Marine Biology MMarBiol (Hons)

Key information


ecology-and-marine-biology-1

Module details

Due to the impact of COVID-19 we're changing how the course is delivered.

Programme Year One

Compulsory modules develop the essential skills required to be a Marine Biologist and build a foundation of knowledge on the physical and biological environments. Two optional modules allow you to focus a little more on the subjects that interest you.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Evolution (LIFE103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This module aims to:
    Describe fundamental genetic mechanisms that are essential for the function and evolution of life;

    Introduce students to fundamental evolutionary concepts and theories, showing how genetic mechanisms help determine the patterns of observed evolution;

    Apply evolutionary concepts to a broad selection of areas of Life Sciences;

    Develop in students the knowledge and understanding of the subject and the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems in biology.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Recall how cells evolved

    (LO2) Identify the causes of evolutionary change in populations

    (LO3) Recognize the consequences of evolutionary change for patterns of biological diversity within and amongst populations

    (LO4) Recall fundamental genetic mechanisms (heredity, mutation, meiosis, sex) and show how they influence evolutionary change in populations

    (LO5) Recognize the widespread applicability of evolutionary ideas across the Life Sciences

    (S1) Lifelong learning skills

  • Laboratory and Field Techniques for [marine and Terrestial] Ecologists (ENVS171)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This practical module will provide training in a range of ecological skills in a series of field exercises, either in person, or through online equivalent exercises, as necessary. The skills used will have a wide application to many fields of environmental science including modern biology, ecology and physical geography. Techniques taught include identification of plants and animals, communities and measurement of selected ecological processes. You will learn quantitative skills in field ecology and how they can be used to solve fundamental and applied problems. You will also learn quite a lot of ecology at the same time.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Apply a quantitative approach to field science

    (LO2) Work safely under lab and field conditions

    (LO3) Describe plant and animal communities and relate these to environmental factors

    (LO4) Appreciate methods used in sampling plant and animal communities and relating patterns in these communities to environmental factors

    (LO5) Appreciate landscape and ecological features

    (LO6) Measure and understand the relevance of ecological processes

    (LO7) Identify selected plants and animals

    (LO8) Investigate animal behaviour

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Numeracy

    (S4) Organisational skills

  • Marine Biology: Life in the Seas and Oceans (ENVS121)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    This module will introduce students to the main groups of organisms found in the marine environment. Students will develop knowledge of the taxonomic diversity of marine life, and from lectures, workshops and practicals will develop the skills to be able to recognise the major groups from their key identifying features. Students will develop knowledge of the function and form of marine organisms and the adaptational solutions organisms adopt to become successful in the marine environment.

    Students will encounter a variety of marine organisms in subsequent modules and field studies and gaining a familiarity with them in this module will enable them to recognise them and understand their role in marine ecosystems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire knowledge and understanding on the taxonomic and functional diversity of marine life.

    (LO2) Develop the ability to recognise the major groups of marine organisms using their key features

    (LO3) Experience how to examine marine organisms and understand their functional biology using different kinds of specimens and approaches.

    (LO4) Recognise the adaptational solutions to functional problems adopted by marine organisms

    (LO5) Teamwork

    (LO6) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (LO7) Problem solving skills

  • Marine Ecosystems: Diversity, Processes and Threats (ENVS122)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    This module aims to introduce students to the diversity of ecosystem types in the marine environment and the various threats that they face.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire knowledge and understanding of representative key ecosystems found in the marine environment.

    (LO2) Be familiar with the marine organisms that live in representative key marine ecosystems.

    (LO3) Acquire a basic knowledge of fundamental ecological principles, transferable to later marine and non-marine modules.

    (LO4) Be aware of the threats that humans may pose to marine ecosystems.

    (LO5) Appreciate how humans assess and may mitigate detrimental impacts to the environment.

    (LO6) Be introduced to the importance to their future studies of critical reading of scientific literature.

  • Quantitative Skills for Ecology and Marine Biology (ENVS128)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module will prepare students for the quantitative aspects of other parts of their degree programme.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completion of this module, students should be able to use basic algebra

    (LO2) On completion of this module, students should be able to use basic statistical methods

    (LO3) On completion of this module, students should be able to use spreadsheets to record, present and analyze scientific data

    (LO4) On completion of this module, students should be able to recognize the basic ideas of calculus in scientific contexts

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) IT skills

  • Study Skills (ecology and Marine Biology) (ENVS104)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop study skills such as referencing, essay writing, oral and poster presentation;
    To introduce and develop the skills necessary for planning a career and obtaining relevant experience.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Be able to write a scientific essay

    (LO2) Be able to produce a scientific poster

    (LO3) Be able to give a scientific oral presentation

    (LO4) Be able to appropriately source and reference the material used in their writing and presentation.

Year One Optional Modules

  • Living With Environmental Change (ENVS119)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The over-arching aim of this module is to introduce students to the so-called ‘Grand Challenges’ facing society and what is being done to address them. Living with Environmental Change is a key interdisciplinary research theme currently being addressed worldwide; from tackling climate change and carbon emissions to promoting sustainable resource use and energy efficiency. This module illustrates that an interdisciplinary approach is crucial to identifying the underlying problems faced by humanity and to finding holistic and sustainable solutions.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Obtain an understanding of the Grand Challenges facing society;

    (LO2) Develop an appreciation of the significance of interdisciplinary working in addressing the Grand Challenges;

    (LO3) Understand that Geography plays a key role in the Living With Environmental Change (LWEC) research agenda;

    (LO4) Become familiar with the linkages between research, policy and sustainability.

