Law LLB (Hons)

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: M100
  • Year of entry: 2020
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB / IB : 33 / BTEC : DDD
law-3

Module details

Programme Year One

The core Year One syllabus comprises modules that must be studied and passed in order to gain a qualifying law degree, known as the ‘Foundations of Legal Knowledge’. The remaining modules are undertaken to introduce you to the English Legal System and basic legal study and research skills.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Criminal Law (level 4) (LAW107)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
    Aims

    To introduce students to the fundamental concepts of criminal law;
    To introduce students to the most important specific offences and defences in the criminal law of England and Wales;
    To enhance students' acquisition of key skills in the study of law;
    To develop students' understand how the study of law differs from practising law;
    To equip students to carry out independent tasks and research to a reasonable level as a basis for further development in subsequent study.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Ability to attain a reasonable theoretical and doctrinal understanding of the criminal law.

    (LO2) Ability to extract the law from legislation and cases.

    (LO3) Ability to trace the development of the law through legislation and case law.

    (LO4) Ability to critically analyse and assess the law.

    (LO5) Ability to apply their knowledge of the law to hypothetical factual situations.

    (LO6) Ability to use traditional and electronic sources of material.

    (LO7) Ability to complete specified tasks with direction from academic staff.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S7) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S8) Skills in using technology - Information accessing

    (S9) Reflection on performance, including the use of feedback to develop the quality of work produced and to self-assess work.

  • English Legal System and Legal Skills (LAW101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to:

    Provide students with a strong foundation in legal method, including case analysis and statutory interpretation;
    To develop legal and academic skills including library research, the organisation of legal sources, academic writing and legal reasoning, and the development and revision of the law within the context of academic critiques and the work of law reform agencies.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Case analysis To understand the significance of case law in the English legal system, the definition and identification of the ratio decidendi in English cases, the organisation of the courts and the operation of the rule of stare decisis, the impact of international treaties and EU law on case analsysis and precedent, the system of law reporting and restrictions placed on the citation of authorities in English courts. To demonstrate a high level of competence in analysing individual cases and in ascertaining the significance of individual cases within the broader case law.

    (LO2) Legislative interpretation To understand the significance and status of different types of legislation, the variety of methods used to analyse, interpret and apply legislation, the impact of styles of drafting relative to different legal systems (English and EU systems) on statutory interpretation. To demonstrate a high level of competence in analysing legislation, in ascertaining the rationale for different interpretations of legislation, and identifying the relevant sources which may be used to assist in this interpretation.

    (LO3) Legal research  To be able to retrieve authoritative primary sources of law and to understand how to differentiate between the status of different primary sources, including relative authority of law reports and currency of cases and legislation. To understand how to use basis secondary indexing sources (both electronic and hard copy) to cross reference between primary legal sources and to verify their status.

    (LO4) Legal writing, critiques and scholarship To understand the nature of critical academic inquiry in the sphere of law, the application of general academic writing principles in the context of legal work, the use of key legal citation and referencing tools, approaches to the organisation and planning of legal problem questions and legal essay questions, the process of peer review in scholarly journals and in undergraduate work. To demonstrate the ability to conduct rational self review and peer review of written work, including interpreting and applying departmental marking criteria.

    (S1) Locating and evaluating the authority of law reports.

    (S2) Case analysis

    (S3) Locating and evaluating the status of legislation

    (S4) Legislative interpretation

    (S5) Critically assessing the political, social and ethical impact of law

    (S6) Writing effectively on a legal topic, adhering to general academic standards and specific Law School requirements for written work

  • Law of Contract (LAW105)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To ensure that you have a solid knowledge and understanding of the main legal principles and issues of English Contract Law in its social, economic and political context;
    To understand the impact of EU Law in English Contract Law and to have a solid understanding of the reform and developments resulting from EU Law;
    To develop your analytical, critical and research skills;
    To develop a strong knowledge and research skills base to enable you to recognize the differences between Contract and Tort Law and appreciate the importnace of Contract Law to related specialist Commercial legal subjects;
    To provide you with a strong base of learning as a foundation for other related academic legal modules and in preparation for your vocational training;
    To develop your skills to work in a team including your communication, negotiation and persuasion skills;
    To develop your skills as an independent learner including time management skills.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate in writing a knowledge of the basic principles of English Contract Law;

    (LO2) Demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the key cases and statutory provisions;        

    (LO3) Appreciate the influence of policy on the development of  English Contract Law; 

    (LO4) Analyse, evaluate and form critical judgements on individual cases and statutes;        

    (LO5) Use primary and secondary sources of law relating to contract law effectively;        

    (LO6) Understand the language of the Law of Contract;        

    (LO7) Present coherent and effective argument about issues relating to contract law;       

    (LO8) Write concisely and coherently about the law relating to contract;       

    (LO9) Identify and engage with contemporary debates while accurately reporting the law in an area of contract law;

    (LO10) Be able to understand and use primarylegal materials;

    (LO11) Apply substantive law and legal reasoning skills to hypothetical cases.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – persuading

    (S8) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S9) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S10) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S11) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S12) Working in groups and teams - Time management

    (S13) Be able to work effectively within a team of your peers.

  • Legal System in Practice (LAW002)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    At the end of this module students will have a strong foundational knowledge of the interaction between key people and the civil legal process. They will develop a personal understanding of how people affect outcomes in the dispute resolution context, and they will develop some of the skills necessary to influence those outcomes.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand how the legal professions operate in order to deliver legal services in England and Wales and critically evaluate their role in the legal services marketplace.

    (LO2) Understand the key civil justice principles which determine how disputes are handled within the civil court system and critically evaluate the form and effectiveness of that system.

    (LO3) Understand the role which alternative dispute resolution plays as part of the machinery of the civil justice system and as one of the areas within which legal professionals practice.

    (S1) Teamwork

    (S2) Communication Skills

    (S3) Organisational Skills

    (S4) Analysis and Evaluation

    (S5) Synthesising and Presenting Information

    (S6) Writing Skills

  • Public Law I (LAW109)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting95:5
    Aims

    Public Law I seeks to:
    Explore the nature and functions of constitutional law;
    Provide students with a knowledge and understanding of the fundamental principles and institutions of the UK constitution;
    Identify and analyse selected key issues that are of critical importance to the UK’s constitutional arrangements;
    Enable students to develop a range of core legal and transferable skills, and become effective independent learners.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of, and the ability to analyse critically, the following topics: - the law, practice and theory of the UK constitution;

    (LO2) The key institutions of the UK constitution, their functions, and the relationship between them;

    (LO3) The doctrine of the sovereignty of Parliament, and its present status within the UK constitution;

    (LO4) The nature and purpose of legal accountability, through the principles of the rule of law and the separation of powers;

    (LO5) The nature and purpose of political accountability, through the notions of ministerial responsibility, parliamentary accountability, and open government.

