Hispanic Studies BA (Hons) Add to your prospectus

Key information


  • Course length: 4 years
  • UCAS code: RR45
  • Year of entry: 2018
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB / IB : 33, with no score less than 4 / BTEC : Applications considered
Modern-Languages-and-Cultures-6

Module details

Programme Year One

Students with advanced Spanish:

  • Four language modules
  • Two foundational modules (Introduction to Iberian and Latin American Studies I and II)
  • Two additional modules in another subject

Programme Year Two

  • Four language modules
  • Four optional modules

All students must take four language modules if taking Hispanic Studies as a Major or as a Single Honours. This means continuing with the two languages studied in Year 1.

Examples of optional modules include:

  • Latin America in its Literature
  • Spain is not Spain: Nation, Identity and Diversity in Iberian Culture
  • Spanish and Latin American Cinemas
  • Volunteering and experience

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Modern Spanish Language (advanced Course IIa) (HISP200)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
    • To provide a stimulating learning environment in which students develop their linguistic skills in Spanish.
    • ​To enable students to understand both written and spoken Spanish and analyse the linguistic nature of Spanish.
    • ​To enhance and develop the oral and listening practical skills.
    • ​To assist the students in speaking Spanish accurately and fluently.
    Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of the module, students will have consolidated and extended their existing knowledge and ability to use the Spanish language and will have developed all skills - speaking, listening, reading, writing and interacting.    

    Upon completion of the module, students will have developed their translation and written skills and will be able to demonstrate a deep understanding of the structures, lexicon and registers of Spanish.​

     

    Upon completion of the module, students will have improved their listening and speaking skills in order to communicate effectively in a variety of contexts and using the appropriate registers in more complex or professional environments.
  • Modern Spanish Language (advanced Course IIb) (HISP201)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
  • To provide a stimulating learning environment in which students develop their linguistic skills in Spanish.

  • ​To enable students to understand both written and spoken Spanish and to analyse the linguistic nature of Spanish.

  • ​To enhance and develop the oral and listening practical skills.

  • ​To assist the students in speaking Spanish accurately and fluently.

  • Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of the module, students will have consolidated and extended ​their existing knowledge and ability to use the Spanish language and will haev developed all skills: speaking, listening, reading, writing and interacting.

    Upon completion of the module, studentswill have developed their translation and written skills and will beable to demonstrate a deep understanding of the structures, lexiconand registers of Spanish.​

    Upon completion of the module, studentswill have improved their listening and speaking skills in order to communicate effectively in avariety of contexts and using the appropriate registersin more complex or professional environments.​​​

  • Modern Spanish Language (beginners IIb) (HISP203)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims• To consolidate the student''s knowledge of Spanish grammar in a variety of different contextsand registers and to explore aspects of contemporary Peninsular and Latin AmericanSpanish language and culture.• To develop and consolidate listening comprehension skills in Spanish in a variety of different contexts and registers.• To communicate effectively in oral Spanish in a variety of different contexts and registers.​
    Learning Outcomes

    By the end of the module students will have markedly improved their linguistic skills in Spanish speaking, listening, understanding, reading, writing and translating, which will equip them for a successful next year spent abroad.

    ​Students will be able to translate texts from English into Spanish froma variety of socio-cultural and literary texts.

    To communicate effectively in oral Spanish in a variety of different contexts and registers and to explore aspects of contemporary Peninsular and Latin American Spanish language and culture.​
  • Modern Portuguese Language IIa (HISP204)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims
    • To provide students with competence in reading, writing, listening and speaking Portuguese at Intermediate level.
    • ​To provide students with a solid understanding of basic and complex structures of Portuguese grammar.
    • To develop students'' language learning strategy use and a reflective approach towards language learning.​
    • ​To explore aspects of contemporary Portuguese-speaking culture through the medium of Portuguese.
    Learning Outcomes

    Apply increasingly complex and nuanced listening, reading, writing and speaking skills in Portuguese.