    (S1) Abstraction and synthesis of information

    (S2) Assessing the merits of contrasting theories and explanations

    (S3) Taking responsibility for learning and reflection upon that learning

    (S4) Synthesising, contextualising and critically evaluating information of different styles and from different sources

  • Climate, Atmosphere and Oceans (ENVS111)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    Introduce the climate system, the atmosphere and ocean:

    Address how the climate system varies and how climate is controlled by radiative forcing;

    How the structure of the atmosphere is determined and how the atmosphere circulates;

    How the structure of the ocean is determined and how the ocean circulates;

    How the atmosphere and ocean vary together in affecting the present and past climate system.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge and Understanding

    a. Understand how physical processes operate within the climate system, the atmosphere and the ocean.

    b. Appreciate the complexity of the climate system, the effect of radiative forcing, the concept of feedbacks, how rotation affects the circulation; the differences between currents and waves.

    c. Gain awareness of the similarities and differences between the atmosphere and ocean.

    (LO2) Intellectual Abilities

    a. To be able to evaluate the relative importance of different physical processes in the climate systemb.

    b. To develop critical skills in transferring insight gained from one problem to another problem, such as how the atmosphere circulates from one planet to another planet.

    (LO3) Subject Based Practical Skills

    a. Perform simple order of magnitude calculations and make inferences from the results.

    b. Understand the use of dimensions.

    (LO4) General Transferable Skills

    a. Application of numbers, involving order of magnitudes and dimensions.

    b. Time management.

    c. Problem solving.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

  • Molecules and Cells (LIFE101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    After successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

    Recognise the basic of structure, composition and function of cells;

    Explain core concepts relating to the organisation and specialisation of eukaryotes, prokaryotes and viruses;

    Define the cellular components involved in the regulation of key functions such as the generation of energy, movement, cell growth and division and differentiation;

    Describe the latest techniques that are used in cell biology to determine cell structure and function;

    Develop in students the knowledge and understanding of the subject and the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

    Describe how cells arose and their structural features;

    (LO2) Compare and contrast eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells;

    (LO3) Identify the different ways cells manipulate energy;

    (LO4) Define the molecular basis of the processes by which cells grow, replicate, communicate, interact with their environment, move and die;

    (LO5) Describe the functional importance of cell specialisation and cooperation in tissues.

    (S1) Skills in using technology - Information accessing

  • Ecology and Conservation (ENVS157)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The module aims to introduce students to the key principles that govern the interactions between organisms and their environment, and how these can be used as the basis for conservation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand and explain fundamental principles of how ecological systems are structured and how they function at the scale of individuals, populations and communities

    (LO2) To understand the effects of human activities on communities and ecosystems at a range of timescales

    (LO3) Develop an ability to critically evaluate how ecological understanding and data can be used to inform conservation policy

    (S1) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

    (S2) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

    (S3) Learning skills online studying and learning effectively in technology-rich environments, formal and informal

    (S4) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

  • Microbiology (LIFE110)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This module aims to:

    Describe how microbes play crucial roles in maintaining the natural environment;

    Explain the role of microbes in disease processes and how the immune system protects against infections;

    Highlight the roles of microbes in biotechnological processes;

    Develop knowledge and understanding in microbiology, and ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems in Microbiology.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of this module, the students will be able to:

    Identify appropriate techniques for assessing microbial diversity with particular reference to bacteria and fungi;

    (LO2) Describe the structure and significance of microbial communities involving these species

    (LO3) Explain the physiological properties and adaptations that enable microbes to colonise diverse environments

    (LO4) Define the roles of microbes as commensals and pathogens and mechanisms by which they interact with the host;

    (LO5) Describe the roles that microbes play in nutrient and biomass recycling;

  • Ecology and the Global Environment (LIFE120)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This module aims to:

    Describe the physical and chemical contexts of the biosphere, the cycling of important elements at different scales, the distribution of biomes and the ecosystem concept;

    Discuss ecological concepts such as succession, niche, food web theory, ecosystem stability and the impact of human activities;

    Explain conservation of biodiversity at a range of scales;

    Develop knowledge and understanding in ecology, and ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:Identify a range of global problems facing mankind that have ecological origins;

    (LO2) Link each of these problems to key ecological concepts;

    (LO3) Recognize how interactions of individuals, populations and communities with the physico-chemical environment contribute to determining species distributions and abundance, and to the flows of energy and nutrients;

    (LO4) Identify the demographic forces underlying the growth and size of populations and the determination of biodiversity.

    (S1) Students will also develop independent learning and self-evaluation skills.

  • Introduction to Genetics and Development (LIFE128)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    1) To develop students’ knowledge of the genetic basis of heredity and the application of modern genetic techniques across biology and medicine.

    2) To develop knowledge and understanding of the major events that comprise embryogenesis and of the genetic and cell-biological mechanisms that underpin developmental events.

    3) To enable students to appreciate the ethical issues surrounding modern genetic technology.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Recognise how germ cell development, meiosis and molecular mechanisms lead to variation in offspring and be able to interpret patterns of inheritance.

    (LO2) Choose and know how to apply relevant molecular technologies to study genes, and at an introductory level to create genetically modified organisms and treat genetic disease.

    (LO3) Identify the fundamental mechanisms that regulate development and the events that lead to germ layer formation and organogenesis.