    (LO6) Students should be able to demonstrate the ability to consult, engage with, and respond to feedback.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S6) Information skills - Evaluation

    (S7) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S8) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

  • Public Law II (LAW110)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting95:5
    Aims

    The module aims to provide students with the constitutional underpinnings and theory of administrative law.

    To provide students with a knowledge and understanding of the institutions, processes and legal principles of redress for judicial and extra-judicial grievances against public;
    To provide students with a knowledge and understanding of the operation of the Human Rights Act; identify and analyse selected key issues that are of critical importance to the UK’s constitutional arrangements;
    To enable students to develop a range of core legal and transferable skills, and become effective independent learners.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the laws, policies and theories relating to constitutional underpinnings of Administrative Law and  Human Rights  in the UK and communicate that knowledge and understanding to others;

    (LO2) Comment in an informed and a critical manner on certain key issues such as  the  process and scope of  methods of challenging governmental/public bodies’ actions, and the  protection of human rights

    (LO3) Apply their knowledge to hypothetical situations

    (LO4) Engage in debate and in written argument regarding contentious legal and political issues

    (LO5) Appreciate the wider political significance of Public Law

    (LO6) To demonstrate the ability to consult, engage with and respond to feedback.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S7) Skills in using technology - Information accessing

Programme Year Two

The core Year Two syllabus comprises the remaining modules that must be studied and passed in order to gain a qualifying law degree, known as the ‘Foundations of Legal Knowledge’. The remaining module, Law and social justice, allows students to acquire and practice advanced legal research skills by exploring the law’s capacity to effect social change.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Equity & Trusts (LAW211)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To stimulate the academic interest of students in a complex and evolving area of law;
    To deliver the substantive elements of the subject area in accordance with the requirements laid down in the Joint Announcement of the SRA and Bar Council, governing the content of qualifying LL.B degree programmes;
    To enhance general legal and transferable skills in the context of the subject area;
    To allow students to carry out independent tasks and research to a high level of aptitude.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate, orally and in writing, knowledge and understanding of thebasic concepts of Equity and the operation of the trust.

    (LO2) Demonstrate a basic understanding of the legal context of trusts and equity  in the operation of the legal system.

    (LO3) Demonstrate an awareness of the practical implications for individuals of the operation of the law of Equity & Trusts in England and Wales, e.g., with reference to the ownership of the matrimonial home.

    (LO4) Demonstrate understanding of the law as it affects trustees - obligations,powers, etc.

    (LO5) Appreciate the social and economic (especially fiscal) context of trusts and the underlying policy issues.

    (LO6) Demonstrate an appreciation of the value of equitable remedies in society.

    (LO7) Demonstrate an understanding of the subject area as a whole, as well as in discrete topics.

    (LO8) Use and interpret complex legal statutory material, case law and academic writing.

    (S2) Application and Problem Solving

    (S3) Effective legal writing

    (S4) Critical analysis

    (S5) Effective group working - including research, organise and deliver a presentation on a substantive legal topic

    (S6) Work and learn independently, with limited guidance

    (S7) General and Transferable Skills, particularly, utilising electronic legal resources in researching topics and preparing for small group sessions.

  • Land Law (LAW242)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting95:5
    Aims

    Stimulate the academic interest of students in a complex area of law;
    Enhance general legal and transferable skills in the context of the subject area;
    Deliver the substantive elements of the subject in accordance with the requirements laid down in the Joint Announcement of the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) and Bar Council governing the content of the qualifying law degree;
    Carry out independent tasks and research to a highl evel of aptitude.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the basic rules affecting an individual's useand occupation of land and the claims of a third party to an interest in land.

    (LO2) Demonstrate detailed knowledge of and the ability to critically evaluate the law in some areas.

    (LO3) Appreciate the social context and underlying policy issues in this area of law and thei nfluences they exert.

    (LO4) Show anawareness of the practical implications for individuals of the operation ofLand Law.

    (LO5) Researchthe relevant laws, electronically and on paper and present an effectiveargument, soundly based in critical analysis of the law in its social andpolicy context both orally and in writing.

    (LO6) Be ableto complete specified tasks with minimal direction or input through formalinstruction.

  • Law and Social Justice (LAW212)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To promote the key characteristics of the “Liverpool Law Graduate” - a student who is distinctively engaged, empowered and employable - particularly a critical awareness of the role of law in facilitating and hindering social change;
    To engage students directly with the research activities of staff within the Liverpool Law School by exploring live issues and methods;
    To promote the development of key legal and transferable skills, particularly as regards research, critical thinking and team work;
    To provide students with an introduction to some of the key optional choices available in their final year of study on the law degree. 

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To demonstrate a critical awareness and understanding of the role of law in promoting (or inhibiting) values such as justice, fairness, equality, citizenship, inclusion and social responsibility; and of how such values are themselves constructed and critiqued;

    (LO2) To work effectively as part of a project team to deliver a research-based presentation;

    (LO3) To demonstrate awareness of the nature of academic legal research, particularly from among the main fields of research undertaken within the Law School.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S5) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S6) Global citizenship - Ethical awareness

    (S7) Time and project management - Project planning

    (S8) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – persuading

  • Law of the European Union I (LAW013)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce the constitutional and institutional law of the European Union;
    To develop an understanding of EU legislative procedures; the nature and limits of Union competence; and the system of judicial review governing Union acts;
    To explore the application of EU law within national legal systems;
    To encourage you to think critically about the integration process, e.g., the democratic character of EU decision-making processes and the effectiveness of the system of judicial protection against Union acts.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a basic understanding of the constitutional and institutional law of the European Union.

    (LO2) Understand, apply, and critique the Union legal method.

    (LO3) Handle Union legal materials, including the case law of the Court of Justice of the European Union, EU Treaties and Union legislation.

    (LO4) Apply specialist knowledge to consider contemporary issues in the field of study. 

    (LO5) Think critically about the evolving process of EU integration.   

    (LO6) Think critically about the evolving process of less EU integration

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

    (S4) Time and project management - Project planning

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S6) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S8) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S9) Working in groups

  • Law of the European Union II (LAW014)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To consider some areas of substantive Union law, as distinct from the constitutional and institutional dimension considered in LAW013.  To examine the development of EU law relating to the free movement of goods, free movement of workers and free movement of economically inactive citizens (such as students and retired persons).  To explore and understand doctrinal and policy problems as relevant to the three topics (above) under consideration.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand how Union law is enforced in substantive areas.

