Irish Studies BA (Hons) Add to your prospectus

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: Q540
  • Year of entry: 2018
  • Typical offer: A-level : BBB / IB : 30, with no score less than 4 / BTEC : Applications considered
Irish Studies

Module details

Programme Year One

Students are required to take a minimum of 90 credits of optional modules and may select up to 30 credits of subsidiary modules.  (Subsidiary modules may be selected either in one or both semesters).

Semester 1

Optional modules

An Introduction to Irish Writing from Swift to Yeats (IRIS103) (15 credits)

From Civil Rights to Armalites: Background to the Troubles; Northern Ireland, 1920-1970 (IRIS107) (15 credits)

Ireland: From Prehistory to Plantation (IRIS112) (15 credits)

Modern Irish Culture (IRIS115) (15 credits)

Semester 2

Optional modules

An Introduction to Irish Writing from Joyce to Heaney (IRIS104) (15 credits)

Foundation Unit in Irish Language (IRIS106) (15 credits)

The Making of Modern Ireland (IRIS114) (15 credits)

A list of subsidiary modules is available at https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/humanities-and-social-sciences

Year One Optional Modules

  • English Literature in Ireland: Jonathan Swift to Wb Yeats (IRIS103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims
    • To introduce students to a broad range of Irish literature in English, from Jonathan Swift to W.B. Yeats;  
    • ​To help students to situate this writing in its historical and cultural contexts;
    • To introduce students to the idea of an Irish literary tradition in English, related to but distinguishable from, the English tradition.​
    Learning Outcomes

    An understanding of major genres and major periods of writing 

    ​An understanding of literary, historical and political contexts out of which the work arose

    ​​

  • From Civil Rights to Armalites: Background to the Troubles; N. Ireland 1920-1970 (IRIS107)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting65:35
    Aims
    1. ​​To enable students to understand the historical background to the development of the Troubles in Northern Ireland with reference to the underlying political, social, economic, cultural and religious context.
    2. ​To examine the motives of main participating elements including the Northern Ireland and British governments, extra-parliamentary and political movements.​​
    3. ​To enable students to understand the main events and underlying causes of the outbreak of violent conflict in the late 1960s

    4. ​To encourage students to engage in a systematic study of the main primary and secondary texts and evidence for this period.

    5. ​To introduce students to the main elements in the debate around modernisation and the ''causes'' of the Troubles.

    Learning Outcomes

    Acquire the knowledge, interpretive and analytical skills appropriate to the advanced study of history.

    Learn to present ideas and complete assessments by engaging with the main primary and secondary sources.

    ​​​Develop communicative and presentational skills in both oral and written form.
  • Ireland: From Prehistory to Plantation (IRIS112)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The course provides an overview of Irish culture and society from prehistory to the end of the Middle Ages. It begins with the Iron Age and ends with the efforts of Henry VIII to impose English rule. This long time span witnessed radical change, including the arrival of Christianity, invasions of Vikings, Normans, and the Reformation. These events shaped Irish identities and contributed to longer term demographic, economic and political trends affecting the lives of people at all levels of society. Through close analysis of primary sources we can attempt to enter the mental world of people living in Ireland’s past to interpret their motivations, actions and ideals. This course will explore the experiences of the past but also highlight how debates about history still influence perceptions of Irish identity today.

    Learning Outcomes

    At the end of this module the student will:

    Have an overview of early Irish history

    Be able to engage  in key historical debates

    Be able to discern the ideological undercurrents and methodologies which have influenced scholarship

    Be able to utilize and criticize a range of written and non-written sources

    Be able to communicate effectively in group discussion

    Be able to evaluate and interpret the opinions of others
  • Modern Irish Culture (IRIS115)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To explore the origins of Modern Irish Culture.

    ​To ilustrate how Irish Culture has changed since its formalisation during the late-ninteenth century cultural revival.

    ​To examine the reasons for missing voices and recently emerging voices.

    To develop the ''Learning Outcomes'' and ''Skills'' listed.​

    Learning Outcomes

    ​Ability to analyse critically the invention and re-interpretation of culture in Ireland.

    ​Increased awareness of the processes informing cultural change.

    ​Increased awareness of the role of the Irish diaspora in defining and redefining Irish culture.

