Geology and Geophysics MESci (Hons) Add to your prospectus

  • Offers study abroad opportunities Offers study abroad opportunities
  • Opportunity to study for a year in China Offers a Year in China
  • This degree is accreditedAccredited

Key information


  • Course length: 4 years
  • UCAS code: F641
  • Year of entry: 2018
  • Typical offer: A-level : AAB / IB : 35 / BTEC : Not accepted
earth-sci-1

Module details

Programme Year One

A strong feature of Years One and Two is the acquisition of fundamentals in Maths, Physics, Geology and Geophysics supported by an integrated approach to transferable skills conveyed through the tutorial system. Students take the following compulsory modules:

  • Study Skills and GIS
  • Introduction to Field Geology
  • Earth Structure and Plate Tectonics
  • Introduction to Sedimentary Rocks and Fossils
  • Introduction to Structural Geology and Geological Maps
  • Newtonian Dynamics
  • Maths for Physics 1
  • Maths for Physics 2

Fieldwork:

  • 1 day in North England (Autumn)
  • 8 days in Pembrokeshire (Easter)

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Study Skills and Gis (earth Science) (ENVS101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
    1. ​To develop essential study and disciplinary skills required by Environmental Scientists, both for their current studies and future employment.

      • Introduce students to key approaches/concepts and ideas in the Earth Sciences
      • To help students identify and effectively employ appropriate sources of data and information
      • Develop students'' study skills and provide essential training for subsequent years
      • Develop students'' personal transferable skills.
    2. To introduce the application of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and Global Positioning Systems (GPS) to Environmental Science 

    3. To introduce students to computer programming.
    Learning Outcomes

    Record field observations and ideas, and write a reflective account.

    ​Plan and structure written work to University standard.

    ​Demonstrate basic GIS interpretation and analysis techniques.

    Use IT tools to find accurate and up to date information, including University Library resources.​

    ​Develop programming skills for use in later modules.

    ​Develop employability skills through a CV and application letter exercise.

    ​Develop ability to communicate science in a small group.

    ​Demonstrate understanding of UoL Academic Integrity policy.

  • Introduction to Field Geology (ENVS109)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to field geology and enable students to apply knowledge and understanding that they have developed previously in lab-based modules. 

    Learning Outcomes

    ​1. On successful completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate competence in rock, fossil, and mineral identification, and the identification and measurement of characteristic features of rock outcrops.

    ​2. On successful completion of this module, students should be able to complete hazard assessments of geological field localities based on topography, access, tide times, etc.

    ​3. On successful completion of this module, students should be able to record observations and interpretations in a scientific notebook.

    ​4. On successful completion of this module, students should be able to perform sedimentary analysis through the construction and interpretation of sedimentary logs.
    ​5. On successful completion of this module, students should be able to perform geometrical analysis of geological structures through the use of stereonets.

    ​6. On successful completion of this module, students should have grasped the rudiments of geological mapping, GVS construction, and cross section construction.

    ​7. On successful completion of this module, students should be able to use geological field observations as a basis to interpret outcrop features in terms of geological processes and environments.

    ​8. On successful completion of this module, students should be able to summarize the geological history of Pembrokeshire, derived from the synthesis of multiple days of field observations and interpretations.

  • Earth Structure and Plate Tectonics (ENVS112)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    AimsTo introduce students to the structure and composition of the Earth, the Earth’s gravitational and magnetic fields, and dynamics within the deep Earth.

    To introduce students to the physics of Earth material and the geological time scale.

    To introduce students to plate tectonics.
    Learning Outcomes

      1. Knowledge and Understanding
     

    On completion of this module, students should:

    a. Have concepts and knowledge of whole Earth structure and composition, Earth’s gravity and magnetic fields, and dynamic processes within the mantle and core.

    b. Have concepts and knowledge of the physical properties and behaviour of Earth material.

    c. Have concepts and knowledge of the geological time scale and radiometric dating methods.

    d. Be able to understand the plate tectonic model and the relationship between plate tectonics and geological and geophysical observations in the major plate tectonic settings.

      2. Intellectual Abilities
     

    On completion of this module, students shouldbe able:

    a. to explain and evaluate the relationships between Earth structure, composition, physical behaviour and Earth dynamics;

    b. to explain and evaluate the relationships between plate tectonics and geological and geophysical processes and observations in the major plate tectonic settings.

      3. Subject Based Practical Skills
     

    On completion of this module, students should:

    a. be able to manipulate geological and geophysical data to help understand Earth structure and processes.

      4. General Transferable Skills
     

    On completion of this module, students should have developed their skills in:

    a. problem solving including simple numerical problems;
    b. numeracy through completion of assignments;
    c. Information synthesis and collation;
    d. time management through regular assignment deadlines.

  • Introduction to Sedimentary Rocks and Fossils (ENVS118)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    Aims
    • The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to the study of sediments and sedimentary rocks and to introduce the main groups of common fossil.
    • The module aims to cover the basic language used to describe sediments and fossils and gives an introduction to a range of physical, chemical and biological concepts.   
    • The students are introduced to the economic significance of sediments and sedimentary rocks and how fossils provide information on geological time, evolutionary history and ancient environments.
    Learning Outcomes

    ​1. On successful completion of this module, a student will be able to describe sediments and sedimentary rocks at outcrop, hand specimen and thin section scales, identifying and naming key structures and fabrics.

    ​2. On successful completion of this module, a student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the relationships between process and product for both depositional and diagenetic features and be able to discuss the utility of sedimentary rocks to determine processs and, to a lesser extent, environment.

    ​3. On successful completion of this module, a student will be able to describe, name and identify and interpret the main features of common fossils.

    4. On successful completion of this module, a student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of how organisms are preserved as fossils, and of the utility of fossils to identify ancient modes of life, environments and relative ages of rocks.
  • Introduction to Structural Geology and Geological Maps (ENVS156)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    To introduce small- and large-scale geological structures.

    To introduce the principles of stress and strain.

    To introduce stereographic projection techniques.

    To use synthetic and real topographic and geological maps to teach a basic understanding of geological maps as representations of geometry and stratigraphy.