    (LO4) Identify the experimental models and methods used to investigate the mechanisms that regulate development.

    (LO5) Identify the general properties of stem cells, their role in development and their therapeutic potential.

    (LO6) Discuss the ethical issues associated with developments in genetics, development and stem cell therapies.

    (S1) Effective Group working

    (S2) Structure and communicate ideas effectively

    (S3) Access and evaluate information

    (S4) Evaluate own performance and working standards and those of others

Programme Year Two

Year 2 develops more specialist knowledge of Marine Biology, while allowing you to take a wide range of options in areas that interest you. You choose three optional modules.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Studying Uk Coastal Marine Biodiversity (ENVS241)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This module aims to increase students' knowledge of how to sample and identify a broad range of taxonomic groups common to UK coastal marine ecosystems. In addition, students teach themselves how to use new digital approaches to producing publishable content (e.g. Publisher and Corel Draw) broadening their digital fluency.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will learn how to sample and identify a broad range of coastal marine taxa

    (LO2) Students will develop a better understanding of how the biodiversity of marine species is adapted to different habitats and environmental conditions

    (LO3) Students will improve their ability to communicate knowledge to others through development of an accessible guide.

    (LO4) Students will improve their digital fluency by self-learning how to use new software to produce a publication-quality brochure

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Teamwork

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) Organisational skills

    (S5) Problem solving skills

  • Marine Ecology Field Studies (ENVS278)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to increase students' knowledge of how to study a broad range of coastal habitats and species. It will build knowledge and confidence in the ability to go on and undertake both field-based and laboratory based marine ecological research in their careers going forward. This module relies heavily on active learning, with students completing their own data collection and working together, with guidance from academics, on how to generate useful outcomes. It will build on core skills developed earlier in tutorial modules - communication, research skills etc, as well as application of subjects previously explored only through lecture-based theory modules. Field and laboratory-based studies allow students to develop and enhance many generic skills, for example, team working, problem solving, and interpersonal relationships, which are of value to the world of work and active citizenship. This module will therefore widen access to a range of professions that require these core skills, increasing the overall employability of our students.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Gain further knowledge of higher level taxonomy and biodiversity of key groups of European marine species

    (LO2) Understand further the physical factors that drive the distributions of species within an estuarine environment and the behavioral and eco-physiological adaptations of animals to this.

    (LO3) Learn how to collect data from a range of different habitats and also develop skills to complete relevant field and/or laboratory experiments

    (LO4) Experience preparation and analysis of different types of quantitative data from different sampling regimes.

    (LO5) Further develop important research skills including communication of results in different media.

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Teamwork

    (S4) Organisational skills

    (S5) Communication skills

    (S6) IT skills

    (S7) Lifelong learning skills

  • Marine Ecophysiology, Ecology and Exploitation (ENVS251)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting55:45
    Aims

    This module aims to provide students with essential background in marine ecology, ecophysiology and resource exploitation required for study at higher levels. Students will also develop the ability to evaluate and critique the scientific literature, as well as the ability to draw in relevant information from multiple topics areas to address this module aims to provide students with essential background in marine ecology, ecophysiology and resource exploitation required for study at higher levels. Students will also develop the ability to evaluate and critique the scientific literature, as well as the ability to draw in relevant information from multiple topics areas to address multi-disciplinary topics.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Be familiar with some key physiological adaptations necessary to survive in the marine environment

    (LO2) Understand the imporance of some key ecological concepts that underpin the stucturing of marine communities

    (LO3) Develop a basic understanding of key human activities that can affect individuals, populations and communities of marine animals

    (LO4) Develop the ability to read and critically evaluate scientific papers

    (LO5) Develop the ability to research, plan and write essay questions that tackle multi-disciplinary issues (using material from across the module as necessary)

    (S1) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S2) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S3) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

    (S4) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S5) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S6) Learning skills online studying and learning effectively in technology-rich environments, formal and informal

    (S7) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

  • Research and Career Skills (ENVS204)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module develops students' understanding and appreciation of Marine Biology and Ocean and Climate Sciences as contemporary academic disciplines. This module will develop students' subject-specific research and employability skills through the following specific aims:

    Develop capacity to conduct independent research projects, through training in research methods, data analysis and transferable skills.

    Develop students' skills in critical thinking and writing in order to prepare students for subsequent years of study.

    Develop students' awareness of careers and employability. Enabling students to plan for future careers and enhance employability.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Build knowledge of the fields of marine biology, ocean and climate sciences

    (LO2) Develop experience in analysing scientific data, creating professional quality display items and writing a report in a scientific format and style.

    (LO3) Demonstrate an understanding of how to evaluate scientific literature

    (LO4) Develop and improve personal employability skills

    (LO5) Enhance ability to write reports and essays in a technical scientific style

  • Statistics for Environmental Scientists (ENVS222)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module provides training in statistics for environmental scientists. We emphasize the use of software to analyze real environmental data. We do not assume extensive prior knowledge. We will teach the essential theory alongside the practical components.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Make sense of the statistical terms that appear in scientific papers and the media

    (LO2) Summarize data using graphs, tables, and numerical summaries

    (LO3) Choose appropriate statistical methods to answer research questions

    (LO4) Use statistical software to apply these methods, and interpret the output

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) IT skills

Year Two Optional Modules

  • Animal Behaviour (LIFE211)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    Introduce students to the fundamental evolutionary principles that explain a wide range of animal behaviours

    Develop in students and understanding of the evolution of co-operative societies, as well as conflict and conflict resolution

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Apply the principles of behavioural ecology to explain human behaviour

    (LO2) Analyse and interpret examples of behavioural data

    (LO3) Apply fundamental evolutionary principles to explain a wide range of animal behaviours

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

  • Comparative Animal Physiology (LIFE212)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    To introduce students to the physiological problems encountered by animals in their natural environments;

    To encourage students to relate lifestyle and physiology to habitat and to potentially hostile environments;

    To explain how increasing complexity of bodily organisation can lead to greater levels of bodily homeostasis;

    To develop in students an understanding of physiological mechanisms at all levels of organisation, in relation to energetics, temperature, respiration, osmoregulation, and nitrogen excretion. 