    (LO2) Apply provisions of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and EU secondary legislation to substantive issues.

    (LO3) Understand Opinions of Advocates General and judgments of the Court of Justice and critically assess their contribution to the development of EU law.

    (LO4) Solve problems in these areas and discuss the process of European integration.

    (LO5) Appreciate similarities and differences between EU free movement law as it applies to goods, on the one hand, and persons, on the other hand.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

  • Law of Tort (LAW209)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To provide an introduction to the functions of the law of torts within the legal system;
    To provide a structured outline of a range of actionable torts, and commentary on contentious issues and recent developments therein;
    To consider how the legal principles can be applied to a variety of hypothetical facts.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the basic principles of the law of tort.

    (LO2) Demonstrate basic understanding of the social and economic context in which the law of tort functions, its aims and objectives and its underlying policy issues.

    (LO3) Identify and correctly apply the law to a set of hypothetical facts.

    (LO4) Adopt a critical perspective to existing legal rules and identify constructive suggestions for reform.

    (LO5) Undertake independent research, with appropriate guidance.

    (LO6) Construct coherent legal arguments, orally and in writing.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

Programme Year Three

In Year Three, students may choose from a range of optional modules based on the research and teaching interests of the School’s academic staff. The School offers a wide range of optional modules, full details of which are below. The range is sufficiently wide to enable students to specialise in one aspect of law if they choose, or to mix options from across the curriculum to suit their interests. Module leaders are leading researchers in their chosen field, offering students the opportunity to learn about the law from expert scholars and practitioners.

Please note that timetabling considerations, research leave cycles, and subject prerequisites mean that the optional modules may vary from year to year. You should check the School’s website to see the range of modules currently on offer.

All Year 3 optional modules are 15 credits each, except Dissertation (Semester 1 and 2) which is 30 credits. Most Year 3 optional modules are taught via ‘blended learning’ methods, utilising weekly lectures (2 hours per week), seminars (either 60 minutes each bi-weekly or 90 minutes three times during a semester), optional drop-in sessions during office hours, independent legal research, e-learning strategies and formative assessments.

Most year 3 optional modules are assessed on a summative basis via examination, coursework or a combination of both. Some optional modules however are partially assessed via the following methods: group project (LAW 377: Debates in Charity Law); practical assessment or presentation (LAW034 (Dissertation (Semester 1), LAW035 (Dissertation (Semester 2) and LAW036 (Dissertation (Semester 1 & 2), LAW364 and LAW369: Access to Justice and Welfare Rights Advice Placements, LAW373: Corporate Insolvency Law; LAW 354: International Law in Current Affairs) and casework and/or reflective logs (LAW321 (Clinical Legal Skills), LAW364 and LAW369: Access to Justice and Welfare Rights Advice Placements).

Year Three Compulsory Modules

  • Equity & Trusts (level 3) (LAW311)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To stimulate the academic interest of students in a complex and involving area of law.  To deliver the substantive elements of the subject area in accordance with the requirements laid down in the Joint Announcement of the SRA and Bar Council, governing the content of qualifying LL.B degree programmes.  To enhance general legal and transferable skills in the context of the subject area.  To allow students to carry out independent tasks and research to a high level of aptitude.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate, orally and in writing, knowledge and understanding of the basic concepts of Equity and the operation of the trust.

    (LO2) Demonstrate a basic understanding of the legal context of trusts and equity in the operation of the legal system.

    (LO3) Demonstrate an awareness of the practical implications for individuals of the operation of the law of Equity & Trusts in England and Wales, e.g. with reference to the ownership of the matrimonial home.  

    (LO4) Demonstrate understanding of the law as it affects trustees - obligations, powers, etc.

    (LO5) Appreciate the social and economic (especially fiscal) context of trusts and the underlying policy issues. 

    (LO6) Demonstrate an appreciation of the value of equitable remedies in society.

    (LO7) Demonstrate an understanding of the subject area as whole, as well as in discrete topics.

    (LO8) Use and interpret complex legal statutory material, case law and academic writing. 

    (S1) Legal knowledge.

    (S2) Application & Problem Solving

    (S3) Effective legal writing.

    (S4) Critical analysis.

    (S5) Effective group working - including research, organise and deliver a presentation on a substantive legal topic

    (S6) Work and learn independently, with limited guidance.

    (S7) General and Transferable Skills, particularly, oral communication, research based and use of technology in learning.

  • Law of the European Union I (LAW313)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce the constitutional and institutional law of the European Union;

    To develop an understanding of EU legislative procedures; the nature and limits of Union competence; and the system of judicial review governing Union acts;

    To explore the application of EU law within national legal systems;

    To encourage you to think critically about the integration process, e.g., the democratic character of EU decision-making processes and the effectiveness of the system of judicial protection against Union acts.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a developed understanding of the constitutional and institutional law of the European Union.

    (LO2) Understand, critique, and apply the Union legal method.

    (LO3) Handle Union legal materials effectively, including case law of the Court of Justice of the European Union, EU Treaties and Union legislation.

    (LO4) Apply specialist knowledge to consider contemporary issues in the field of study.

    (LO5) Think critically about the evolving process of EU integration.

    (LO6) Think critically about the evolving process of less EU integration

    (S1) Working in groups and teams - Negotiation skills

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

    (S5) Time and project management - Project planning

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S7) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S8) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S9) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

  • Law of the European Union II (LAW314)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To consider some areas of substantive Union law, as distinct from the constitutional and institutional dimension considered in LAW313;
    To critically examine the development of EU law relating to the free movement of goods, free movement of workers and free movement of economically inactive citizens (such as students and of retired persons);
    To explore and show appreciation of the doctrinal and policy problems as relevant to the three topics (above) under consideration.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand how Union law is enforced in substantive areas.

    (LO2) Apply provisions of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and EU secondary legislation to substantive issues.

    (LO3) Understand Opinions of Advocates General and judgments of the Court of Justice and critically assess their contribution to the development of EU law.

    (LO4) Solve problems in these areas and discuss the process of European integration.

    (LO5) Appreciate similarities and differences between EU freemovement law as it applies to goods, on the one hand, andpersons, on the other hand.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Access to Justice and Welfare Rights Advice Placements Semester 2 (LAW369)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Students will develop legal advice-giving skills through undertaking tasks within a practical context.

    Students will apply academic or theoretical knowledge within a practical context.

    Students will develop an understanding of issues relating to access to justice issues and their impact.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completion of module, students will have the skills to interview clients, research and analyse the relevant law and present this in legal writing.

    (LO2) Demonstrate a critical understanding of the services offered by the organisation and the broader sector in the context of access to justice.

    (LO3) Demonstrate a critical understanding of the concepts of and current issues related to access to justice.