    Learning Outcomes
      1. Knowledge and Understanding
     

    On the successful completion of this module students should:

    a. know the geometry and nomenclature of geological structures;

    b. understand the appropriate classification schemes for geological structures;

    c. understand how selected small-scale structures may be used to interpret the geometry of large-scale structures.

    d. recognising common geological map patterns and elements.

    e. understanding geological map conventions

    f. understanding that 3D geometry can be interpreted from map data.

    g. stratigraphic concepts as applied to maps

      2. Intellectual Abilities
     

    On the successful completion of this module students should:

    a. have developed strategies for the description and identification of geological structures;

    b. have an appreciation of stress and strain.

    c. be able to visualise the 3D interaction of geological surfaces with topography

    d. be able to synthesise a sequence of events from information on a geological map

      3. Subject Based Practical Skills
     

    On the successful completion of this module students should be competent in:

    a. the use of the compass-clinometer;

    b. the plotting and manipulation of orientation data using stereographic projection;

    c. the portrayal of three-dimensional structures in two-dimensions;

    d. the interpretation of two-dimensional representations of three-dimensional structures.

    e. use of topographic maps: including finding and reading grid references, reading distances and directions, reading topography using contours.

    f. the use of structure contours, to map the 3D shape of geologically important surfaces

    g. construction of cross sections and generalised vertical successions from geological maps.

    h. use of the compass clinometer for recording bearings

      4. General Transferable Skills
     

    On the successful completion of this module students should have:

    a. learnt, by example, how to use textbooks to support their studies.

    b. practical use of topographic and geological maps.

    c. ability to work neatly and legibly on maps

  • Newtonian Dynamics (PHYS101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
    • To introduce the fundamental concepts and principles of classical mechanics at an elementary level.
    • To provide an introduction to the study of fluids.
    • To introduce the use of elementary vector algebra in the context of mechanics.
    Learning Outcomes

    Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the laws of classical mechanics, and understand physical quantities with magnitudes, directions (where applicable), units and uncertainties.

    • understand physical quantities with magnitudes, directions (where applicable), units and uncertainties.
    • apply the laws of mechanics to statics, linear motion, motion in a plane, rotational motion, simple harmonic motion and gravitation.

    Apply the laws of mechanics to unseen situations and solve problems.

    Develop a knowledge and understanding of the analysis of linear and rotational motion.

    ​Develop a knowledge and understanding of the analysis of orbits, gravity, simple harmonic motion and fluid flow.

  • Mathematics for Physicists I (PHYS107)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To provide a foundation for the mathematics required by physical scientists.

    To assist students in acquiring the skills necessary to use the mathematics developed in the module.

    Learning Outcomes

  • a good working knowledge of differential and integral calculus



  • familiarity with some of the elementary functions common in applied mathematics and science



  • an introductory knowledge of functions of several variables


  • manipulation of complex numbers and use them to solve simple problems involving fractional powers


  • an introductory knowledge of series


  • a good rudimentary knowledge of simple problems involving statistics: binomial and Poisson distributions, mean, standard deviation, standard error of mean
  • Mathematics for Physicists II (PHYS108)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims
    • To consolidate and extend the understanding of mathematics required for the physical sciences.
    • To develop the student’s ability to apply the mathematical techniques developed in the module to the understanding of physical problems.
    Learning OutcomesAbility to manipulate matrices with confidence and use matrix methods to solve simultaneous linear equations.

    ​Familiarity with methods for solving first and second order differential equations in one variable.

    ​A basic knowledge of vector algebra.

    A basic understanding of Fourier series and transforms.

    ​A basic understanding of series methods for the solution of differential equations

  • Foundations of Modern Physics (PHYS104)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
    • To introduce the theory of special relativity and its experimental proofs.
    • To carry out calculations using relativity and visualise them.
    • To introduce the concepts and the experimental foundations of quantum theory.
    • To carry out simple calculations related to quantum mechanical problem tasks.
    • To show the impact of relativity and quantum theory on contemporary science and society.
    Learning Outcomes

    An understanding why classical mechanics must have failed to describe the properties of light, the motion of objects with speeds close to the speed of light and the properties of microspopic systems.

    ​A basic knowledge on the experimental and theoretical concepts which founded modern physics, i.e. that either relativity or quantum theory or both are needed to explain certain phenomena.​

    ​A knowledge of the postulates of special relativity.​

    ​An understanding of the concept of spacetime, of the relativity of length, time and velocity.​

    An ability to apply the Lorentz transformation and the concept of Lorentz invariance to simple cases​

    ​An ability to apply the equations of relativistic energy, momentum and rest mass.​

    ​An understanding of the Doppler effect for light and visualisation of relativistic effects.​

    ​An ability to solve problems based on special relativity.​

    ​An understanding why quantum theory is the conceptual framework to understand the microscopic properties of the universe.​

    ​An understanding of the quantum theory of light and the ability to apply the energy-momentum conservation for light, e.g. photo-electric effect, Compton effect.​

    ​An understanding of the structure of atoms and its experimental foundations.

    ​An understanding of Bohr''s theory of the atom and its application to the H-atom including the concept of principal quantum numbers.​

    ​An understanding of de Broglie waves and their statistical interpretation.​

    ​An ability to explain the experimental evidence of de Broglie waves with scattering experiments of electrons, X-rays and neutrons.​

    ​An understanding of the principles of quantum mechanical measurements and Heisenberg''s uncertainty principle.​

    ​An understanding of the identity principle of microscopic particles and the basic idea of quantum (Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein) statistics.​

    ​A basic knowledge of contemporary applications of quantum theory and relativity, e.g. nuclear reactor and nuclear fissions, and the impact on our society.​

  • Wave Phenomena (PHYS103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
    • To introduce the fundamental concepts and principles of wave phenomena.
    • To highlight the many diverse areas of physics in which an understanding of waves is crucial.
    • To introduce the concepts of interference and diffraction.
    Learning Outcomes

    At the end of the module the student should be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of oscillators.
    • Understand the fundamental principles underlying wave phenomena.
    • Apply those principles to diverse phenomena.
    • Understand wave reflection and transmission, superposition of waves.
    • Solve problems on the behaviour of electromagnetic waves in vacuo and in dielectric materials.
    • Understand linear and circular polarisation.
    • Understand inteference and diffraction effects.
    • Understand lenses and optical instruments.
    • Apply Fourier techniques and understand their link to diffraction patterns.
    • Understand the basic principles of lasers.

Programme Year Two

Students take the following compulsory modules:

  • Minerals, Magmas and Volcanoes
  • Geophysical Mathematics and Potential Theory
  • Exploration Geophysics
  • Seismology and Computing
  • Structural Geology and Interpretation of Geological Maps
  • Field Mapping Techniques
  • Dynamic Stratigraphy
  • Electromagnetism

One option from:

  • Magmatism and Volcanic Hazards
  • Deep Earth Mineralisation Systems

Fieldwork:

  • 15 days Geological Mapping Training in Spain (Easter)

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Minerals, Magmas and Volcanoes (ENVS115)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    To introduce the petrological microscope
    To introduce the main rock forming minerals
    To examine the origins of Earth''s magmas, igneous rocks and volcanoes.
    To consider the physical and chemical properties of magmas, how compositions of magmas are changed, and how magma emplacement history is recorded in rock texture.
    To examine the physical processes of the main types of volcanic activity and the associated hazards.
    To introduce volcanic hazards awareness and principles of risk mitigation.

