Law with Accounting and Finance LLB (Hons) Add to your prospectus

  • Opportunity to study for a year in China Offers a Year in China
  • This degree is accreditedAccredited

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: M101
  • Year of entry: 2018
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB / IB : 33 / BTEC : DDD
law-2

Module details

Programme Year One

In addition to studying some of the modules that must be studied and passed in order to gain a Qualifying Law Degree, known as the ‘Foundations of Legal Knowledge’, students also undertake Accounting and Finance modules with a value of 30 credits in the first year.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Law of Contract (LAW105)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims
    1.  To ensure that you have a solid knowledge and understanding of the main legal principles and issues of englsih Contract Law in its social, economic and political context.       

    2.  To understand the impact of EU Law in English Contract Law and to have a solid  understanding of the reform and developments resulting from EU Law           ​
    3.  To develop your analytical, critical and research skills;        ​
    4. To develop a strong knowledge and research skills base to enable you to recognize the differences between Contract and Tort Law and appreciate the importnace of Contract Law to related specialist Commercial legal subjects ​
    5.  To provide you with a strong base of learning as a foundation for other related academic legal modules and in preparation for your vocational training   ​
    6.  To develop your skills to work in a team including your communication, negotiation and persuasion skills        ​
    7. To develop your skills as an independent learner including time management skills 

    Learning Outcomes

    Demonstrate in writing a knowledge of the basic principles of English Contract Law;    

    Demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the key cases and statutory provisions;        ​

    Appreciate the influence of policy on the development of  English Contract Law; ​

    Analyse, evaluate and form critical judgements on individual cases and statutes;        ​Use primary and secondary sources of law relating to contract law effectively;         ​Understand the language of the Law of Contract;        ​Present coherent and effective argument about issues relating to contract law;       ​Write concisely and coherently about the law relating to contract;       ​Identify and engage with contemporary debates while accurately reporting the law in an area of contract law;

    ​Be able to understand and use primarylegal materials;

    ​Apply substantive law and legal reasoning skills to hypothetical cases.

  • Criminal Law (level 4) (LAW107)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
    Aims
    1. To introduce students to the fundamental concepts of criminal law.
      • ​To introduce students to the most important specific offences and defences in the criminal law of England and Wales.

      • To enhance students'' acquisition of key skills in the study of law.

      • Todevelop students'' understand how the study of law differs from practising law.​

      • To equip students to carry out independent tasks and research to a reasonable level as a basis for further development in subsequent study.

      Learning OutcomesAbility to attain a reasonable theoretical and doctrinal understanding of the criminal law.

      Ability to extractthe law from legislation and cases.​

      Ability to tracethe development of the law through legislation and case law.

      Ability to criticallyanalyse and assess the law.

      ​Ability to apply theirknowledge of the law to hypothetical factual situations.

      Ability to use traditionaland electronic sources of material.

      Ability to completespecified tasks with direction from academic staff.

    2. Public Law I (LAW109)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting95:5
      Aims
    3. Public Law I seeks to:  - explore the nature and functions of constitutional law;
    4. ​- provide students with a knowledge and understanding of the fundamental principles and institutions of the UK constitution;

    5. ​- identify and analyse selected key issues that are of critical importance to the UK’s constitutional arrangements;

    6. ​- enable students to develop a range of core legal and transferable skills, and become effective independent learners.

    7. Learning Outcomes

      By the end of Public Law I, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of, and the ability to analyse critically, the following topics:

      - the law, practice and theory of the UK constitution;

      ​- the key institutions of the UK constitution, their functions, and the relationship between them;

      ​- the doctrine of the sovereignty of Parliament, and its present status within the UK constitution;

      ​- the nature and purpose of legal accountability, through the principles of the rule of law and the separation of powers;

      ​- the nature and purpose of political accountability, through the notions of ministerial responsibility, parliamentary accountability, and open government.

      ​Students should be able to demonstrate the ability to consult, engage with, and respond to feedback.

    8. Public Law II (LAW110)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting95:5
      Aims

      The module aims to provide students with the constitutional underpinnings and theory of administrative law;

      1.  provide students with a knowledge and understanding of the institutions, processes and legal principles of  redress for judicial and extra-judicial grievances against public;
      2. provide students with a knowledge and understanding of the operation of the Human Rights Act; identify and analyse selected key issues that are of critical importance to the UK’s constitutional arrangements;   
      3. ​enable students to develop a range of core legal and transferable skills, and become effective independent learners.
      Learning Outcomes

      Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the laws, policies and theories relating to constitutional underpinnings of Administrative Law and  Human Rights  in the UK and communicate that knowledge and understanding to others;

       

       

      Comment in an informed and a critical manner on certain key issues such as  the  process and scope of  methods of challenging governmental/public bodies’ actions, and the  protection of human rights

      ​Apply their knowledge to hypothetical situations

      Engage in debate and in written argument regarding contentious legal and political issues

      Appreciate the wider political significance of Public Law

      ​To demonstrate the ability to consult, engage with and respond to feedback.

    9. Introduction to Financial Accounting (ACFI101)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
      Aims

      To develop knowledge and understanding of the underlying principles and concepts relating to financial accounting and technical proficiency in the use of double entry accounting techniques in recording transactions, adjusting financial records and preparing basic financial statements. 

      Learning Outcomes

         Prepare basic financial statements

      ​Explain the context and purpose of financial reporting

      Demonstrate the use of double entry and accounting systems​

      ​Record transactions and events

      ​Prepare a trial balance

    10. Introduction to Management Accounting (ACFI102)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      The aim of this module is to introduce students to the nature and purpose of management accounting and to establish a sound foundation in its fundamental techniques.

      Learning Outcomes

      ​Understand, interpret and analyse management accounting information, and demonstrate an awareness of the importance of non-financial factors;

      ​Evaluate the usefulness of various techniques in different situations and for different purposes.

    Programme Year Two

    The core Year Two modules are made up largely of modules that must be studied and passed in order to gain a Qualifying Law Degree, known as the 'Foundations of Legal Knowledge'. Students also undertake Accounting and Finance modules with a value of 30 credits in the second year.