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To apply the general principles underlying physiological adaptation

    (LO2) To analyze relationships between animal lifestyle, increasing complexity of bodily organisation and ability to maintain homeostasis

    (LO3) To identify the physiological mechanisms operating at all levels of organisation in relation to the control of temperature, oxygen, osmoregulation, energetics, and nitrogen excretion

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S2) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

  • Evolutionary Biology (LIFE213)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    This modules aims to:

    Provide students with a modern framework for understanding how organisms evolve and the major transitions in evolution;

    Explain where heritable phenotypic variation comes from, how it shapes the evolutionary process within species (microevolution) and el ucidate the link between micro- and macro-evolution;

    Describe the factors influencing the genetic constitution of a population;

    Explain how evolution and ecology are linked OR explain how gene sequence data can be used to study evolutionary processes;

    Equip students with knowledge and understanding in evolutionary biology, and the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve biological problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Discuss the origins of heritable phenotypic variation;

    (LO2) Describe the main factors that cause changes in the genetic constitution of populations including the basic principles of studying molecular evolution; 

    (LO3) Explain the difference between microevolution and macroevolution and how the two processes are linked;

    (LO4) Explain patterns of biodiversity from an evolutionary perspective;

    (LO5) Describe the major evolutionary transitions;

    (LO6) Explain how ecology influences evolution and evolution influences ecology (Elective option 1) OR Explain the basic principles of studying molecular evolution and interpret genetic sequence data (Elective option 2);

    (LO7) Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the principles of evolutionary biology, and how this knowledge has been applied to solve problems.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

  • Population and Community Ecology (LIFE214)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    Introduce students to the concepts and principles underlying the dynamic interactions between species within communities and populations; Describe examples taken from across the globe that illustrate the importance of population ecology, pressures on fish stocks, and use of natural predators for biological control processes Describe how mutualistic interactions benefit communities, such as coral reefs and leguminous plants; Explore how knowledge and understanding of species- and community- interactions can help to develop plans for ecological restoration; Develop students’ ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge and understanding to solve problems in zoology.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Analyze the demographic forces acting on populations of single and multiple interacting species, and their consequences;

    (LO2) Explain the development of community patterns in time (succession) and in space;

    (LO3) Explain the relationships between structure and function operating at the level of the ecological community;

    (LO4) Interpret biological patterns in terms of their dynamics and underlying processes.

    (S1) Numeracy

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

  • Oceanography, Plankton and Climate (ENVS245)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The module will provide a multi-disciplinary view of how ocean physics, microbiology, chemistry and plankton ecology operate in different ocean environments, explain how Earth's climate is affected by the plankton, and show how plankton ecosystems are responding to a changing climate.

    The aim is then to use this multi-disciplinary framework to develop skills in setting sensible hypotheses, numeracy, problem-solving and written communication. Throughout the module material will connect to the research currently being carried out by staff, using research results and research tools to illustrate key concepts and formulate methods to test hypotheses.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain a broad understanding of how different plankton communities arise in different oceanic regimes, and how that ultimately structures food chains to larger marine animals and effects Earth's climate.

    (LO2) Students will be able to compare quantitatively the scales of different processes, and critically assess their relative importance for life in the ocean.

    (LO3) Students will strengthen, and acquire new, skills in quantifying physical-biological drivers of ecosystems.

    (LO4) Students will learn the importance of a multi-disciplinary approach to marine biology and gain experience in solving novel problems.

    (LO5) Students will acquire knowledge of key concepts in physical and biological oceanography.

    (LO6) Students will learn the importance of understanding the assumptions behind key theories in oceanography.

    (LO7) Students will learn how to frame and test hypotheses using appropriate data and methods.

    (LO8) Students will develop skills in written communication of science.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S4) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Marine Pollution (ENVS232)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting45:55
    Aims

    To introduce students to the main anthropogenic stressors, their effects and importance on the marine system

    To train students in literature search and reading of scientific papers

    To enhance writing and communication skills

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the main anthropogenic stressors of the marine system, their causes, functioning, effects and their remediation/regulation;

    (LO2) An awareness of current problems (news + scientific papers)

    (LO3) To enhance communication skills

    (LO4) To learn how to use Web of Science

    (S1) Communication skills

    (S2) International awareness

  • Understanding Marine and Terrestrial Spatial Ecology Using Gis (ENVS255)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to introduce students to the nature, operation and application of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) relevant to ecologists and marine biologists. Through a series of workshops student will learn how to conduct complex tasks in GIS and how to apply these to real-world scientific questions. Through an essay addressing the use of GIS in conservation, students will review published literature to examine how the advent of GIS has changed marine and terrestrial ecology.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Be able to critically review selected applications of GIS in areas of ecology, environmental management and marine biology in order to appreciate its role in decision support.

