Irish Studies BA (Hons)

Key information


Irish Studies

Module details

Due to the impact of COVID-19 we are changing how the course is delivered.

Programme Year One

Students are required to take a minimum of 90 credits of optional modules and may select up to 30 credits of subsidiary modules. (Subsidiary modules may be selected either in one or both semesters).

A list of subsidiary modules is available at https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/humanities-and-social-sciences

Year One Optional Modules

  • Irish Literature 1914-2014: From James Joyce to Eimear Mcbride (IRIS104)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To introduce students to a broad range of Irish literature in English, from James Joyce to Seamus Heaney;

    To help students to situate this writing in its historical and cultural contexts;

    To introduce students to the idea of an Irish literary tradition in English, related to but distinguishable from, the English tradition.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To introduce students to the academic study of a wide range of texts, ranging across the major genres.

    (LO2) To train students to read carefully and to write in an argued manner about literary texts

    (LO3) To encourage students to avail of the range of scholarly work written in the discipline

    (LO4) To prepare students for the advanced study of literature.

    (S1) Global citizenship - cultural awareness

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - listening skills

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

    (S6) Information skills - critical reading

    (S7) Information skills - Information accessing: locating relevant information, identifying and evaluating information sources

  • English Literature in Ireland: Jonathan Swift to Wb Yeats (IRIS103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To introduce students to a broad range of Irish literature in English, from Jonathan Swift to W.B. Yeats;

    To help students to situate this writing in its historical and cultural contexts;

    To introduce students to the idea of an Irish literary tradition in English, related to but distinguishable from, the English tradition.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of major genres and major periods of writing

    (LO2) An understanding of literary, historical and political contexts out of which the work arose

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - communicating for audience

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

  • Fieldtrip to Ireland and Study Methods (IRIS102)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Achieve the learning outcomes and skills outlined below:

    Interdisciplinary perspective towards the study of Ireland;

    An appreciation of Irish culture and society.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An appreciation of the diversity and plurality of Irish identity.

    (LO2) Familiarity with a range of research methods used in Irish Studies.

    (LO3) Ability to define key movements and events in the history and culture of Dublin.

    (LO4) Awareness of changes in Irish society, scholarship and politics over the last 20 years.

    (S1) Global citizenship - cultural awareness

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S3) Working in groups and teams - group action planning

    (S4) Information skills - information accessing: locating relevant information. Identifying and evaluating information sources

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

    (S6) Global citizenship - understanding of equality and diversity

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - evaluation

  • Northern Ireland Before the 'troubles': From Partition to Civil Rights and Armalites (IRIS107)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To enable students to understand the historical background to the development of the Troubles in Northern Ireland with reference to the underlying political, social, economic, cultural and religious context;

    To examine the motives of  main participating elements including the Northern Ireland and British governments,  extra-parliamentary and political movements;

    To enable students to understand the main events and underlying causes of the  outbreak of violent conflict in the late 1960s;

    To encourage students to engage in a systematic study of the main primary and secondary texts and evidence for this period;

    To introduce students to the main elements in the debate around modernisation  and the 'causes' of the Troubles.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire the knowledge, interpretive and analytical skills appropriate to the advanced study of history.

    (LO2) Learn to present ideas and complete assessments by engaging with the main primary and secondary sources.

    (LO3) Develop communicative and presentational skills in both oral and written form.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills – oral.

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing (including referencing skills).

    (S3) Time and project management - personal organisation.

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis.

    (S5) Working in groups and teams - listening skills.

    (S6) Information skills - Information accessing: locating relevant information. Identifying and evaluating information sources.

    (S7) Commercial awareness - relevant economic / political understanding.

  • Ireland's Battle for Ideas (IRIS114)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with an understanding of the various ideas that have shaped modern Ireland;

    To explain how these ideas have interacted with one another and how they have shaped political debates and brought about social change;

    To enable students to critically assess the various debates on these issues.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire an understanding of the key ideas that shape Irish history and identity.