    (LO4) To identify the connection between academic or theoretical knowledge and its practical application.

    (S1) Problem Solving Skills

    (S2) Communication Skills

    (S3) Ethical Awareness

    (S4) Teamwork

    (S5) Adaptability

    (S6) Organisational Skills

  • Administrative Justice (LAW315)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    To consider and evaluate extra-judicial means for redress of people's complaints and challenges to governmental or public bodies focussing upon the techniques (and the associated institutions) of complaint, investigation, adjudication and alternative dispute resolution methods used in administrative justice;
    To consider how lessons may be learned from redress so as to improve both initial decision-making and redress;
    To consider if the 'system' approach provides a better understanding of the arrangments, institutions and  techniques of administrative justice.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To demonstrate a critical understanding of the  techniques and their objectives used in extra-judicial redress of people's grievances against governmental and public bodies and in learning the lessons so as to improve initial decision-making and administration

    (LO2) To demonstrate a critical understanding of the contexts of these techniques including the perspectives of all of the stake-holders, and the implications for the public interest.

    (LO3) To be able to evaluate critically the respective strengths and weaknesses of of the United Kingdom's administrative justice system in an international comparison

    (LO4) To demonstrate some understanding of observation in empirical research

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S5) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S9) Research skills - All Information skills

  • Banking Law (LAW317)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The aims of this module are:

    To ensure that students have a solid knowledge and understanding of the main legal principles and issues of english Banking Law in its social, economic and political context.

    To understand the impact of EU Law in English Banking Law and to have a solid understanding of the reform and developments resulting from EU Law

    To allow students to develop a strong knowledge and research skills base to enable them to recognize the differences between Banking, Contract and Tort Law and appreciate the importance of Banking Law to related specialist Commercial legal subjects

    To develop students skills to work in a team including communication, negotiation and persuasion skills and to work in groups as a participant contributing professionally and effectively to successful completion of the joint task

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand the laws applicable to the banker/customer relationship, bank regulation and negotiable instruments and appreciate the practical and legal problems in this area of regulating the banking sector;

    (LO2) Apply substantive law and legal reasoning skills to hypothetical cases;

    (LO3) Understand and appreciate the impact and importance of EU Law in these areas;

    (LO4) Show an awareness at the basic level of economic and government policy behind the  the banking sector;

    (LO5) Analyse, evaluate and form critical judgements on individual cases and statutes;

    (LO6) Use primary and secondary sources of law relating to contract law effectively;

    (LO7) Present coherent and effective argument about issues relating to Banking Law;

    (LO8) Identify and engage with contemporary debates while accurately reporting the law in an area of Banking law;

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S3) Global citizenship - Relevant economic/political understanding

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S6) Working in groups and teams - Negotiation skills

    (S7) Research skills - Ethical awareness

    (S8) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

  • Children's Rights Debates (LAW358)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the legal and theoretical framework underpinning children's rights. To provide students with an appreciation of the challenges (practical/ethical) of applying children's rights standards in practice. To provide a platform for critical and informed interrogation of a range of contemporary children's rights questions.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will have a thorough understanding of international, European and domestic law governing children's rights in different contexts and of the main theories underpinning children's rights. They will also be able to identify the procedural mechanisms that children can use to enforce their rights.

    (LO2) Students will be able to critically interrogate a range of contemporary children's rights questions in the light of the legal, theoretical and research framework.

    (LO3) Students will have a strong appreciation of the highly contested nature of children's rights in certain contexts, and the problems associated with applying universal human rights standards in diverse settings.

    (LO4) Students will be able to present their arguments around contemporary children's rights questions orally and in writing, in a succinct, well-informed and critical manner. They will be able to respond to questions and challenges and to reflect on open debates.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – persuading

    (S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

    (S8) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S9) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience

    (S10) Time and project management - Personal organisation

  • Clinical Legal Skills - A Law Clinic Module (LAW321)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    1.To provide students with the opportunity to study an area of law and justice in depth through experiential and enquiry based learning by assisting a practicing lawyer to provide legal services to members of the public who cannot afford to pay for legal advice and who do not qualify for legal aid.

    2.To provide students with the opportunity to engage with their own personal, professional and academic development through reflection, collaborative working, research and self-directed learning.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) At the end of the module you will have demonstrated an ability to research the law and procedure in order to provide advice or other legal assistance to their client.

    (LO2) At the end of the module you will have demonstrated an ability to write a letter of advice to a client or to write another legal document to advance their case, such as a letter of representation to the Home Office based on research undertaken.

    (LO3) At the end of the module you will have demonstrated an ability to critically analyse client cases that you have worked on, taking a theoretical approach to evaluating an aspect of access to justice that is relevant to the client cases and to reflect critically on how you have developed your understanding of law, procedure and policy through your casework and experiential learning.

    (LO4) At the end of the module you will have demonstrated an ability to reflect on your personal, academic and professional development.

    (LO5) At the end of the module you will have demonstrated your ability to maintain case files in accordance with the Law Clinic Office Manual and SRA Handbook and Code of Conduct.

    (S1) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

    (S2) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S3) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S4) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

    (S5) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

    (S6) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, influencing, presentations

    (S7) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

  • Clinical Legal Skills - A Law Clinic Module (LAW322)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    1. To provide students with the opportunity to study an area of law and justice in depth through experiential and enquiry based learning by assisting a practicing lawyer to provide legal services to members of the public who cannot afford to pay for legal advice and who do not qualify for legal aid.

    2. To provide students with the opportunity to engage with their own personal, professional and academic development through reflection, collaborative working, research and self-directed learning.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) At the end of the module you will have demonstrated an ability to research the law and procedure in order to provide advice or other legal assistance to their client.

    (LO2) At the end of the module you will have demonstrated an ability to write a letter of advice to a client or to write another legal document to advance their case, such as a letter of representation to the Home Office based on research undertaken.

    (LO3) At the end of the module you will have demonstrated an ability to critically analyse client cases that you have worked on, taking a theoretical approach to evaluating an aspect of access to justice that is relevant to the client cases and to reflect critically on how you have developed your understanding of law, procedure and policy through your casework and experiential learning.

    (LO4) At the end of the module you will have demonstrated an ability to reflect on your personal, academic and professional development.

    (LO5) At the end of the module you will have demonstrated your ability to maintain case files in accordance with the Law Clinic Office Manual and SRA Handbook and Code of Conduct. 

    (S1) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

    (S2) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S3) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S4) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

    (S5) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

    (S6) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S7) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

  • Commercial Law (LAW318)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To stimulate the academic and practical interest of students in a challenging area of law.

    To encourage and develop analytical thinking, using comparative study of legal authority where relevant.