    (LO2) Understand the nature and sources of spatial data by correct analysis of a variety of datasets provided (particuarly with respect to remotely sensed information) used within GIS, have practised the input of these data into a GIS and have developed a critical awareness of the importance of error and quality with respect to spatial data.

    (LO3) Demonstrate the ability to accurately deploy a variety of GIS functions (such as measurement, queries, neighbourhood analyses, overlay, interpolation, etc.) available within a GIS package to integrate manipulate and analyse spatial datasets.

    (LO4) Apply selected GIS functions with respect to solving a problem based exercise.

    (LO5) Communicate the results from GIS operations by outputting results in the appropriate format.

Programme Year Three

The core compulsory modules focus on research skills and include your independent research project. A wide choice of specialist research-led modules from right across the University allows you to focus on the subjects which interest you the most. You choose four optional modules.

Year Three Compulsory Modules

  • Contemporary Issues in Ecology and Marine Biology (ENVS301)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to develop advanced skills, attributes and experiences required by graduates in ecology and marine biology with a focus on careers, an appreciation of the current state of their field and an international perspective.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Increased confidence to plan and work independently.

    (LO2) Develop an awareness of the current state of the students' Honours fields, including an international perspective.

    (LO3) Become exposed to, and experienced in, a diversity of communication types, such as oral, written and interpersonal.

    (LO4) Reflect on, plan and develop a personalised range of skills and attributes in the context of future opportunities.

  • Marine Biology Honours Field Class (ENVS303)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to further develop students' experience of the variety of UK biota and the ability to carry out a research project, both achieved through group work on a field class.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Increased understanding of the behaviour, ecology or physiology of marine organisms using UK species as model study species.

    (LO2) Further develops the ability to carry out a research project using approaches most commonly used in our sector.

    (LO3) Experience group working in the context of a research project.

  • Honours Project - Ecology & Environment / Marine Biology (ENVS305)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide individual experience in the planning, design and execution of a research project in a defined topic

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completion of the project, students should be able to demonstrate the following skills: Organisational Plan and implement an original research project Design and plan subsequent work to extend initial findings and gain some independence in these activities Demonstrate time management skills Act responsibly and display commitment to the work Practical Recognise hazards and follow safe and ethical working practices Demonstrate skills in an appropriate range of research techniques Generate and record reliable data/information Intellectual Display familiarity with the background literature to the project Appreciate the aims and learning outcomes of the project Analyse, interpret and evaluate observations/data/information and draw conclusions Appreciate the relevance of the project's findings in the wider context of the scientific literature Communication Interact with academic staff, research staff and students Maintain an accurate, comprehensive and intelligible record of methods, observations/data/information Produce Preliminary and Final word processed reports and give an oral presentation using PowerPoint

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Organisational skills

    (S3) Adaptability

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Surviving the Marine Environment: Adaptation, Behaviour and Conservation (ENVS310)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to foster a broad understanding of contemporary theory in behavioural ecology, evolutionary biology and ecophysiology, with special reference to the marine environment. We will consider processes that operate at scales from individuals to populations and consider implications of these processes for the conservation of marine species and ecosystems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Appreciate the diversity of behavioural, life-history, genetic and phenotypic adaptations that are adopted by a variety of marine organisms.

    (LO2) Understand the costs and benefits of these behavioural and life-history strategies of different marine species.

    (LO3) Understand the various processes that drive evolution in the marine environment.

    (LO4) Have experience of the relevance of evolutionary processes to contemporary marine science and biological conservation.

  • Marine Planning Theory & Practice (ENVS341)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to introduce students to the theoretical, practical and critical background of marine planning as it is developing internationally. The objectives of this module are that students should be able:
    To explore the background, history and theoretical underpinnings of the concept of marine planning;
    To understand key writings that are contributing to the development of marine planning;
    To appreciate the diversity of marine planning thought and practice in different political and geographical settings;
    To argue constructively for the appropriate development of marine planning in various contexts.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge of the historical, conceptual and theoretical background of marine planning.

    (LO2) Knowledge of the practical application of the principles of marine planning in selected contexts.

    (LO3) Ability to understand international academic and practitioner arguments for the development of marine planning.

    (LO4) Ability to present knowledge and critical thinking about marine planning orally and in written form.

    (LO5) Ability to show commitment to preparation of a group-based task at specific times.

    (S1) Communication skills

    (S2) International awareness

    (S3) Lifelong learning skills

    (S4) Problem solving skills

    (S5) Team (group) working

  • Coastal Environments: Spatial and Temporal Change (ENVS376)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This module aims to consider the response of physical processes and coastal environments to changes in sea-level and climate. Attention is given to the geomorphology of coastal environments, its response to external agents, as well as to possible coastal management strategies. The module aims at proving students with knowledge and understanding of the physical processes acting along coastal areas, and to promote students capability to critically understand pros and cons of different management techniques in relation to future climate change.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge and understanding of physical aspects of coastal environments

    (LO2) Knowledge and understanding of the concept of spatial and temporal variation: physical processes and landforms, and the importance of spatial and temporal scales

    (LO3) Knowledge and understanding of environments as a result of process and form interaction

    (LO4) Knowledge and understanding of methodologies of analysis and interpretation

    (LO5) Development of an informed concern for the Earth and its people

    (LO6) Capability to critically analyze real case studies in the context of previously acquired knowledge