    Learning Outcomes

    Knowledge and understanding​

    On successful completion of this module, students should: a. Know the properties of common rock-forming minerals;
    b. Understand common classification schemes for minerals and rocks;
    c. Understand how minerals may be interpreted to infer geological conditions and processes.
    d. Understand the nature, origins and possible outcomes of magmatic activity.
    e. Understand processes of magma compositional change, and know how magmas and igneous rocks are classified.
    f. Recognise common magmatic rocks in hand specimen and under the microscope.
    g. Understand the physical and chemical processes and conditions that govern the spectrum of volcanic eruption styles, and know how volcanic activity is classified.
    h. Understand the impact of volcanism on society and environment.

    Intellectual abilities

    On successful completion of this module, students should have developed the ability to: a. Design a strategy for identifying minerals in hand specimen and thin section.
    b. Be able to analyse magmatic rocks and make simple deductions concerning magmatic history.
    c. Be able to observe, record, interpret and present descriptive information regarding volcanic activity.
    d. Be able to solve problems concerning physical processes and the environment.
    e. Be able to infer conditions and processes of emplacement and cooling from rock texture.

    Subject base practical skillsOn successful completion of this module students should: a. Be able to use a hand lens and a petrological microscope;
    b. Be able to make proper drawings of minerals seen in hand specimen and thin section.
    c. Be able to use simple techniques of visualisation and numeracy to solve volcanological problems.
    d. Competently use the petrological microscope to record textural information and unravel magmatic process.

  • Geophysical Mathematics and Potential Theory (ENVS201)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    To provide mathematical training required for geophysical research, with a specific focus on:

    1) Mathematical methods, providing a bridge between year 1 mathematics courses and geophysical applications in year 3 and 4.

    2) The application of these methods, with particular emphasis on applied potential theory (gravity and magnetic methods).
    Learning Outcomes

    Knowledge of mathematical methods appropriate for geophysical science.


    ​Advanced knowledge and understanding of the concepts of gravity and magnetic field potentials, fundamental mathematical framework of potential field theory, and application to data manipulation and interpretation.

    ​The ability to manipulate gravitational and magnetic data using potential field theory.

    ​Report writing from practical exercise, involving synthesising and presenting key conclusions rather than a simple practical report - to mimic professional reporting.

  • Exploration Geophysics (ENVS216)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    This module aims to enable students to gain an understanding in the basic principles and practise of exploration geophysics

    Learning OutcomesOn successful completion of the module, students should be capable of explaining the principles of seismic refraction and reflection, electrical and electromagnetic methods, gravity and magnetic surveying and well logging.

    On successful completion of the module students should be able to identify which geophysical technique(s) should be applied to the solution of specific geological and environmental problems.​

    On successful completion of the module students should be able to carry out simple interpretations of data derived from the application of these geophysical methods.​

  • Seismology and Computing (ENVS229)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
  • ​Understanding fundamentals of theoretical and observational seismology.



  • ​Familiarization with basic MATLAB programming.​
  • ​Understanding of and ability to analyse various seismological data sets.​

  • Learning Outcomes​​
      1. Knowledge and Understanding
     

    On successful completion of this module students should have knowledge of and understand fundamentals of seismology and its applications, and should have some familiarity in programming in Matlab. 

     


    ​​

     2. Subject Based Practical Skills
     

    On successful completion of this module, students should be able to

    a) apply theory and methods to seismological data, analyse seismological data.

    b) Programme in MATLAB

    On successful completion of this module, students should have developed their skills in:

    a) communication (written)

    b) numeracy through practicals and homework

    c) teamwork in practicals

    d) IT literacy, including programming skills, through practicals

    e) time management through practicals and homework​

  • Structural Geology and Interpretation of Geological Maps (ENVS263)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To develop an understanding of the geometric, kinematic and temporal relationships between similar and dissimilar structures.

    To develop an understanding of the role of finite strain in geological structures.

    Learning Outcomes

    1. Knowledge and Understanding
    On successful completion of this module students should:
    a. know the common associations of small- and large-scale geological structures;
    b. understand the principles of finite strain in two- and three-dimensions.

    2. Intellectual Abilities
    On successful completion of this module students should have developed the ability to:
    a. interpret kinematic indicators;
    b. determine the relative ages of pairs of geological structures;
    c. explain the origins of geological structures using strain analysis.

    3. Subject Based Practical Skills
    On successful completion of this module students should be able to construct:
    a. valid cross-sections and closely related diagrams from geological maps;
    b. valid deformation histories from the relative ages of pairs of geological structures.

    4. General Transferable Skills
    On successful completion of this module students should have developed the ability to:
    a. communicate using graphical techniques;
    b. evaluate the validity of and uncertainties associated with natural datasets.

  • Field Mapping Techniques (ENVS269)


    ​4. General Transferable Skills

    On successful completion of this module, students should have competence in:

    1. Teamwork through initial mapping training in small groups.
    2. Time and logistical management constrained by the need to meet regular deadlines and the often unpredictable nature of weather conditions.
    3. Conceptual problem solving through repeated observation, analysis and synthesis cycles.
    4. Fieldwork hazard assessment and safe conduct in mountain terrain.
    5. Graphical communication through the development of graphical representations of geology/geomorphology (map, section GVS).

    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To train students in the techniques required to make geological and geomorphological maps.

    Learning Outcomes

    1. Knowledge and Understanding

    On successful completion of this module, students should have competence in:

    1. the geological/geomorphological history and structural geometry of a mapping area.






    ​2. Intellectual Abilities

    On successful completion of this module, students should have competence in:

    1. developing lithostratigraphic models;
    2. three-dimensual visualization of geological/geomorphological relationships and developing geometrical models;
    3. analysis and synthesis of discrete observations to build an overall solution (map and interpreation of geological/geomorphological evolution).

    ​3. Subject Based Practical Skills

    On successful completion of this module, students should have competence in:

    Map skills

    1. How to locate themselves on a topographic map, both with and without a compass
    2. How to follow a linear feature and mark this on a map
    3. How to record structural measurements on a map
    4. How to record map data in the field
    5. How to ink in a map to make a permanent record
    6. How to keep a notebook to accompany a map, including practical solutions for linking locality information between the two.