    To enable the creation of effective solutions to (legally and factually) complex problems.

    To develop an effective argument, soundly based in critical analysis of the law both orally and in writing.

    To develop detailed knowledge of the law in all areas .

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of commercial law principles affecting a sale of goods transaction.

    (LO2) Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of commercial law principles as they apply to the agent-principal relationship.

    (LO3) Demonstrate awareness of the practical implications for individuals of the operation of commercial law.

    (LO4) Develop a capacity to work independently to solve complex legal problems.

    (LO5) Use and understand complex statutory material, case law, and academic writing.

    (LO6) Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of commercial law as a whole and in discrete topics.

    (LO7) Demonstrate an understanding of suitable legal reforms from both economic and social perspectives.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S7) Apply legal knowledge to complex factual situations

    (S8) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

  • Company Law (LAW029)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    This module examines those aspects of Company Law which provide the legal framework for businesses and regulate their legal environment. It views Company Law from the perspective of those who form and manage the company.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire a critical understanding of the laws applicable to the formation, establishment and management of a registered company;

    (LO2) Gain an in-depth appreciation the practical and legal implicationsof contractual capacity and the consequences of artificial legal entity issuesrelating to management of the company and protection of minority shareholders.

    (LO3) Show an awareness and appreciation at the basic level of policy relating to Company Law in its context;

    (LO4) Critically apply the law to factual situations in their social and legal context;

    (LO5) Research the relevant laws, electronically and on paper so that a familiarity with academic and professional literature is acquired;

    (LO6) Present an effective argument in examinations, formative assessments, seminar sessions;

    (LO7) Understand and appreciate the impact and importance of EU Law and domestic laws in these areas.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S3) Working in groups and teams - Negotiation skills

    (S4) Personal attributes and qualities - Willingness to take responsibility

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S7) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S9) Personal attributes and qualities - Willingness to take responsibility

    (S10) Improving own learning/performance - Record-keeping

  • Contemporary Issues in Migration Law (LAW345)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:0
    Aims

    This module aims to: ·          Use a series of contemporary issues to explore in-depth the UK’s legal regulation of migration; ·          Offer insights into the relationship between legal regulation of migration and the wider social, political, economic and cultural context; ·          Encourage students to explore the influence of international and European frameworks on national and local legal regulation; ·          Promote critical analysis of the status of migrants in UK law using social justice perspectives.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Show an advanced understanding of the law relating to asylum and immigration in its UK, European and global context.

    (LO2) Think critically about complex issues in immigration law, including: the impact of immigration law on individuals; the political and economic factors which shape immigration law; the fluidity and complexity of immigration status(es).

    (LO3) Demonstrate an ability to research independently in the field of immigration and asylum law.

    (LO4) Synthesise a range of complex sources and present a clear argument to a particular audience.

    (S1) Written communication

    (S2) Comunicating to a non-legal audience

    (S3) Synthesis

    (S4) Critical Analysis

  • Contemporary Issues in the Law of Business Enterprise (LAW382)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to enhance the knowledge and skill set of students seeking to work both in and around business enterprises and corporations, imparting broad understanding and awareness of the most pressing legal issues relevant to the operations and strategy of modern enterprises. It aims to give students an opportunity to further develop and refine their skills of research, critical reasoning, project and time management, and legal writing relevant to the topic. It will enable them to provide enlightened, social and ethical leadership and management, supported by an understanding of the sustainability of long-term, socially responsive business models, underpinned by comprehension of the historical evolution and likely future direction of the business environment

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) At the end of the module, you will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the impact of emerging legal frameworks as they affect corporations

    (LO2) At the end of the module, you will be able to conduct research into complex concepts at the intersection of business law, corporate governance, and corporate culture

    (LO3) At the end of the module, you will be able to make reasoned and evidence-based judgements in a complex and rapidly evolving area of law

    (LO4) At the end of the module, you will be able to articulate the risks involved for business enterprises when operating in complex and high-risk environments

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Research

  • Criminal Evidence (LAW033)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To cultivate a knowledge and understanding of the rationale and development of the law governing criminal evidence, specifically the operation and admissibility of evidence in criminal cases;
    To foster an ability to appreciate the significance of those rules of evidence for defendants in criminal cases;
    To develop competence in critically evaluating the law governing the admissibility of evidence in criminal cases;
    To assist in the capacity to apply the law on criminal evidence to hypothetical situations in an effective manner;
    To inculcate additional electronic and bibliographic research skills, particular the ability to research the law of evidence and the policies underlying specific rules of evidence;
    To aid students in the presentation of legal and critical argument re: criminal evidence both orally and in writing.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Have a reasonably good theoretical and doctrinal appreciation of criminal evidence principles.

    (LO2) Extract the relevant law on criminal evidence from legislation and case law.

    (LO3) Trace the development of the law on criminal evidence through legislation and case law.

    (LO4) Demonstrate orally and in writing a thorough knowledge and understanding of the generalprinciples of criminal evidence.

    (LO5) Apply their knowledge of the law on criminal evidence to hypothetical factualsituations.

    (LO6) Identify gaps and ambiguities in the law on criminal evidence.

    (LO7) Use traditional and electronic sources of material.

    (LO8) Participate in group work.

    (LO9) Reflection their understanding of the syllabus and use feedback to develop the qualityof their work.

    (LO10) Complete specified tasks with direction from academic staff.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S8) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S9) Skills in using technology - Information accessing

  • Debates in Charity Law (LAW377)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To stimulate the academic interest of students and develop knowledge and skills in a complex area of law.

    To enhance general legal and transferable skills in the context of the subject area.

    To apply theoretical knowledge within a practical context , via student-led debate and group tasks.

    To develop materials and undertake tasks within a practical context.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of concepts of the law related to charities.

    (LO2) Research the relevant laws and policy and present an effective argument based in critical analysis of the law in its social and policy context.

    (LO3) Demonstrate understanding of the practical implications of charity law for organisations.

    (LO4) Use and interpret complex legal statutory material, case law and academic writing.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Teamwork

    (S3) Adaptability

    (S4) Communication skills

    (S5) Be able to complete specified tasks independently of input from formal instruction

  • Family Law (LAW316)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    Provide students with an introduction to key aspects of family law in England and Wales in the context of both public and private proceedings;
    To explore how the law defines ‘family’;
    To highlight the extent to which the law accommodates different family forms and interpersonal relationships in the light of cultural, religious and social variables;
    To consider the impact of human rights on the development and interpretation of family law;
    To critically examine key features of and developments in family law in England and Wales, including an analysis of the ongoing family justice review and key judicial decisions;
    To critically examine the role and limitations of the state in regulating family relationships, including an analysis of the interplay between state welfare provision and the organisation of private family life.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Have acquired a detailed understanding of legal instruments and processes governing family law in England and Wales

    (LO2) Be able to apply legal instruments to practical scenarios

    (LO3) Be able to determine individuals' rights in family law matters, particularly the rights of vulnerable and socially/legally marginalised groups (ex. Children; same sex couples; ethnic minorities).