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) Organisational skills

  • Conservation Biology (LIFE326)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To develop in students the ability to explore current thinking and research in conservation biology;

    To develop in students knowledge and understanding about patterns of biodiversity and to enable them to critically evaluate the evidence supporting alternative explanations for the extinctions or demise of many animal and some plant species;

    To develop in students knowledge and deep understanding in conservation biology, and ability to apply, critically evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve complex problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To construct justified arguments for the value of conserving biodiversity

    (LO2) To evaluate the human activities that affect biodiversity and describe how they act individually and in combination to affect individuals, populations and ecosystems

    (LO3) To evaluate, using case studies, the pros and cons of a wide range of conservation interventions, from international legal instruments to local habitat management

    (LO4) To analyze where conservation questions can be answered with scientific evidence, and where socio-economic and other types of information are more important

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) Ethical awareness

  • Advanced Topics in Ecology (LIFE337)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To describe modern approaches to long standing ecological issues;

    To introduce current research in the expanding areas of ecology;

    To develop students' knowledge and deep understanding in key areas of ecology and an ability to apply, critically evaluate, and interpret this knowledge to solve complex ecological problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To assess how a range of biotic and abiotic processes can act, and interact, to drive ecological dynamics and the structure and assembly of communities

    (LO2) To evaluate predictions associated with relationships between organisms and their environment at a range of spatial and trophic scales

    (LO3) To explain how current key concepts can be used to understand, and manage, ecosystems

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

    (S2) Students will develop skills in participating in group discussions to reach consensus and/or recognise where ambiguities exist in conclusions associated with addressing issues.

  • Integrative Comparative Animal Physiology (LIFE339)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    Develop students’ understanding of the physiological mechanisms that underpin animal adaptations to environmental conditions;

    Develop students’ ability to solve complex physiological problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Evaluate integrative physiological mechanisms enabling animals to survive in potentially hostile environmental conditions

    (LO2) Critically discuss the evolution of air-breathing, terrestriality and endothermy in vertebrates

    (LO3) Critically review evidence to solve complex problems within the context of animal physiology

    (S1) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S2) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S3) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Marine Ecology: Theory and Applications (ENVS383)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop the connections between ecological theory and the management of marine communities and ecosystems. The theory covered will mostly be concerned with the dynamics and diversity of communities and ecosystems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) evaluate the major ecological theories underlying the dynamics and diversity of marine communities and ecosystems.

    (LO2) relate problems in marine conservation and resource exploitation to these ecological concepts.

    (LO3) use appropriate methods to assess the consequences of environmental change and management for marine communities and ecosystems.

    (LO4) recognize the importance of ecological theory in underpinning scientific advice to management.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

  • Current Topics in Animal Behaviour (LIFE322)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    To develop in students an understanding of the use of evolutionary theory to understand animal behaviour;

    To develop in students the ability to apply, critically evaluate and interpret this knowledge and understanding, to solve complex problems in the study of behaviour;

    To develop in students an understanding how predictive modelling, experimental, and observational approaches integrate to explain animal behaviour.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To evaluate the use of the adaptationist approach in studying behaviour

    (LO2) To critically appraise factors affecting the evolution of reproductive behaviour and the evolution of altruism and cooperation

    (LO3) To assess comparative approaches in the study of animal cognition and critically evaluate why cognitive processes of animals might not be, and often are not, analogous to human cognitive processes

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Communication skills

  • Current Skills and Topics in Evolutionary Biology (LIFE324)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To develop in students the skills to construct phylogenetic trees and to use them to infer the evolutionary origins of novel traits, using the latest software packages;

    To encourage students to explore key concepts in contemporary evolutionary biology;

    To develop in students knowledge and deep understanding in selected areas of evolutionary biology, providing opportunities for students to apply, critically evaluate and interpret evolutionary knowledge and ideas.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To construct, graphically display and critically evaluate phylogenetic trees from phenotypic characters and DNA sequences

    (LO2) To use phylogenetic trees to generate and test hypotheses about the evolutionary history of selected traits, and detect molecular signatures of selection within nucleotide or amino acid sequence

    (LO3) To critically evaluate theoretical frameworks and empirical evidence relating to a selection of current research themes in evolutionary biology

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) IT skills

    (S3) Communication skills

  • Global Carbon Cycle (ENVS335)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To provide students with a view of the ocean carbon cycle as a dynamic system;
    To give students an appreciation of the importance of chemical and biological processes in controlling the distribution of carbon in the ocean;
    To provide students with an in depth understanding of the carbon cycle from the surface ocean, to the deep ocean and sediments, and the impact environmental change may have on it.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will learn how physical, chemical and biological process control the transfer of carbon between the atmosphere, ocean and land, and the distribution of carbon species between these environments

    (LO2) Students will understand the role and significance that the ocean plays in the global cycling of carbon

    (LO3) Students will understand the pathways involved in cycling of inorganic and organic carbon between land and the ocean and the surface and deep ocean, with emphasis on the solubility, carbonate and biological pumps

    (LO4) Students will understand how stable isotopes can be used to study the carbon cycle and how it has varied in Earth's history

    (LO5) Students will understand how environmental change is perturbing the global carbon cycle in the present day. Topics covered will include ocean acidification and changes in the surface temperature

    (S1) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S2) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S3) Communication, listening and questioning, respecting others, contributing to discussions, influencing, presentations

Programme Year Four

Your Masters Year focusses on the key modules required for contemporary research in Marine Biology. You choose two optional modules.