    Year Two Compulsory Modules

    • Law of Tort (LAW209)
      Level2
      Credit level30
      SemesterWhole Session
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims
    • To provide an introduction to the functions of the law of torts within the legal system.

    • To provide a structured outline of a range of actionable torts, and commentary on contentious issues and recent developments therein​.

    • To consider how the legal principles can be applied to a variety of hypothetical facts​.

    • Learning Outcomes

       Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the basic principles of the law of tort.

      ​ Demonstrate basic understanding of the social and economic context in which the law of tort functions, its aims and objectives and its underlying policy issues.

      Identify and correctly apply the law to a set of hypothetical facts.

      Adopt a critical perspective to existing legal rules and identify constructive suggestions for reform.

       Undertake independent research, with appropriate guidance.​

      Construct coherent legal arguments, orally and in writing.​

    • Equity & Trusts (LAW211)
      Level2
      Credit level30
      SemesterWhole Session
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      To stimulate the academic interest of students in a complex and evolving area of law.

      ​To deliver the substantive elements of the subject area in accordance withthe requirements laid down in the Joint Announcement of the SRA and Bar Council, governing the content of qualifying LL.B degree programmes.

      ​To enhance general legal and transferable skills in the context of the subject area.

      ​To allow students to carry out independent tasks and research to a high level of aptitude.

      Learning OutcomesDemonstrate, orally and in writing, knowledge and understanding of thebasic concepts of Equity and the operation of the trust.

      Demonstrate a basic understanding of the legal context of trusts and equity  in the operation of the legal system.

      ​Demonstrate an awareness of the practical implications for individuals of the operation of the law of Equity & Trusts in England and Wales, e.g., with reference to the ownership of the matrimonial home.

      Demonstrate understanding of the law as it affects trustees - obligations,powers, etc.

      ​Appreciate the social and economic (especially fiscal) context of trusts and the underlying policy issues.

      Demonstrate an appreciation of the value of equitable remedies in society.

      ​Demonstrate an understanding of the subject area as a whole, as well as in discrete topics.

      ​Use and interpret complex legal statutory material, case law and academic writing.

    • Law and Social Justice (LAW212)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
    • To promote the key characteristics of the “Liverpool Law Graduate” - a student who is distinctively engaged, empowered and employable - particularly a critical awareness of the role of law in facilitating and hindering social change;

    • To engage students directly with the research activities of staff within the Liverpool Law School by exploring live issues and methods;

    • To promote the development of key legal and transferable skills, particularly as regards research, critical thinking and team work;

    • To provide students with an introduction to some of the key optional choices available in their final year of study on the law degree. ​

    • Learning Outcomes

      To demonstrate a critical awareness and understanding of the role of law in promoting (or inhibiting) values such as justice, fairness, equality, citizenship, inclusion and social responsibility; and of how such values are themselves constructed and critiqued;

       

      To work effectively as part of a project team to deliver a research-based presentation;​

      To demonstrate awareness of the nature of academic legal research, particularly from among the main fields of research undertaken within the Law School.​
    • Land Law (LAW242)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting95:5
      Aims
    • ?Stimulate theacademic interest of students in a complex area of law

    • Enhancegeneral legal and transferable skills in the context of the subject area.

    • ????Deliver the substantive elements of the subject in accordance with the requirements laid down in the JointAnnouncement ofthe Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) and Bar Council governing the content of the qualifying law degree.

    • ?Carry out independent tasks and research to a highlevel of aptitude.

    • Learning Outcomes

      ?Demonstrateknowledge and understanding of the basic rules affecting an individual''s useand occupation of land and the claims of a third party to an interest in land.

      ?Demonstratedetailed knowledge of and the ability to critically evaluate the law in someareas.?

      ?Appreciatethe social context and underlying policy issues in this area of law and theinfluences they exert.

      ???

      ?Show anawareness of the practical implications for individuals of the operation ofLand Law.?

      ?Researchthe relevant laws, electronically and on paper and present an effectiveargument, soundly based in critical analysis of the law in its social andpolicy context both orally and in writing.?

      ?Be ableto complete specified tasks with minimal direction or input through formalinstruction.?

    • Financial Reporting 1 (ACFI201)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims
    • To enable candidates to prepare single entity financial statements, and extracts from those financial statements,covering a wide range of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS)
    • ​Candidates will also be expected to explain accounting and reporting concepts and ethical issues, and the application of specified IFRS to specified single entity.

    • Learning Outcomesdraw up a set of financial statements which comply with the major provisions of IAS1 and other key International Accounting Standards;

      understand and apply key international accounting standard regulations with respect to presentation, disclosure, recognition and measurement for individual company financial statements​;

      ​assess the concepts underlying financial reporting through a knowledge of the IASBs Conceptual Framework.

    • Management Accounting (ACFI203)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      The aim of the module is to build on the basic management accounting methods seen in the first year through coverage of a range of further techniques that aid costing, decision-making, planning and control. Themes relating to the impact of internal accounting systems on managerial motivation and incentives will also be introduced.

      Learning Outcomes

      ​Analyse and evaluate information such that suitable recommendations to management may be made, showing an awareness of financial and non-financial factors.

      ​Demonstrate an awareness of the behavioural impact of management accounting systems in terms of motivation and incentives.

    Programme Year Three

    In addition to core modules, students choose two Law optional modules in each semester. The School offers a wide range of optional modules, full details of which are on our website. The range is sufficiently wide to enable students to specialise in one aspect of law, if they choose, or to mix options from across the curriculum. The modules leaders are generally leading researchers in their field, enabling students to benefit from the latest developments in the law.

    Timetabling considerations and subject prerequisites mean that not all optional modules will be available to all students every year. The list of options is reviewed each year.

    Year Three Compulsory Modules

    • Law of the European Union I (LAW313)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
      1. To introduce the constitutional and institutional law of the European Union.