    (LO2) They will be able to determine their relevance both politically and socially, make comparisons between them and understand key debates in the field.

    (LO3) Through their seminar discussions and written work, students will develop analytical and research skills by using a wide range of source material.

    (LO4) The seminars will encourage students to debate the merits of primary sources and present arguments concisely.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S3) Time and project management - personal organisation

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

    (S5) Working in groups and teams - listening skills

    (S6) Information skills - information accessing: locating relevant information. Identifying and evaluating information sources

    (S7) Global citizenship - ethical awareness

  • Warriors, Witches and Legends: the Origins of Ireland (IRIS109)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop the 'Learning Outcomes' and 'Skills' listed; 

    To develop an awareness and appreciation of the interdisciplinary character of medieval studies;

    To advance interest and knowledge about the origins of Ireland.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An overview of early Irish history, archaeology and geography.

    (LO2) Ability to engage in key debates regarding the history and archaeology of Ireland, from the Iron Age to the reign of Henry VIII.

    (LO3) Ability to discern the ideological undercurrents and methodologies which have influenced scholarship.

    (LO4) Ability to utilize and criticise a range of written and non-written sources pertaining to early Ireland.

    (S1) Improving own learning / performance - reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills - written

    (S4) Time and project management - personal action planning

    (S5) Working in groups and teams - listening skills

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - creative thinking

    (S8) Information skills - information accessing: locating relevant information. Identifying and evaluating information sources

    (S9) Global citizenship - cultural awareness

    (S10) Research skills - awareness of / commitment to academic integrity

  • Beginners' Irish Language 1 (IRIS141)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To develop a basic knowledge of Irish language and grammar, to a beginners’ (A1) level;

    To develop an understanding of the origins and development of writing in Irish;

    To begin to speak, write and translate Irish.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Apply beginner-level reading, writing and comprehension skills in Irish.

    (LO2) Demonstrate knowledge of Irish culture, history and literature.

    (LO3) Demonstrate knowledge of the grammar of Irish.

    (S1) Communication skills (oral and written Irish).

    (S2) Global citizenship (knowledge of Irish culture in context).

    (S3) Confidence (interpersonal and presentation skills).

  • Beginners' Irish Language 2 (IRIS142)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To develop a knowledge of Irish language and grammar, to a beginners’ (A2) level;

    To develop an understanding of the origins and development of writing in Irish;

    To continue to develop written and spoken Irish and to translate Irish texts into English.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Apply elementary-level reading, writing and comprehension skills in Irish.

    (LO2) Demonstrate knowledge of Irish culture, history and literature.

    (LO3) Demonstrate knowledge of the grammar of Irish.

    (S1) Communication skills (oral and written Irish).

    (S2) Global citizenship (knowledge of Irish culture in context).

    (S3) Confidence (interpersonal and presentation skills).

  • Intermediate Irish Language (IRIS143)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To develop a knowledge of Irish language and grammar, to an intermediate level;

    To develop an understanding of the origins and development of writing in Irish;

    To understand, to an intermediate level, written and spoken Irish and to be able to translate Irish texts into English.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Apply intermediate-level reading, writing and comprehension skills in Irish.

    (LO2) Demonstrate knowledge of Irish culture, history and literature.

    (LO3) Demonstrate knowledge of the grammar of Irish.

    (S1) Communication skills (oral and written Irish).

    (S2) Global citizenship (knowledge of Irish culture in context).

    (S3) Confidence (interpersonal and presentation skills).

Programme Year Two

Students take 15 credits of required modules and 45 credits of optional modules in Semester 1 and 60 credits of optional modules in Semester 2.

Registration onto IRIS217 is subject to a suitable placement being sourced.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Research Methods for Irish Studies (IRIS230)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To promote confidence in undertaking research projects;

    To provide an interdisciplinary perspective on the study of Ireland;

    To introduce skills required for independent research.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students learn the methods used by professional researchers when approaching a new research question.

    (LO2) Students gain an understanding of how to develop their own opinions, in positive engagement with the primary and secondary literature.