    Related skills

    1. How to construct a cross section in the field
    2. How to construct a GVS in the field
    3. How to develop lithostratigraphy from lithology, geometry and younging evidence


  • Dynamic Stratigraphy (ENVS281)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims
    This Module aims to: examine the controls on the stratigraphic organisation of sedimentary strata, and to foster understanding of how a time framework can be established in such strata; examine the differences between lithostratigraphy and chronostratigraphy and communication of formal stratigraphic nomenclature; introduce the concepts of sequence stratigraphy, seismic stratigraphy and practical core-logging; and enable students to produce well constrained interpretations of the ways in which controlling processes operate to create stratigraphic organization and architecture with particular reference to the dynamic stratigraphy of the UK and Europe.
      Learning Outcomes

      ​Explain the concept of geological time and the differences between lithostratigraphy and chronostratigraphy, and  be able to analyse stratigraphy in terms of space and time and to interpret likely controls on stratal patterns.

      ​Evaluate the geological controls of stratigraphic development though an understanding of the startigraphic evolution of the British Isles and Europe.

      ​Be able to interpret the geological history and stratigraphic evolution of an area by analysing a geological map.

      ​Apply formal stratigraphic nomenclature to the geological record and construct a chronostratigraphic diagram.

      ​Problem solving through working independently and with others on a range of data types to produce integrated solutions.

      ​Develop simple sequence stratigraphic or seismic startigraphic models from outcrop and/or subsurface data and communicate results though graphical means.

    1. Electromagnetism (PHYS201)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
      Aims
      • To introduce the fundamental concepts and principles of electrostatics, magnetostatics, electromagnetism and Maxwell''s equations, and electromagnetic waves.
      • To introduce differential vector analysis in the context of electromagnetism.
      • To introduce circuit principles and analysis (EMF, Ohm''s law, Kirchhoff''s rules, RC and RLC circuits)
      • To introduce the formulation fo Maxwell''s equations in the presence of dielectric and magnetic materials.
      • To develop the ability of students to apply Maxwell''s equations to simple problems involving dielectric and magnetic materials.
      • To develop the concepts of field theories in Physics using electromagnetism as an example.
      • To introduce light as an electromagnetic wave.
      Learning Outcomes

      ​Demonstrate a good knowledge of the laws of electromagnetism and an understanding of the practical meaning of Maxwell''s equations in integral and differential forms.

      ​Apply differential vector analysis to electromagnetism.

      ​Demonstrate simple knowledge and understanding of how the presence of matter affects electrostatics and magnetostatics, and the ability to solve simple problems in these situations.

      ​Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how the laws are altered in the case of non-static electric and magnetic fields and the ability to solve simple problems in these situations.

    Year Two Optional Modules

    • Magmatism and Volcanic Hazards (ENVS262)
      Level2
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
      Aims

      To examine fundamentally contrasting magmatic systems and consider in each case the nature and origin of the magmatic activity with follow-up intensive case studies of actual and putative associated hazards.

      To consider the scientific basis for anticipation of volcanic hazards and impact of volcanism on climate.

      To consider the problems associated with volcanic risk mitigation and evaluate the role of the scientist in specific cases.

      To evaluate the media handling of volcanic activity in relation to hazards and potential climate change, from the perspectives both of quality of science and of moral issues arising.

      Learning Outcomes​Explain the nature and origin of ocean-island volcanism andcritically assess the hazards associated with island collapse.

      ​Integrate diverse primary evidence to construct and evaluateconceptual models of volcanic processes.

      ​Evaluate strategies for effective communication ofscientific ideas and concepts with the general public, and critically assessthe role of the media.

      ​​Explain key volcanological processes and concepts graphically using a poster presentation.
    • Deep Earth Mineralisation Systems (ENVS268)
      Level2
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
      • To examine the igneous processes that form layered mafic igneous complexes and associated nickel and platinum group element ore deposits.
      • To examine the igneous processes that form granitoids and associated porphyry copper ore deposits
      • To examine the dissipation of heat from plutons, and its contact metamorphic effects on adjacent country rock.
      • To examine the origin of orogenic gold deposits
      • To examine the origin of kimberlite-hosted diamond depsoits
      • To enable students to work together in teams and develop reporting skills
      Learning Outcomes

      Explain the processes that results in abnormal geochemical concentrations of certain elements to form mineral deposits.

      ​Explain the relationship between source, melting, cooling, crystallisation and plutonic rock composition, and be able to rationalise mineral modes and textures in terms of likely igneous processes.

      ​Explain the mechanisms by which heat is transferred from a pluton into its surrounding country rock and how this may relate to mineral assemblages developed in ancient settings.

      ​Know the common mineral assemblages developed in pelitic rocks during low pressure contact metamorphism and be able to use compatibility diagrams and petrogenetic grids to interpret them in terms of pluton depth of formation.​

      Know the common rock types associated with Ni/PGE, porphyry copper, orogenic gold and diamond mineralisation, and be able to predict likely targets for these types of mineralisation.

    Programme Year Three

    Students take the following compulsory modules:

    • Metamorphism and Crustal Evolution
    • Environmental Geophysics
    • Quantitative tectonics
    • Exploration Geophysics and Signal Processing
    • Advanced Field Techniques
    • Field Project Dissertation
    • Volcano, earthquake and tsunami geophysics
    • Science communication

    Fieldwork:

    • 13 days Advanced Field Techniques in Donegal in the summer between Years Two and Three

    Project:

    • Geological Field Project and Dissertation (35 days fieldwork in the summer between Years Two and Three). Dissertation write-up in Semester One, Year Three.

    Year Three Compulsory Modules

    • Metamorphism and Crustal Evolution (ENVS212)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      AimsTo introduce metamorphic rocks and the ways in which they form, to develop observational skills in relation to metamorphic rocks, and to show how they relate to other parts of geology. To convey the detailed techniques used for studying mineral assemblages in metamorphic rocks, to illustrate these in relation to contact and regional metamorphic case studies, and to discuss the large scale patterns of metamorphic rocks in terms of burial, erosion and overprinting.
      Learning Outcomes

      To recall and explain the basic nomenclature and concepts used in metamorphism

      To use and explain graphical, pictorial and numerical techniques related to metamorphic study​

      Ability to describe and identify common metamorphic minerals and textures in hand specimen and/or using the microscope​

      Ability to interpret common metamorphic minerals and textures from individual observations, diagrams and basic concepts

      To recall and explain the origins of large scale metamorphic patterns from for example burial, heating, erosion and overprinting, ultimately linked to plate tectonic setting​

      To recall and explain how the evolution of a particular mountain belt involves the links between metamorphism and other geological processes​

    • Environmental Geophysics (ENVS258)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
      Aims​This module aims to build on theory taught in ENVS216 through practical application of methods previously taught. In addition, fundamentals of remote sensing will be taught. The module will equip students with experience in a range of geophysical methods, carrying out surveys and associated data analysis and interpretation. How the various methods can be integrated will also be explored.
      Learning Outcomes

      Students will learn fundamentals of good survey practice in electrical, seismic, gravity and magnetic methods to make them ready for field-based activity with industry.​

      ​Students will learn basics of remote sensing techniques and how to interpret images, including through the use of GIS.