      2. ​To develop an understanding of EU legislative procedures; the nature and limits of Union competence; and the system of judicial review governing Union acts.​

      3. To explore the application of EU law within national legal systems.

      4. ​To encourage you to think critically about the integration process, e.g., the democratic character of EU decision-making processes and the effectiveness of the system of judicial protection against Union acts.​

      Learning OutcomesDemonstrate a developed understanding of the constitutional and institutional law of the European Union.

      ​Understand, critique, and apply the Union legal method.

      ​Handle Union legal materials effectively, including case law of the Court of Justice of the European Union, EU Treaties and Union legislation.​

      ​Apply specialist knowledge to consider contemporary issues in the field of study.

      ​Think critically about the evolving process of EU integration.

      ​Think critically about the evolving process of less EU integration

    • Law of the European Union II (LAW314)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims
    • To consider some areas of substantive Union law, as distinct from the constitutional and institutional dimension considered in LAW313.

    • To critically examine the development of EU law relating to the free movement of goods, free movement of workers and free movement of economically inactive citizens (such as students and of retired persons).​

    • To explore and show appreciation of the doctrinal and policy problems as relevant to the three topics (above) under consideration.​

    • Learning Outcomes

      Understand how Union law is enforced in substantive areas.

      Apply provisions of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and EU secondary legislation to substantive issues.

      Understand Opinions of Advocates General and judgments of the Court of Justice and critically assess their contribution to the development of EU law.

      Solve problems in these areas and discuss the process of European integration.​

      ​Appreciate similarities and differences between EU freemovement law as it applies to goods, on the one hand, andpersons, on the other hand.​

    • Corporate Reporting and Analysis (ACFI302)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
      Aims
    • This module aims to develop students understanding of financial reporting to an advanced level by building upon the knowledge and skills gained in earlier financial reporting modules.  Complex IFRS on topics such as share based payments and deferred tax will be looked at.

    • ​This module also aims to develop students consolidated accounting skills by looking at complex business combinations.

    • ​This module also aims to develop an understanding of financial statement analysis using financial reporting and business strategy skills developed in this and earlier modules.

    • This module aims to give students an appreciation of the ethical and professional issues an accountant may face in practice and develop an understanding of how to deal with those issues.​

    • Learning Outcomes​Students will be able to prepare and evaluate single company financial statements, or extracts thereof, in accordance with IFRS for complex transactions. Students will be able to account for complex business combinations in accordance with International Accounting Standards.Students will be able to analyse and interpret financial statements and other financial information and draw appropriate conclusions.

      ​Students will learn to appraise ethical, CSR and professional issues for an accountant undertaking work in corporate reporting and recommend courses of action.

    • Advanced Management Accounting (ACFI303)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
      Aims

      The module aims to increase students'' knowledge of the theory and practice of management accounting and to build on study of this topic in earlier years, especially to extend and complement the material covered in the second year Management Accounting (ACFI 203). An important part of the module is reviewing of the various theoretical approaches which have been adopted or proposed for the development of management accounting and management decision-making.  Also, detailed materials on the practice of management accounting will be provided and explored in lectures and workshops.  The module thus presents management accounting in a broad context of organisational management and control.  The module is also based on the notion that the primary aim of a business organisation is to identify and pursue a successful long-term competitive strategy. Keeping in mind this notion the module explores the links between management accounting practices and business strategy.

      Learning Outcomes

      ·  Understand, analyse and evaluate issuesin theory and practice in management accounting;


      ​·    Examine the factors that influence thedesign of organisations and their management accounting control systems;

      ​·  Evaluate the different approaches toplanning and performance measurement;

      ​·     Identify the important behavioural,ethical and social responsibility issues associated with management accountingcontrol systems;

      ·        Critically evaluate ''traditional''management accounting controls and assess possible future developments.

    Year Three Optional Modules

    • Company Law (LAW029)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      This module examines those aspects of Company Law which provide the legal framework for businesses and regulate their legal environment. It views Company Law from the perspective of those who form and manage the company.

      Learning OutcomesAcquire a critical understanding of the laws applicable to the formation, establishment and management of a registered company;

      Gain an in-depth appreciation the practical and legal implicationsof contractual capacity and the consequences of artificial legal entity issuesrelating to management of the company and protection of minority shareholders. ​

      ​Show an awareness and appreciation at the basic level of policy relating to Company Law in its context;

      Critically apply the law to factual situations in their social and legal context;

      ​Research the relevant laws, electronically and on paper so that a familiarity with academic and professional literature is acquired; ​

      ​Present an effective argument in examinations, formative assessments, seminar sessions; 

      ​Understand and appreciate the impact and importance of EU Law and domestic laws in these areas.

    • Criminal Evidence (LAW033)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims
    • ·    To cultivate a knowledge and understanding of the rationale and development of the law governing criminal evidence, specifically the operation and admissibility of evidence in criminal cases.


    • ·       To foster an ability to appreciate the significance of those rules of evidence for defendants in criminal cases.

    • ·  To develop competence in critically evaluating the law governing the admissibility of evidence in criminal cases.

    • ​To assist in the capacity to apply the law on criminal evidence to hypothetical situations in an effective manner.

      ·    

    • To inculcate additional electronic and bibliographic research skills, particular the ability to research the law of evidence and the policies underlying specific rules of evidence.

    • To aid students in the presentation of legal and critical argument re: criminal evidence both orally and in writing.

    • Learning Outcomes

      ·     hHave a reasonably good theoretical and doctrinal appreciation of criminal evidence principles.


      ·        extractthe relevant law on criminal evidence from legislation and case law.

      ·     tTrace the development of the law on criminal evidence through legislation and case law.

      ·        demonstrateorally and in writing a thorough knowledge and understanding of the generalprinciples of criminal evidence.

      ·      applytheir knowledge of the law on criminal evidence to hypothetical factualsituations.

      ·        identifygaps and ambiguities in the law on criminal evidence.

      ·     usetraditional and electronic sources of material.

      ·     participatein group work.

      ​      reflecton their understanding of the syllabus and use feedback to develop the qualityof their work.