    Communicate in Portuguese in everyday contexts and in increasingly complex formal and informal registers.

    ​Demonstrate a considerable knowledge and understanding of the structures, registers and, as appropriate, varieties of Portuguese.

    ​Critically reflect on and effectively apply language learning strategies.

    Demonstrate a considerable knowledge and understanding of the cultures and linguistic contexts of Portuguese countries.

Year Two Optional Modules

  • Latin American in Its Literature (LATI203)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims
    • to introduce students to Latin American literature through the study of a selection of major works
    • to deepen students understanding of Latin American social reality through an examination of its portrayal in literature ​
    • to train students in the reading of literary texts and to encourage them to develop an ability to analyse for themselves
    Learning Outcomes

    Students will acquire an understanding of some of the best in Latin American literature in its broader historical, cultural and socio-political context

    Students will deepen their understanding of Latin American socio-political reality and of its portrayal in the regions literature​

    Students will develop their ability to do a close critical reading of literary texts and also improve their analytical skills generally​

    Students will have learned to apply theoretical approach and secondary literature to the analysis of literary texts​

  • Spain is Not Spain: Nationalisms & Identities in Spanish Literature (HISP216)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims·       The principal aim of this module is to provide students with a detailed introduction to the nationalism(s) of Spain. Special emphasis will be placed on the emergence of historical nationalisms in the Basque Country and Catalonia in the late 19th century as well as their re-emergence after Francisco Franco''s dictatorship. ·        The module will enable students to acquire a broad understanding of the different nationalist identities in Spain looking at different literary texts (fiction, poetry and short stories, in Spanish). ·        The module will also enable students to acquire wide-ranging skills in literary analysis. ·        The module will enable students to gain a solid understanding of key social, political and cultural concerns in Spain.
    Learning Outcomes

    ​Upon successful completion of the module, students will be able to explain and illustrate the key issues that are driving contemporary debates in Spain regarding nationalisms and they will also have acquired a clear understanding of the historical, cultural, institutional and constitutional framework in which Spanish state nationalism is pitted against competing nationalisms.

    Students will be able to critically interpret and contextualise a wide range of contemporary texts. ​

    Students will be able to apply theoretical approaches or critical secondary literature to the analysis of primary texts. ​

  • Spanish and Latin American Cinemas: An Introduction (HISP229)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims·        To introduce students to the cinematic dimension of Spanish and Latin American cultures·        To create an awareness of the economic forces which frame the film industry in Spain and Latin America in specific areas of contemporary political and cultural life; ·         ​To develop students'' skills in close textual analysis of a range of film texts·         ​To explore the relationship between film, society and politics across various national contexts within Spain and Latin America
    Learning Outcomes

    Demonstrate a knowledge of the cinematic practices and cultures of Spain and Latin America

     

    ​Show an understanding of the ways in which Spanish and Latin American film are shaped by wider economic and cultural forces

    ​Show an ability to apply close readings to film texts

    ​Display an understanding of the relationship between film, society and politics across various national contexts with Spain and Latin America

  • School of Histories, Languages and Cultures Volunteering and Experience Module 1 (HLAC211)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    ​1. To develop materials and/or undertake tasks within a practical or vocational context

    2. To apply within that context pedagogical and other theoretical or practical knowledge relevant to the development and delivery of those materials and/or tasks.

    3. To apply academic and/or theoretical knowledge within a practical context and to reflect and report on the relationship between the two.

    4. To develop and identify a range of personal/employability skills and to reflect and report on this.

    Learning Outcomes

    ​Students should be able to demonstrate an ability to develop materials and/or undertake tasks according to a given specification and requirement, within a practical or vocational context.

    ​Students should be able to reflect on and evaluate the efficacy of the materials developed and/or the tasks undertaken.

    ​Students should be able to identify the connection between academic and/or theoretical knowledge and its practical or vocational application.