       

      ​To interpret, both qualitatively and quantitatively, practical data derived from the application of field methods.​​​To interpret graphs and remotely sensed data.​
    • Quantitative Tectonics (ENVS314)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
      Aims
    • This module aims to impart a detailed understanding of lithospheric-scale active tectonics, and the ability to carry out mathematical calculations to understand and analyse tectonic processes. 

    • ​A subsidiary aim is to improve MATLAB programming skills initially acquired in ENVS229.​

    • Learning Outcomes

      ​Intellectual Abilities​

      On successful completion of this module, students should be able to

              a) Understand principles and details of active tectonic processes

              b) Apply mathematical methods to describe tectonic processes

              c) Apply methods and theory to tectonic data​​​ ​
      Subject Based Practical Skills

      On successful completion of this module, students should be able to​

             a) Set up simple models to simulate tectonic processes

             a) Programme fluently in MATLAB to solve geophysical problems.

    • Exploration Geophysics and Signal Processing (ENVS343)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
      Aims

      To provide an understanding of the theory and fundamental principles of signal processing;    

      To provide an understanding of the principal signal processing techniques and their applications to seismic reflection, refraction and passive seismological time series;

      To gain familiarity with an industry standard reflection seismic processing  package and the underlying work flows. 

        Learning Outcomes

        To be able to apply signal processingtechniques to problems in reflection, refraction, and passive seismology.

        To identify problems inseismic processing which can be solved by signal processing techniques andevaluate the uncertainties in processed seismic sections.

        ​To be able to use a compuer based seismic processing system and understand the fundamentals of a seismic processing work flow.

        ​To be able to develop signal processing routines in MATLAB and graphical cimmunicate the results.

        ​To gain an understanding of the principle theory and routines of signal processing.

      • Advanced Geology Field Techniques (ENVS351)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        The module is based on a series of projects concerned with a range of geological phenomena. The aim of this module is to develop a student’s capability for detailed and sophisticated field analysis of rocks and relationships related to these phenomena. 

        Learning Outcomes

        1a. On successful completion of this module, students will know in detail some of the key events in the geological history of County Donegal.

        2a. On successful completion of this module, students will be able to undertake the reconnaissance of an area and identify the important geological processes that have operated.2b. On successful completion of this module, students will be able to plan, implement and report on a detailed geological analysis, including the following stages: (1) data collection, (2) interpretation, (3) synthesis, (4) evaluation, (5) planning. During the data collection phase, appropriate techniques must be identified, applied and, where necessary, refined or adapted to suit local circumstances.​3a. On successful completion of this module, students will​ have developed a capability for detailed and sophisticated field analysis of rocks and the processes that formed them.

        3b. On successful completion of this module, students will​ be able to integrate geological information from a range of sources to produce a geological history.3c. On successful completion of this module, students will​ have the ability to maintain a personal field notebook at an advanced level.

        ​4a. On successful completion of this module, students will have developed their ability to manage their time both as individuals and as part of a group.

        ​4b. On successful completion of this module, students will have developed their ability to report and discuss verbally their observations and interpretations.
        ​4c. On successful completion of this module, students will have developed their ability to ​communicate graphically their observations, interpretatiopns and conclusions.
      • Field Project and Dissertation (ENVS354)
        Level3
        Credit level30
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        For students to complete an independent field project involving creation of:

        a geological and/or geomorphological map; 

        field (and if appropriate, laboratory) notebook;

        other field data (e.g. cross sections, logs, stereonets, river data, glacial data);

         a final dissertation together with a final poster (often but not always a map) constructed from the field data.

        Learning Outcomes

        ​Ability to describe the geology and/or geomorphology of an area based on independent investigation

        ​Ability to interpret the data related to that area to create a model for the evolution of the area

        ​Ability to synthesise the geological and/or geomorphological history of that area, referring to (but not relying upon) previous literature

        ​Ability to report on the project in a presentation

        ​Ability to report on the project in a written dissertation

      • Volcanoes, Earthquakes, and Tsunami Geophysics (ENVS388)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
        Aims

        To provide the students with:

        •  A thorough understanding of thechallenges and practices in collecting and analyzing Geophysical time series


        •  Knowledge of the wide varietyof earthquake signals that occur in nature, including volcanic seismic sourcesand non-volcanic tremors 

        •  Knowledge of the structure ofthe Earth in tectonically active regions, and volcanic and geothermal areas.Understanding of the methods to infer the Earth’s structure using seismic data.

         •  Understanding the temporal andspatial evolution of seismicity before, during, and after large earthquakes andvolcanic eruptions. Outline knowledge of the use of this information in earlywarning and hazard mitigation schemes.

        • Knowledge of mechanical models for earthquake and volcano deformation,and their validation using geophysical observations

        • Understanding of surface volcanic processes  (pyroclastic density currents and ash plumes) bymeans of geophysical data analyses and numerical modeling

        • Understanding tsunami generation and the use of earthquake data in tsunamiearly warning.