    (LO3) Students develop their report writing skills through successive assessments.

    (S1) Improving own learning / performance - reflective practice.

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - influencing skills – argumentation.

    (S4) Information skills - information accessing: Locating relevant information; identifying and evaluating information sources.

    (S5) Time and project management - project planning.

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - synthesis.

Year Two Optional Modules

  • Irish Studies in Action (IRIS217)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with hands on experience of a workplace related to their academic study;

    To encourage students to reflect on the relationship between the workplace and their intellectual development.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An ability to learn and apply a range of skills in a workplace environment and to record these.

    (LO2) An ability to critically reflect on the contribution academic skills and knowledge make in a work place environment.

    (LO3) An ability to communicate in writing the relationship between practice-based learning, research and theory.

    (S1) Confidence, independence of mind, responsibility, organisation and time-management.

    (S2) The ability to work collaboratively and to participate in group discussion.

    (S3) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression.

  • Living the Global Eighteenth Century (HLAC200)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To offer students an introduction to some key aspects of European culture and society in the eighteenth century;

    To make students who come from a range of major subject areas aware of the ways in which study of that period is approached by and can enrich a range of disciplines.;

    To help students to grasp and reflect on the historical dimensions of their own shared and contested culture(s) and the contemporary political and global order;

    To develop students' capacity for asking questions (curiosity) as well as for answering them (research skills) by engaging them in active and interactive learning.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) A sound knowledge of key aspects of European culture, society and politics in the eighteenth century and insight into the historical dimensions of European and global modernity

    (LO2) An understanding of the ways in which study of the eighteenth century is approached by scholars in a range of disciplines and in working with people from disciplinary backgrounds different from their own

    (LO3) Ability to analyse and respond to primary texts critically in terms of their historical and geographical context

    (LO4) Ability to devise and carry out an independent research project, deploying both data and imagination

    (LO5) A sound knowledge of aspects of material culture of the eighteenth century and ability to analyse artefacts of material culture critically and in their geographical historical context

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S6) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S7) Personal attributes and qualities - independence

  • Saints, Scholars and Saxons: Ireland and the North Atlantic, C.400 - C.800 (HIST234)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the contours of early medieval Irish history;

    To provide students with a foundational understanding of modern historiographical debates;

    To develop an ability to critically analyse texts in a range of medieval genres (history, hagiography, theology).

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will become familiar with the major themes of early Irish history.

    (LO2) Students will be able to critically analyze the primary textual material in its context.

    (LO3) Students will develop critical reading skills in relation to modern secondary studies of medieval history.

    (LO4) Students will engage with various modern cultural, teleological and ethno-nationalist readings of early Irish history and be able to reflect critically on them.

    (LO5) Students will begin to develop the skills requisite for comparative history.

    (S1) Research skills

    (S2) Academic writing

    (S3) Presentation skills

  • Modernist Magazines: History, Fiction and the Literary Periodical (ENGL299)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To enable students to examine the major literary magazines of the long twentieth century from a diversity of contexts;

    To introduce students to the magazine culture and its contexts in historical change of the long twentieth century;

    To consider writers’ innovations via analysis of the work of their predecessors and contemporaries;

    To encourage students to engage in the detailed study of both primary and secondary texts;

    To encourage students to consider magazine material culture and the systems of its production.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To appreciate the breadth and diversity of literary magazines in the long twentieth century.

    (LO2) To help students will acquire reading and writing skills appropriate to the advanced study of literature.

    (LO3) To encourage students to present their own ideas, in positive engagement with both primary and secondary sources and to encourage that presentation in both oral and written form.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - creative thinking.

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis.

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

  • Banned: Fiction, Sex and the Limits of Decency (ENGL298)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to censorship and the debates around its informal and formal use;

    To equip students to study the novel and its relationship with censorship;

    To help students to see the relationship between censorship and the cultural and historical contexts in which it arose.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the major debates around the censorship of literature.