    Ability to utilise and criticise a range of written and non-written sources relating to Irish culture.​

  • English Literature in Ireland From James Joyce to Seamus Heaney (IRIS104)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims
    • ​To introduce students to a broad range of Irish literature in English, from James Joyce to Seamus Heaney
    • ​To help students to situate this writing in its historical and cultural contexts
    • To introduce students to the idea of an Irish literary tradition in English, related to but distinguishable from, the English tradition.
    Learning Outcomes​​​ To introduce students to the academic study of a wide range of texts, ranging across the major genres.

    ​To train students to read carefully and to write in an argued manner about literary texts​

    ​ To encourage students to avail of the range of scholarly work written in the discipline​

    ​To prepare students for the advanced study of literature.

  • Irish Language and Culture for Beginners (IRIS106)
    LevelQ4
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims
    1. ​This module introduces students to basic Irish grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation.
    2. ​The module aims to provide introductory understanding of the language’s heritage, and its role in modern Irish society

    3. ​​ It aims to assist an appreciation of the contemporary Irish use of English​.
    Learning Outcomes

    Oral and Aural skills will be developed, alongside more traditional written learning in chosen TEG (Teastas Eorpach Gaeilge) topics, providing vocabulary and understanding.

    ​​​​Students will obtain an appreciation of the language''s place in society .

    ​By the end of this module, students should be well-prepared for IRIS207, and working towards A1 level (TEG).

  • Ireland's Battle for Ideas (IRIS114)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
    • To provide students with an understanding of the various ideas that have shaped modern Ireland
    • To explain how these ideas have interacted with one another and how they have shaped political debates and brought about social change
    • To enable students to critically assess the various debates on these issues.
    Learning OutcomesStudents will acquire an understanding of the key ideas that shape Irish history and identity.

    ​They will be able to determine their relevance both politically and socially, make comparisons between them and understand key debates in the field.

     

    Through their seminar discussions and written work, students will develop analytical and research skills by using a wide range of source material.

    ​The seminars will encourage students to debate the merits of primary sources and present arguments concisely.

  • Fieldtrip to Ireland and Study Methods (IRIS102)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
    • ​Achieve the Learning Outcomes and Skills outlined below
    • ​​​Interdisciplinary perspective towards the study of Ireland​
    • ​An appreciation of Irish culture and society
    Learning Outcomes

     An appreciation of the diversity and plurality of Irish identity.

    ​​​​​​​​​Familiarity with a range of research methods used in Irish Studies. Ability to define key movements and events in the history and culture of Dublin. 

    ​Awareness of changes in Irish society, scholarship and politics over the last 20 years.


  • Ireland's Battle for Ideas (IRIS114)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
    • To provide students with an understanding of the various ideas that have shaped modern Ireland
    • To explain how these ideas have interacted with one another and how they have shaped political debates and brought about social change
    • To enable students to critically assess the various debates on these issues.
    Learning OutcomesStudents will acquire an understanding of the key ideas that shape Irish history and identity.

    ​They will be able to determine their relevance both politically and socially, make comparisons between them and understand key debates in the field.

     

    Through their seminar discussions and written work, students will develop analytical and research skills by using a wide range of source material.

    ​The seminars will encourage students to debate the merits of primary sources and present arguments concisely.

  • Warriors, Witches and Legends: the Origins of Ireland (IRIS109)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
  • ​To develop the ''Learning Outcomes'' and ''Skills'' listed. 
  • ​To develop an awareness and appreciation of the interdisciplinary character of medieval studies.​
  • ​To advance interest and knowledge about the origins of Ireland. 

  • Learning OutcomesAn overview of early Irish history, archaeology and geography.

    Ability to engage in key debates regarding the history and archaeology of Ireland, from the Iron Age to the reign of Henry VIII.


    ​Ability to discern the ideological undercurrents and methodologies which have influenced scholarship.


    ​​​​​​​​​Ability to utilize and criticize a range of written and non-written sources pertaining to early Ireland.


Programme Year Two

Students are required to take modules for a total of 120 credits. For modules currently offered please see here.

Programme Year Three

Students are required to take modules for a total of 120 credits. For modules currently offered please see here.

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

You will attend lectures, seminars and make a field trip to Ireland. You will be assessed by a mixture of coursework and examinations in January and May/June of each year. Your final degree classification is determined by performance in Years Two and Three and assessment of the third year project-based modules is by extended essay or dissertation.