Year Four Compulsory Modules

  • Advanced Statistics for Biological Research (LIFE707)
    LevelM
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To enable students to analyse biological data by:

    Choice of appropriate statistical approaches to test hypotheses;

    Critical understanding of the use of a range of advanced statistical tests for appropriate analysis and  model fitting of a range of biological datasets;

    Using the software package, R;

    Synthesizing information, summarising statistical findings, and using hypothesis testing to critically review evidence from experimental data to support conclusions.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Illustrate and explain the methods of hypothesis testing

    (LO2) Critically evaluate experimental design(s) used in data collection and then apply the appropriate statistical test(s).

    (LO3) Design data collection methods appropriate to rigorous data analysis

    (LO4) Synthesise information from data analysis, test statistical hypotheses and critically review evidence to support conclusions.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) IT skills

    (S4) Communication skills

    (S5) Organisational skills

    (S6) Lifelong learning skills

  • Dissertation (mmbiol and Mecol) (ENVS496)
    LevelM
    Credit level60
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop the ability to carry out an individual research project at a masters level building on the knowledge and skills acquired in previous years of the programme (MMBiol/MEcol) or previous BSc studies.

    Students should be aiming for high quality research, where possible, of publishable standard.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Execute an individual research project, seeking appropriate advice as necessary and planning time accordingly

    (LO2) Select appropriate research strategies and undertake appropriate methods of data collection and analysis

    (LO3) Keep clear records of the research undertaken such that these could be followed by someone not involved in direct execution of the project

    (LO4) Produce a final report at a level of quality that would be suitable for publication or for submission as a high quality project report

    (LO5) Present an oral presentation to a relevant research group informing them of the research project and progress to date

    (LO6) Be able to critique and synthesise different information sources to form coherent arguements and relate research findings to relevant issues

    (S1) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S2) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

    (S3) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S4) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S5) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S6) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S7) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

    (S8) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

  • Mastering Marine Biology (ENVS406)
    LevelM
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to prepare students for life after graduation with an M Level qualification, as they continue their careers in research and/or industry;
    Students will become familiar with the latest developments in understanding, application and commmunication of contemporary marine biology topics, as well as strengthening their own core skills.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Build an up to date understanding of the status of the field of marine biology.

    (LO2) Experience and understand the grant writing and assessment process.

    (LO3) Build in-depth knowledge on specific topics of interest to each student.

    (LO4) Improved formal and informal communication and organisational skills

    (S1) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, influencing, presentations

    (S2) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

    (S3) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S4) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S5) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

    (S6) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S7) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

    (S8) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

    (S9) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

Year Four Optional Modules

  • Advanced Conservation Biology (ENVS423)
    LevelM
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to provide students with an appreciation of the variety of approaches used in conservation and the value of a long-term perspective;
    Specifically the module aims to provide students with:
    An understanding of changes in paradigms underlying ecology and conservation;
    An understanding of the strategies used in conservation management, insitu, ex situ, and from global to local;
    An insight into the science of restoration ecology and enable students to develop specific skills including essay writing, presentations, critical evaluation;
    Help students to gain both team-building skills but the ability to plan and execute work independently.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand and summarize how ecological andconservation paradigms have changed over time

    (LO2) Demonstrate knowledge of strategies and approaches used in conservation management

    (LO3) Critique and analyse published materials and synthesize into appropriate argument

    (LO4) Design, orally communicate and critique approaches to conservation management.

    (S1) Teamwork

    (S2) Organisational skills

    (S3) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, influencing, presentations

    (S4) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S5) Problem solving skills

  • Advanced Ecology (ENVS412)
    LevelM
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to provide students with:

    • A clear and critical appreciation of ecological theory.
    • Information on statistical methods appropriate to community ecology.
    • The ability to apply scientific rigour when critically assessing the options available for conservation action in any given case.
    • The ability to present balanced, critical written accounts on scientific issues.
    Learning Outcomes

    On successful compeltion of this module students should have a knowledge and critical understanding of community ecology, specifically below:    

    Have understanding of aspects of macro-ecology.

    ​Discuss current scientific approaches and their uses

    ​Access, understand and summarise scientific information

    ​Have a knowledge of communtiy analysis using multivariate tools

  • Advanced Topics in Comparative Physiology (LIFE745)
    LevelM
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    Provide a critical insight into physiological mechanisms underpinning adaptation to potentially hostile environmental conditions;

    Provide an opportunity to study in depth the integration and evolution of physiological mechanisms;

    Develop a critical understanding of animal physiology, and the ability to apply, critically evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve complex physiological problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Appraise current concepts linking extreme environments to physiological stress;

    (LO2) Evaluate physiological adaptations to potentially hostile environmental conditions, such as anoxia, high hydrostatic pressure and extreme temperatures

    (LO3) Integrate components of a complex physiological mechanism from molecular to whole organism levels

    (LO4) Critically appraise the evolution of air-breathing, terrestriality and endothermy in vertebrates

    (S1) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S2) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S3) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Evolution and Behaviour (LIFE709)
    LevelM
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to introduce students to a set of key concepts and case studies in contemporary evolutionary and behavioural biology such that they can apply key ideas in a critical and evaluative manner

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Synthesise new information on evolutionary and behaviour research

    (LO2) Explain complex evolutionary and behavioural topics for both generalist and specialist biologists

    (LO3) Critically evaluate evolutionary and behavioural evidence, and suggest novel areas for research.

