To develop the connections between ecological theory and the management of marine communities and ecosystems. The theory covered will mostly be concerned with the dynamics and diversity of communities and ecosystems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) evaluate the major ecological theories underlying the dynamics and diversity of marine communities and ecosystems.

    (LO2) relate problems in marine conservation and resource exploitation to these ecological concepts.

    (LO3) use appropriate methods to assess the consequences of environmental change and management for marine communities and ecosystems.

    (LO4) recognize the importance of ecological theory in underpinning scientific advice to management.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

  • Ocean Dynamics (ENVS332)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To gain a high level understanding of ocean and atmospheric dynamics:

    To understand the background state of the atmosphere and ocean;

    To address how tracers spread;

    To understand the effects of rotation and how jets and eddies form on a rotating planet;

    To understand how waves influence and interact with the ocean circulation;

    To understand why there are western boundary currents and gyres in ocean basins;

    To understand how topography shapes the deep ocean circulation over the globe.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire knowledge of key concepts in ocean and atmosphere dynamics.

    (LO2) Students will learn to appreciate the approximate nature of theoretical ideas, and the strengths and weaknesses of such ideas as explanations of observed phenomena.

    (LO3) Students will develop mathematical skills in scale analysis of differential equations to isolate the essential phenomena.

    (LO4) Students will acquire experience in combining quantitative and qualitative understanding of dynamics to give clear explanations of observed phenomena in the ocean and atmosphere.

    (LO5) Students will develop an understanding of the factors controllng fluid flows on a range of rotating planets.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

  • Honours Project - Ecology & Environment / Marine Biology (ENVS305)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide individual experience in the planning, design and execution of a research project in a defined topic, that may be based on laboratory work, field work, data analysis, or modelling.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completion of the project, students should be able to demonstrate the following skills: Organisational Plan and implement an original research project Design and plan subsequent work to extend initial findings and gain some independence in these activities Demonstrate time management skills Act responsibly and display commitment to the work Practical Recognise hazards and follow safe and ethical working practices Demonstrate skills in an appropriate range of research techniques Generate and record reliable data/information Intellectual Display familiarity with the background literature to the project Appreciate the aims and learning outcomes of the project Analyse, interpret and evaluate observations/data/information and draw conclusions Appreciate the relevance of the project's findings in the wider context of the scientific literature Communication Interact with academic staff, research staff and students Maintain an accurate, comprehensive and intelligible record of methods, observations/data/information Produce Preliminary and Final word processed reports and give an oral presentation using PowerPoint

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Organisational skills

    (S3) Adaptability

  • Ocean Sciences Research Project (ENVS377)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop skills in all aspects of research in ocean sciences, including:

    literature searching, review and appraisal,

    design of experiments or models,

    practical and computing skills,

    collection and/or manipulation of data,

    construction of scientific hypotheses,

    oral communication and report writing.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Plan, organise and undertake a programme of research.

    (LO2) Make observations of data, reflect on outcomes and adjust the research design if necessary.

    (LO3) Interpret, critically evaluate and present the data.

    (LO4) Complete a scientific report of the research planned and undertaken

    (S1) Acquiring, analysing and assessing data

    (S2) Scientific writing

    (S3) Communicating results

  • Science Communication (ENVS393)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Provide key transferable skills to undergraduates, including: communication, presentation, practical classroom skills and team working. Provide classoom based experience for undergraduates who are considering teaching as a potential career Encourage a new generation of STEM teachers. Provide role models for pupils within schools located in areas of high deprivation. Increase University of Liverpool widening participation activites within merseyside.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Have an understanding of the UK educational system and relevant teaching and learning styles.

    (LO2) Have an understanding of the Widening Participation Agenda

    (LO3) Have an understanding of relevant STEM subjects and activities that would link into the National Curriculum

    (LO4) Develop appropriate STEM activities for KS2 and KS3 school groups that link with the National Curriculum

    (LO5) Reflect on and evaluate the effectiveness of the outreach acivities and their delivery

    (LO6) Be able to apply the relevant protocols and safeguarding practice when delivering within a school setting

    (LO7) Be able to apply practical knowledge of effective delivery styles when engaging with primary or secondary aged pupils

    (LO8) Have experience of planning the delivery of a project

    (LO9) Have experience of team working

    (LO10) Have experience of science communication in a variety of situations

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – envisioning

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S6) Time and project management - Project planning

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S8) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S9) Global citizenship - Understanding of equality and diversity

    (S10) Personal attributes and qualities - Willingness to take responsibility

  • Surviving the Marine Environment: Adaptation, Behaviour and Conservation (ENVS310)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to foster a broad understanding of contemporary theory in behavioural ecology, evolutionary biology and ecophysiology, with special reference to the marine environment. We will consider processes that operate at scales from individuals to populations and consider implications of these processes for the conservation of marine species and ecosystems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Appreciate the diversity of behavioural, life-history, genetic and phenotypic adaptations that are adopted by a variety of marine organisms;

    (LO2) Understand the costs and benefits of these behavioural and life-history strategies of different marine species;

    (LO3) Understand the various processes that drive evolution in the marine environment;

    (LO4) Have experience of the relevance of evolutionary processes to contemporary marine science and biological conservation.

    (S1) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S2) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

    (S3) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

Teaching takes place through lectures, practicals, workshops, seminars, tutorials and computer based learning, with an emphasis on learning through doing. The award-winning £23 million Central Teaching Laboratories provides a state-of-the-art facility for undergraduate practical work.

Students value the learning opportunities provided by field classes, including the rapid feedback on performance. You will typically receive at least 15 hours of formal teaching each week. Between 30 and 100 hours of fieldwork and hands-on activities are provided each year depending on the discipline.

A typical module might involve two or three one-hour lectures each week, and often a three- hour laboratory or computer-based practical as well. Tutorials typically involve groups of 4-7 students meeting with a member of staff at least every two weeks in Year One and Two. In Year Three, you will undertake an Honours project, which is a piece of independent research (field, laboratory or data analysis) on a topic of your choice, supervised by a member of staff. In Years Three and Four students meet with their project supervisor on a weekly or more frequent basis. As you progress through your degree, you will be increasingly challenged to engage with current debates, to think critically and to study independently.

A number of the School’s degree programmes involve laboratory and field work. The field work is carried out in various locations, ranging from inner city to coastal and mountainous environments. We consider applications from prospective students with disabilities on the same basis as all other students, and reasonable adjustments will be considered to address barriers to access.