    (LO2) An understanding of key issues in the secondary literature in this area;

    (LO3) The development of the reading and writing skills appropriate to criticism of the genres

    (LO4) An ability to develop their own opinions in positive engagement with the secondary literature.

    (S1) Improving own learning / performance - reflective practice

    (S2) Time and project management - personal organisation

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - creative thinking

  • Uk General Elections and Referendums Since 1945 (POLI204)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce students to key theoretical accounts of electoral behaviour and electoral competition;

    To equip students with a foundation knowledge of key changes and developments in the UK electoral and party systems since 1945;

    To introduce students to a variety of statistical data sources relating to UK General Elections and referendums;

    To furnish students with basic skills to analyse and visualise electoral statistics using Microsoft Excel and SPSS.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) You will be able to summarise the evidence relating to both trends in turnout over time and to differences in levels of turnout geographically and among key social groups, and to assess the relative merits of competing theoretical and empirical explanations of these trends and patterns.

    (LO2) You will be able to compare and contrast the principal theories of voting behaviour associated with the alignment and de-alignment debates in British electoral studies, including the application of theoretical assumptions to specific examples of voting behaviour.

    (LO3) You will be able to compare and contrast notions of 'issue voting' and 'valence voting', and debate the extent to which there is evidence to support the contention that the British electorate responds, rationally or otherwise, to the positioning and performance of parties in relation to key issues.

    (LO4) You will be able to evaluate how far evidence supports the proposition that perceptions of party image and party leaders are increasingly important determinants of voting behaviour in Britain and assess the implications of these developments for theories of electoralcompetition and for the practice of running successful election campaigns.

    (LO5) You will be able to summarise how campaigning and media coverage at UK general elections have changed since 1945 and analyse the reasons for these changes, as well as their consequences for election campaigns and outcomes.

    (LO6) You will be able to outline and apply appropriate criteria for assessing the performance of the electoral system for UK General Elections since 1945 and evaluate the arguments for and against electoral reform.

    (LO7) You will be able to describe in broad terms how the social composition of the House of Commons has changed since 1945, analyse the possible reasons for these trends, and evaluate the case for taking action to make the House of Commons more socially representative.

    (LO8) You will be able to outline the key changes to electoral law and administration since 1945 and discuss the reasons why such reforms have frequently been the subject of intense partisan controversy.

    (LO9) You will be able to discuss the outcomes of General Elections from 1983-2019 in relation to debates about a) dealignment, issue voting, and party image/leadership; b) the operation of the electoral system and the case for electoral reform; and c) for the 2017 and 2019 General Elections, the impact of Brexit.

    (LO10) You will acquire a knowledge of the key statistical datasets and techniques used in the study of UK general elections and referendums, including how to locate such data, and be able to apply a range of basic statistical techniques to compile, analyse and visualise electoral data.

    (S1) Numeracy/computational skills - Confidence/competence in measuring and using numbers

    (S2) Numeracy/computational skills - Reason with numbers/mathematical concepts

    (S3) Numeracy/computational skills - Numerical methods

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S6) Working in groups and teams - Time management

    (S7) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills

    (S8) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S9) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S10) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

  • Contemporary Populist Politics: Britain in Comparative Perspective (POLI223)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
    Aims

    To introduce students to the distinctive character of contemporary populist political parties and movements in Britain and other established democracies;

    To equip students with an understanding of the factors which have driven the rise of political populism in Britain and other established democracies;

    To enable students to identify and debate the potential consequences of populism for mainstream party politics and for established democratic norms and institutions;

    To engage students with some of the most important questions in contemporary western political science.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to identify and discuss the common and distinctive features of left- and right-wing populism in a range of established democracies.

    (LO2) Students will be able to compare and contrast the character of contemporary populist political parties and movements in Britain with those in other established democracies.

    (LO3) Students will be able to demonstrate a sound understanding of the factors which have driven the rise of political populism in Britain and other established democracies.

    (LO4) Students will be able to outline and discuss the potential consequences of populism for mainstream party politics and for established democratic norms and institutions.

    (S1) Time management, organisation and adaptability

    (S2) Communicate complex ideas both written and orally.