    (S1) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

    (S2) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S3) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S4) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S5) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

  • Geographic Information Science (ENVS609)
    LevelM
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Understand how digital representations of the real world can be created within a GIS including the referencing of geographic features;
    To gain familiarity with the unique properties of geographic data including spatial autocorrelation and modifiable areal units;
    Appreciate that there are uncertainties in the creation of geographic representations;
    Develop skills in the basic use of GIS to create digital representations and understand their constraints within a framework of GIScience

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Gain a sound understanding of the function, concepts  and features of a Geographic Information System

    (LO2) Understand those constraints and considerations that are required when implementing a GIS to build geographic representations

    (LO3) Develop practical skills in the application of a GIS to those data types often associated with a student's disciplinary area

    (S1) Numeracy

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) IT skills

  • Marine Planning & Management in Action (ENVS465)
    LevelM
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The purpose of this module is to:
    - Engage students in a client related marine planning and management strategy making exercise.
    - Provide an opportunity for students to apply marine planning and management concepts and techniques in a practical context.
    - Enhance the capacity of students to identify, collect and synthesis a variety of relevant information from a variety of sources in relation to a marine planning and management task.
    - Evaluate marine planning and management options and develop objectives and strategies which are realistic, implementable and measurable.
    - Develop an awareness of the ethical and professional issues that confront marine planning and management practitioners working for a client;.
    - Develop collaborative problem solving, project management and written, oral and graphic communication skills.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An ability to work collaboratively as part of a team in developing a realisable solution to a complex marine planning and management problem;

    (LO2) good written and oral communication skills to explain how they have tackled and resolved the task;

    (LO3) An ability to identify, collect, analyse and synthesise a range of information relevant to developing an appropriate strategy;

    (LO4) an ability to meet the need of a client within a prescribed timescale;

    (LO5) an awareness of the way that cultural, political and institutional forces shape policy responses

    (S1) Time and project management - Project planning

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

    (S4) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S5) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

  • Marine Planning Theory and Practice (ENVS541)
    LevelM
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to enable students to develop a theoretical, practical and critical understanding of the notion of marine planning as it is developing internationally, in its wider context of marine management and policy-making. The objectives of this module are that students should be able:
    To explore the background, history and theoretical underpinnings of the concept of marine planning;
    To understand and critically appraise key writings that are contributing to the development of marine planning;
    To investigate leading approaches and techniques being applied in marine plan-making and pilot projects;
    To appreciate the diversity of marine planning thought and practice in different political and geographical settings;
    To argue constructively for the appropriate development of marine planning in various contexts.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) 1. Knowledge of the historical, conceptual and theoretical background of marine planning

    (LO2) 2 . Knowledge of the practical application of the principles of marine planning in selected contexts.

    (LO3) 3. Ability to research marine planning literature and documentation.

    (LO4) 4. Ability to engage critically with international academic and practitioner arguments for the development of marine planning.

    (LO5) 5. Ability to present knowledge and critical thinking about marine planning orally and in written form.

    (S1) Communication skills

    (S2) International awareness

    (S3) Lifelong learning skills

    (S4) Problem solving skills

  • Research in Anthropocene Environments (ENVS485)
    LevelM
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to provide students with:

    The opportunity to conduct in depth piece of research on a chosen topic within the broad theme of human impacts on the environment;

    Provide students with training in research methods and critical analysis techniques;

    Teach them to write a short concise abstract (in a conference format);

    To present the results in the form of a high impact, high quality A0 poster.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) 1. Demonstrate an understanding of anthropocene environments;

    (LO2) 2. Knowledge of a series of key case studies illustrating interactions between human activities and terrestrial and marine ecosystems;

    (LO3) 3. Critically analyse and assess previously published materials and synthesize into an appropriate case study;

    (LO4) 4. Write a concise abstract;

    (LO5) 5. Demonstrate knowledge of poster development and construction;

    (LO6) 6. Present a poster in a professional manner.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) IT skills

    (S4) Organisational skills

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

Teaching strategies include a mix of lectures, tutorials, workshops, field classes, research vessel cruises, laboratory work, computer sessions, group projects and individual work under supervision. You will typically receive around 15 hours of formal teaching each week, as well as about 60 hours on residential field courses each year. You will study four modules per semester. A module might involve two one-hour lectures each week, and a laboratory or computer-based practical as well. Tutorials are an integral part of our approach, involving groups of 5-7 students meeting regularly with a member of academic staff to discuss study skills, careers, current research and topical issues.

As you progress through your degree, you are increasingly challenged to engage with current debates, to think critically and to study independently. You will do an ‘Honours Project’ throughout Year Three, which is a piece of independent research (field, lab or data analysis) on a topic of your choice, supervised by a member of academic staff. If you opt for the four-year integrated master’s programmes, you will spend 50% of your final year on a ‘master’s project’ working closely within a research group on an area which may well generate publishable results.

A number of the School’s degree programmes involve laboratory and field work. The field work is carried out in various locations, ranging from inner city to coastal and mountainous environments. We consider applications from prospective students with disabilities on the same basis as all other students, and reasonable adjustments will be considered to address barriers to access.


Assessment

Assessment matches the learning objectives for each module and may take the form of written exams, coursework submissions in the form of essays, scientific papers, briefing notes or lab/field notebooks, oral and poster presentations and contributions to group projects.