      ·        completespecified tasks with direction from academic staff.

    • Dissertation in Law (sem 1) (LAW034)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
    • ​​Students are supported in the development of independent research skills through research into an area of law that they find particularly interesting.
    • Students develop their presentation skills in supportive context. They recognise the differences between effective oral and written presentation.
    • ​​​Students are equipped as ''independent learners'', relying largely on self-motivation and enthusiasm.
    • ​Students gain experience of formulating research questions and undertaking extended writing.

    • Learning OutcomesApplication of critical judgement to an area of legal literature

      ​Development of polished legal writing skills

      ​​Development of oral presentation skills

      ​Development of time management skills

      ​​Development of the ability to synthesise complex legal information

      ​​Development of ability to independently find useful legal information

      ​Formulation of student''s own research question​

    • Dissertation (sem 2) (LAW035)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

       

      Students are supported in the development of independent research skills through research into an area of law that they find particularly interesting.
    • Students develop their presentation skills in supportive context. They recognise the differences between effective oral and written presentation.
    • ​​​Students are equipped as ''independent learners'', relying largely on self-motivation and enthusiasm.
    • ​Students gain experience of formulating research questions and undertaking extended writing.

    • Learning Outcomes

      Application of critical judgement to an area of legal literature.




       

      Development of polished legal writing skills.

      Development of oral presentation skills.

      Development of time management skills.Development of the ability to synthesise complex legal information.Development of ability to independently find useful legal information.Formulation of student''s own research question
    • Dissertation (LAW036)
      Level3
      Credit level30
      SemesterWhole Session
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
      • Students are supported in the development of independent research skills through research into an area of law they find particularly interesting.
      • Students develop their presentation skills in a supportive context. They recognise the differences the differences between effective oral and written presentation.
      • Students are equipped as ''independent learners'', relying largely on self-motivation and enthusiasm.
      • Student s gain experience of formulating research questions and undertaking extended writing.
      Learning Outcomes

       Application of critical judgement to an area of legal literature.

      Development of polished legal writing skills.


      ​Development of oral presentation skills.

      ​Development of time management skills.

      ​Developement of the ability to synthesise complex legal information.

      ​Development of ability to independently find useful legal information.

      ​Formulation of student''s own research question.

    • Medical Law and Ethics 1 (LAW051)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims
    • To examine the interaction between medical practice and the law and the fundamental legal principles governing the doctor-patient relationship.

    • ​To offer a detailed consideration of the legal principles regulating compensation of victims of medical accidents, consent to medical treatment and the confidentiality of the doctor-patient relationship.

    • ​To consider basic principles of medical ethics and their application 

    • Learning Outcomes

      knowledge and understanding of the basic principles of Medical Law and detailed knowledge of the law in some key areas

      ​a basic understanding of the context in which medicine is practised in the UK and the impact of legal rules on the practice of medicine

      ​a basic understanding of the ethical issues involved in particular areas of medical practice, such as consent to treatment

      An ability to identify correctly and apply the law and ethical principles to hypothetical facts​

      ​An ability to adopt a critical perspective to existing legal rules and/or practices, and to identify constructive suggestions for reform

    • Human Rights Law (LAW073)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      ​To enable you to become familiar with the institutionalframework behind the international, European and UK human rights law.

      To prepare you to analyse the substantive international, Europeanand UK human rights law.

      ​To enhance your understanding of how human rights law affectsthe lives of all people.

      ​To facilitate your engagement with the current key issues inhuman rights law and policies at international, European and domestic level.

      Learning Outcomes

      ​Identify the human rights institutional framework at theinternational, European and domestic level.

      ​Understand the principal case law and legislative frameworksrelating to the substantive human rights law at the international, European anddomestic level.

      ​Analytically apply substantive human rights law to practicalsituations.

      ​Appreciate the impact of human rights law on people’sdifferent areas of life, as well as the key challenges currently facing humanrights law.

      ​Identify and analyse fictional and factual scenarios ofhuman rights violations.

      ​Determine the extent of the impact of human rights statutorynorms and case law, at international, supra-national and domestic level, onpeople’s everyday lives.

    • Police Powers, Public Order and Protest (LAW074)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      This module introduces students to police powers, public order law and police accountability in England and Wales.

      Learning Outcomes

      At the end of the module students should be able to

      • Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the laws, policies and some theory relating to civil liberties in England and Wales in the field of police powers
      • Demonstrate that knowledge orally and in writing
      • apply that knowledge to hypothetical practical situations
      • distil law from the statutes and cases and use traditional and electronic sources of material for research - including keeping up to date with change in a fast moving Government and court lead area of the law
      • write concisely and incisively about legal issues as appropriate
      • present coherent and effective oral argument about legal issues and an ability to support the positions taken from legal analysis
    • Internet Law (LAW077)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      The module aims:

      1. To introduce students to the theoretical, technological and practical dimensions of internet technology within the political economy of the emerging legal architecture.
      2. To facilitate students acquisition of a range of skills that may not be covered in more defined law modules where, the focus is on acquiring knowledge of substantive rules and doctrines.
      3. To challenge students to confront some of the ways law is responding to new as well as old problems.


      Learning Outcomes

      On completion of the modules students should be able:

      1. To demonstrate their understanding and familiarity with the topics covered.
      2. To demonstrate, either orally or in writing, their critical appreciation of the primary and secondary material and explain their relevance to the role of law in the Internet.
      3. To collaborate and deliver a group presentation on a case study.
      4. To assume responsibility for their progression and development by successfully completing the seminar cycles and the end of module assessment.
      5. To interpret and synthesize complex primary and secondary legal material.
      6. To undertake independent study, research and utilise electronic and web based resources.
    • Discrimination Law (LAW079)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      To prepare you to analyse the substantiveinternational, European and UK law on discrimination.

      To enhance your understanding of how the law ondiscrimination affects the working and private lives and patterns of all people.