    (S3) Teamwork

    (S4) Ability to apply topic-specific knowledge and concepts; critical and analytical thinking

    (S5) Information gathering, evaluation and synthesis

    (S6) Ability to work under pressure

    (S7) Enhanced research skills.

  • Liverpool: History and Heritage (HIST227)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To explore the history of Liverpool, placing it in the context of international urban history;

    To use Liverpool’s experience to explore the issue of heritage and its relationship with history;

    To explore a variety of sources, methods and theories as applied to a case study city of global importance to urban historians.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

    (LO2) To understand the development of history as a discipline and awareness of different historical methodologies.

    (LO3) To understand the relationship between history and heritage in modern Liverpool.

    (S1) Confidence, independence of mind, responsibility, organisation and time-management.

    (S2) The ability to work collaboratively and to participate in group discussion.

    (S3) Gathering, analysing and organising information, including online and digital resources.

    (S4) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of oral expression.

    (S5) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression.

  • Beginners' Irish Language 1 (IRIS241)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To develop a basic knowledge of Irish language and grammar, to a beginners’ (A1) level;

    To develop an understanding of the origins and development of writing in Irish;

    To begin to speak, write and translate Irish.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Apply beginner-level reading, writing and comprehension skills in Irish.

    (LO2) Demonstrate knowledge of Irish culture, history and literature.

    (LO3) Demonstrate knowledge of the grammar of Irish.

    (S1) Communication skills (oral and written Irish).

    (S2) Global citizenship (knowledge of Irish culture in context).

    (S3) Confidence (interpersonal and presentation skills).

  • Beginners' Irish Language 2 (IRIS242)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To develop a knowledge of Irish language and grammar, to a beginners’ (A2) level;

    To develop an understanding of the origins and development of writing in Irish;

    To continue to develop written and spoken Irish and to translate Irish texts into English.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Apply elementary-level reading, writing and comprehension skills in Irish.

    (LO2) Demonstrate knowledge of Irish culture, history and literature.

    (LO3) Demonstrate knowledge of the grammar of Irish.

    (S1) Communication skills (oral and written Irish).

    (S2) Global citizenship (knowledge of Irish culture in context).

    (S3) Confidence (interpersonal and presentation skills).

  • Intermediate Irish Language (IRIS243)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To develop a knowledge of Irish language and grammar, to an intermediate level;

    To develop an understanding of the origins and development of writing in Irish;

    To understand, to an intermediate level, written and spoken Irish and to be able to translate Irish texts into English.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Apply intermediate-level reading, writing and comprehension skills in Irish.

    (LO2) Demonstrate knowledge of Irish culture, history and literature.

    (LO3) Demonstrate knowledge of the grammar of Irish.

    (S1) Communication skills (oral and written Irish).

    (S2) Global citizenship (knowledge of Irish culture in context).

    (S3) Confidence (interpersonal and presentation skills).

Programme Year Three

Students are required to take modules for a total of 120 credits. Students must take the Irish Studies dissertation (either in the form of IRIS310 or IRIS400).

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Dissertation in Irish Studies (whole Session) (IRIS400)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to a higher level of research and writing than they would meet outside this format of a self-designed and driven research topic;

    To teach students a high degree of independence as researchers;

    To introduce to students the writing skills (including referencing and bibliography formation) required of a researcher considering taking up post-graduate study.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students acquire the ability to design and deliver a major research project.

    (LO2) Students acquire the reading and writing skills appropriate to this project.

    (LO3) Students gain an understanding of how to develop their own opinions, in positive engagement with the primary and secondary literature.

    (S1) Improving own learning / performance - reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - influencing skills – argumentation

    (S4) Information skills - information accessing: locating relevant information. Identifying and evaluating information sources

    (S5) Research skills - awareness of / commitment to academic integrity

    (S6) Information skills - record-keeping

    (S7) Time and project management - project planning

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - creative thinking

    (S9) Critical thinking and problem solving - synthesis

    (S10) Information skills - critical reading

  • Dissertation in Irish Studies - Second Semester (IRIS310)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to a higher level of research and writing than they would meet outside the format of a self-designed and driven research topic;

    To teach students a high degree of independence as researchers;

    To introduce to students the writing skills (including referencing and bibliography formation) required of a researcher considering taking up post-graduate study.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To equip students for the design and delivery of a major research project.