        Learning Outcomes​​1.Knowledge and Understanding 
         
        Oncompletion of this module, students should have advanced knowledge andunderstanding of: (a) Geophysical instrumentation and its use in differentenvironment. Good practices for data collection, archival, and processing. (b)Methods to assess the structure of the Earth in tectonically active, volcanicand geothermal regions. (c) Models of earthquake generation, seismicityevolution, and Earth deformation on active faults and volcanic regions. (d)Models of volcanic processes, including magma storage at depth, magma migrationand eruption at the surface. (e) Models and observation of surface andatmospheric processes during volcanic eruptions. (f) The tsunami genicpotential of large earthquakes      

           




        2. Intellectual Abilities 
         
        On completion of this module, students should have demonstrated the: (a) evaluate the linkage between geophysical evidence and hypotheses for earthquake and volcanic processes. (b) Demonstrate a thorough perspective of the way in which geophysical observations can inform investigation and monitoring of geological processes. (c) Ability to evaluate and validate analytical models of earthquake and volcanic processes.
(d) Ability to assess the evolution and impact of earthquakes sequences, volcanic eruptions and tsunami processes using geophysical signals. ​​3. Subject Based Practical Skills 
         
        On completion of this module, students should have developed competence in: (a) Manipulation, reduction and interpretation of geophysical data. (b) Modeling of various geophysical processes using computer software packages. ​4.  General Transferable Skills    

        On completion of this module, students should have developed their skills in:(a) numeracy through manipulation and visualisation of data using Fortran, Python, and Matlab. (b) Graphical communication. (c) Written and oral communication through report preparation using Microsoft Word and Power Point.  ​

      Year Three Optional Modules

      • Geoarchaeology (ENVS392)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
        Aims
      • ​To provide an understanding the principles and methods of the application of the earth sciences in archaeological investigations.

      • ​To develop an appreciation of the value of a multidisciplinary scientific approach to understanding landscape evolution during archaeological investigations

      • ​To provide an understanding of the principles and methods of archaeological sciences in archaeological investigations.

      • ​To develop an understanding of the techniques used in archaeological sciences during investigation of artefacts and their geological significance

      • To gain experience in the use of multiple data sets from different scientific disciplines used in archaeological analyses.

      • ​To develop experience in communicating between multiple disciplines and both scientifically literate specialist and non-specialist audiences

      • Learning Outcomes

        ​Understand the different aspects of geoarchaeology and scientific archaeology

        ​Know the range of different practical analyses that can be used in geoarchaeological and archaeometric investigations

        Understand how and where to apply multiple datasets in geoarchaeological and archaeometric investigations​

        Critically evaluate competing theories of landscape and palaeoenvironmental development​

        ​Critically evaluate the benefits of different techniques and be able to assess the appropriate scientific techniques to answer archaeological questions

        ​​Assess and communicate the level of certainty in predictions from imperfect datasets

        ​Use different microscopy techniques to recognise important minerals and alteration products

        ​​Use data from a range of scientific methods to interpret landscape and palaeoenvironmental influences, source materials and chronology

        ​Use and correlate stratigraphic data from archaeological sites

        ​Presentation skills for written and oral work and communication of scientific data to different audiences

        ​Working collaboratively to summarise and share information effectively during development of an online resource

      • Geodynamics Field Class (ENVS409)
        LevelM
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
        Aims

        In-depth appraisal of models concerned with orogenic evolution: structural, metamorphic, geophysical and sedimentological. NW Spain Variscan geotraverse as the case study. Particular emphasis concerns appreciation of inter-relations of theoretical, experimental and observationally based modelling.

        Field appraisal of rock textures and compositions that are supposed to register eclogite formation and subsequent return to Earth''s surface.

        Evolution of structures at different metamorphic grades.

        In depth appraisal of models concerned with explaining the formation of marine to subaerial sedimentary basins during shortening.

        Field appraisal of evidence for basin development controlled by orogenesis.

        Fostering of capability to create a research-level synthesis of diverse models and disparate data.
        Learning Outcomes
      • Rock Deformation (ENVS460)
        LevelM
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
        Aims

        To provide an understanding of the principles and mechanisms of rock deformation throughout the crust, including the theory of homogeneous stress in two-dimensions, brittle fracture, rock friction, diffusive mass transfer and intracrystalline platic flow.

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Knowledge and Understanding
        Students should:
        a. Understand how stress is analysed and how it relates to the deformation of rocks.
        b. Have a knowledge of the mechanisms by which rocks undergo deformation

         

        ​2. Intellectual Abilities
        Students should:
        a. Have a systematic quantitative understanding of the principal deformation processes in geological materials.
        b. Have an critical appreciation of how experimental data may be used to quantify the mechanical properties of geological materials.

        c. Be able to criticaally assess the published literature within the subject area and present this in a concise report format.

        ​3. Subject-based practical skills

        Students should:

        a. Be able to apply analytical and numerical techniques to the analysis of stress and strain in rocks.

        b. Be able to apply analytical and numerical techniques to the quantification of the deformationbehaviour of rocks at all levels in the Earth.

        4. General transferable skills

        a. General numeracy

        b. The ability to present in a report format the finidngs of a laboratory investigation

        c. Critical thinking and problem solving through resolution of practical problems

        d. ICT through report presentation and data processing and analysis

      • Planetary Geophysics (m Level) (ENVS540)
        LevelM
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
        Aims1) Detailed and comprehensive understanding of the structure, composition and dynamic behaviour of the Earth and an appreciation of the way multiple geophysical disciplines combine to contribute to our understanding of the Earth and solar system.​

        2) Awareness of research frontiers in the subject area and the activities underway to advance these.
        3) Development of learning strategies appropriate to graduate study and a research environment. graduate study and a research environment.
        Learning OutcomesWill understand current theories regarding the formation of the solar system. ​

        Will understand current theories and controversies regarding the structure and dynamics of Earth from mantle to core including fundamentals of Earth models and the methods used to study planetary interiors.

        Will be able to compare and contrast the Earth to the other planets in the solar system.​

        Will be able to integrate and synthesise, to a high degree, different facts and arguments to derive unified conclusions concerning planetary structures and dynamics.​

        Will be capable of analysing geophysical datasets in Matlab and Unix.​

        Will be able to critically analyse and develop sophisticated inferences from recent publications in the peer-reviewed literature.​

      Programme Year Four

      Students take the following compulsory modules:

      • Geophysical Project (Masters level)
      • Geophysical Data Modelling
      • Geophysical Exploration Techniques (Masters level)

      One option from:

      • Geodynamics Field Class
      • Geohazards and Risk Mitigation
      • Mineral Deposits in Space and Time
      • Rock Deformation

      Fieldwork:

      • 14 days in Tenerife (winter)
      • Optional seven day Geodynamics field class in Spain (Easter)

      Project:

      • Field, laboratory or computer-based Advanced Geophysics project.

      Year Four Compulsory Modules

      • Exploration Geophysics and Signal Processing (ENVS343)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
        Aims

        To provide an understanding of the theory and fundamental principles of signal processing;    

        To provide an understanding of the principal signal processing techniques and their applications to seismic reflection, refraction and passive seismological time series;

        To gain familiarity with an industry standard reflection seismic processing  package and the underlying work flows. 

          Learning Outcomes

          To be able to apply signal processingtechniques to problems in reflection, refraction, and passive seismology.