    ​Students should be able to identify, reflect and report on a range of personal/employability skills.

Programme Year Three

Year abroad

For students specialising in Latin American Studies:

You spend your third year in a country of your choice, such as Mexico, Peru, Bolivia, Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil or Cuba. You are required to enrol in university classes, including language, unless exempted by the director of the programme or be attached to a Non-Governmental Organisation or research centre.

While abroad, you carry out research for a dissertation, you submit a pre-dissertation report and a draft chapter at the beginning of June, while the dissertation itself is a compulsory module (across both semesters) in final year.

All other students:

Extended essay or portfolio written in Spanish, or accredited ERASMUS modules.

Programme Year Four

  • 4 language modules
  • 4 optional modules

All students must take four language modules. This means continuing with the two languages studied in Years 1 and 2 normally.

Year Four Compulsory Modules

  • Modern Spanish Language IIIa (HISP300)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
    Aims
  • Students are expected to be able to show ability to assimilate and transmit information through simultaneous and liaison interpreting.

  • Through (assessed) translation from English​ to Spanish, students are expected to develop an excellent understanding of Spanish grammar.

  • Through a weekly class with the Spanish lector(a)​, students are expected to develop and consolidate advanced oral skills, building particularly on their experience during their year abroad.

  • Learning Outcomes

    By the end of the module, students will be able to speak and write Spanish with near-native fluency and with grammatical correctness.

    ​Students will be able to communicate effectively in a variety of different contexts and registers.

    ​Students'' speaking, listening, reading and writing skills will all have improved and their ability to translate texts and interpret short interviews/talks will have been enhanced.

    ​Students will be expected to be able to translate from English into Spanish with grammatical correctness and cultural awareness.

  • Modern Spanish Language IIIb (HISP301)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
    Aims
    1. Students are expected to show ability to assimilate and transmit information through simultaneous and liaison interpreting.
    2. ​Through writing in a variety of registers (reporting tasks, letters, summaries, dialogues, descriptions) students are expected to consolidate and apply their understanding of Spanish grammar.
    3. Through a weekly class with the Spanish lector(a)​, students are expected to develop and consolidate advanced oral skills, building particularly on their experience during their year abroad.
    Learning Outcomes

    By the end of the module, students will be expected to be able to speak and write Spanish with near-native fluency and with grammatical correctness. 

    ​Students will be able to communicate effectively in a variety of different contexts and registers.

    ​Students'' ability to write in different registers and interpret short interviews/talks will have been enhanced.

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

You will be taught in a mixture of formal lectures, seminars and small group tutorials where a friendly environment prevails and great attention is paid to giving feedback on assessed work.

In language classes, we make every effort to ensure that we have a small number of students compared to competitor institutions, which means that academic staff are able to support students to achieve their full potential. All language modules involve continuous assessment such as oral presentations, listening tests and grammar tests as well as exams. Tuition takes place in small groups with first-language speakers playing a prominent part and includes a range of skills such as listening, writing, speaking, interpreting and translation.

Students are also expected to make regular use of our fully-refurbished Language Lounge to enhance their own study. We encourage our students to become independent learners, and support them through our dedicated library resources in the Sydney Jones Library which is open 24-hour in term time. We also make extensive use of our virtual learning environment VITAL where students can complete structured tasks outside the classroom.


Assessment

Performance throughout the year is carefully monitored and used to supplement examinations. For language, such a programme of continuous assessment involves evaluating performance in a variety of written and oral exercises. Other modules have a mix of essay and exam assessment. Our aim is always to assess by methods of evaluation appropriate to the skills being developed and to allow students to gain credit for good work done during the year.

Exams take place at two points in the academic year: at the end of Semester One in January and at the end of the session in May, so that the workload is evenly distributed. As regards the final degree result, for language programmes, the second year’s work counts for 20%, the work done during the Year Abroad (foreign exams or extended essay or portfolio) counts for another 10%, and the final year’s work counts for 70%.