    (LO2) To provide students with the reading and writing skills appropriate to this project.

    (LO3) To encourage students to develop their own opinions, in positive engagement with the primary and secondary literature.

    (S1) Improving own learning / performance - reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - influencing skills – argumentation

    (S4) Information skills - information accessing: locating relevant information. Identifying and evaluating information sources

    (S5) Research skills - awareness of / commitment to academic integrity

    (S6) Information skills - record-keeping

    (S7) Time and project management - project planning

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - creative thinking

    (S9) Critical thinking and problem solving - synthesis

    (S10) Information skills - critical reading

  • Ireland: Political, Social and Cultural Geographies (ENVS399)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Students will develop their knowledge of Irish cultural geography from human settlement until the present. Students will gain insight into the impact of human activity on the Irish landscape. The module seeks to foster an undertanding of contemporary Irish identity,culture, society and politics. The module aims to develop students' skills of interdisciplinary study relating Ireland and it's past.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will obtain an overview of Irish cultural geography from human settlement until the present.

    (LO2) Students will gain insight into the impact of human activity on the Irish landscape.

    (LO3) Students will develop knowlege of contemporary Irish identity

    (LO4) Students will develop interdisciplinary study skills.

    (S1) Organisational skills

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) International awareness

    (S4) Adaptability

  • Conflict and Politics in Northern Ireland (POLI815)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with a well-informed and up-to-date understanding of the politics and governance of Northern Ireland;

    To engage students with scholarly debates about the conflict and its aftermath in Northern Ireland;

    To enable students to develop their communication and critical thinking skills.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understanding of the causes of the Northern Ireland conflict.

    (LO2) Ability to evaluate different interpretations of the Northern Ireland conflict.

    (LO3) Knowledge of the theory and practice of consociational power-sharing.

    (LO4) Ability to assess the extent and implications of division in contemporary Northern Ireland politics and society.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - seminar discussions.

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing including referencing skills.

    (S3) Time and project management - personal organisation.

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis.

    (S5) Working in groups and teams - listening skills.

    (S6) Information skills - information accessing: locating relevant information, identifying and evaluating information sources.

    (S7) Global citizenship - relevant economic / political understanding.

  • Vikings in Ireland (HIST304)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To explore key problems in the interpretation of the Viking world;

    To acquaint students with the range of primary and secondary sources used to analyse Ireland in the Viking Age;

    To familiarize students with a range of perspectives on medieval history, and challenge them to broaden their chronological and conceptual assumptions.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Anability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon primarysources.

    (LO2) An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

    (LO3) An ability to explain the significance of Vikings in Ireland within the broader phenomenon of the ''Viking Age''.

    (S1) Confidence, independence of mind, responsibility, organisation and time-management.

    (S2) The ability to work collaboratively and to participate in group discussion

    (S3) Gathering, analysing and organising information, including online and digital resources.

    (S4) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of oral expression.

    (S5) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression

  • Writing for Radio: Broadcasting in Twentieth-century Britain and Ireland (ENGL487)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to radio as a writer’s medium and to the history of that medium;

    To help students situate writing for radio in its historical, political and cultural contexts;

    To invite students to investigate what is stylistically specific about writing for radio;

    To encourage students to produce their own broadcast.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To develop students’ ability to analyse a wide range of texts, ranging across major genres.

    (LO2) To enhance students’ critical reading and writing skills.

    (LO3) To foster in students an interdisciplinary and creative approach to cultural studies.

    (LO4) To encourage students to avail of the range of scholarly work written in the discipline.

    (LO5) To prepare students for further study of literature, professional training and / or employment in broadcasting.