          To identify problems inseismic processing which can be solved by signal processing techniques andevaluate the uncertainties in processed seismic sections.

          ​To be able to use a compuer based seismic processing system and understand the fundamentals of a seismic processing work flow.

          ​To be able to develop signal processing routines in MATLAB and graphical cimmunicate the results.

          ​To gain an understanding of the principle theory and routines of signal processing.

        • Geophysical Project (level M) (ENVS400)
          LevelM
          Credit level60
          SemesterWhole Session
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          Aims

          To provide a research level training in a specific geophysical subject area, and for the student to utilise this training in pursuing significant independent work. The aspiration is that this work if successful will be of publishable quality.

          To develop skills in presenting data and ideas visually, verbally and in written form.

          Learning OutcomesDemonstrate an ability to locate research literature and to evaluate its relevance to own research project
          ​​Demonstrate the ability to define the nature of scientific problems, and determine methods to approach and solve these problems, using (and where necessary extending) standard techniques.

          ​Denonstrate the ability to 

          acquire and evaluate data, and formulate hypotheses in a critical manner

          ​Demonstrate a high-level knowledge of a specific field of geophysics

          ​Demonstrate competence in audio-visual presentation

          ​Demonstrate competance in the organisation and writing of word-processed scientific reports

          Demonstrate competence in producing a short paper appropriate for publication in a peer-reviewed journal.​
        • Geophysical Exploration Techniques (ENVS562)
          LevelM
          Credit level15
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
          AimsTo provide, for geophysics  students, an understanding of:

          1. The application of geophysical theory to exploration and engineering targets.

          2.  Practical use and evaluation of geophysical instrumentation, data acquisition, processing and interpretation.

          3. Critical analysis, synthesis and interpretation of a broad mix of geophysical data to a level suitable for publication.
          Learning Outcomes

          ​To develop knowledge of the response of geophysical instruments to a variety of targets.

          ​To understand the physical principles, limitations and errors associated with geophysical data aquisition.

          ​To synthesise and interpret multiple complex geophysical data sets within the appropriate geological context.

          ​To develop problem solving skills analogous to working for a major exploration company or geophysical engineering company/consultancy, including planning, logistics, budgeting time and expenditure.

          To develop skills in advanced scientific writing as required for publication in international peer-review journals.

        • Geophysical Data Modelling (level M) (ENVS586)
          Level3
          Credit level15
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
          Aims

          Ability to create of geophysical models from data. Practical experience in inversion of mathematically linear problems, with knowledge of how to approach more general nonlinear problems.

          Understanding of the limitations of such models, and how they should be interpreted, with particular reference to model non-uniqueness and instability. Optimisation theory, and its application to interpretation of geophysical models. Integration of concepts of resolution and error estimation for practical problems. Time series analysis with non-Fourier methods.

          Understanding of basic statistics, confidence, implications of hypothesis testing.

          Learning Outcomes
            Knowledge and understanding of 
            eigenvalue analysis and its application to data analysis; implications of model existence, uniqueness for interpretation; basic statistics, including confidence testing, central limit theory       



           

           
           
           
           

          ​Interpretation of statistical results, geophysical modelling of real data set, amd understanding and application of concepts of resolution, error estimation, and quantification of model quality (and of its limitations.

          Inverting a large data set to give a geophysical model, and time series analysis from optimisation.

          ​Programming skills, including fluency in a unix/linux operating system, and shell programming.

        Year Four Optional Modules

        • Palaeobiology and Evolution (ENVS283)
          Level2
          Credit level7.5
          SemesterSecond Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
          Aims

          1. To introduce evolutionary theory and how fossils contribute to the study of evolution.

          2. To provide an overview of the most important events in vertebrate evolution.

          3. To introduce the main groups of microfossil.

          4. To demonstrate the uses of palaeontological field data.

          Learning Outcomes

          ​1a. On successful completion of this module, students will know the characteristic features and applications of the main groups of microfossil​

          1b. On successful completion of this module, students will understand how evolution occurs and how evolutionary relationships can be deduced from fossils


          1c. On successful completion of this module, students will understand the spatial and temporal controls on biodiversity​ and corresponding patterns in the fossil record

           
          1d. On successful completion of this module, students will know some of the key events in the evolution of vertebrates​

          ​1e. On successful completion of this module, students will understand how palaeontological field data can be used to aid interpretation of palaeoecology, palaeoenvironment and geological history


          ​2a. On successful completion of this module, students will be able to explain the theory of evolution and the fossil evidence for it


          ​2b. On successful completion of this module, students will be able to evaluate the arrangement of taxa on a cladogram in terms of evolutionary relatedness


          ​2c. On successful completion of this module, students will be able to combine palaeontological with other geological data to produce a full account of the palaeoenvironment of a given area


          ​3a. On successful completion of this module, students will be able to use the binocular microscope and camera lucida to produce accurate drawings

          ​3b. On successful completion of this module, students will be able to observe and describe the characteristic features of the main microfossil groups

          ​3c. On successful completion of this module, students will be able to make a full systematic description of a common invertebrate fossil

          ​3d. On successful competion of this module, students will be able to construct a simple phylogeny

          ​3e. On successful competion of this module, students will be able to construct a stratigraphic range chart

          ​4a. On successful completion of this module, students will have developed time management skills

          ​4b. On successful completion of this module, students will have developed skills in the systematic observation and recording of data

          ​4c. On successful completion of this module, students will have developed the ability to present information in a variety of alternative formats such as spreadsheets, charts and graphs

          ​4d. On successful completion of this module, students will be able to write scientific reports effectively

          ​4e. On successful completion of this module, students will have developed the ability to search for, gather and utilise information from a variety of sources

        • Geodynamics Field Class (ENVS409)
          LevelM
          Credit level15
          SemesterSecond Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
          Aims

          In-depth appraisal of models concerned with orogenic evolution: structural, metamorphic, geophysical and sedimentological. NW Spain Variscan geotraverse as the case study. Particular emphasis concerns appreciation of inter-relations of theoretical, experimental and observationally based modelling.

          Field appraisal of rock textures and compositions that are supposed to register eclogite formation and subsequent return to Earth''s surface.

          Evolution of structures at different metamorphic grades.

          In depth appraisal of models concerned with explaining the formation of marine to subaerial sedimentary basins during shortening.

          Field appraisal of evidence for basin development controlled by orogenesis.