    (LO4) Have gained a critical perspective of key legal and policy developments in family law and be able to suggest areas for development and reform;

    (LO5) Be able to appreciate the relationship between social policy/state welfare provision and the development of family law.

    (LO6) Understand the impact of human rights on the interpretation and application of family law

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

  • Asylum and Immigration Law (LAW335)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting10:90
    Aims

    This module explores the rapidly evolving law on asylum and immigration in the UK, with an emphasis on the law's interaction with wider contemporary debates on migration.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To demonstrate and understanding of, and an ability to critically analyse, the law on asylum and immigration in the UK;

    (LO2) To show an appreciation of the interrelationship between provisions at international, EU and domestic level;

    (LO3) To understand the practical implications of this legal framework on the lived experiences of a range of migrants in the UK;

    (LO4) To situate the law on immigration and asylum within its broader sociological, political and historical context;

    (LO5) To use an appropriate range of legal resources (including electronic) to carry out independent research into asylum and immigration law.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

  • Intellectual Property Law I: Copyright, Designs and Enforcement of Ip Rights (LAW338)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Presenting the respective IP rights. Allow students to evaluate whether conditions under which they can be obtained are fulfilled in a real life case. Prepare students to enforce IP rights in the real world.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate knowledgeand understanding of the basic rules relating to copyright, designs andenforcement of intellectual property rights.

    (LO2) Demonstrate detailed knowledge of and the ability to critically evaluate the law regarding the above mentioned intellectual property rights

    (LO3) Appreciate the social context and underlying policy issues in this area of law and the influences they exert

    (LO4) Show an awareness of the practical implications for individuals and corporations of the operation of the abovementioned intellectual property rights

    (LO5) Research the relevant laws, electronically and on paper and present an effective argument, soundly based in critical analysis of the law in its social and policy context both orally and in writing

    (LO6) Be able to complete specified tasks and case studies with minimal direction or input through formal instruction prior to preparing such tasks

    (S1) Problem solving

    (S2) Written communication

    (S3) Conduct independent research

    (S4) Communicate in legal terminology with care and accuracy

    (S5) Critical analysis

    (S6) Reflective learning

    (S7) Communicate orally findings in solving case studies (problem questions)

  • Intellectual Property Law II: Trade Marks, Passing Off and Patents (LAW339)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Presenting the respective IP rights.

    Allow students to evaluate whether conditions under which they can be obtained are fulfilled in a real life case.

    Prepare students to enforce these IP rights in the real world.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the basic rules relating to trade marks, patents and the law of passing off

    (LO2) Demonstrate detailed knowledge of and the ability to critically evaluate the law regarding the above mentioned intellectual property rights

    (LO3) Appreciate the social context and underlying policy issues in this area of law and the influences they exert

    (LO4) Show an awareness of the practical implications for individuals and corporations of the operation of the abovementioned intellectual property rights

    (LO5) Research the relevant laws, electronically and on paper and present an effective argument, soundly based in critical analysis of the law in its social and policy context both orally and in writing

    (LO6) Be able to complete specified tasks and case studies with minimal direction or input through formal instruction prior to preparing such tasks

    (S1) Problem solving

    (S2) Written communication

    (S3) Conduct independent research

    (S4) Communicate in legal terminology with care and accuracy

    (S5) Critical analysis

    (S6) Reflective learning

    (S7) Communicate orally findings in solving case studies (problem questions)

  • International Investment Protection Law (LAW378)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    1. To stimulate the academic and practical interest of students in an increasingly important and challenging area of law.

    2. To encourage and develop analytical thinking.

    3. To foster students' ability to create effective solutions to legally and factually complex problems.

    4. To develop students' capacity to construct an effective argument, soundly based in critical analysis of the law

    5. To cultivate a range of fundamental legal and transferable skills.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Use and understand complex legal texts, case law, and academic writing to identify solutions for law and policy issues arising from the application of international investment law

    (LO2) Develop a sound and critical understanding of the institutional and normative foundations of international investment law

    (LO3) Critically appraise international investment law from the perspective of different groups of states, business interests and other stakeholders

    (LO4) Critically evaluate the role and existing scope of investor-state dispute settlement, particularly in light of growing criticisms of free trade agreements such as TTIP and CETA.

    (LO5) Demonstrate an ability to create and present arguments defending and/or criticising international investment law

    (S1) Communication: influencing skills argumentation

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual): Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving: Critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving: Problem identification

    (S5) Working in groups and teams: Negotiation skills

  • International Law in Current Affairs (LAW354)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    International law knowledge: This module will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the complex international legal questions that make the headlines;

    Interrelationship between law and politics knowledge: Students will learn to demonstrate and critically evaluate how law and politics interrelate and how issues of globalisation are incorporated into the international legal language;

    Critical analysis of media and international law: The module will also encourage students to take a step back and critically analyse why it is that international law seems to be focussed on crises that make headlines;

    Through the means of recognising and ranking complex issues, a further site of enquiry will be the question of whether there is also an every-day international law that is not discussed in the news?

    Understanding doctrine and theory: The module will analyse the relationship between doctrine (treaties, statutes) and theory in international law. It will encourage an employment of critical legal theory to understand some of the power struggles of international law.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Identify and critically assess international legal debates in current affairs;

    (LO2) Understand how current affairs themselves impact on international law;

    (LO3) Critically analyse the predominant international legal issues prevalent in current affairs debates with reference to specific key issue-areas (e.g. the ‘war on terror’ in general and the Iraq and Afghanistan wars in particular, the ‘Arab Spring’ in general and the arrest warrant of Muammar Gaddafi in particular) and primary and secondary sources;

    (LO4) Question and assess the emphasis of crises in international law and identify issues that are a concern to international law but do not make the headlines;

    (LO5) Present a news item, in a group, in its international legal context;

    (LO6) Speak elloquently about the complexitities of international law in current affairs, and the available sources

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience

    (S8) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S9) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S10) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S11) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S12) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S13) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S14) Working in groups and teams - Time management

    (S15) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S16) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

    (S17) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S18) Global citizenship - Relevant economic/political understanding

    (S19) Global citizenship - Ethical awareness

    (S20) Global citizenship - Understanding of equality and diversity

  • The Law of the European Convention On Human Rights 1 (LAW362)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    Provide an understanding of the institutional structure of the European Court of Human Rights and admissibility of complaints. Students will be able to critically analyse the developments in case law of the European Court of Human Rights.