    (S1) Global citizenship – cultural awareness.

    (S2) Technical skills – using specialist broadcast media equipment.

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) – presentation skills.

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) – listening skills.

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) – academic writing (including referencing skills).

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving.

    (S7) Information skills – critical reading.

    (S8) Information skills – information accessing (locating relevant information; identifying and evaluating information sources).

  • War Writing (ENGL488)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To explore how “wartime” and “peacetime” are imagined by 20th and 21st century writers;

    To read essays and novels in the context of theories of wartime, peacetime, and their interrelatedness;

    To explore how the boundaries between non-fiction and fictional writing are manipulated by writers’ responses to war;

    To develop an analytical vocabulary for discussing war writing.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To understand the main theories of war and war literature pertinent to this module’s study of 20th and 21st century war writing.

    (LO2) To understand the principles of contemporary genre theory as they apply to this module’s study of the non-fiction essay and the novel.

    (LO3) To communicate effectively in writing, with an appropriate grasp of the mechanics of written English and in accordance with the style guide for the course module.

    (LO4) To present an organised, supported thesis on a topic related to 20th and 21st century war writing to an audience of peers and assessor.

    (S1) Time management

    (S2) Research skills

    (S3) Presentation skills

    (S4) Reading comprehension

    (S5) Persuasive writing

  • James Joyce: A Writing Life (ENGL499)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To engage with the oeuvre of James Joyce at an advanced level, considering his stylistic progression from the early stories to the final complex workings of Finnegans Wake;

    To provide students with the necessary historical and sociological background to understand the environmental conditions that produces a writer of Joyce’s stature and motivations;

    To provide students with a thorough understanding of the biographical facts of Joyce’s life and the ways in which this biography feeds into his work; 

    To encourage students, through seminar presentations, thorough compulsory reading and, finally, through a lengthy end-of-semester essay to reflect on the extraordinary range of Joyce’s achievement both in an Irish and in a world context.

    Seminar presentations will stress the importance of constructing a valid and lucid literary-historical argument under pressures designed to mirror an academic conference.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire the knowledge, interpretive and analytical skills appropriate to the advanced study of literature;

    (LO2) Learn to present their own ideas and assessments by engaging with the main primary and secondary sources;

    (LO3) Develop their communicative and presentational skills in both oral and written form;

    (LO4) Develop an appreciation for the unique achievement of James Joyce.

    (S1) Global citizenship - cultural awareness

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills - written

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills - visual

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - listening skills

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

    (S7) Information skills - critical reading

    (S8) Information skills - information accessing: locating relevant information. Identifying and evaluating information sources

  • From the Ira to Isis: Understanding Political Violence in the Contemporary World (POLI324)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To help students think critically about the world we live in today, specifically focusing on terrorism;

    To consider why and how terrorist groups come into existence and disappear;

    To examine the historical evolution of terrorism, the importance of terrorism in the contemporary world, different types of terrorism, and the responses to such threats;

    To think about why a universal definition of terrorism has proven so elusive and what this means for the study of terrorism;

    To explore the controversies that have been generated by terrorism and counter-terrorism.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The ability to think critically about the world in which we live today, especially regarding the legitimacy of political violence.

    (LO2) An understanding of the key debates and controversies in the study of terrorism and counter-terrorism.

    (LO3) The ability to engage in critical discussion about questions relating to terrorism and counter-terrorism.

    (LO4) The ability to engage and interact with the main themes in a specific body of intellectual knowledge.

    (LO5) An ability to access and make effective use of bibliographical and electronic sources of information.

    (LO6) Make arguments in a coherent and effective manner.

    (LO7) The ability to write a cogent, well-argued research paper that deals with a significant aspect of these debates.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual).

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis.

    (S3) Working in groups and teams - group action planning.

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

You will attend lectures, seminars and make a field trip to Ireland. You will be assessed by a mixture of coursework and examinations in January and May/June of each year. Your final degree classification is determined by performance in Years Two and Three and assessment of the third year project-based modules is by extended essay or dissertation.