      To allow you to critically assess the impact of thesubstantive international, EU and UK law on discrimination on employment practicesand labour policies of national and international business.To facilitate your engagement with the current keyissues in discrimination law and policies at international, European and UKlevel.
      Learning Outcomes

      Understand the principal case law and legislativeframeworks relating to the substantive law on discrimination at theinternational, European Union and domestic level.

      ​Analytically apply substantive discrimination law topractical situations of inequality and discrimination.

      ​Appreciate the impact of discrimination law on people’sdifferent areas of life, as well as the key challenges currently facing discriminationlaw.

      ​Identify and analyse fictional and factual scenarios oflegally and/or socially discriminatory conduct.

      ​Determine the extent of the impact of statutory normsand case law, at international, supra-national and domestic level, on people’severyday lives.

    • Eu Social Law (LAW302)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
    • To develop further knowledge of EU Law, by exploring a range of specialist topics relating to the EU''s competence over social law and policy within the Member States.

    • To explore the relationship, and tensions, between the EU''s economic and social competences.​

    • Learning Outcomes

      Show an advanced understanding of Union legal method.

      Demonstrate the ability to conduct research in specialist fields of EU Law.​

      Think critically about the social dimension of European integration, including its broader economic, political, constitutional and cultural contexts.​

    • Financial Services Law (LAW305)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      Provide an understanding of the role of financial services and the legal framework in the EU and UK;

      Study the core features of financial services law, including the process of authorisation, conduct of business rules, and financial promotion

      Provide an understanding of the function of the criminal law in the sphere of financial services Study the relationship between the financial services provider and the consumer and the role of the law in this context  ​Provide an understanding of questions of reform and competing arguments regarding reform

       

      Learning Outcomes

      Understand and evaluate the relevance of financial services law in the legal and economic system and in the study of law

      ​Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the role of the law and fundamental legal principles in facilitating and regulating financial services

      Assess and weigh legal materials in relation to financial services lawDemonstrate a knowledge and understanding of different regulatory approaches in financial services

      ​Acquire problem-solving techniques and understand the role of law in the financial markets

    • Administrative Justice (LAW315)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
      Aims
    • To consider and evaluate extra-judicial means for redress of people''s complaints and challenges to governmental or public bodies focussing upon the techniques (and the associated institutions) of complaint, investigation, adjudication and alternative dispute resolution methods used in administrative justice. 

    • ​To consider how lessons may be learned from  redress so as to improve both initial decision-making and redress.

    • To consider if the ''system'' approach provides a better understanding of the arrangments, institutions and  techniques of administrative justice.​

    • Learning Outcomes

      To demonstrate a critical understanding of the  techniques and their objectives used in extra-judicial redress of people''s grievances against governmental and public bodiesand in learning the lessons so as to improve initial decision-making and administration




      ​To demonstrate a critical understanding of the contexts of these techniques including the perspectives of all of the stake-holders, and the implications for the public interest.

      ​To be able to evaluate critically the respective strengths and weaknesses of of the United Kingdom''s administrative justice system in an international comparison

      ​To demonstrate some understanding of observation in empirical research

    • Family Law (LAW316)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims
      1. Provide students with an introduction to key aspects of family law in England and Wales in the context of both public and private proceedings.

      2. To explore how the law defines ‘family’

      3. ​To highlight the extent to which the law accommodates different family forms and interpersonal relationships in the light of cultural, religious and social variables.

      4. To consider the impact of human rights on the development and interpretation of family law.

      5. ​To critically examine key features of and developments in family law in England and Wales, including an analysis of the ongoing family justice review and key judicial decisions.

      6. To critically examine the role and limitations of the state in regulating family relationships, including an analysis of the interplay between state welfare provision and the organisation of private family life.

      Learning Outcomes

      Have acquired a detailed understanding of legal instruments and processes governing family law in England and Wales

       

      ​Be able to apply legal instruments to practical scenarios

      ​Be able to determine individuals'' rights in family law matters, particularly the rights of vulnerable and socially/legally marginalised groups (ex. Children; same sex couples; ethnic minorities).

      ​Have gained a critical perspective of key legal and policy developments in family law and be able to suggest areas for development and reform;

      ​Be able to appreciate the relationship between social policy/state welfare provision and the development of family law.

      ​Understand the impact of human rights on the interpretation and application of family law

    • Banking Law (LAW317)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      The aims of this module are:

      To ensure that students have a solid knowledge and understanding of the main legal principles and issues of english Banking Law in its social, economic and political context.      

      To understand the impact of EU Law in English Banking Law and to have a solid  understanding of the reform and developments resulting from EU Law​

      To allow students to develop a strong knowledge and research skills base to enable them to recognize the differences between Banking,  Contract and Tort Law and appreciate the importance of Banking Law to related specialist Commercial legal subjects

      To develop students skills to work in a team including communication, negotiation and persuasion skills and to work in groups as a participant contributing professionally and effectively to successful completion of the joint task ​

       

      Learning OutcomesUnderstand the laws applicable to the banker/customer relationship, bank regulation and negotiable instruments and appreciate the practical and legal problems in this area of regulating the banking sector.

      Apply substantive law and legal reasoning skills to hypothetical cases;​

      Understand and appreciate the impact and importance of EU Law in these areas;

      Show an awareness at the basic level of economic and government policy behind the  the banking sector;

      Analyse, evaluate and form critical judgements on individual cases and statutes;​

      Use primary and secondary sources of law relating to contract law effectively;​

      Present coherent and effective argument about issues relating to Banking Law;​

      Identify and engage with contemporary debates while accurately reporting the law in an area of Banking law;​

    • Commercial Law (LAW318)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims
    • To stimulate the academic and practical interest of students in a challenging area of law.

    • ​To encourage and develop analytical thinking, using comparative study of legal authority where relevant.

    • ​To enable the creation of effective solutions to (legally and factually) complex problems.

    • ​To develop an effective argument, soundly based in critical analysis of the law both orally and in writing.

    • ​To develop detailed knowledge of the law in all areas.

    • Learning Outcomes

      Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of commercial law principles affecting a sale of goods transaction.

      ​Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of commercial law principles as they apply to the agent-principal relationship.