    Provide an understanding of key doctrinal concepts adopted by the European Court of Human Rights.

    Provide an introduction to substantive rights, such as right to life, prohibition of torture and degrading treatment, prohibition of slavery, right to privacy and freedom of religion.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to identify, define and critically analyse the core doctrinal concepts of the European Court of Human Rights and substantive concepts of the ECHR.

    (LO2) Students will be able to demonstrate an advanced understanding of the themes and trends in the case law.

    (LO3) Students will be able to apply rules and standards of ECHR law to real life situations.

    (LO4) Students will develop critical understanding of approaches to interpretation of the Convention.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Adaptability

    (S3) Communication skills

  • Jurisprudence (LAW332)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to give students an understanding of the basic problems of jurisprudence.

    At the same time the module will introduce students to the work of some of the most important authors in legal theory. Particular emphasis will be given to the detailed study of some of the most influential modern legal theorists, H.L.A. Hart, Lon Fuller, and Ronald Dworkin.

    Students will also be introduced to some of the crucial contemporary concerns of legal philosophy, and in particular, the relationship between the rule of law, rights and democracy.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To demonstrate a critical knowledge and understanding of the central concerns of jurisprudence;

    (LO2) To reflect upon and analyse critically the main arguments in the discourse about the concept of law and its relationship to morality;

    (LO3) To demonstrate a critical understanding of models and theories as to the internal structure of law;

    (LO4) To demonstrate a critical understanding of the work, in particular, of H.L.A. Hart, Lon Fuller and Ronald Dworkin;

    (LO5) To demonstrate an ability to evaluate competing conceptions of the role of law in a democratic state.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S7) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S8) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

  • Law of the European Convention On Human Rights 2 (LAW379)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Provide an understanding of the key concepts determining the effectiveness of the European Convention on Human Rights such as legitimacy, sovereignty, authority and responsibility.

    Provide a detailed outline of substantive rights, such as freedom of expression and association, right to private property, right to free elections and prohibition of discrimination.

    Provide an opportunity to critically analyse the reform of the European Court of Human Rights.

    Foster the students' engagement with relevant literature on the topic.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of the Law of the European Convention on Human Rights by identifying, defining and critically analysing various doctrinal concepts of the European Court of Human Rights including legitimacy and universality) building on knowledge acquired in LAW362

    (LO2) Students will be able to articulate and critically analyse themes and trends from the case law of the Court.

    (LO3) Students will be able to apply complex rules and standards of ECHR law to real life situations.

    (LO4) Students will demonstrate a critical understanding of approaches to interpretation of the Convention, building on understanding of key concepts gained in LAW362, such as the margin of appreciation and autonomous interpretation.

    (LO5) Students will be able to critically analyse the reform of the European Court of Human Rights

    (S1) Problem Solving Skills

    (S2) Adaptability

    (S3) Communication Skills

  • Medical Law and Ethics 1 (LAW051)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To examine the interaction between medical practice and the law and the fundamental legal principles governing the doctor-patient relationship;

    To offer a detailed consideration of the legal principles regulating compensation of victims of medical accidents, consent to medical treatment and the confidentiality of the doctor-patient relationship;

    To consider basic principles of medical ethics and their application

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge and understanding of the basic principles of Medical Law and detailed knowledge of the law in some key areas

    (LO2) A basic understanding of the context in which medicine is practised in the UK and the impact of legal rules on the practice of medicine

    (LO3) A basic understanding of the ethical issues involved in particular areas of medical practice, such as consent to treatment

    (LO4) An ability to identify correctly and apply the law and ethical principles to hypothetical facts

    (LO5) An ability to adopt a critical perspective to existing legal rules and/or practices, and to identify constructive suggestions for reform

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

  • Medical Law and Ethics II (LAW052)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To examine the interaction between the law, ethics and medical and scientific practice.       T o develop students' ability to appreciate how the fundamental principles of law dealt with in Medical Law and Ethics I are developed and re-shaped in light of novel technological and medical developments To enable students to understand the relevant case-law, clinical literature, statutory materials and their relationship to ethical debate

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An appreciation of long standing and new challenges which have arisen in the medico-legal arena from a regulatory and ethical perspective as well as from a purely legal perspective.

    (LO2) The ability to engage in reasoned arguments in a field of study which arouses strong emotions and arrive at independent conclusions.

    (LO3) An understanding of the legal and ethical issues involved in particular areas of medical practice.

    (LO4) An ability to identify correctly and apply the law and ethical principles to hypothetical facts

    (LO5) An ability to adopt a critical perspective to existing legal rules and/or practices, and to identify constructive suggestions for reform

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

  • Principles of International Law (LAW353)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module provides students with an in-depth specialist knowledge of the principles and structure of international law, with special emphasis on law-making processes;

    Critical tools for an understanding of the interaction of political and legal factors in the conduct of international relations;

    Ability to identify the law and apply it correctly to hypothetical scenarios informed by major doctrinal and policy concerns;

    Ability to undertake independent research and reflect on today’s most debated theoretical and practical issue in the field;

    Ability to construct coherent legal arguments orally and in writing;

    Ability to interpret and evaluate international legal materials against the backdrop of multiple international, regional and domestic legal and policy frameworks.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) A critical understanding and knowledge of the principles that form the basis of the law governing inter-state relations

    (LO2) An ability to identify complex international legal issues and problems including those suitable for further research

    (LO3) An ability to work effectively with all relevant primary and secondary international legal sources, including complex materials, and to inform and develop understanding of a given topic

    (LO4) An awareness of the interaction of political and legal factors in the conduct of international relations

    (LO5) An ability to apply legal knowledge to complex situations including those involving doctrinal disputes over the theory and practice of international law, and to offer own reasoned views over such legal disputes

    (LO6) An ability to construct coherent legal arguments orally and in writing

    (LO7) An ability to undertake independent research, and to think critically about international legal issues

    (LO8) An ability to interpret and evaluate international legal materials within the wider context of international relations and domestic practices

    (S1) Conduct independent research and critical analysis

    (S2) Problem Solving

    (S3) Verbal communication and reasoning

    (S4) Effective legal reasoning

  • Privacy, Surveillance and the Law of Social Media (LAW341)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To examine the logic and rationale of privacy and data protection (as set out in the UK, EU and other international instruments)

    To assess the policy and practical significance of the Internet, social media and communication tools for regulation

    To identify and critically appraise the potential of the Internet and new communication technologies to both undermine and enhance privacy values and norms

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Identify and discuss key privacy and data protection concepts, articulate their rationale and relevance within policy, commercial and political settings.