          Fostering of capability to create a research-level synthesis of diverse models and disparate data.
          Learning Outcomes
        • Geohazards and Risk Mitigation (ENVS410)
          LevelM
          Credit level15
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
          Aims

          The module aims

          a. To examine in detail the research frontiers of understanding of diverse natural hazards.

          b. To consider the objectives of risk mitigation strategies and their problems of implementation. Role Playing ''Game'' to provide realistic experience of conflicting interests, uncertainty and decision making.

          c. To examine the problems of dealing with uncertainties on a range of time-scales, including geological time-scales, and to review statistical methods for semi-quantitative analysis.

          d. To develop consensus on future research directions that would mitigate risks from natural hazards.

          Learning Outcomes

          ​Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the nature, origins and possible outcomes of natural hazards and be able to evaluate natural hazards and derive parameters involved in specific risk mitigation.

          ​Students will be able to use numerical methods for risk quantification and dealing with uncertainty., and make effective oral communications / presentations of complex data sets and complicated arguments.

          ​Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the processes involved for the evaluation of hazards and the preparation of risk assessments through state-of-the-art summaries.

          ​Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the problems of risk communication to varied audiences and the development of consensus, and be able to evaluate critically the conflicting views presented in diverse media, from web, broadcasting, books and research articles.

        • Mineral Deposits in Space and Time (ENVS458)
          LevelM
          Credit level15
          SemesterFirst Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
          Aims

          The module aims

          1. To provide understanding of major types of mineral deposits through critical assessment of conceptual models of deposit forming processes.
          2. To synthesise the distribution of mineral deposits in space and time and to evaluate this in relation to overall Earth evolution.
          3. To develop an understanding of mineral exploration and resource estimation.

          Learning Outcomes

          ​Successful students will be able to describe and explain the geological and geochemical processes responsible for the main types of mineral deposit: magmatic, hydrothermal, sedimentary.

          ​Successful students will be able to design an approriate strategy for mineral exploration and use order of magnitude and dimensional analysis to quantify resource.

          ​Successful students will be able to research and synthesise large amounts of information into short seminar presentations and engage in a scientific dialogue during the seminars.

          Successful students will be able to to describe the evidence for non-uniform distribution of mineral deposits in space and time and critically evaluate the reasons in relation to uniformitarian and non-uniformitarian processes and events in Earth history.

          ​Successful students will be able to work effectively in an mineral exploration team and present results both orally and in executive report form.

          ​Successful students will be able to evaluate the sustainability of mineral resource development in terms of "peak minerals", environmental impact, economics and politics.

        • Rock Deformation (ENVS460)
          LevelM
          Credit level15
          SemesterSecond Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
          Aims

          To provide an understanding of the principles and mechanisms of rock deformation throughout the crust, including the theory of homogeneous stress in two-dimensions, brittle fracture, rock friction, diffusive mass transfer and intracrystalline platic flow.

          Learning Outcomes

          1. Knowledge and Understanding
          Students should:
          a. Understand how stress is analysed and how it relates to the deformation of rocks.
          b. Have a knowledge of the mechanisms by which rocks undergo deformation

           

          ​2. Intellectual Abilities
          Students should:
          a. Have a systematic quantitative understanding of the principal deformation processes in geological materials.
          b. Have an critical appreciation of how experimental data may be used to quantify the mechanical properties of geological materials.

          c. Be able to criticaally assess the published literature within the subject area and present this in a concise report format.

          ​3. Subject-based practical skills

          Students should:

          a. Be able to apply analytical and numerical techniques to the analysis of stress and strain in rocks.

          b. Be able to apply analytical and numerical techniques to the quantification of the deformationbehaviour of rocks at all levels in the Earth.

          4. General transferable skills

          a. General numeracy

          b. The ability to present in a report format the finidngs of a laboratory investigation

          c. Critical thinking and problem solving through resolution of practical problems

          d. ICT through report presentation and data processing and analysis

        • Planetary Geophysics (m Level) (ENVS540)
          LevelM
          Credit level15
          SemesterSecond Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
          Aims1) Detailed and comprehensive understanding of the structure, composition and dynamic behaviour of the Earth and an appreciation of the way multiple geophysical disciplines combine to contribute to our understanding of the Earth and solar system.​

          2) Awareness of research frontiers in the subject area and the activities underway to advance these.
          3) Development of learning strategies appropriate to graduate study and a research environment. graduate study and a research environment.
          Learning OutcomesWill understand current theories regarding the formation of the solar system. ​

          Will understand current theories and controversies regarding the structure and dynamics of Earth from mantle to core including fundamentals of Earth models and the methods used to study planetary interiors.

          Will be able to compare and contrast the Earth to the other planets in the solar system.​

          Will be able to integrate and synthesise, to a high degree, different facts and arguments to derive unified conclusions concerning planetary structures and dynamics.​

          Will be capable of analysing geophysical datasets in Matlab and Unix.​

          Will be able to critically analyse and develop sophisticated inferences from recent publications in the peer-reviewed literature.​

        • Advanced Structural Geology (m Level) (ENVS595)
          LevelM
          Credit level15
          SemesterSecond Semester
          Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
          Aims
        • ​​To further an understanding of the role of finite strain in the analysis of geological structures

        • ​To develop an understanding of the mechanics of geological structures on scales of millimetres to to tens of kilometres

        • Learning Outcomes

          ​describe, explain andevaluate the principles and methods used to investigate strain patternsassociated with geological structures

          ​describe, explain andevaluate the principles and methods that may be used to analyse natural strainpaths

          ​describe and explainthe role of work and minimum work paths in the evolution of geologicalstructures

          ​explain andcritically assess the origins of selected geological structures using dynamicanalysis and mechanical principles

          ​assess the roles ofconceptual, physical and mathematical models in the scientific process

          ​investigatesystematically patterns of strain within rocks

          ​determine strainpaths from natural data sets

        The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


        Teaching and Learning

        Teaching takes place through lectures, practicals, workshops, seminars, tutorials and fieldwork, with an emphasis on learning through doing. The award-winning Central Teaching Laboratories, provide a state-of-the-art facility for undergraduate practical work. Students value the learning opportunities provided by field classes, including the rapid and detailed feedback on performance.

        You will typically receive 15-20 hours of formal teaching each week, and complete between 50 and 100 days of residential fieldwork over the course of their programme. In Years Three and Four you will carry out independent research projects on a topic and location of your choice. All projects are supervised by a member of staff who will meet with you on a weekly, or more frequent, basis.

        A number of the School’s degree programmes involve laboratory and field work. The field work is carried out in various locations, ranging from inner city to coastal and mountainous environments. We consider applications from prospective students with disabilities on the same basis as all other students, and reasonable adjustments will be considered to address barriers to access.