      ​Demonstrate awareness of the practical implications for individuals of the operation of commercial law.

      ​Develop a capacity to work independently to solve complex legal problems.

      ​Use and understand complex statutory material, case law, and academic writing.

      ​Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of commercial law as a whole and in discrete topics.

      ​Demonstrate an understanding of suitable legal reforms from both economic and social perspectives.

    • Clinical Legal Skills - A Law Clinic Module (LAW321)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      1.      To provide students with the opportunity to study an area of law and justice in depth through experiential and enquiry based learning by assisting solicitor to proved legal advice to members of the public.  These opportunities will be provided through the following activities:

      a.      Researching law and procedure relevant to the client’s problems will develop their ability to identify issues which require researching and their ability to retrieve and evaluate accurate, current and relevant information from a range of appropriate sources.

      b.      Drafting a letter of advice to a client (and any other documents necessary to progress the client’s case, for example forms for court, or letters of complaint,) will develop their ability to explain legal and procedural rules, apply rules clearly and succinctly in order to offer a reasoned choice/conclusion.

      c.       Analysis of client cases will develop their ability to engage in critical analysis, synthesise relevant doctrinal, theoretical and policy issues and develop understanding of the principles and values of law and justice in context.

       

      2.      To provide students with the opportunity to engage with their own personal, professional and academic development through reflection, collaborative working, research and self-directed learning.  These opportunities will be provided through the following activities:

      a.      Engaging in exercises to identify their own strengths and weaknesses, in order to set personal targets for their own development during the module and to produce a reflective journal.

      b.      Working collaboratively in teams or “firms” throughout the module will develop skills including team-work, self-management, problem-solving and professionalism.

      c.       Working on client cases will develop legal skills such as drafting, file-management, client interviewing and professional conduct.

      d.      Participating in weekly firm supervisions with regular peer-feedback and supervisor feedback which will develop self management, including ability to reflect on their own learning, make effective use of feedback, willingness to acknowledge and correct errors. 

      e.      Participating in weekly practical workshops with regular oral presentations will develop students’ abilities to communicate both orally and in writing in relation to legal matters, including an ability to listen and respond to written and oral stimuli.

      Learning OutcomesAt the end of the module you will have demonstrated an ability to research the law and procedure relevant to client problems and write a research report. At the end of the module you will have demonstrated an ability to advise a client in writing on the courses of action available to them, based on research undertaken. At the end of the module you will have demonstrated an ability to critically analyse a client case that you have worked on, taking a theoretical approach to evaluating an aspect of access to justice in Merseyside.  At the end of the module you will have demonstrated an ability to reflect on your personal, academic and professional development.  

      ​​​At the end of the module you will have demonstrated your ability to maintain case files in accordance with the Law Clinic Office Manual and SRA Handbook and Code of Conduct.  

    • Clinical Legal Skills - A Law Clinic Module (LAW322)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      1.     To provide students with theopportunity to study an area of law and justice in depth through experientialand enquiry based learning by assisting solicitor to proved legal advice tomembers of the public.  Theseopportunities will be provided through the following activities:

      a.     Researching law and procedurerelevant to the client’s problems will develop their ability to identify issueswhich require researching and their ability to retrieve and evaluate accurate,current and relevant information from a range of appropriate sources.

      b.     Drafting a letter of advice toa client (and any other documents necessary to progress the client’s case, forexample forms for court, or letters of complaint,) will develop their abilityto explain legal and procedural rules, apply rules clearly and succinctly inorder to offer a reasoned choice/conclusion.

      c.      Analysis of client cases willdevelop their ability to engage in critical analysis, synthesise relevantdoctrinal, theoretical and policy issues and develop understanding of theprinciples and values of law and justice in context.

       

      2.     To provide students with theopportunity to engage with their own personal, professional and academicdevelopment through reflection, collaborative working, research andself-directed learning.  Theseopportunities will be provided through the following activities:

      a.     Engaging in exercises toidentify their own strengths and weaknesses, in order to set personal targetsfor their own development during the module and to produce a reflectivejournal.

      b.     Working collaboratively inteams or “firms” throughout the module will develop skills including team-work,self-management, problem-solving and professionalism.

      c.      Working on client cases willdevelop legal skills such as drafting, file-management, client interviewing andprofessional conduct.

      d.     Participating in weekly firmsupervisions with regular peer-feedback and supervisor feedback which willdevelop self management, including ability to reflect on their own learning,make effective use of feedback, willingness to acknowledge and correcterrors. 

      e.     Participating in weeklypractical workshops with regular oral presentations will develop students’abilities to communicate both orally and in writing in relation to legalmatters, including an ability to listen and respond to written and oralstimuli.




        Learning Outcomes

        At the end of the module you will have demonstrated an ability to research the law and procedure relevant to client problems and write a research report. 

        At the end of the module you will have demonstrated an ability to advise a client in writing on the courses of action available to them, based on research undertaken.

        ​  At the end of the module you will have demonstrated an ability to critically analyse a client case that you have worked on, taking a theoretical approach to evaluating an aspect of access to justice in Merseyside.

        ​ At the end of the module you will have demonstrated an ability to reflect on your personal, academic and professional development. 

        At the end of the module you will have demonstrated your ability to maintain case files in accordance with the Law Clinic Office Manual and SRA Handbook and Code of Conduct. 

      • Eu Competition Law (LAW331)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        To introduce the legal and administrative framework prohibiting anti-competitive conduct within the EU internal market.