    (LO2) Demonstrate an understanding of the nature of digital information and the practical implications of technological convergence for managing personal information and threats to privacy, particularly in the context of online social media networks and communication services.

    (LO3) Explain the interaction of legal norms with the regulatory effects of IT and other non-legal instruments, such as sectoral codes of practice.

    (LO4) Evaluate the key debates and assess the potential of the Internet and new communication technologies to both undermine and enhance privacy values and norms.

    (S1) Describe and apply privacy and data protection concepts to actual or hypothetical situations in a reasoned, accurate and concise manner.

    (S2) Formulate key issues from debates relating to surveillance and privacy threats arising within the context of the Internet and social media.

    (S3) Organize issues, knowledge and argument in a way that is readily comprehensible to others.

    (S4) Collate and synthesise primary and secondary sources obtained from both course materials and independent research.

  • Public Health Law and Non-communicable Disease Prevention (LAW368)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aims of the module will be:

    - To develop a critical understanding of a number of topical issues of public health law, with a specific focus on non-communicable disease (NCD) prevention, in a global context.

    - To develop an appreciation of the legal and ethical issues that arise when utilising law as a public health tool for NCD prevention.

    - To crically assess the legal interventions that public policymakers have at their disposal for contributing to NCD prevention.

    - To reflect on how evidence derived from related fields of study, such as epidemiology, psychology, behavioural economics and other social sciences can be used to support the development of effective NCD prevention strategies.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of the control regimes for NCD risk factors

    (LO2) Identify and critically analyse the ethical issues arising from efforts to use law to prevent NCDs

    (LO3) Understand and critically appraise the national and international policy processes through which NCD prevention law is made

    (LO4) Understand and critically evaluate the theoretical frameworks for effective legal governance and intervention in the field of NCD prevention.

    (LO5) Demonstrate a critical knoweldge of the multifaceted legal and policy problems inherent in using law as a tool of NCD prevention

    (S1) Locate, intepret and evaluate legal instruments relevant to public health and NCD prevention

    (S2) Locate, interpret and evaluate non-legal evidence relevant to public health and NCD prevention

    (S3) Critically evaluate the relationship between public health law, policy, theory and ethics

    (S4) Critically analyse and synthesise arguments on public health law and NCD prevention

    (S5) Engage with non-legal literature relating to NCD prevention

    (S6) Critically compare public health law regimes

    (S7) Conduct self-motivated research

    (S8) Demonstrate advanced scholarly writing skills

  • The Regulation of Emerging Technologies: Law, Ethics and Governance (LAW342)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    1. To examine key concepts and techniques for regulation. 2. To explore the role of law and its limits as an instrument for regulation against the background of emerging technologies and innovations. 3. To identify and appraise the ethical and legal questions raised by rapid technological changes and innovations. 4. To critically reflect on the impact of economic and social goals for regulatory choices and responses.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire relevant knowledge and understanding of key regulatory concepts, techniques and processes.

    (LO2) Students will be able to recognise the conditions which influence the regulatory options being chosen.

    (LO3) Students will have greater awareness of the role and limits of law as an instrument for regulation.

    (LO4) Students will be able to identify and critically assess the legitimacy of regulatory responses to emerging technologies and innovations.

    (LO5) Students will be familiar with regulatory responses from other jurisdictions such as the United States, Australia and the European Union.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

  • The Uk's Withdrawal From the Eu (LAW325)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to:

    Give students the knowledge and skills necessary to understand and consider critically, the emerging decisions and processes necessary to effect the UK's withdrawal from the European Union.

    Give students an opportunity to further develop and refine their skills of critical reasoning, project and time management, and legal writing.

    Provide a flexible, engaging environment in which students can develop their own research into Brexit.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) At the end of the module, you will be able to conduct research into complex concepts at the intersection of Public Law and European Law.

    (LO2) At the end of the module, you will be able to review and abstract relevant materials in carrying out research on a set topic

    (LO3) At the end of the module, you will be able to make reasoned and evidence-based judgements in a complex and uncertain area of law

    (LO4) At the end of the module, you will be able to describe, and critically analyse, some of the challenges posed by the UK leaving the EU

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

  • Transnational Criminal Law (LAW363)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:0
    Aims

    To introduce students to key theoretical concepts, principles of, and policy debates surrounding transnational criminal law. To develop knowledge and awareness of the strengths and limitations of currentl legal and policy responses to transnational crime. To encourage and develop independent research skills into specific issues and crimes of transnational criminal law. To stimulate critical thinking, challenging students to explore the wider social, political, and cultural context of transnational crime.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of main concepts, principles of, and policy considerations surrounding transnational criminal law.

    (LO2) Demonstrate a critical awareness of current theoretical, doctrinal, and political debates in transnational criminal law.

    (LO3) Develop the ability to evaluate, synthesise and critically analyse information from primary, secondary and electronic sources.

    (LO4) Demonstrate the ability to formulate reasoned arguments and critical opinions based on independent research.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropiate solutions.

    (S2) Communication skills - oral and written.

    (S3) Organisational skills - developing research strategy, formulating questions and selecting relevant literature.

    (S4) Research skills - identify issues and gather information from relevant primary, secondary and electronic

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

You will be taught through a combination of large group lectures and small class sessions, such as tutorials, seminars or workshops. Formal lectures are intended to give you a sound understanding of relevant legal topics, and you are expected to enhance your knowledge through private study and research. Tutorials and seminars require active student participation and are particularly effective in assisting you in applying the law to practical situations. In addition, we use alternative forms of teaching delivery to provide a broad-based learning experience for our students. For example, student learning is enhanced through the use of podcasts and lecture capture technology, drop-in sessions, learning cafés, and clinical legal skills workshops. Online resources and exercises, group work, and presentations all help to ensure that you develop a strong set of transferrable skills.


Assessment

Assessment takes many forms, each appropriate to the learning outcomes of the module in question. Degrees are classified on the basis of 240 credits, taken across the final two years in each programme. Year Two contributes 30% to the overall classification and the final year contributes 70% to the overall classification. For students taking a year abroad or in China, the programme lasts four years and Year Three is spent in your chosen destination. For these students, Year Two is worth 20%, Year Three 10%, and Year Four contributes 70% to their final classification.

Formal assessment tends to take place twice in an academic year; once at the end of Semester One (January) and then again at the end of Semester Two (May-June). Some modules may employ formal mid-semester assessment opportunities too. We use a range of methods to ensure that assessments complement learning, including seen and unseen examinations and extended coursework assignments. Other methods, such as case work, empirical projects, and the preparation of reflective journals, are also used to ensure that you experience a diverse range of assessment as part of your programme.