        To outline concept(s) of competition in economic theory; the differing possible approaches to anti-competitive behaviour; and the range of legal and policy tools available to safeguard competitive markets.​

        To develop an understanding of key concepts underpinning the application of  (EU) competition law.​

        To outline the legal and administrative framework governing the application and enforcement of Article 101 (cartels) and 102 TFEU (abuses of dominance) within the EU internal amarket.​

        To familiar students with the position of EU competition law within the process of EU integration.​To outline the relationship between EU competition law and the UK provisions prohibiting anti-competitive conduct.To encourage students to reflect critically on the evolving system of EU competition law, particularly as regards the development of the rules on abuses of dominance and private enforcement.​​
        Learning Outcomes

        Demonstrate a good understanding of the legal and administrative framework prohibiting anti-competitive conduct within the internal market.​

        Understand, apply, and critique the the EU Treaty provisions on cartels and abuses of dominance.​

        Demonstrate a good understanding of economic theories informing the application and enforcement of (EU) competition law.​

        Understand the relationship between the development of EU competition law and the process EU integration.​

        Handle Union legal materials, including the case law of the Court of Justice of the European Union, EU Treaties and Union legislation.​

        Work effectively, both independently and in groups, to complete set tasks.​

        Apply specialist knowledge to resolve practical problems in the field of study.

      • Jurisprudence (LAW332)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims
      • This module aims to give students an understanding of the basic problems of jurisprudence.

      • At the same time the module will introduce students to the work of some of the most important authors in legal theory. Particular emphasis will be given to the detailed study of some of the most influential modern legal theorists, H.L.A. Hart, Lon Fuller, and Ronald Dworkin. ​

      • Students will also be introduced to some of the crucial contemporary concerns of legal philosophy, and in particular, the relationship between the rule of law, rights and democracy.​

      • Learning Outcomes

        To demonstrate a critical knowledge and understanding of the central concerns of jurisprudence; 

        To reflect upon and analyse critically the main arguments in the discourse about the concept of law and its relationship to morality;​

        To demonstrate a critical understanding of models and theories as to the internal structure of law;​

        To demonstrate a critical understanding of the work, in particular, of H.L.A. Hart, Lon Fuller and Ronald Dworkin;​

        To demonstrate an ability to evaluate competing conceptions of the role of law in a democratic state.​

      • Law in Literature and Film (LAW333)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        To equip students with a critical knowledge and understanding of the ways in which the relationship between individuals, law and culture are portrayed in literature and film and the theoretical underpinnings thereof.

        To allow students to improve their contextual skills by enabling them to consider law in its socio, political, economic and cultural context.

        To examine the relationship between aspects of law (metalaw) and the portrayal thereof in literature and film.

        To enable students to develop an interdisciplinary approach to the analysis of law, literature and film.

        To foster a critical awareness of socio-legal debates on law and its portrayal in literature and film.

        Learning Outcomes

        Display a critical knowledge and understanding of law in literature and film.

           

        ​Understand the ways in which law is portrayed in both literature and film and the impact of that portrayal upon law itself.

        ​Identify contemporary debates and engage with these while accurately reporting the law in the area.

        ​Analyse the influence of law upon popular culture (through the mediums of literature and film) and the influence of popular culture (through the mediums of literature and film) upon law.

      • Asylum and Immigration Law (LAW335)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting10:90
        Aims

        This module explores the rapidly evolving law on asylum and immigration in the UK, with an emphasis on the law''s interaction with wider contemporary debates on migration.

        Learning Outcomes

        To demonstrate and understanding of, and an ability to critically analyse, the law on asylum and immigration in the UK;

        To show an appreciation of the interrelationship between provisions at international, EU and domestic level;

        To understand the practical implications of this legal framework on the lived experiences of a range of migrants in the UK;

        To situate the law on immigration and asylum within its broader sociological, political and historical context;

        To use an appropriate range of legal resources (including electronic) to carry out independent research into asylum and immigration law.

      • Introduction to the Conflict of Laws (LAW337)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        This module aims to:

        To introduce students to the basic concepts in the conflict of laws, considering the rules of jurisdiction, choice of law and recognition and enforcement of judgments for the resolution of disputes with an international dimension in commercial and family law contexts in English and European Union law.

        Learning Outcomes

        By the end of the module, students should be able to:

        1. Understand and explain the concepts of jurisdiction, choice of law and the recognition and enforcement of judgments and their role in the reconciling conflict of laws

        2. Demonstrate basic knowledge and understanding of the law relating to jurisdiction and choice of law in contract and tort, particularly under the Brussels I Regulation and Rome I and II Regulations

        3. Demonstrate basic knowledge and understanding of the law relating to jurisdiction and choice of law in divorce and parental responsibility, and international child abduction, particularly under Brussels II Revised and the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction 1980

        4. Be able to manipulate complex legal instruments, identify relevant provisions and construct informed arguments based on the provisions identified and relevant case law

        5. Develop a critique of the policy choices informing the conflict of laws, particularly identifying the different approach in family law and commercial cases, and the difference in the approaches adopted by European law and English law to the resolution of disputes

      • Intellectual Property Law I: Copyright, Designs and Enforcement of Ip Rights (LAW338)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims
      • Presenting the respective IP rights.

      • Allow students to evaluate whether conditions under which they can be obtained are fulfilled in a real life case.

        ​​

      • ​Prepare students to enforce IP rights in the real world.

      • Learning OutcomesDemonstrate knowledgeand understanding of the basic rules relating to copyright, designs andenforcement of intellectual property rights. 

        ​​​Demonstrate detailed knowledge of and the ability to critically evaluate the law regarding the above mentioned intellectual property rights​

        ​​

        ​Appreciate the social context and underlying policy issues in this area of law and the influences they exert​

        ​Show an awareness of the practical implications for individuals and corporations of the operation of the abovementioned intellectual property rights​

        ​Research the relevant laws, electronically and on paper and present an effective argument, soundly based in critical analysis of the law in its social and policy context both orally and in writing​

        ​Be able to complete specified tasks and case studies with minimal direction or input through formal instruction prior to preparing such tasks​

      • Intellectual Property Law II: Trade Marks, Passing Off and Patents (LAW339)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims
      • Presenting the respective IP rights.

      • Allow students to evaluate whether conditions under which they can be obtained are fulfilled in a real life case.

        ​​

      • ​Prepare students to enforce these IP rights in the real world.

      • Learning Outcomes

        Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the basic rules relating to trade marks, patents and the law of passing off​ 

        ​​​Demonstrate detailed knowledge of and the ability to critically evaluate the law regarding the above mentioned intellectual property rights​​

        ​​

        ​Appreciate the social context and underlying policy issues in this area of law and the influences they exert​​

        ​Show an awareness of the practical implications for individuals and corporations of the operation of the abovementioned intellectual property rights​

        ​Research the relevant laws, electronically and on paper and present an effective argument, soundly based in critical analysis of the law in its social and policy context both orally and in writing​

        ​​​​​​Be able to complete specified tasks and case studies with minimal direction or input through formal instruction prior to preparing such tasks​​

      • Principles of International Law (LAW353)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims
      • The module provides students with an in-depth specialist knowledge of the principles and structure of international law, with special emphasis on law-making processes;

      • Critical tools for an understanding of the interaction of political and legal factors in the conduct of international relations;

      • Ability to identify the law and apply it correctly to hypothetical scenarios informed by major doctrinal and policy concerns;

      • Ability to undertake independent research and reflect on today’s most debated theoretical and practical issue in the field;

      • ​Ability to construct coherent legal arguments orally and in writing;

      • ​Ability to interpret and evaluate international legal materials against the backdrop of multiple international, regional and domestic legal and policy frameworks.

      • Learning Outcomes

        A critical understanding and knowledge of the principles that form the basis of the law governing inter-state relations;

        ​An ability to identify complex international legal issues and problems including those suitable for further research   

        ​An ability to work effectively with all relevant primary and secondary international legal sources, including complex materials, and to inform and develop understanding of a given topic

        ​An awareness of the interaction of political and legal factors in the conduct of international relations 

        An ability to apply legal knowledge to complex situations including those involving doctrinal disputes over the theory and practice of international law, and to offer own reasoned views over such legal disputes

        ​An ability to construct coherent legal arguments orally and in writing

        ​An ability to undertake independent research, and to think critically about international legal issues

        ​An ability to interpret and evaluate international legal materials within the wider context of international relations and domestic practices 

      • International Law in Current Affairs (LAW354)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims
      • International law knowledge: This module will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the complex international legal questions that make the headlines.

      • Interrelationship between law and politics knowledge: Students will learn to demonstrate and critically evaluate how law and politics interrelate and how issues of globalisation are incorporated into the international legal language.

      • Critical analysis of media and international law: The module will also encourage students to take a step back and critically analyse why it is that international law seems to be focussed on crises that make headlines.

        Through the means of recognising and ranking complex issues, a further site of enquiry will be the question of whether there is also an every-day international law that is not discussed in the news?

      • Understanding doctrine and theory: The module will analyse the relationship between doctrine (treaties, statutes) and theory in international law. It will encourage an employment of critical legal theory to understand some of the power struggles of international law.​

      • Learning Outcomes

        Identify and critically assess international legal debates in current affairs;  

        Understand how current affairs themselves impact on international law; ​

        Critically analyse the predominant international legal issues prevalent in current affairs debates with reference to specific key issue-areas (e.g. the ‘war on terror’ in general and the Iraq and Afghanistan wars in particular, the ‘Arab Spring’ in general and the arrest warrant of Muammar Gaddafi in particular) and primary and secondary sources;​

        Question and assess the emphasis of crises in international law and identify issues that are a concern to international law but do not make the headlines.​

        Present a news item, in a group, in its international legal context​

        Speak elloquently about the complexitities of international law in current affairs, and the available sources​

      • Law and Economics (LAW355)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        To increase students'' critical engagement with law by introducing them to an alternative viewpoint offered by economics. Other modules question whether the law is fair or just. In this module we ask whether the law is efficient and if not how we can make it more efficient. 

        To improve students'' communication skills by introducing them to the terminology and methological toolkit of another discipline. Due to the increasingly complex economic aspect of legal conflicts, many law firms and other institutions involved in law enforcement employ economists in addition to lawyers. 

        To communicate more effectively with economists with whom they are likely to work together in the future.

        Learning Outcomes​​​Student awareness ofbasic economics concepts, such as efficiency, externalities, collective actionproblems, principal-agent problems, moral hazard, information asymmetries, expost and ex ante, game theory and transaction costs.

        ​Student awareness of the key objectives and functions of economics as a discipline. More specifically at the end of the module, students should be aware that economics deals with all kinds of human behaviour, thus, it might be helpful in the explanation and solution of all kinds of legal problems, including those in public law subjects.​ Thus contrary to the common assumption, economics is not only about markets and commercial activities.

        ​Student appreciation that using economic concepts in a simple way may contribute to the strength of legal argumentation. Thus, students should be aware that the module does not only engage in a theoretical debate, but skills developed in this course will be highly relevant and useful in their professional life.​ ​Student sensitivity to spot the aspects of economics involved in daily life situations and the strength of economic concepts in explaining those situations.​

      The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


      Teaching and Learning

      You will benefit from a mix of formal instruction and private study. Formal lectures are intended to give you a sound understanding of legal topics covered in the relevant modules, and you are expected to enhance your knowledge through private study and research. Tutorials and seminars (small group teaching) require active student participation and are particularly effective in assisting you in applying the law to practical situations. Online resources and exercises, group work and presentations all help to ensure that you develop a strong set of skills to equip you for life.

      In addition, there are alternative forms of teaching delivery, such as podcasts, drop-in sessions, learning cafés and clinical legal skills.

      • Lectures – provide an overview of the topic
      • Tutorials/Seminars – provide an opportunity to question and develop knowledge in a small group setting.

      Assessment

      Assessment takes many forms, each appropriate to the learning outcomes of the particular module studied. Degrees are classified on the basis of 240 credits, taken across the final two years in each degree programme. Year Two contributes 30% to the overall classification and the third year contributes 70%. 

      For our four year Law with a Year Abroad LLB (Hons) programme, Year Two contributes 20%, Year Three 10% and Year Four 70% to the overall classification.

      Formal assessment takes place twice in an academic year at the end of semester one and semester two. We employ a range of methods to ensure that assessments complement learning, including seen/unseen, as well as open/closed book examinations. Additionally, coursework assesses depth of knowledge and independent research skills.